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HISTORICAL MANUSCRIPTS COMMISSION.

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REPORT

ON

AMERICAN MANUSCRIPTS

IN THE

ROYAL INSTITUTION OF
GREAT BRITAIN
.

Vol. I

 

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Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty
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LONDON:

PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE

BY MACKIE & CO. LD.

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1904

 

 

Price 2s. 3d.

 

 

 

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INTRODUCTION.

The American Manuscripts preserved at the Royal Institution. London, sometimes spoken of as the Carleton or Dorchester Papers, are, briefly, the Head Quarters Papers of the successive British commanders in chief in the American War of Independence and are thus described on a flyleaf of the first volume:—

 
"AMERICAN OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS

Presented to the Royal Institution of Great Britain
by John Symmons, Esq., of Paddington House,
MDCCCIV.

These papers belong'd to Mr. M. Morgann, Secretary to Sir Guy Carleton (since Lord Dorchester), during the last years of the American War, and consist of many curious and unique documents relative to the transactions of those times. By him they were given in 1798 to John Symmons and by Mr. Symmons to the Royal Institution, 1804.

Maurice Morgann died March 28, 1802, aged 76. For an eloquent memorial of him see Dr. Chas. Symmons's Life of Milton, pages 81-82, and also Sir Eg. Brydges's Censura Literaria, Vol. 4, p. 178.

Wm. H[arris] Aug. 27, 1811."
 

In the library of Harvard are a few transcripts of these papers made by Mr. Jared Sparks. They were also consulted by the historian George Bancroft. The attention of the late Mr. B. F. Stevens was early called to these papers in the course of his researches for his comprehensive catalogue of manuscripts relating to the American Revolution, and he immediately set to work to examine, catalogue, and collate them with his other historical material.

The complete collection comprises 58 bound volumes and 4 cases or rolls — 62 in all. They are bound with a certain regard to subjects. The dates thus overlap, and the papers themselves frequently appear in duplicate. On the decision therefore to include these MSS. in this series of Reports, and arrangements having been made with Mr. Stevens to prepare the calendar, it was thought preferable to present the same in chronological order by the aid of his slip index. An idea of the collection in its original form, however, may be gathered from the brief title to each volume as here quoted :—

Vol. 1.   Correspondence between Sir Wm. Howe, Lord Barrington, Sir Geo. Osborne and Capt. Mackenzie, American War, 1775 to 1777.

Vol. 2.   Correspondence between Sir Wm. Howe and the Treasury Office, 1775 to 1777.

Vol. 3.   Correspondence between Sir Wm. Howe and General Washington, 1776 to 1778.

Vol. 4.   Sundry Letters to Gen. Howe and Sir Henry Clinton from Lords North and . . . . , Charles Jenkinson, Esq., 1777 to 1782.

Vol. 5.   Correspondence between Sir Wm. Howe, General Washington, Gen. Walcot and Sundry Officers, 1777.

Vol. 6.   Correspondence between Lord Barrington and General Howe. Sundry years, 1775 to 1778.

Vol. 7.   Letters between Lord George Germain and Sir Henry Clinton. Sundry years.

Vol. 8.   Correspondence — Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord George Germain to Sundry Officers, 1778.

Vol. 9.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton, Genl. Heath and Major-General Phillips, 1778.

Vol. 10.   Sir Wm. Howe's correspondence with the War Office, General Washington and other Officers, 1779.

Vol. 11.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and Genl. Haldimand, Quebec, 1779, 1780, 1781.

Vol. 12.   Correspondence between the Officers of State, Sir Henry Clinton, Gen. Prevost and Robert Mackenzie, Esq., 1778, 1779, &c.

Vol. 13.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and Genl. Campbell, West Florida, 1779 and 1780.

Vol. 14.   Letters from the Treasury Commissioners, Gen. Washington and Sundry Business to Sir Henry Clinton, 1779 and 1780.

Vol. 15.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and General Washington, 1779 to 1782.

Vol. 16.   Letters to Sir Henry Clinton from Gov. (sic) Gen. Campbell Commander [at] Pensacola, 1780.

Vol. 17.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and Gov. Franklin and Sundry Persons, 1781 to 1782.

Vol. 18.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and Gen. Haldimand, and Sundry Warrants and Accounts.

Vol. 19.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and Earl Cornwallis, 1780.

Vol. 20.   Sir Henry Clinton's Correspondence with the Treasury, General Washington and Sundry Officers, 1780, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 21.   Correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton and General McLean, Halifax, 1780 and 1781.

Vol. 22.   Sir Henry Clinton's Correspondence with Lord George Germain and Officers of the Treasury, 1781.

Vol. 23.   Correspondence with General Leslie, Sir James Wright, and John Robinson, Esq., 1781 and 1782.

Vol. 24.   Sundry Correspondence between different Officers with the Treaties respecting the Hessian Troops and Regiment[al] Occurrences, 1782.

Vol. 25.   Petitions and Complimentary Letters with the Proceedings of a Board of Directors to Sir Guy Carleton, 1782.

Vol. 26.   Sir Henry Clinton and Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with the Treasury and War Office, March, April and May 1782.

Vol. 27.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with Lord Shelburne, General Washington and others, 1781 and 1782.

Vol. 28.   Warrants for Pay to different Regiments, and Sundry Letters — Sir Guy Carleton, 1782.

Vol. 29.   Correspondence — Sir Henry Clinton, Sir William Howe, and Genl. Phillips and various officers, Sundry years.

Vol. 30.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with Sundrv Officers, 1782.

Vol. 31.   Abstracts, Warrants and Certificates by Sir Guy Carleton, 1782.

Vol. 32.   Correspondence between Sir Guy Carleton, Governor Parr and General Patterson, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 33.   Sir Henry Clinton's Correspondence with the Treasury and War Office and Sir Guy Carleton, 1778, 1779, 1780, 1781, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 34.   Correspondence between Sir Guy Carleton, Brook Watson, Esq., Maurice Morgann, Esq., and Sundry Officers, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 35.   Muster Rolls of different Regiments, Abstracts and Cash Accounts between Bankers and Sundry Officers, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 36.   Vessels Entered and Cleared from Superintendent's Office and from Victualling Offices, Ireland, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 37.   Warrants and Lists of Staff and Extraordinary Officers. To Sir Guy Carleton, 1783.

Vol. 38.   No title. [Petitions from refugee loyalists; warrants and accounts of sundry regiments, and miscellaneous, 1782 and 1783.]

Vol. 39.   Warrants granted for pay of Sundry Regiments and Corresponding Letters to Sir Guy Carleton, 1783.

Vol. 40.   Affidavits and Memorials of Loyalists, 1783.

Vol. 41.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with the Treasury and Sundry Commanders, May and June 1783.

Vol 42.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with the Honourable Thomas Townshend, and George Yonge, Bart., &c. March and April 1783.

Vol. 43.   Orders and Abstracts of Sir Guy Carleton and Correspondence with General Washington, June and July 1782.

Vol. 44.   Inquisitions taken in the county of New York and reports from the Military and Civil Department, 1783.

Vol. 45.   Sir Guy Carleton to General Delancy, Washington, and Sundry Accounts, October and November, 1783.

Vol. 46.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with the Treasury and Various Occurrences in the American War, June 1783.

Vol. 47.   Sir Guy Carleton's Correspondence with Generals Haldimand, McArthur and Colonel Anstruther, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 48.   Sir Guy Carleton's Warrants to Wm. Deane Poyntz Esq., and Correspondence with the Treasury, October and December 1782.

Vol. 49.   Letters from Halifax and Nova Scotia to Sir Guy Carleton, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 50.   Memorials and Letters to Sir Guy Carleton, 1783.

Vol. 51.   Sir Guy Carleton's correspondence with Lord North, George Rose, Esq., and sundry persons, July 1783.

Vol. 52.   Petitions from Loyalists to Sir Henry Clinton and Sir Guy Carleton, 1783.

Vol. 53.   Sundry Letters to various Officers, 1782 and 1783.

Vol. 54.   Reports of Officers from the different Regiments — Petitions and Memorials, 1783.

Vol. 55.   Book of negroes registered and certified . . . . . on sailing from New York . . . between 23 April and 30 November 1783, &c.

Vol. 50.   Muster Rolls, Returns of Clothing, Provisions, Prisoners and Loyalists. Sundry years.

Vol. 57.   [Army List.] List of . . Officers in the several British, Foreign and Provincial regiments serving under Sir Henry Clinton Printed by McDonald and Cameron . . . New York 1779.

Vol. 58.   Orderly Book . . Sir William Howe, 17 June 1775 to 26 May 1776.

(Case) 59.   Commissary General's Account, 27 May to 31 Dec. 1782.

(Case) 60.   Commissary General's Account, 1 Jan. to 24 June 1783, and Plan of Nassau.

(Case) 61.   Warrant to Sir William Howe, Warrants and Commissions to Sir Guy Carleton, &c, 1777 and 1782.

(Case) 62.   Letters Patent to Sir Guy Carleton and Rear-Adml. Digby as Commissioners, 21 March 1782.

It will be seen from the foregoing list that the larger proportion of these manuscripts concerns the later period of the war, more than one half in reality being dated in the years 1782 and 1783. This is probably accounted for by the large number of accounts, returns, lists, pay-rolls, pay-warrants and similar papers, which in that period of the suspension of hostilities pending negotiations for peace might naturally accumulate in the hands of the last commander — Sir Guy Carleton. The earlier papers, during the command of Sir William Howe, are largely copies or duplicate signed letters, which, it is supposed, on his leaving America in May, 1778, he transferred to his successor, Sir Henry Clinton. With Sir Henry Clinton's appointment, Philadelphia was abandoned and the army established at New York, which, from that date (June, 1778), remained its Head Quarters till the last of the British troops sailed thence in December, 1783.

In attempting a review of the whole of the collection of which the present volume forms a part, attention may be called first to the fact that while the official correspondence of the Commander-in- Chief with the Secretary of State and with the War Office is also in the Public Record Office, his instructions to his subordinate officers and their letters to him are not generally found elsewhere than in this collection, and afford many valuable and interesting details of the war. As the Southern Colonies remained longest in the British interest, and were the great hope of the Government, the correspondence is largest with the commanding officers of the different posts there. Colonel or Brigadier-General Augustine Prevost being commander of the forces in Florida dates his correspondence first of all from Saint Augustine; afterwards, being ordered to co-operate with Lieut.-Col. Archibald Campbell and Captain Hyde Parker in the military and naval expedition to capture Savannah, Georgia, in the winter of 1778-9, he successfully effected the junction and established himself in that garrison, maintaining it against the combined attack of the Americans under Gen. Lincoln and the French under Comte D'Estaing in the autumn of the same year. Georgia was reckoned amongst the most loyal of the colonies, and was the only one in which the royal civil government was actually re-established, the Governor (Sir James Wright) and the crown officers being sent over from England to resume their functions. The letters of both Prevost and Wright are continual requests for military reinforcements. In 1781, the Governor writes :— " 500 troops might save the Province." — " The Province is ruined and lost for want of a little assistance." — "There is great loyalty. Many have come into Savannah and taken arms; many more are hiding in the swamps to avoid the enemy, and had they had the protection which it would have been the best policy to have given them, the province would soon have been able to defend itself." Again, in July, 1782, on receiving orders that Savannah was to be evacuated, he fears the Commander-in-Chief is not well acquainted with the situation of affairs in Georgia to order such a step to be taken — "4 or 500 men could have effectually held this important province." But, as Sir Guy Carleton pointed out, " the evacuation was not a matter of choice but of desperate necessity in consequence of an unsuccessful war."

The third expedition to the southward, commanded by Sir Henry Clinton in person and by Admiral Arbuthnot, which sailed from New York for Charlestown, South Carolina, in December, 1779, and from which Sir Henry returned in June, 1780, leaving Earl Cornwallis in command, opens up correspondence with that General and with Maj.-Gen. Alexander Leslie, Lord Rawdon, Lt.-Col. Nisbet Balfour, Brig.-Generals McArthur and O'Hara, Lt.-Col. Alured Clarke, and other officers. The letters from or to Earl Cornwallis are largely repeated in the Public Record Office or are printed in the two volumes which Mr. Stevens edited and published some years ago entitled " The Clinton-Cornwallis Controversy, or, The Campaign in Virginia, 1780-1781." After the surrender of York Town, General Leslie was appointed, in October, 1781, to take command of "all hitherto held by Earl Cornwallis," and the letters written by him from Charlestown are especially interesting. Preparations had been made for restoring the civil government also in South Carolina and several of the civil servants had been sent from England, but the distracted state of the country necessitated military authority and Leslie could only suggest their employment on the Board of Police. Instructions were later received by Sir Henry Clinton from the Treasury to place them, for allowances, on the military chest. As regards the sentiments of this province, Lt.-Col. Balfour, then commandant at Charlestown, reports in July, 1781 :— " The revolt is universal — the minds of the people bent on their former principles, and the efforts of friends feeble and pusillanimous — the country must be ruined without a single advantage hereafter to be reaped from the boasted loyalty and extensive possessions enjoyed in South Carolina."

The slowness with which news travelled in these days is forcibly brought out in the fact that arrangements were being made throughout the month of April, 1782, to detach troops from New York and Charlestown under General O'Hara for the relief of Jamaica, in ignorance of Rodney's great victory over the French on the 12th of April, and it was not till the 3rd of May that Leslie at Charlestown appears to have heard of the event. There are many letters and papers referring to the evacuation of Charlestown, where Leslie remained till towards the end of 1782, the post being finally occupied by the Americans on the 17th December.

The correspondence with West Florida is maintained with Brig.-Gen. John Campbell who commanded there, and with the Governor, Peter Chester, till, in May, 1781, Pensacola was obliged to surrender to the Spanish General, Don Bernardo de Galvez. General Campbell was allowed to sail to New York and there are numerous papers relative to the adjustment of accounts and payment of the Waldeck and Provincial Troops which had served with him as well as to a dispute with Galvez over the detention of prisoners. There is a curious Spanish document from Don Bernardo conferring upon an Indian Chief a commission and decoration with the small medal of merit. It is written on parchment with a painted red and yellow border and a brilliantly coloured coat of arms, two sides, wherein may be easily recognized the castle and lion of Spain.

Governor Patrick Tonyn, of East Florida, appears indefatigable in his efforts to save his province for the King; and in 1778 and 1779 particularly, to defend St. Augustine from threatened attacks of the Americans and Indians, his corps of Rangers being a continual bone of contention with the military authority — Brigadier Prevost (see pp. 193, 197-199, 216, etc.). In later years his labours to make the province an asylum for the homeless or propertyless loyalists of North and South Carolina and Georgia are wTell shown in this collection. Great numbers did actually remove thither and by the exertions of the Governor and of Brigadier McArthur, in command of the troops, were provided with lands, provisions, tools, etc., only to find by the articles of the treaty of peace that the province was eventually to be ceded to the King of Spain.

To the north of New York the main post was of course Halifax, the only one, indeed, after Boston and Rhode Island were abandoned, and accordingly the letters from the successive commanding officers — Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey, Brig.-Gen. Francis Maclean, Lt.-Col. James Bruce, Lt.-Col. John Campbell, Maj.- Gen. James Paterson and Brig.-Gen. Fox, as well as from Lt.-Gov. Hughes and Governor Parr are frequent and full of detail. The military affairs of the island, the fortifications of Halifax, and the fact of its being a base of supplies, are all dealt with in this correspondence, until with the advent of Governor Parr and the close of the war, the removal to Nova Scotia and the settlement there of the loyalists and the disbanded Provincial, German, or other troops became the engrossing topic.

An interesting side-study is that of Penobscot. General Sir Henry Clinton being ordered in September, 1778 (see p. 284), by the Home Government to take post on that river with the idea of erecting a province to which the loyal adherents of the crown might ultimately repair, instructed Gen. Maclean at Halifax, in the following year, to organize an expedition, which, with a naval detachment from New York, might carry the plan into effect. Maclean himself commanded the expedition, assisted by Capt. Andrew Barkley of H.M.S. Blonde, and the timely appearance of Sir George Collier on the scene resulted in the destruction of the American naval forces. An attack being apprehended on Nova Scotia, Maclean returned thither, leaving Lt.-Col. John Campbell of the 71th(sic) to occupy the post at Penobscot. He remained there till June, 1781, when, on the death of Maclean, he took the command at Halifax, from which place, on Maj.-Gen. Paterson's arrival in August, 1782, he was directed to return to Penobscot, and to strengthen and fortify it with a "view to an establishment of greater consequence." In October, 1782, he is stated to have under him 1,000 men, but in June, 1783, he was allowed, according to his request, to return to England, the German troops were withdrawn, assistance was provided for those loyalists who wished to remove to Nova Scotia, and by October the last of the British troops and stores were withdrawn and the post, "with what American artillery should be found therein," was delivered over to the American authorities.

Several papers relate to the Island of St. John (afterwards Prince Edward Island) even though, as is stated, Sir Henry did not consider it within his command. It is closely connected with Nova Scotia, though, again, Brig. MacLean says that he had no instructions whatever relative to it as connected with his command. The letters are from Phillips Callbeck, President of the Council and commander of the island, Timothy Hierlihy, major commandant of the Independent Companies, Capt. Spry of the Engineers, Lt.-Gov. Desbrisay, and, after June, 1780, from the Governor, Walter Patterson.

The colliery on Cape Breton Island is frequently mentioned in connexion with the military stores at Halifax and New York.

A few papers relate to Bermuda and the Bahamas.

It was to be expected that the case of the loyal adherents to the Crown would be largely represented in these papers. While most of the Crown Officers of the various provinces and many of the wealthier loyalists repaired to England and taxed the time and resources of the Treasury, many more remained behind. The embodying of the loyalists into the provincial corps developed with the war until, at its close, leaving out of the question those which came under the administration of General Haldimand in Canada, there were more than twenty regiments under the commander at New York. These included the three battalions of Delancey's Brigade, the New York Volunteers commanded by Lt.-Col. George Turnbull, the three battalions of the New Jersey Volunteers under Cortland Skinner, the Pennsylvania Loyalists under William Allen, Maryland Loyalists under James Chalmers, King's American Regiment under Edmund Fanning, Beverley Robinson's Loyal American Regiment, Tarleton's British Legion, Simcoe's Queen's Rangers, and the corps of Guides and Pioneers, also under Beverley Robinson. The bi-monthly pay rolls of these for 1782 and 1783 are in many cases complete. They give the names of the officers, but not of the men. Quarterly lists of the widows of those officers who fell in the service, with the amounts paid to each, appear under the control of Beverley Robinson of New York and of Robert Alexander of Maryland. There are also numerous accounts and papers of Alexander Innes, Inspector- General of the Provincial Forces. The disbanding of the regiments and settlement in Nova Scotia have been already referred to. Some of the officers were transferred to the regular army, while three of the corps — Manning's King's American Regiment, Tarleton's Cavalry, and Simcoe's Queen's Rangers were placed upon the British establishment.

But besides the numerous loyalists in military service or who obtained such posts as were available in the city of New York, a large and increasing number drifted within the lines, as the confiscation acts of the various States or local animosity drove them from farms and townships, who could only be described as "distressed refugees." The problem of dealing with these persons, who became thus dependent on the army for protection, housing, rations, and fuel, was met by establishing an office under the authority of Colonel Roger Morris with the title of " Inspector of the Claims of Refugees " at a salary of 450l. sterling or 25s. a day New York currency, to whom all applications were referred. Col. Morris had been a member of the Council of the Colony of New York, and, in the previous French war, one of the aids of General Braddock. His wife, Mary, daughter of Frederick Phillipse, was one of the few women in the war attainted of treason, in order to include her property in the Confiscation Act. The reversionary interest of the estate, however, being accounted recoverable, it was, according to Lorenzo Sabine, disposed of in 1809 by her son to John Jacob Astor of New York. Refugee applicants were required to state their losses, services, and needs, in writing, to the Commander-in- Chief or other officer, which in the form of petitions or memorials were then certified or recommended by a loyalist of good standing. If approved of, they were either supplied by the Commander-in-Chief's order with a sum of money and so disposed of, or were placed on the quarterly list for rations or fuel or a stated allowance. By a statement signed by Col. Morris on the 31st of January, 1783, of the warrants granted to him from 8 July to 23 December of the previous year, more than 12,000l. sterling was thus appropriated. After Sir Guy Carleton's arrival Col. Morris appears to be replaced by a Board consisting of Beverley Robinson of New York, Samuel Shoemaker of Pennsylvania, and Robert Alexander of Maryland, appointed "to consider the circumstances and claims " of these loyalists. The list of persons recommended by them for support for the first quarter in 1783, January to March, called for the sum of £9,500 New York Currency, or more than £5,000 sterling, for the second quarter £7,374 New York currency, and for the third quarter £5,471. These amounts do not appear to include the allowances to more prominent loyalists nor salaries or sums paid for services rendered, all of which were settled by special warrants from the commander in chief direct, and which amounted to some thousands of pounds more. The houses vacated by the Americans in 1776 were classed as derelict property and, for the city proper, were in the care of the vestry, Philip J. Livingston being appointed superintendent of such property on Long Island. These were apportioned to the King's service or to the housing of the various loyalists and refugees. Some of the returns are explicit as to the names of the original proprietors and to the then present occupants, even to the number of rooms or of acres appointed. As the removals of the loyalists to Canada, Nova Scotia, or the Bahamas began to take place, the sums paid for support naturally decreased and there are several lists of names of the persons so removing. William Franklin, the royal governor of New Jersey, son of Dr. Franklin, was very active in all these matters, and organized and presided over a board called the "Board of Associated Loyalists."

In the year 1781 an enquiry was instituted into the expenditure of the different departments of the army, resulting in much correspondence, the deliberations of a board of officers, and a number of muster rolls showing the numbers of drivers, waggons, carts, horses, clerks, storekeepers, artificers, and labourers employed under the Quarter Master General, Commissary General, Barrack Master General, Waggon Master General, and in the Engineers' and Forage Departments.

A letter from the Treasury, 6 September, 1782, directs a pension for Maurice Morgann, Sir Guy Carleton's secretary, in whose possession these papers were left, "of 250l. out of the civil list revenues, a further sum of 250l. out of the extraordinaries of the army to continue as long as he should be employed in his present service, and a sum of 250l. to reimburse him the expenses of his equipment."

As another person intimately connected with the Royal Institution, the name of Benjamin Thompson, Count Bumford, should not be omitted. He appears in these papers twice in 1781, in his capacity of Under Secretary of State, writing by direction of Lord George Germain, and, later, in 1782 and 1783, as commanding the regiment of King's American Dragoons and in forming plans for some light infantry companies to be attached thereto, as well as for a corps of volunteers to be raised out of the Provincial Forces to serve in the West Indies. On his return to England in 1783 he appears to have taken pains to represent to the Government the case of the provincial officers, as he recounts his proceedings to Sir Guy Carleton on 6 July, 1783. A paper entitled : " Precis of all the correspondence between the " Secretary of State and the Commander-in-Chief relative to the " Provincial Forces, with other authentic information upon that " subject " — containing connecting remarks and marginal notes and endorsed "B.T., 23 June, 1783," is also attributed to him.

Amongst other papers which might be particularly noticed are the Orderly Book of Sir William Howe at Boston and Halifax, from 17 June, 1775, to 26 May, 1776 (see page 41 of this report); an Army List of the British, Foreign, and Provincial troops serving under Clinton, printed at New York by Macdonald and Cameron in 1779 ; a set of coroner's inquests in that city from April to November, 1783; the almost daily reports of the numbers of the vessels entered and cleared from Nov., 1782, to Nov., 1783, and some returns of the Provost ; some lists of American prisoners; a book of negroes embarked at New York from April to Nov., 1783, having been previously inspected and registered; correspondence, accounts and pay warrants for the German troops of Anhalt, Anspach, Brunswick, Hesse Hanau, Hesse-Cassel and Waldeck, as well as bi-monthly accounts for many of the British regiments. A personal touch is given by some few tradesmen's accounts to Sir Guy Carleton, for groceries, tailoring, domestic servants' wages, and clothing for an orphan or two. Tea varies from 10s. to 24s. a pound, powder sugar 1s. 8d., macaroni 5s. 6d., sago 6s., truffles 1l. 16s. 0d. a pound, white pepper 8s., ham and Gloucester cheese both 3s. a pound ; a bottle of mushrooms 12s., of capers 10s., of mustard 6s. Lemons are 8s. a dozen, a ball of twine usually 2s. and a large bottle of rose water 14s. His barber's bill for two months, November 24, 1782, to January 26, 1783, appears at 2l. 8s. 6d. — powder being 3s. a pound, and a pot of pomatum 6s., a toothbrush 2s. 6d. A hair-ribbon appears elsewhere as 6s., thread stockings at 6s. 9d. and a yard of white satin 1l. For some festivity, apparently, there is a bill for the loan of 142 dozen pieces of china, glass and earthenware at 1s. per dozen, and for the use of a "glass upurn" 18s. 8d. is charged. Damaged in use are 38 items.

Having thus indicated some of the features of the whole of the collection, a few words remain to be said on the present volume.

By the chronological arrangement already mentioned this comprises the papers to the end of July, 1779.

Where it has been ascertained that any particular paper is also in the Public Record Office a reference to the series, volume and page is given. Similarly, reference is made to the Haldimand Collection in the British Museum.

The letters from the Treasury give some idea of the great pressure on that Board in furnishing the stores, provisions, forage, fuel, and money required by the forces (specie being sent out to keep down the exchange) hampered as their lordships were by lack of conveyance — "the country drained of ships for transport purposes " (pp. 37 and 46) — by combinations of workmen, carelessness of paymasters, confusion of accounts and by fraudulent contractors in supplying bad bread or flour, as well as by the dangers and uncertainties of the sea voyage. It may be interesting to note here that John Robinson, the secretary to the Board during Lord North's administration, was, by the marriage of his daughter, connected with the Marquis of Abergavenny, whose collection of manuscripts, calendared by this Commission in 1887, 10th Report, Appendix VI., comprises a number of letters from and to Mr. Robinson, largely political, but many having reference to American affairs.

Numerous papers in this volume relate to the captivity of the Troops of Convention, as the army of General Burgoyne after its surrender at Saratoga on 17 October, 1777, was called. The two letters of Burgoyne to Howe upon his capitulation are given here in full (pp. 140, 143). The friction between the subsequent commanding officer — Major-Gen. Phillips— and the United States authorities and Major-Gen. Heath, while at Cambridge in 1778, is well told from the British point of view in the various letters. On page 298 is Sir Henry Clinton's formal requisition to Gen. Washington on behalf of the troops. Their chagrin, disappointment, and distress for want of money and necessaries, when, instead of the exchange so fully expected, they received from Congress orders to march to Virginia, are shown in the months of October, November and December, 1778, beginning on page 319.

Sir William Howe's Orderly Book, the correspondence of Brigadier Prevost at St. Augustine and Savannah, of Governor Tonyn, of General John Campbell at Pensacola, the papers relating to Halifax , the expedition to Penobscot, and, generally, the memorials and petitions of loyalist refugees, have already been referred to. The War Office correspondence is departmental, relating chiefly to commissions, promotions, and leaves of absence for the officers of the army, and to the dispatch or recall of regiments. That with the Secretary of State — Lord George Germain — being duplicated in the Public Record Office is here only briefly noted. In dealing with the correspondence with General Washington reference has been made to the volume and page of Sparks's Writings of Washington, if the particular letter is there found printed.

The preparation of this calendar was well advanced in the lifetime of the late Mr. B. F. Stevens. This volume has been seen through the press by his successor, Mr. H. J. Brown.

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Page 1

CALENDAR

OF

MANUSCRIPTS

IN THE

ROYAL INSTITUTION.

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Gov. Geo. Clinton to George Burns.

1747, July 1.— Commission as ensign of a company of volunteers raised for an expedition against Canada whereof Henry Livingston is captain.
Printed and filled in. Vol. 10. No. 143. 1 page.
Enclosed by Capt. Burns to Sir H. Clinton 22 Feb. 1779.

Geo. III. to James Pitcher.

1754, Sept. 25. Kensington.— Commission as commissary of musters.
Signed and sealed. Vol. 56. No. 33. 1 page.

Order in Council
.
[1765, Feb. 9.] — Copy of His Majesty's Order in Council ascertaining the power and authority of the civil governors over H. M. forces stationed in the respective provinces as transmitted to the Com.-in-chief in North America in the Secretary of State's letter of 9 Feb. 1765.
Copy. Vol. 31. No. 13. 2 pages.

Stephen Colby to Morris (sic) Morgann.

1767, October 18. Fynnone. — Borough affairs in the town of Cardigan. Election of a mayor. Gives this account lest Lord Shelburne should ask any questions.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 84. No. 95. 2 pages.

Page 2

Troops.

1768 and 1769. — State of lodging money allowed the officers at Boston. Table showing rank and sum per week.
Vol. 10. No. 218. 1 page.

New York.

1768, May 18. New York. — Extract from the Ordinance of Fees.
Vol, 32. No. 186. 2 pages.
To accompany [Sir G. Carleton] to Thos. Townshend, 17 Nov. 1782.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 145, fo. 679 ; and Foreign Office, Misc.

Thomas Bradshaw to Maj.-Gen. Gage.

1769, March 8. Treasury Chambers, Whitehall. — Acknowledging letter of 6 January as to the office of storekeeper at New York and desiring that Mr. Blundell be paid during his life and at his death to let the office drop unless the province make a provision for the same. Followed by copy of Maj.-Gen. Gage's certificate of 18 September that the above is a true copy delivered to Mr. Blundell to make known the intentions of the Treasury to any future Commander-in-Chief.
Copy. Vol. 28. No. 71. 2 pages.
Copy in the British Museum, Addtl. MSS. 21697, fo. 33.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Gage.

1770, March 23. War Office. — That the bounty of 20s. to persons apprehending deserters should be satisfied out of the contingencies.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 145. 1 page.
Enclosed by Ld. Barrington to Sir W. Howe, 1 June 1777.

Lord Westmeath to [                   ].

1771, July 20. Merion Square. — "Dear Sir, I at last received by the last packets the inclosed letter which tho' not as satisfactory as I shoud have wished I think youl do well to send to your Brother that he may see I have done everything in my power, and at the same time the steps he is to take to obtain the place he wishes at the Council Board. Lord Hillsborough as you will see by his letter, to whom I had wrote long ago (since it was immediately after you mentioned the affair to me) committed a mistake in directing his answer intended for me, to some other person ; as I saw his mistake by a former letter which I had from him I wrote to him a second time. I am endeed very sorry not to have been more successfull; for it woud make me very happy to have it in my power to serve your Brother and to convince you of the
Page 3
true regard with which I am, dear Sir, your most obedient humble servant, Westmeath."
P.S.— I hope to have soon the pleasure of hearing from you and that youl be able to send me at least a part of the arrears du by the People of Kittobar.
Autograph letter signed. Vol. 38. No. 290.

Geo. III. to Frederick Smyth.

1772, May 14. Court of St. James's. — Warrant as Justice of the peace in New Jersey.
Copy in Mr. Smyth's hand. Vol. 14. No. 58. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 4 Dec. 1780.

Lt.-Col. Joseph Goreham.

1772, May 25. St. James's.— Appointment as lieutenant-colonel of foot. Signed by the Earl of Hillsborough.
Copy. Vol. 13. No. 195. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lt.-Col. Goreham to Sir H. Clinton, 6 May 1781.

John Collet.

1774, September 10, 14. — Statement of account with George Whiton for 2,003 feet flagging stones, for a platform at Fort Johnston, North Carolina, delivered there by Capt. Andrew Wilson, at 2s. per foot
 
£200  6  0
100 feet reed flagging, for a platform at Fort Cape Fear, also delivered by Capt. Wilson, at 1s. 6d.
 
7 10  0
 
£207 16  0
Addressed to His Excellency General Robertson.
Original. Vol. 25. No. 8.

Lord Barrington, Sec. at War, to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, March 1. War Office. — Extract. That it has been judged expedient to send out officers' tents for six battalions.
Vol. 1. No. 28. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, May 1776.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, March 21. — Extract. Mr. Mallet, purveyor, to issue pay to hospital mates at the rate of 5s. per day, to Mr. Fennings, surgery man, at 2s. 6d., and to Mr. Brown, storekeeper of hospital stores, at 3s.
Vol. 2. No. 159. 1 page.
Enclosed by Capt. Mackenzie to Thomas Barrow, 4 March 1777.

Troops.

1775, March 26. — Distribution of full pay of a regiment of foot,
Vol. 28. No. 67. 2 pages.

Page 4

Lt.-Gen. Gage to Gov. John Wentworth.

1775, April 17. Boston.
Copy. Vol. 18. No. 18/11. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 406 fo. 161.

Lt.-Gen. Gage to Lt.-Col. Allen McLean.

1775, June 12. Headquarters, Boston. — Order to raise the Boyal Highland Emigrants Corps.
Copy. Vol. 25. No. 85. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 16 April 1779. Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 294, fo. 401, and in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21833, fos. 1 and 37.

Gov. Josiah Martin to the Earl of Dartmouth.

1775, June 30. Fort Johnston, North Carolina.
Extract. Vol. 2. No. 8. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 15 Sept. 1775.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 222, fo. 253; copy, vol. 313, fo. 87 ; duplicate signed letter in Lord Dartmouth's collection, see Fourteenth Report, Appendix X., pp. 322 and 327.

Gov. Josiah Martin to Alexander McLeod.

1775, July 4. Fort Johnston. — Acknowledges letter received yesterday by Mr. McDonald of Kingborough.
"It is impossible for me to express my respect for the gentlemen who have cultivated the good dispositions that are manifested by the Highlanders throughout this province in this time of unnatural revolt, and I can only promise that I shall faithfully represent their merits to the King; assuring myself, that when time and occasion shall call for their aid, they will furnish me with abundant testimonials still more powerful to do them honour before his Majesty. I perfectly agree in your sentiments of the propriety of the good and faithful Highlanders forbearing any open declarations, until there is a necessity to call them into action, and they are amply provided to take the field with dignity and effect; the necessaries for which I have not omitted to apply for, nor to represent the expediency of maintaining a correspondence with the chiefs to the eastward.
"I am much obliged to you, sir, for your hint with respect to Mr. F. Campbell, to whom I have just now written a letter, that I hope may produce good effect.
"The part you have taken, sir, upon the present occasion, does you the highest honour, and cannot fail to recommend you in the most effectual manner to his Majesty's favour; you may rely upon my faithful representations of it, and of my best disposition
Page 5
to render you every service in my power. I concur in your opinion of your services being more useful here than anywhere else, and I have concerted a plan with Mr. McDonald (for which I beg leave to refer you to him) of making use of your influence here, as well for your own advantage as that of our royal master; and which I shall be happy to find meets with your approbation. Do me the honour to commend me to your lady and family in particular, and in general to all the good and faithful Highland people in whom I have the firmest confidence, and for whom I have ever felt peculiar regard and attachment."
Copy, Vol, 2. No. 161. 3 pages.

Gov. Josiah Maktin to the Earl of Dartmouth
.
1775, July 6. Fort Johnston, North Carolina.
Extract. Vol, 2. No. 9. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 15 Sept. 1775.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 222, fo. 281 ; copy, vol. 313, fo. 109 ; duplicate in Lord Dartmouth's Collection, see Fourteenth Report, Appendix X.,p. 327.

Gov. Lord William Campbell to Lord Dartmouth.

1775, July 19. Charles Town.
Extract. Vol. 2. No. 14. 4 pages.
Enclosed by John Pownall to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 25 Sept. 1775.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 229, fo. 333; 317, fo. 178; signed letter in Lord Dartmouth's Collection as above, p. 331.
Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage
.
1775, July 24. War Office. — Acknowledges dispatches. Will give directions that Capt. Hutcheson, appointed Assistant Deputy Quarter Master General, and Major William Dunbar, appointed Major of brigade, shall receive pay from 12 June last. Will consider Mr. Mallet's request. Desires the certificate of officers who have commanded at the outposts from 25 December 1773 to 24 June 1774. Sends list of promotions.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 186. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, July 28. War Office. — Acknowledges letters of 25 June.
"I have it in command to signify to you his Majesty's entire approbation of the firmness and spirit which distinguished the troops in the late action ; at the same time permit me to express my extreme concern for the heavy loss sustained." Directions to transmit the general monthly returns by frequent opportunities, also a distinct return of the troops lately assembled under his command at Boston, including all detachments made. Sends list of promotions. P.S. — Recommends to his consideration whether he should not be provided with more shoes, shirts, stockings, &c,
Page 6
which the troops might wish to purchase. In that case he is to make use of Mr. Coffin or indicate such other mode of supplying them as he shall think most expedient, sending the minutest details of everything requisite.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 187. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, July 28. War Office. — The King has agreed to the whole list of promotions recommended. "Troops who have acted with that valor, which was exerted so much to the honor of the British name on the 17th of last month, deserve everything that can be done for them." If through accident any person recommended to an ensigncy should have been under sixteen years of age, the King must be informed of it that the commission may be recalled. Sir Charles Thompson having voluntarily resigned the 15th regiment, the King has been pleased to bestow the command on Col. Bigot, whose gallant services in the late action have well deserved this mark of favour. P.S. — The King not intending that Major Bruce shall succeed Brigadier Pigot as lieut.-col. of the 38th, a proper major is to be recommended for that commission.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 188. 2 pages.

Treasury Minutes.

1775, June 13 to 28 July. — Touching supplies to the army in America.
Copy. Vol, 4. No. 4. 13 pages.
Enclosed by John Bobinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 14 September 1775.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Howe.

1775, August 2. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 2. No. 1. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 427 ; copy 431, fo. 70 ; copy in Lord Dartmouth's Collection, see Fourteenth Report, Appendix X., p. 344.
Enclosure:—
1775, August 2. St. James's. — Royal commission to Maj.-Gen. Howe as commandcr-in-chief of the forces employed within the colonies lying upon the Atlantic Ocean.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 2. 3 pages.
Also in Lord Dartmouth's Collection.

Lord Barrington to the Hon. Lt.-Gen. Monckton or Officer
commanding the 17th Foot.

1775, August 28. War Office. — To prevent any volunteers embarking with his regiment in expectation of receiving commissions at Boston.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 202. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage, 30 October.

Page 7

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, August 31. War Office. — Directions for drafts from regiments which are ordered home. The remaining battalions under his command to be augmented and two additional companies to be added to each regiment. Sends a copy of the establishment and of his circular letter. One of the additional companies is to remain to recruit for the regiment in Ireland, the other in Great Britain. Regiments now under orders to embark from Ireland for N. America to be augmented. The 60th regiment for the West Indies and the 6th, proposed for N. America, also to be augmented. And the 42nd, or Royal Highland Regiment, the Queen's Regiment of Light Dragoons, Burgoyne's, to be augmented and sent in the spring.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 189. 4 pages.
Enclosures:—
Establishment of a regiment offoot from 25 August.
Duplicate. Vol. 6. No. 190. 1 page.
1775. August 26. Whitehall. — Circular from Lord Barrington to the colonels oj the augmented regiments. Particulars to be observed in the augmentation, recruiting, &c. Signed copy. Vol. 6. No. 191. 3 pages.

Lord Dartmouth to the Gov. of Mass. Bay [Gen. Gage]
.
1775, September 5. Whitehall. — Circular. No ships of war to be employed in conveying dispatches.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 4. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 261; 397, fo. 91; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 104.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 5. Whitehall. — Separate. Question of evacuating Boston before winter and removing to New York or elsewhere.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 3. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 473 ; copy 431, fo. 72.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 5. Whitehall. — Secret. That their confident hope of having a large army in America in the spring rests on the ground of an assurance from the Empress of Russia that she would give any number of infantry that might be wanted, and that a requisition has thereupon been made for twenty thousand men.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 25. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 481 copy 431, fo. 75.

Page 8

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage or Officer commanding
in chief his Majesty's Forces, North America.

1775, September 6. War Office. — Acknowledges letters, papers and returns. A proper quantity of flocks for the bedding of the forces shall be provided and sent with all possible expedition. The mode of remitting the officers' subsistence shall be taken into consideration. In consequence of a recommendation from Gen. Keppel, Lt. Smelt had been notified for the adjutancy to the 14th before his Excellency's recommendation of St. Laurie was received. All the other promotions recommended have been confirmed. No officer should be allowed to sell who did not purchase his commission unless in very particular cases. Transmits list of promotions made and of six additional hospital mates who are to embark with the forces now under orders for America. P.S. — Cannot alter the dates in commissions for the 52nd regiment. Asks minute details of everything requisite for the forces.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 192. 2 pages.

John Pownall to the Gov. of Mass. Bay [Gage].

1775, September 6. Whitehall. — Circular. Transmitting the proclamation for suppressing rebellion and sedition.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 5. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 265 ; and 397, fo. 93.

John Pownall to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 8. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 6. 3 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 485; 431, fo. 77.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, September 9. War Office. — Tents, officers' baggage and camp necessaries for the 26th regiment being shipped for Boston are to be forwarded to Canada by the first opportunity.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 193. 1 page.

John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 9. Whitehall Treasury Chambers. — "Sir, As it is apprehended that General Gage may have left Boston on a leave of absence to return to England before this can arrive in America, I am directed by the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury to acquaint you it having been represented to them that Colonel James Robertson, Barrack Master General, had applied to Messieurs John and George Erving, merchants, at Boston, for the providing and importing into Boston sundry articles in the schedule herein inclosed marked Letter A, for the service and use of the Army, and that Messieurs Ervings had
Page 9
directed their correspondents here to execute such commission which they had endeavored to do but could not; their Lordships, altho' no information hereon had been sent to them, thought it right to direct due enquiry to be made into this business; and upon such inquiry their Lordships have judged it expedient to order such stores to be provided: I am therefore directed to acquaint you that several of the stores mentioned in the Schedule A are now shipped according to an invoice marked Letter B, on board the ship "Friendship," James Holmes, master, under sailing orders to go to Spithead, and from thence to come under convoy of one of his Majesty's ships of war consigned to the order of the officer commanding his Majesty's forces at Boston or elsewhere, as he shall direct her to proceed, and as will appear by the Charter Party, a copy of which shall be sent by the ship. You will observe by my former dispatches to General Gage of the 30th June and 26th of July last, and by the remarks on the Schedule A, that the articles of coals and oats had been before provided by the Board.
"Their Lordships having since taken into consideration what may be further wanted for the Army, have ordered thirty watch coats to be sent out for the use of each battalion, which will come by the same ship, and have also ordered the several articles in the paper marked Letter C to be provided with all possible expedition. This last order is not so forward as to enable me to inform you more particularly than I have endeavored to do by the remarks on the Paper C, but I hope soon to do it.
"In General Gage's dispatch of the 8th of July he transmits his account of warrants for the quarter commencing the first day of April, and ending the 30th of June, amounting to £31,121 0s. 2¼d., and in his letter of the 22nd advises of his requisition to the agent for the contractors for remitting money for the pay, &c. of the troops in America for £20,000 for the extraordinary expenses of the army in the ensuing quarter, but mentions nothing else. Their Lordships hope, however, that by the steps they have taken the wants of the army will in some measure be supplied, and that many conveniences and comforts will be provided for the troops; and they direct me to repeat to you what has been before said in my several dispatches, to which I beg leave to refer you, that you will give the earliest notice to this Board of the requisitions you may find it proper to make for any supplies whether of money, provisions, forage, or any other necessary whatever; it being their Lordships' earnest wish to give every aid in their power towards carrying on the service.
"It was yesterday represented to their Lordships by Lord Barrington, enclosing to me a letter from General Gage of the 26th of July, that the officers suffer an inconvenience arising from the present difficulties in obtaining cash for their bills on the respective agents of the regiments here. This mode was established for the conveniency as well as for the advantage of the officers; but on the representation made by General Gage, by his letter of the 19th May last, of the difficulty he met with in raising cash for his bills, it was foreseen here that the
Page 10
inconvenience now complained of must arise to the officers serving in America. Their Lordships therefore ordered me then to endeavor to obviate it; I tried to do so, but the officers' subsistence having a little before been issued to the agents here, it could not be remedied at that time. Directions were, however, given that this inconvenience should be provided against in future; and I have the pleasure to acquaint you that in the last issue on the 25th of August care has been taken at the Pay Office to issue to the contractors for remitting money to America the sum of £450 per regiment for the pay of the officers serving in America, to be issued by them in specie to the deputy paymaster at Boston to answer their demands, and which sum it is alleged is sufficient for this purpose; the remaining sum of about £250 per regiment being paid to the agents here to enable them to pay the officers of each regiment who may be absent on the recruiting service or otherwise. This inconveniency therefore it is hoped will be remedied on the arrival of the specie which has been lately sent out (of which advise was given to General Gage by my dispatch of the 7th of July last) and by the directions which have been given herein.
"To pursue the mode laid down in that dispatch and to keep you amply supplied with cash for the extraordinary services of the army under the present difficulties and disadvantages in procuring cash for bills, their Lordships have issued to the contractors the sum of £20,000 on the last requisition made the 22nd of July by General Gage, and have directed them to send it out in specie by the first ship of war that will be ready after it can be so provided. This sum, with the £20,000 you will have received by this time by the 'Raven,' and the £30,000 that is on board the 'Cerberus' on account of the extraordinaries, besides the sums sent in specie on account of the subsistence, will, it is hoped, be an ample supply; and I have their Lordships' orders to desire that during the time these disadvantages in exchange subsist you will avoid as much as possible drawing bills for the money that may be wanted for the extraordinary service of the army, out in lieu thereof that you will from time to time make requisitions to their lordships for the money which you apprehend will be necessary and wanted for this service for each ensuing quarter, so that my lords may have timely notice to issue the same, and order the contractors to send it out in specie. Directions have likewise been given to the contractors to take due care to keep the Deputy Paymaster supplied with sufficient specie for the payment of the subsistence to the officers and private men; so that, upon the whole, it is hoped there will be no deficiency. I have the honor," &c.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 6. 4 pages.
Enclosures:—
A. — Account of the several goods and stores which were desired to be sent out by Col. Robertson. Includes 5,000 pairs blankets.
B. — Invoice of sundries ordered to he shipped per the "Friendship" Capt. James Holmes,for the forces in America.
Page 11
C. — Account of stores and other necessaries ordered to be sent out to Boston. Begins: — Flock beds ordered by the War Office .... Coals, 3,000 chaldrons, &c.
Vol. 4. Nos, 7, 8, 9. 2 pages each.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, September 12. War Office. — Capt. David Skene of the 28th being permitted to retire, asks the name of the eldest lieutenant willing to purchase at the regulated price.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 194. 1 page.

John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, September 14. Whitehall Treasury Chambers. — As it is necessary he should be made acquainted with every step taken by the Treasury in respect to supplying the army in America with money, provisions, forage and fuel, transmits for his information copies of all the minutes and resolutions of the Board thereon. Recommends obtaining coal from Louisburg.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 5. 2 pages.
Enclosing Treasury minutes, 13 June to 28 July 1775.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, September 15. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 7. 2 pages. Enclosing extracts of two letters from Gov. Martin to Lord Dartmouth, 30 June and 6 July.
Draft and copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 491; 431, fo. 78.

Stores.

1775, September 16. Liverpool. — Certificate that Thomas Birch has laden so many chaldrons of coals, Winchester measure, on board four ships for Boston. Marked B. Sworn before the collector of customs.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 3. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 22 September.

Stores.

1775, September 19. London. — Invoice of sundries shipped on the "Friendship," Capt. Holmes, for the use of the forces.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 13. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 16 October.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, September 22. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 12. 1 page.
Page 12
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 529 ; copy 431, fo. 79; extracts in Admiralty, Secretary, In Letters, 484 and 4,132.
Enclosures:—
Earl of Rochford to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
1775, September 21. St James's. — Touching the regiments embarking at Corke, &c.
Copy, Vol. 2. No. 10. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 4130.
Earl of Dartmouth to the Lords of the Admiralty.
1775, September 22. Whitehall. — Storeships.
Copy, Vol
. 2. No. 11. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 4130.
Home Office, Admiralty 167.
1775, September 23. London.— Invoice or list from Mure, Son and Atkinson of 23 ships and their cargoes.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 10, 2 pages.
Another copy, vol. 4, No. 1, is enclosed in the following letter from Mr. Robinson.
Also in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 484 and 4130.

John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, September 22. Treasury Chambers. — His former letter advised of the orders given for shipping provisions and stores. Sends now (a) a list of the ships taken up for the purpose. The "Thames," David Laird, master, is already laden and will fall down the river in a day or two. An account of her cargo is in the list and Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson, the merchants employed to ship the stores, will send the bill of lading by that ship. Mr. Anthony Bacon's agent has advised of the shipping at Liverpool of 487½ chaldrons of coal as per the enclosed certificate, (b) as part of the order for 3,000 chaldrons. Expects every day to hear of the remainder being shipped.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 2. 2 pages.
Enclosinga. Invoice of ships and cargoes, 23 Sept.
b. Certificate of cargoes of coal, see 16 Sept.
Extract in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 484.

Philip Stephens, Secretary of the Admiralty.

1775, September 22. Admiralty Office. — Private signals to be observed by the ships and vessels under the command of the admiral commanding in chief in North America.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 12. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 1 October.

Page 13

John Pownall to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 25. Whitehall. — Touching the enclosed extract. Refers to Lord Rochford's letter of the 21st.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 13. 2 pages.
Enclosing Gov. Campbell to Lord Dartmouth, 19 July 1775.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 533; 431, fo. 81; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 116.

John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, September 25. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — He will receive this letter by the storeship "Friendship," Mr. Holmes, who has orders to deliver his cargo and await orders. Sends inclosed an invoice of the lading to be disposed of as thought proper for the comfort and use of the army. The oznaburgs and thread are to supply the sheets which have not been made here for the bedding, the remainder of which will be sent by the first ship after it can be got completed. The hatchets on board are shipped by Mr. Harley, the contractor, for Quebec. If desired Mr. Holmes may be taken into the transport service. P.S. — Mr. Trotter, the contractor with the War Office for the beds, has not sent an account of the bedding shipped on the "Friendship." It will be sent by the first opportunity.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 15. 2 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 484.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage or Officer commanding
in chief his Majesty's forces, North America.

1775, September 26. War Office. — Sends list of officers of the 52nd with dates of their commissions. Regulations for hospitals. To employ extra mates. Concerning promotions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 195. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
Instructions for the direction of the hospital established Jor the forces.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 196. 2 pages.

Stores.

1775, September 26. — Invoice of bedding per the "Friendship,"
Capt. Holmes, for Boston. Consigned to the commander-in-chief.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 16. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 1 October.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage or Officer commanding
in chief his Majesty's forces, North America.

1775, September 29. War Office. — Captains Smith, of the 5th, Disney, of the 44th, and Browne, of the 52nd, to be paid as
Page 14
majors of brigade. Dr. Veale to be physician to the hospital. Mr. Michael Croker to be apothecary. Promotion of ensigns. Sends invoice of bedding p. the "Friendship."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 197. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage or Officer commanding
in chief his Majesty's forces, North America.

1775, September 30. War Office. — Question of Capt. Vatas of the 10th regiment retiring or selling out.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 198. 1 page.

John Robinson to [Maj.-Gen. William Howe].

1775, October 1. Treasury Chambers. — "In a former letter to you I acquainted you that the Lords of his Majesty's Treasury had, in pursuance of General Gage's requisition, issued the sum of twenty thousand pounds, and directed the remitters to send it by the first ship of war that should sail to America. That sum has now been put on board the 'Centurion,' Capt. Brathwaite, and I hope it will arrive safe. General Gage, by a subsequent requisition, has desired that the remitters' agent might provide a further sum of forty thousand pounds, and has transmitted to the Board notice of this requisition. In consequence of which and of the several bills which have been drawn, the remitters have applied for a further imprest, and their Lordships have accordingly issued to them fifty thousand pounds. From these large issues, and the sums before sent out in specie, there remain no doubt but that you must have a very ample supply in your military chest for the extraordinary and contingent service of the army, which their Lordships have had anxiously in view since they were informed of the difficulties that attended the getting specie for bills. The representations which General Gage made of the impossibility to obtain money for bills and the distresses which it has been reported the army was put to from such difficulty are however not a little irreconcileable with the having actually obtained these sums; and I am directed to observe to you that it is a matter of some surprize how Mr. Apthorpe, the agent to the remitters at Boston, who also appears to be deputy paymaster, should have since been able to procure at one time upwards of thirty-five thousand pounds in specie for bills, and on this late occasion, the further sum of forty thousand pounds in two or three days, and after he, also, had represented the impracticability of obtaining money for bills, and the necessity of sending out specie, for it is very striking that in two days after General Gage's requisition to him, he as deputy paymaster should transmit receipts for the forty thousand pounds as money actually paid into the military chest in that period. From this mode of going on, both in drawing bills and sending out the money in specie a double remittance would be made. The contractors therefore will not send out this last issue of fifty thousand pounds, but keep it here for the
Page 15
purpose of discharging the bills so drawn upon them. Their Lordships have been informed that the difference in exchange in receiving specie in America for bills drawn upon England had been for some time 15 per cent, to the disadvantage of Government, but that upon a bill of seven thousand pounds drawn in favor of Mr. Apthorpe's house in London and some other bills of the last sett which were drawn from Boston, it has suddenly risen to 23 per cent., a loss which I am to remark falls most heavy upon Government, as, for the purpose of exchange alone, near one fourth part of their supplies are swallowed up. These circumstances, together with the great disadvantage which at present subsists in the exchange, induce their Lordships to direct me to desire your attention to the present mode of drawing bills for the extraordinary and contingent services of the army, and to repeat the request that during the time the exchange shall remain so high, you will not permit bills to be drawn upon them for these services except upon the most pressing occasions and in cases of necessity, but that you will pursue the method of requisition immediately to their Lordships for such supplies of money as well as every other necessary which you may want in the manner desired by my former dispatches, and give their Lordships notice thereof in due time that you may be amply supplied by their issues to the remitters to be paid by them into the military chest. I have lately from time to time advised you of the several ships that have been sent out with stores for the use of the army, and I now send you a copy of a letter from Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson to me with a duplicate of their letter and inclosures, and also a copy of the invoice of bedding shipped by Mr. Trotter by order of the War Office on board the 'Friendship,' James Holmes, master, of which I before advised you, with a copy of his charter party, two bills of lading, and a correct copy of the invoice of goods shipped by Mr. Harley marked Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4. The other store ships will be coming out to you every two or three days, and I have already wrote the letters and given the private signals (of which I send you copies inclosed in the papers marked No. 5, 6 and 7) to the several ships in the paper marked No. 8. I shall do the same to the other ships as they come out, and Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson will advise you of their cargo &c. by each ship.
"The 'Thames,' David Laird, master (who is also a lieutenant in the navy), I am informed is a ship of some force, pierced for guns, well found and capable of being fitted out as an armed vessel for any purposes. Mr. Laird is also well known to many gentlemen in the navy, and particularly to Sir George Pococke, under whom he served at the Havanna. We were not apprized before he sailed that that ship could have been taken into the service as she was destined for the West Indies, but Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson have to-day offered her if Government should want her, as an armed vessel, and from the best accounts I can get she may probably be made useful to the service, and cannot have a more active and better officer to command her. I have apprized Admiral Shuldham of this and submitted it to his consideration.
Page 16
The 'Thames' has sailed without any such orders, but they will be sent after her by the first store ship that shall sail."
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 14. 4 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 484.
Enclosures:—
Letter from Mr. Robinson to the commanders of the storeships to open their sealed directions when 100 leagues off Cape Clear.
Copy. Vol
. 4. No. 10. 2 pages.
List of ships with names of their masters to whom private signals have been given
, 1 October 1775.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 14. 1 page.
Letter from Mr. Robinson to the commanders of the ships respecting use of the following signals.
Copy. Vol
. 4. No. 11. 1 page.
Signals to be observed. From the Admiralty. See 22 Sept,
Invoice of Sundries shipped &c. See 19 September.
Invoice of bedding. See 26 September.

Vice-Admiral Samuel Graves to Lt. Henry Mowat.
1775, October 6. "Preston" — Orders for an expedition along the eastern coasts of New England.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 71. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lieut. Mowat to Sir H. Clinton, 25 April 1779.

Vice-Admiral Samuel Graves. General Orders.

1775, October 6. "Preston," Boston. — To the respective captains and commanders of his Majesty's ships and vessels in North America. Not to interfere with Lieut. Mowat in his command of the expedition.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 70. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lieut. Mowat to Sir H. Clinton, 25 April 1779.

Stores.

1775, October 6. Headquarters, Boston. — Return, signed William Sherriff, D.Q.M.G., of the number of tents and marquees issued to the various corps named and to be charged to their respective agents. Total, 9 field officers' tents; 76 captains' or subalterns'.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 29. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, May 1776.
Copy in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, signed Wm. Shirreff.

Maj.-Gen. William Howe to Captain Mackenzie.

1775, October 12. Boston. — To make a stoppage of 1s. in the £ from the full pay of all commissioned officers in the
Page 17
provincial corps raised or to bo raised, in consideration of which no contingent charges on that account are to be produced.
Copy, Vol. 31. No. 51. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Col. Roy.

1775, October 14. War Office. — That he is appointed superintendent of the stores and necessaries for the forces in North America, and is to follow all directions he may receive from the Secretaries of State, the Treasury, the Admiralty and this office. Is to be allowed 40s. per day.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 200. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 28 October 1775.

Bermuda.

1775, October 14. — List of iron ordnance and stores delivered to the Hon. J. Tollemache of H.M.S. "Scorpion," and shipped per the transport "Palliser," W. Waters, master. Certified by J. Lewis, Clerk of the Council. On the back is a note by Lieutenant Colonel Martin testifying that the ordnance was sent to Boston, see 29 June 1782.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 10. 2 pages.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, October 22. Whitehall. — Expedition to the southern provinces.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.2. No. 15. 10 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 539; 289, fos. 431-442; 431, fo. 83. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Earl of Dartmouth to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, October 27. Whitehall. — Return of commissioned and non-commissioned officers. Sends the King's Speech. The prospect of troops from Russia doubtful.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 16. 4 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 555 ; 431, fo. 91. Printed in the American Archives of Peter Force.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, October 28. Cavendish Square. — That the King has appointed Lt.-Col. Roy to superintend all matters relative to providing and shipping such stores and necessaries as shall be sent hence for the use of the forces in North America. Submits expediency of sending Lt. Bailev or some other person to act under Col. Roy.
Implicate signed letter. Vol.6. No. 199. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Lt.-Col. Roy, 14 October.

Page 18

Earl of Dartmouth to the Governor of St. John [Patterson].

1775, October 28. Whitehall. — Circular. Sending the King's Speech.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 18. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 291; 397, fo. 94; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 124.

Proclamations.

1775, October 28. Boston. — Manuscript copies of three proclamations issued by Maj.-Gen. Howe.
Vol. 2. Nos. 152, 156 and 157. 1 page each.
These and the following are printed in Force's American Archives.
An association proposed to the loyal citizens of Boston agreeable to the proclamation of Gen. Howe the 28th October to promote the peace and security of the town.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 136. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage or Officer commanding
in chief H.M. Forces in North America at Boston.

1775, October 30. War Office. — To send over one commissioned officer from each of the regiments under his command for the purpose of conducting recruits. No volunteers to be allowed to embark. Sends list of promotions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 201. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gov. Monckton, 28 August.

Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage.

1775, October 30. War Office. — As the friends of Lt. Gordon cannot assist him in the difference between the lieutenancy and Capt. Crawford's company, asks the name of the eldest lieutenant willing to purchase. (52nd regiment.)
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 203. 1 page.

Proclamation.

1775, November 1. Boston. — Respecting vessels in Boston harbour.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 137. 2 pages.

Earl of Dartmouth. Circular.

1775, November 8. Whitehall. — Addressed to the Governors of Massachusetts and other provinces in N. America.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 19. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 295; 397, fo. 95.

Page 19

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, November 8. Whitehall. — On the expedition to the southern provinces.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 20. 3 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office (as Dartmouth to Howe), America and W. Indies 130, fo. 561; 431, fo. 94. Printed in Force's American Archives.
Enclosures:
Earl of Dartmouth to Gov. Lord Wm. Campbell.
1775, November 7. Whitehall. — Same subject.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 21. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 229, fo. 437; copy 435, fo. 189.
Earl of Dartmouth to Gov. Josiah Martin.
1775, November 7. Whitehall. — Same subject.
Copy. Vol.
2. No. 22. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 222, fo. 341; copy 434, fo. 188.
1775, November 8. — Triplicate of Germain's letter above.
Vol. 2. No. 17.

Lord George Germain to the Commander-in-chief in
North America [Howe],

1775, November 10. Whitehall. — Circular, announcing his appointment as Secretary of State.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 23. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 299; 397, fo. 98; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 126.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe, or Officer commanding
His Majesty's Forces in North America, at Boston.

1775, November 14. War Office. — The 15th and 37th regiments intended for service in the spring have received orders to embark on the 1st of next month, together with the 53rd, 54th, and 57th regiments. They embark agreeable to their old numbers, viz. 477. The three last-mentioned corps, as soon as they come on the British establishment, are to be augmented to the same numbers as the regiments now under his command, viz. each battalion to 811 men. The 28th and 7 companies of the 46th regiments, having been prevented by stress of weather from pursuing their voyage, are to wait until they can proceed with the regiments from Corke. The "Argo" transport, with the remaining three companies of the 46th, has not been heard of since the 20th of October, when she parted from the other
Page 20
transports in a storm. A hospital staff attends these 7 regiments. The appointment of all the mates as well in the medical as chirurgical department, is left generally to the Hospital Board. Has not received a return of the distribution of the officers' tents sent the beginning of March last.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 204. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, November 18. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 24. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 633; copy 431, fo. 95; copy in Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Erle or Officer commanding
the 28th Regiment of Foot at Haverfordwest
.
1775, November 25. War Office. — To reduce supernumerary sergeants and drummers added by mistake to that part of the 28th Regiment under his command, as it is the King's intention that the regiment should embark for North America on their old numbers. Officers to remain behind to conduct recruits.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 206. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 9 Dec. 1775.

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. Sir Henry Clinton or
the Officer appointed to command an expedition to the
Southern Colonies.

1775, December 6. Whitehall. — Directions.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 30. 12 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Maj.-Gen. Howe, 5 Jan. 1776.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 759; copy 431, fo. 97a; copy in Sackville MSS.

Maryland Loyalists.

1775, December 8. — Copy of the Association entered into in the year 1775. To support and defend his Majesty's person, his crown and dignity against all enemies and to endeavour to put an end to the present rebellion. The resolution deposited in the hands of Hugh Kelly and James Fleming of Frederick County.
Copy of Instructions to the nominated officers of the Maryland Royal Retaliators with copy of the oaths to be administered:— No. 1 to Menonites, German Baptists and Quakers; No. 2 for aged and infirm people; No. 3 for distinguished non-jurist loyalists who will voluntarily serve; No. 4 for those having previously taken oath of allegiance to the States.
At the end is copy of Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton's certificate to the loyalty of Hugh Kelly, dated 6 Dec. 1781. These papers are annexed to the case of Hugh Kelly and James Fleming, 1782.
Copy. Vol. 25. Nos. 141 and 142. 1 page and 2 pages respectively.

Page 21

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 9. War Office. — General Gage's representation of the badness of the tents sent out last year is transmitted to the Board of Ordnance. Reduction of supernumerary Serjeants and drummers. The 33rd, under Earl Cornwallis, is to embark for America instead of the 53rd, together with about 90 recruits. Earl Cornwallis to act as major-general in America, with one aid-de-camp and Cols. Gabbett and Vaughan as brigadiers.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 205. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Erle, 25 November.

[Maj.-Gen. Howe] to the Officer commanding at Halifax.

1775, December 11. Boston. — Instructions to take command of the forces in Nova Scotia; to communicate with Gov. Legge and Como. Arbuthnot; defence of dockyard; works on Citadel Hill; conduct towards the enemy, &c, &c. (see the letter for Brig.-Gen. Massey, 19 December).
Copy. Vol. 47. No. 211. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 13. War Office. — Appointment of Colonels Pigot and Grant to different regiments, and the promotion of Maj. Grant of the 40th as lieutenant-colonel.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 207. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Fraser.

1775, December 16. War Office. — Extract of letter of service for raising the 71st regiment.
Extract. 2 copies. Vol. 26. No. 195o; 33 No. 212o. 1 page.
Enclosed by Townshend to Sir G. Carleton, 10 May 1782.

Sir William Howe to Captain Spry.

1775, December 17. Boston. — "No man feels more sensibly for the honour of a soldier than myself, and I am distressed to think that an officer of your rank and long services should imagine himself injured by any neglect whatever. I found Captain Montressor Chief Engineer in this Department and you in Nova Scotia, his conduct hitherto has merited my utmost approbation, and I never can entertain a thought of supersceding him in his appointment without some very sufficient cause, besides the service in Nova Scotia is of the last importance, and no place requires more the presence of an experienced officer."
Extract. Vol. 30. No. 29. 2 folios.
Enclosed by Sir G. Carleton to Gen. Conway, 11 Sept. 1782.

Page 22

Maj.-Gen. Howe to Geo. James Williams, Esq., Deputy
Paymaster General, Nova Scotia.

1775, December 18. Boston. — To supply Brig.-Gen. Massey with such sums as he may demand to defray services incurred under his command in Nova Scotia.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 160. 1 page.

Gen. Washington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 18. Cambridge. — Complaining of the treatment of Col. Allen and threatening retaliation on Brigadier Prescott. Followed by Howe's answer dated 20th. (Both printed in Sparks's Washington III. 201-3, and in Force's American Archives.)
Two copies. Vol. 1, No, 1; 3, No. 1. 2 pages each.

Maj.-Gen. William Howe to Brig.-Gen. Massey.

1775, December 19. Boston. — Extracts. His appointment as brigadier-general.
"The troops you found in Nova Scotia with the 27th regiment will remain under your command until further orders from me.
"I am well assured you will not omit communicating with the governor and the commodore of his Majesty's ships when there may be any matter in agitation wherein they are particularly concerned.
"The defence of the dockyard must be your first object, in which you will no doubt receive material assistance from the ships of war.
"Your next attention in course will be directed to the town of Halifax, wherein I apprehend that fortifying the Citadel Hill is absolutely necessary, from whence you will draw a collateral defence to the dockyard. I could also recommend an entrenchment with block-houses at the isthmus leading to the town, placing abbatis in front, and as it may be proper to have blockhouses in other situations in the spring, I would advise there(sic) being prepared in the winter in order for fixing them when the seasons permit.
"Respecting your gaining intelligence of the rebel movements on your side of the Bay of Fundy, I should recommend your taking proper persons into pay for that purpose, rather than by the mode you propose, of having a number of parties upon the road, which would be attended with inconvenience at this season. But I desire to be understood that intention is not to prevent your sending parties for intelligence, or to attack or harass an enemy in their approach to the town, and I beg leave to mention Lieut.-Col. Goreham, who will be of great utility to you from his knowledge of the country in every respect.
"His Excellency Governor Legge, having undertaken to treat with and secure the attachment and assistance of the Mickmack and St. John's River Indians for the defence of the province when called upon, you will, if he should request it, order a small
Page 23
quantity of powder and lead to be delivered for their winter hunting, and promise such presents as may be judged needfull, to be sent from thence in the spring, to bind them to their engagement, but you will not otherwise interfere with his excellency in the management of this service than in such manner as he may require.
"You will appoint such assistants and overseers as may be deemed necessary to attend the Engineers' Department.
"I beg the strictest attention may be given to the discipline of the young corps, allowing a sufficient quantity of ammunition for the men to fire at marks.
"Herewith enclosed you will receive copies of instructions that have been given to Lieut.-Col. Goreham, which you will be pleased to observe where there is nothing contrary to mine of this date.
"In consequence of your recommendation I have appointed Mr. Studholme to be your major of brigade with the usual pay, and you will appoint whom you judge fit your secretary at one dollar per day, during your command in Nova Scotia.
"Having perused your Surveyor General's report of the three forts of Annapolis, Cumberland and Edward I should wish they were prepared to a certain degree as soon as it can be done, by stockading and having their parapets and ditches cleared.
"The barracks also to be made fit for the proportion of men necessary for their defence, which I suppose may be for Annapolis about one hundred, Cumberland one hundred, and Edward thirty or forty, as you think proper, and if two or three large guns could be transported to ye two large forts, any attempts the rebels could make upon them in that situation would I trust prove fruitless.
"In these repairs you will be pleased to consult Captain Spry, taking care that no unnecessary expense be incurred in this business; but having no knowledge of their situation and consequence I desire to leave to your discretion every expedient for the possession and defence of them.
"You will be pleased to observe that the troops in Newfoundland are under the command and direction of the Governor of ye Island for the time being.
"In answer to particular parts of your letters I am to acquaint you that the women belonging to the troops under your command may be victualled, giving two women the allowance of one man, but this is not to be allowed unless from an absolute necessity.
"You are pleased to say you have stopped working at the lines upon the Citadel Hill on a supposition that the plan was too expensive to which I cannot make any answer, having received no estimate from Captain Spry, notwithstanding my orders sent to him for that purpose, but from the idea I have of the necessity for a work in that situation for the defence of the town and dock yard as before mentioned, I should wish you to proceed upon it with all dispatch, by block houses having curtains between them well pallisaded, or a strong stockade by way of curtain may answer perhaps as well. The block houses to have cannon and to contain fifty men in each of them."
Extracts. Vol. 47. No. 212. 5 pages.

Page 24

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 20. War Office. — His Majesty having consented to a proposal made by Maj.-Gen. Fraser for raising a regiment of foot of two battalions, and Gen. Fraser having named Capt. Duncan McPherson of the 63rd, Lieut. Boyd Porterfield of the 22nd, and Lieut. Sir James Baird of the 17th for commissions in his regiment, the said officers are to be allowed to return to Great Britain to assist in raising their proportion of recruits.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 208. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 21. War Office. — Clothing shipped for various regiments.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 209. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1775, December 23. Whitehall. — Sending the Prohibitory Act.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 20. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 279, fo. 389; 397, fo. 99. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. William Howe.

1775, December 27. Whitehall. — Sends the enclosed. To receive and dispose of the prisoners as he thinks proper.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 28. 1 page.
Draft in Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 130, fo. 637; copy 431, fo. 107; copy in Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
Lord George Germain to Lords of the Admiralty.
1775, December 27. Whitehall. — Sends list of the names of thirty-four persons taken in arms against the King near Montreal on the 25th of September last and sent from Quebec, now in Pendennis Castle. It is the King's pleasure that these prisoners are to be sent to Boston on board the "Solebay" and orders have been given to the officer at Pendennis Castle to put them in custody of Mr. James Cleverly, who will deliver them to the Commander of the "Solebay" or any other ship) appointed to go to Falmouth to receive them. Sends letter for General Howe signifying his Majesty's pleasure respecting them.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 27. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, Adm. See. LL. 4130; draft in Home Office, Admiralty 167.

Page 25

Fort Gage, Illinois.

1775, July 1 - December 31. — Crown account at Fort Gage. Capt. Hugh Lord Dr. to Mr. Thomas Bentley £208 18s. 5¼d..
Copy, Vol. 4. No, 59. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 11 Nov. 1770.

New York.

1775, December. — List of books removed from the Secretary's Office, New York, in the month of December, by order of Gov. Tryon, on board the "Dutchess of Gordon" then lying in the harbour. Consisting of grants of land, records of charters, minutes of council, &c. At the foot is a note that they were returned into the Secretary's Office in November 1781, except the records of Indian cessions, which had been lost.
Vol. 42. No. 304. 1 page.

Commissions.

1776, January 1. — List of commissions giving higher rank to the general officers serving in America.
Copy. Vol, 2. No, 39o. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 28 March 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, January 5. Whitehall. — A long letter on the means of augmenting his forces, questions of waggons, horses, provisions, &c, and touching Quebec and Boston.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 2. No, 29. 10 pages.
Enclosing Lord G. Germain to Maj.-Gen. Clinton, 6 Dec. 1775.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 1; 431, fo. 107; Adm. Sec. I.L. 4132; Dartmouth MSS.; Sackville MSS.

Maj.-Gen. Campbell to the Secretary at War [Barrington].

1776, January 6. — Requesting Capt. Drew's leave may be renewed till the latter end of May, as he is still very lame from wounds received on Charlestown Heights.
Extract. Vol. 1. No, 5.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 29 January.

Brunswick Treaty with Great Britain.

1776, January 9. Brunswick. — To supply troops.
Copy, in French, Vol. 54. No, 24. 13 pages.
"Notte sur l'etat de solde de deux mois enoncee dans Particle xiii. du traite"
Copy, in French, Vol. 2. No, 39. I page.
Page 26
"Notte concernant l'argent de levee" and " Etat du nombre de Tetes pour lesquelles l'argent doit etre paie."
Copy, in French. Vol. 2. No. 35. 1 page.
Qy. Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 28 March.
Original treaty in the Public Record Office.

Hesse Cassel Treaty with Great Britain.

1776, January 15. — Cassel.
Copy, in French and translation. Vol. 24. Nos. 95 and 88.
Original in the Public Record Office.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, January 18. War Office. — Acknowledges letters. His Majesty approves of the extra staff. The transports with the officers for the additional companies and the recruiting service are not yet arrived. Officers and parties except such as belong to the additional companies will be ordered to return in the spring to North America. Leave to any officers will not be extended but upon the most urgent occasions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 2 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, January 19. War Office. — Before his letter of 2nd December was received the officers for the 2nd additional companies of the regiments in North America had been appointed according to the recommendation of Lt.-Gen. Gage. Enumerates particulars in which the promotions made at home or vacancies remaining vary from those specified in his, Howe's, list of 2nd December.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 3. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, January 29. War Office. — Promotions confirmed. Brigadier Robertson of the 16th appointed colonel of the 2nd battalion of Royal Americans in the room of Maj.-Gen. Haldimand promoted, and Brigadier Jones of the 52nd made colonel of 62nd vice Strode, deceased. Sends the enclosed extract. The 3rd, 9th, 11th, 20th, 24th, 34th, 53rd and 62nd are to embark early in March according to the establishment of 677 each (including officers) with tents and camp necessaries complete. It is intended that each of the battalions shall have two additional companies to remain at home for the purpose of recruiting. 1 cornet, 1 Serjeant, 2 corporals, and 30 privates, dismounted, are to be added to each troop of the 16th and 17th Light Dragoons and to be sent out. The recruits for the regiments under his command are to be forwarded in detachments as occasion may require, on board the victualling transports, &c. A detachment of about 30 men for the 6th regiment goes on board the "Renown."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 4. 2 pages.
Enclosing Maj.-Gen. Campbell to [Lord Barrington] 6 January.

Page 27

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, January 30. War Office. — The request to sell an ensigncy to reimburse to the 45th regiment the deficiencies of their late paymaster, Capt. Mitchell, is not granted.
Duplicate sinned letter. Vol. 1. No. 6. 1 page.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, January 30. Cambridge. — Proposing exchange of Governor Skene for James Lovell and family. Accompanied by Howe's answer of the 2nd February. Both printed in Sparks's Washington III. 523, and in Force's Archives.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 7. Vol. 3. No. 2. 2 pages each.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, February 1. Whitehall. — Concerning the relief of Quebec. Promotion of generals. Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Guards to serve in America. Officers of an American privateer, taken prisoners by one of Graves' squadron, sent back to America to enable him to obtain exchange of some British, &c.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 2. No.31. 7 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, to. 33; copy 131, fo. 113; copy in Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776. February 2. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 32. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 43; 431, fo. 117; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
1770, February 1. St. James's. — Warrant to General Hone to post officers to vacancies,
Copy. Vol
.2. No. 33. 3 pages.

Hanau Treaty with Great Britain.

1776, February 5. Hanau. — Treaty, with "Etat du Regiment d'lnfanterie."
Copy. Vol. 24. Nos. 92 and 93. 5 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office.

Gen. William Howe to Phillips Callbeck.

1770, February 6. Boston. — Approves his return to St. John's Island and proposal to raise 100 men. That island is outside his command.
3 copies. Vol. 29. Nos. 231, 288, 300. 3 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Prince Edward Is. 3, 193; America and W. Indies 131, fo. 199.

Page 28

Gen. William Howe. Proclamation

1776, February 6. Boston. — Offering pardon to deserters in Nova Scotia on surrendering themselves to serve in the Loyal Nova Scotia Volunteers.
Copy. Vol. 2. No, 146. 1 page.

Thomas Nixon, merchant, to the Lords of the Treasury.

1776, February 6. Lombard Street. — Memorial, representing that he has storehouses at St. Augustine, and offering to supply, through his correspondent in East Florida, black cattle for the troops, to be delivered to his Majesty's ships at St. Mary's River.
Copy. Vol. 4. No, 30. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 1 May 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, February 7. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No, 34. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 57; copy 431, fo. 117; and in Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, February 12. War Office. — The appointment of Barrack Master General not to be held by any colonel of a regiment. To recommend a proper officer to succeed Brigadier Robertson in that department if wanted.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 8. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Howe.

1776, February 14. War Office. — Recommending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 9. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Petition of Lieut. George Bruere, 18th Regiment, to the King. Representing his losses in preferment by succession, through the reduction of the regiment in 1763. Asks a company in the 14th
. Copy. Vol. 1. No, 10. 2 pages.

Sir Robert Hamilton to Lord Barrington.

1776, February 22. — Asks three months' leave for Lt. Hamilton to recover his health.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 15. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 14 March.

Page 29

Intelligence.

1776, February 27. — Extract of a letter from New York.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 57. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 3 May.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 241.

Messrs. Cox and Mair to Lord Barrington.

1776, February 29. Craig's Court. — Requesting commissions for two purchases in the 43rd regiment.
Copy. Vol. 1. No, 38. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 10 June.

Thomas Nixon to John Robinson.

1776, March 1, Friday evening. No. 60, Lombard Street. — "Since I had the honor of conversing with you this morning on the subject of supplying provision to the cattle for the voyage from St. Mary's to the place of delivery, being informed by my Lord Howe yesterday that he did not expect it could be sent by him from the north ports of America in the victualling ships to be sent to bring the cattle, I have been considering of the proper means whereby I should be able to perform this necessary service. I perceive one most essential circumstance which requires immediate dispatch and occasions me to interrupt you by this letter, viz:— that is to consider of grinding the corn. That you may excuse this liberty I acquaint you in the first place that Florida is so levell a country that there is no fall of water in any place that I have heard of on the most strict enquiry, which is the reason that no water mills have been erected. In the next place corn used in Florida is either ground by negroes on the plantations or by those kept for domestic uses, therefore none is to be bought ground in a markett. The only expedient then left for this service is to erect a windmill or two horse mills on my arrival, as it is not possible to conceive that mill wrights and millstones, the iron work and many other necessarys are to be had in so infant a colony. 'Tis necessary (as I mean to be on that absolute certainty the utility of the service requires) to take out with me from London the most essential parts of a wind mill or horse mill with an ingenious workman capable of placing them together, so that the frames being properly markt and numbered they may in a very few days be erected by this means. I think the King's service will not be subject to any risk of provision for the voyage, for the maize is so extremely hard the cattle will not eat it unless 'tis broken. If this should strike you in same light it will be absolutely necessary to give immediate orders to the different workmen employed in this kind of business to be expedited with all possible dispatch. If the variety of affairs of great importance under your management should prevent your taking this petite affair under your direction I will then undertake it myself, leaving the terms
Page 30
of buying the corn on commission or contracting to future consideration, but as the construction of the mill will require two or three weeks at least scarce a day should be lost on so material an object, especially in looking at it as to its cost 'tis a trifle, and as to its consequence it is extremely great. I do most sincerely intend to render the King all the service that is in my power, and my zeal will apologize to you sir for being so importunate. I conceive it would be most essentially conducive to the recovery of the sick both in the fleet and army to have fresh provisions as soon after their arrival as possible, therefore as my duty requires me to be in Florida a month before the troops are in America, in course my departure from England should be forwarded by all means. If you sir are desirous to see me on this subject I will wait on you at any hour or place you may appoint."
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 31. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 1 May 1776.

Lord George Germain to Maj.-Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1770, March 3. Whitehall. — To join Gen. Howe if he judges that nothing of real service and advantage is to be gained by the Southern expedition.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 40. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 28 March.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W.Indies 131, fo. 717; copy 431, fo. 118; and in the Sackville MSS.

Joseph Chew, Secretary of Indian affairs, to the Treasury.

1776, March 7. London. — Memorial, touching his loss of salary by the unhappy state of affairs. Attended Col. Guy Johnson.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 17. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 11 April.

Thomas Nixon to Lords of the Treasury.

1776, March 7. 60, Lombard Street, London. — Question of supplying black cattle from East Florida.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 32. 3 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 1 May.

Lords of the Admiralty to Sir Peter Parker.

1776, March 8. — Order, to act with Clinton in joining Howe, &c. Accompanied by a list of ships and vessels separated from Sir Peter Parker's squadron and put into various ports in the South of England.
Copy. Vol. 2. Nos. 41 and 42. 6 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 28 March.
Copy in the Public Record Office, Home Office, Admiralty.

Page 31

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 9. War Office. — The King has approved the appointments made in the hospital at Boston. His Majesty recommends to his consideration the state of the 14th Regiment of Foot. The officers appointed to commissions in the corps raising by Colonels Maclean, Goreham, and Legge must choose between the two commissions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 11. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 11. War Office. — Relative to promotions or commissions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 12. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 13. War Office. — A detachment from the three regiments of Foot Guards is to embark this month from Portsmouth. Col. Mathew to command.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 13. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Particulars of the above detachment. Vol. 1. 13o. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 14. War Office. — Recruits. Leave of absence to Lt. Hamilton. Lt. Williams allowed to dispose of his commission. Capt. Crawford allowed to withdraw his resignation.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 14. 2 pages.
Enclosing Sir R. Hamilton to Lord Barrington, 22 Feb. 1776.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, March 15. War Office. — Pardon to Thomas Owen, soldier in 59th Regiment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 16. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, March 15. Whitehall. — To give assistance to a Dr. Moffat.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 37. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 133; 143, fo. 120.

Brunswick Troops.

1776, March 17. — Etat General des Troupes de Bronswic qui composent la 1e Division, apres leur Embarquement a Stade le 17e de Mars.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 36. 2 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, S.P. For. German States, 183; copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21813, fo. 17.

Page 32

Extract of a Letter from the Pay Office.

1776, March 21. — Containing instructions to a paymaster respecting the pay of the staff officers and officers of the hospital.
Extract. Vol. 31. No. 54. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 23. War Office. — He is appointed to the rank of general in America.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 17. 1 page.

Messrs. Cox and Mair to Lord Barrington.

1776, March 26. Craig's Court. — Desiring commissions for two purchases in the 17th Dragoons.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 24. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 3 May.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, March 28. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 38. 13 pages.
Enclosing Brunswick Treaty, "Notte sur l'Etat de Solde," and "Notte concernant l'argent de Levee," &c. 9 January.
List of Commissions. 1 January.
Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton. 3 March.
Lords of the Admiralty to Sir P. Parker. 8 March.
Also in the Puhlic Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 137; 431, fo. 124; 606, fo. 20; and in the Sackville MSS.

Col. Guy Johnson to the Lords of the Treasury.

1776, March 28. London. — Memorial. Accompanied by statement of his account with the Crown as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, amounting to £2,961 14s. 8d.
Copy. Vol. 4. Nos. 40 and 41. 2 pages and 1 page respectively.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 18 May.

John Robinson to John Pownall.

1776, March 28. Treasury Chambers. — Contracts have been entered into for supplying the army under Gen. Howe and the army in Canada with provisions, also for victualling 1,500 men at Halifax and the same at St. Augustine. Bat horses have been provided and are waiting to be embarked ; 52,000 blankets and 4,200 watchcoats are provided. Endeavours have been made to provide six small ships of little draught of water to be fitted out as armed vessels.
Copy. Vol.2. No. 56. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 3 May

Page 33

Lt.-Gen. Gage to John Robinson.

1776, April 1. Park Place. — That Mr. Pierce Sinnott's salary as Lieut.-Governor of Niagara was paid out of the military contingencies of N. America. Question as to how it is now to be paid.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 92. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 6 August 1777.

Lord George Germain to [Lords of the Admiralty].

1776, April 1. Whitehall. — Directions for the commander of the ships convoying the Hessians and the Guards.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 45. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 27 April 1776.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, Adm. Sec. I.L. 4131; draft in Home Office, Admiralty.

Lord George Germain to Lt.-Col. Sir William Erskine,
Commanding Officer of the 42nd and 71st Regiments.

1776, April 1. Whitehall. — To proceed to Boston, &c.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 46. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 27 April 1776.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131 fo. 755; 431, fo. 123; and in the Sackville MSS.

Instructions to Daniel Chamier.

1776, April 1. St. James's. — As Commissary.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 25. 2 pages.
Qy. Enclosed by John Robinson to General Howe, 1 May 1776.

Treasury Contract with Nesbitt, Drummond and Franks.

1776, April 2. — For provisions to supply twelve thousand men from 1st January 1776 to 1st May 1777, for each person for seven days successively 7 lbs. bread or flour, 7 lbs. beef or 4 of pork, 6 oz. butter, 3 pts. pease, 1 lb. flour or ½ lb. rice or oatmeal. To be delivered to storehouses at Corke. Note.— Like contracts with other firms for smaller numbers amounting to 13,200.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 24. 5 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to General Howe, 1 May 1776.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, April 3. War Office. — Half pay for regimental surgeons.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 18. 2 pages.

Page 34

John Robinson to General Howe.

1776, April 11. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — To grant out of the extraordinaries of the army a warrant for the pay of Mr. Chew's salary.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 18. 1 page.
Enclosing memorial of Joseph Chew, 7 March 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, April 12. Whitehall. — Recommends Mr. Punderson.
Copy. Vol. 2. No; 47. 1 page.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 153; 431, fo. 132.

John Robinson to General Howe.

1776, April 12. Treasury Chambers. — On his Excellency's representation that it had become necessary to send out the transports armed which brought provisions, the Treasury find it necessary to alter the mode of supply as they could not engage gentlemen to arm ships at great expense, risk the cargoes, or ensure them at high premiums. They are obliged to contract for the delivery of the provisions to a Commissary at Cork, who will ship them from time to time. Necessity of appointing a Commissary with deputies and assistants to receive them in America. These gentlemen go to Boston as soon as possible; Mr. Chamier will lay his commission before the General. Specifies some of the supplies ready. These ships will be kept for this service going to and from Cork. The "Greyhound" and "Milford" carry out £120,000 for pay and subsistence. Endorsed:— Duplicate .   .   .   .   Recd, at Staten Isld. July 27. Original recd. 1st June, by the Canceaux at Halifax. Ansdd. 6th June.
Duplicate original. Vol. 4. No. 19. 5 pages.

Stores.

1776, April 12 and 15. — Account of provisions shipped at Cork on three ships on these dates.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 38. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 2 May.

Hessians.

1776, April 12 and 19. — "Ordre de Bataille, Lt.-Gen. de Heister." Also, "Clothing of the 1st division of Hessian troops"; "Etat General de Trouppes Hessoises en Solde de sa Majeste Britannique sous les ordres de S.E.M. le Lt.-Gen. de Heister, savoir, les trois brigades de la premiere division comme elles passeront en revue aux cantonnements de Lehe le 12 Avril"; and, "Etat des trois Compagnies d'artillerie attachee au Corps de 12,000 Hommes Hessois a Cassel le 19 Avril."
Vol. 2. Nos. 43 and 44. 6 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 27 April.

Page 35

Sir Grey Cooper to [Gen. Howe].

1776, April 19. Treasury Chambers. — In consequence of a proposal from Mr. Anthony Merry, merchant of London, the Lords of the Treasury have employed him to ship on board certain vessels, live cattle, sheep and hogs, at the port of Milford in Wales, to be carried to North America for the use of the forces. Mr. Edward Hawker, a lieutenant in H.M. service, who is well acquainted with the manner of transporting live cattle from the coast of Barbary to the West Indies, commands the "Resolution," which is fitted out on account of Government; the other provisions with which the ships are freighted are on Mr. Merry's own account. Lieutenant Hawker has received directions to obey Howe's orders in the future destination and employment of these ships; they may be of use in bringing live stock from Nova Scotia, Florida, &c.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 20. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, April 20. War Office. — Directions for drafting and sending home the 65th and 14th regiments.
Duplicate signed letter. Yol.l. No. 19. 2 pages.

Royal Warrant.

1776, April 23. St. James's. — Authorizing Colonels Edward Mathew, Francis Smith, Jas. Agnew, Alexander Leslie, Samuel Cleveland and Sir William Erskine to rank as brigadiers in America.
Copy. Yol.l. No. 22. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 27 April 1776.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, April 24. War Office. — That his Majesty has conferred the rank of colonel in North America only on Sir William Erskine, Lieut.-Col. of the 1st Battalion of the 71st Regiment, and on the arrival of that regiment it is the King's pleasure that he act as a brigadier and command the Brigade of Highlanders now under orders for North America.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 20. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Lt.-Gen. [Philip von] Heister.

1776, April 25. Whitehall. — Directions as to the departure and destination of the 1st division of Hessians.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 52. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 27 April.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 827; copy 431, fo. 134; copy in the Sackville MSS,

Page 36

Lord North to General Howe.

1776, April 26. Downing Street. — Recommending Mr. Christie, a gentleman driven from Maryland and appointed by his Majesty Assistant Commissary to the army at Boston.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 48. 1 page.

Lord North to [General Howe].

1776, April 26. Downing Street. — Kecommending Major Morrison of the E. India Co.'s service now appointed Deputy Commissary.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 49. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, April 27. War Office. — Sends the enclosed warrant to prevent difficulties which may arise with regard to the rank of the British brigadiers serving without commission and that of the foreign officers. It is left to him to produce this sign manual as occasion may require.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 21. 1 page.
Enclosing warrant authorising Cols. Mathew, &c. 23 April.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, April 27. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 53. 3 pages.
Enclosing Statements of Hessian troops, 12 April 1776.
Lord Germain to Lt.-Gen. von Heister, 25 April 1776.
Lord Germain to Lords of the Admiralty, 1 April 1776.
Lord Germain to Sir Wm. Erskine, 1 April 1776.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 161; copy 431, fo. 138; copy in Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord George Germain to General Howe.

1776, April 27. Pall Mall. — Recommending Mr. Christie as a man of merit and a great sufferer in his fortune by the unhappy disputes.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 50. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, April 30. Whitehall. — Introduces Mr. Burgess, partner of Champion and Dickenson.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 54. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131 fo. 169.

Page 37

John Robinson to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 1. Treasury Chambers. — A long letter on the measures of the Treasury to supply provisions for the army. The country drained of ships for transport purposes. Lack of constant and regular returns of quantities received and persons victualled. As to the question of bad flour, Messrs. Nesbitt were called before the Board and alleged in their defence that there was no other than American flour in the market here, which they were under a necessity of sending, that it was good when shipped but from its being kept so long it might fail, though their agent says he could sell all the flour rejected by the Army Commissaries at an advanced price, but since other flour could be had they have sent the best kiln-dried English flour. They have been ordered to send 4,000 barrels to supply deficiencies. Hay too bulky a commodity to be sent. It should be obtained from Nova Scotia, Ehode Island and Long Island. The proposal of Mr. Nixon to supply cattle from E. Florida is left to his Excellency's judgment. Contracts made for rum. Concerning the military chest, the traffic in bills and Mr. Apthorpe's actions. Directions on the making out of the accounts distinguishing between Extraordinaries and subsistence. Frequent states to be remitted home. "Lord Cornwallis carried out with him £40,000 for Extraordinary services and £20,000 for the pay and subsistence of the troops, it is hoped therefore that he will have no occasion to call on you for any supply of cash, and 150,000 pounds has been sent to Quebec by General Burgoyne for extraordinaries, besides the subsistence of the Army there till the 24th of October next, and besides £40,000 with which they were supplied at Quebec before the close of winter, and the £22,000 sent thither also lately by the 'Triton' man-of-war." It is hoped coal may be supplied from Cape Breton. The ill-success in attempts to send out live stock is unfortunate, but does not proceed from want of attention.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 21. 19 pages.
Enclosures:—
Description of the Hydrometers made by order of the Treasury and instructions how to use them.
Vol.
4. No. 22. 3 pages.
Contract between Sir James Cockbwn and the Treasury to supply 100,000 gallons of rum from various islands in the West Indies at 3s. 6d. per gallon. (Like contracts with other firms for varying quantities and at different prices.)
Vol. 4. No. 23. 4 pages.
Account ofprovisions in the stores at Boston on 25 March 1775, and of store ships arrived since that time.
Vol.
4. No. 26. 2 pages.
Account of provisions shipped from England and Ireland (in 1775) not yet arrived by any account received.
Vol
. 4. No. 27. 2 pages.
Page 38
Account of provisions shipped at Cork about March 26 and April 2, 1776, showing names of ships and amount to each.
Vol.
4. No. 28. 2 pages.
List of ships appropriated to the transporting of provisions ordered to be at Cork on or before 20 May.
Vol. 4. No. 29. 1 page.
Account of Bills drawn from Boston on Messrs, Harley and Drummond from 16 May 1775 to 30 Jan. 1776.
Vol. 4. No. 33. 10 pages.
Account of requisitions and issues showing the requisitions of the Commander-in-Chief since January 1775, and against them the monies issued to the contractors and how applied.
Vol.
4. No. 34. 1 double page.
Dr. and Cr. account of the Deputy Paymaster at Boston of issues and payments in 1775.
Vol. 4. No. 35. 2 pp.
Memorial of Thos. Nixon, see 6 February.
Thomas Nixon to John Robinson, see 1 March.
Memorial of Thos. Nixon, see 7 March.
Instructions to Daniel Chamier, see 1 April.
Provision contract with Nesbitt, Drummond, dr., see 2 April.

John Robinson to General Howe.

1776, May 2. Treasury Chambers. — Since yesterday advice has been received of his quitting Boston. Sends therefore triplicates of recent dispatches. An express is sent to Cork with orders for the victualling transports to proceed to Halifax and thence follow his army wherever it shall be. "Our concern and distress is almost inexpressible on finding from your returns to Lord George Germain that no ships had reached you from England, and that from your accounts received from the West India Islands, there was reason to believe all the victualling transports had been blown off the coast of America and obliged to take shelter there, an event that has proved most unfortunate, but has been out of the reach of human power to prevent. I am directed by the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury to inform you that by the express to Cork orders are repeated to send off the provision ships to you with the utmost expedition."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 36. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
List of sliips appropriated to the supply of provisions for the Army under Gen. Howe.
Vol 4. No. 37. 1 page.
Account of provisions shipped at Cork, 12 and 15 April; see at that date.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 3. War Office. — Leave of absence to Majors Blakeney and Saxton, Capts. Parsons and Gillan and Ensign
Page 39
Shawe. Sends list of promotions; that made in the 17th Light Dragoons was done in consequence of a letter from Gen. Preston's agent, a copy of which is enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 23. 1 page.
Enclosing Messrs. Cox and Mair to Lord Barrington, 26 March 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 3. Whitehall. — Supplies, troops, operations generally.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 55. 7 pages.
Enclosing John Robinson to John Pownall 28 March. Intelligence from New York 27 February.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 231; copy 431, fo. 139; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 4. — Note. Not to give any commissions or vacancies in the detachment of Guards.
Copy. Vol. 1. No, 25. 1 page.

[Lt.-Gen.] S. Hodgson to Lord Barrington.

1776, May 6. Old Burlington Street. — That Forbes Champagne was promoted as lieutenant on 26th January. "This promotion not being known to Gen. Howe he has allowed Mr. Champagne to buy a lieutenancy in the 17th, who has drawn a bill on Lord Paget for the money." Desires that when the next list of promotions is sent to Gen. Howe the affair may be explained and another purchaser found for the lieutenancy in the 17th that Lord Paget may be reimbursed.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 35. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 3 June.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 12. Whitehall. — Not to appoint to any vacancies in the Guards, as they are only a detachment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 58. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 245; copy 431, fo. 144; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe
.
1776, May 13. Whitehall. — Recommends Mr. Gilbert Tice.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 51. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 431, fo. 144.

Page 40

Gen. Howe to the Treasurer and Gentlemen of the Committee
for the Relief of the Soldiers, &c, &c.

1776, May 18. Halifax. — Acknowledges letter announcing that 2,178 dollars had been shipped on the "Triton" and 2,000 ounces more of silver on the "Greyhound" for the relief of the soldiers, their widows and orphans. His best endeavours shall be exerted to distribute these and all other donations from the society.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 138. 1 page.

The Same to the Same.

1776, May 18. Halifax. — "I have been favoured with your letter of the 16th February and its several enclosures, wherein I observe with pleasure the benevolence of the nation to .the soldiers employed on this service. The strictest attention will be paid to their recommendations in distributing the bounty, and the money, small mounting, &c., will be bestowed in the best manner." To this end he has appointed a board of general officers to receive and enquire into applications and render an account to the Society. Has ordered a list of the subscribers to be reprinted and distributed that the troops may know who their generous friends are.
Copy. Vol, 2. No. 139. 1 page.

John Robinson to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 18. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Their Lordships have ordered £2,000 to be paid Col. Johnson as part of the balance of his account. His Excellency is desired to examine the said account and pay such further sum as may appear due.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 39. 1 page.
Enclosing Memorial and account of Col. Johnson, 28 March.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 20. War Office. — Sends warrant for holding a court-martial on the complaints brought by Lt.-Gen. Keppel against Capt. Stanton of the 14th.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 26. 2 pages.

Gov. Sir Guy Carleton to Lord Robert Bertie.

1776, May 21. Quebec. — Is sending home the officers of his Lordship's regiment, the men being drafted into the 47th, as it is weak in numbers. Recommends Lts. Selwyn and Layard.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 53. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Amherst to Sir H. Clinton, 17 Feb. 1779.

Page 41

Gen. Howe to Lt.-Col. Dickson.

1776, May 23. Halifax — Received letters of 30th September and 20 November with letter from Mr. Hutchins and several enclosures. Cannot see how to relieve his want of money. Subsistence may be procured by drafts on the agent in England, negotiated in Jamaica, and contingent expenses will be defrayed by acknowledging his bills whenever they appear. As no attempt on Pensacola is apprehended no expense is to be incurred on works, excepting repairs. Three companies of the 16th to remain at St. Augustine under Maj. Gardiner, who is to succeed if he (Dickson) is posted lieutenant-colonel in the place of Maj.- General Robertson. If Captain Lord at Fort Chartres is in want of supplies to send them. Approves his conduct respecting the command of the staff in Pensacola.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 110. 2 pages.

Gen. William Howe to John Stuart.

1776, May 23. Halifax. — Directions as to the management of the Southern Indians.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 121, 4 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Oihce, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 167.

General William Howe.

1773 June 17 - 1776 May 26 — Orderly Book of General Howe. Camps at Charlestown, Boston, and Halifax.
Vol. 58. (Printed and published by B. F. Stevens, 1890.)

Prisoners.

1776, May 27. Vaudreuil and St. Ann. — Articles of Agreement between George Forster, Capt. Commanding the King's troops, and Brig.-Gen. Benedict Arnold.
Three copies. Vols. 1, No. 30-31; 3, No. 3; 11, No. 87. 3 pages each.
Also in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec 12. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, May 28. War Office. — A body of German recruits being directed to embark for North America, to be incorporated into the regiments, he sends copy of distribution of the same. Sergeants and corporals are to continue to do duty and receive pay and clothing as sergeants and corporals according to the rank in which they have been sent over. And the difference of pay and clothing between non-commissioned officers and privates is to be made a charge in the contingent bill of the regiment to which they belong.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 33. 3 folios.
Page 42
Enclosure:—
Distribution of the German recruits for the forces with General Howe. Shewing forty or forty-one recruits each for the 4th, 5th, 10th, 15th, 17th, 22nd, 23rd, 28th, 35th and 38th Regiments.
Vol. 1. No. 33o. 1 page.

Gen. Howe to George Daubenny, Esq.

1776, May 29. Halifax. — Acknowledges letter of 17th February and the "arrival of the 'Renown' freighted by the Marine Society in London for purposes that must reflect no less upon the loyalty than the benevolence of the subscribers." The distribution of the donations will, he hopes, be made by the Board of Officers appointed for the purpose in such a manner as to answer every generous design of the friends at Bristol.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 143. 2 pages.

Waldeck Troops.

1776, May 29. — Etat du 3me Regiment de Waldeck a Vegesack le 29 de Mai.
1776, May 31. — Etat du 3me Regiment de Waldeck apres son embarquement a Bremerlehe le 31.
Copies. Vol. 2. Nos. 71 and 70. 1 page each.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 21 June.
Originals in the Public Record Office, S.P. For. German States, 184.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, May 30. War Office. — Fifty-nine British drafts are to embark with the German recruits, and to be turned over to the regiments mentioned in his letter of the 28th.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 32. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, May. War Office. — Sends copy of letter to Gen. Gage in 1775. As no particular return of the names of the officers to whom tents have been delivered has yet been received, asks that such a return may be forwarded that the proper charges may be made against the respective officers.
Duplicate letter signed. Vol. 1. No. 27. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Lt.-Gen. Gage, 1 March 1775.
Return of tents and marquees, 6 October 1775.

German Recruits.

1776, June 1. Portsmouth. — Embarkation return of 402 German recruits for the regiments of foot in America.
Vol. 2. No. 74. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 21 June.

Page 43

Gen. Howe to the Treasurer and Gentlemen of the
Committee for the Relief of the Soldiers, &c, &c.

1776, June 2. Halifax. — Acknowledging the attention and services of Lt. Geo. Robertson of the navy, in discharge of the trust they had committed to him. on board the "Renown." "He has delivered her up to my perfect satisfaction."
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 141. 1 p.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, June 3. War Office. — With regard to vacancies, promotions and leaves of absence.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 34. 2 pp.
Enclosures:—
Vacancies in the Regiments serving under General Howe by the promotion of officers in Maj. Gen. Eraser's corps.
Vol. 1. No. 34o.
Gen. Hodgson to Lord Barrington, see 6 May.

Hessians.

1776, June 3 to 6. — Etat du Regiment de Huyne apres son Embarquement a Ritzebuttel le 3 Juin.
Etat du Regiment de Stein, ditto, same date.
Etat du Compagnie des Chasseurs du Capitaine Ewald, ditto, 4 June.
Etat du Bataillon de Grenadiers Kohler, ditto, 4 June.
Etat du Regiment de Weissenbach a Ritzebuttell le 5 Juin.
Etat du Regiment de Wissenbach apres son Embarquement a Rutzen le 5 Juin.
Etat du Regiment d'Infanterie de Biinau a Ritzebuttell ce 6 Juin.
Etat du Regiment de Biinau apres son Embarquement a Rutzenbuttel le 6 Juin.
Etat du Regiment de Wutginau a Ritzebuttell le 6 Juin.
Etat du Regiment de Wutginau apres son Embarquement a Ritzebuttell ce 6 Juin.
Etat General de la 2e Division des Trouppes Hessoises aux ordres de Lt.-Gen. de Knyphausen a Ritzenbuttell le 6 Juin.
Vol 2. Nos. 61, 62, 64 to 69, 72, 73 and 75. 20 pages in all.
All enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 21 June.
The originals in the Public Record Office, S.P. For. German States, 184 and 185.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 8. War Office. — Explanations relative to the confusion in past promotions. Did not know till January last that the King had empowered his Excellency to grant commissions below the rank of a field officer.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 36. 3 pages.

Page 44

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 10. War Office. — Pay for non-commissioned officers and private men of the dismounted dragoons of the 16th and 17th regiments of (Light) Dragoons to he the same as mounted men. The Serjeant is made out at 1s. 7¾d. per diem, the corporal or trumpeter at 1s. 1¾ 10/100 parts of a penny and the private dragoon at 9 ¾ 12/100 parts of a penny. Two trumpeters to be added to each from the 25th April inclusive.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 40. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 10. War Office. — Approval of appointment of Lt.-Col. Paterson of the 63rd to be adjutant-general in America, of Capt. Lyons late 17th to be town major of Halifax vice Marsh resigned, and of Lt. Spaight of the 65th to be assistant deputy-quarter- master general. Sends paper showing variations from recent list of promotions. Capt. Montgomery to remain in the 9th foot. Officers appointed to new corps and at the same time holding their rank in the established regiments, must make their immediate option.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No, 37. 3 pages.
Enclosures:—
Observations on the list of promotions transmitted in Gen. Howe's letter of 8 May.
Vol. 1. No. 39. 3 pages.
Cox and Mair to Lord Barrington, see 29 February.

Colonel Augustine Prevost to Lord Barrington.

1776, June 10. St. Augustine. — Memorial. Praying an addition to the salary of Charles Shireff, Fort Adjutant and Barrack Master, his present pay of 5s. a day being wholly inadequate.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 85. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 12 Nov. 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. William Howe.

1776, June 11. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 59. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 369; copy 431, fo. 145; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 12. War Office. — The regimental surgeons to be furnished with necessary medicines from the general hospital.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 41. 1 page.

Page 45

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 12. War Office. — The troop in the 17th Kegiment of Light Dragoons will be open for Cornet Stanley's appointment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 42. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 12. War Office. — His Majesty does not think proper to continue Capt. Holmes in the service. It is left to the General to determine whether he shall have leave to dispose of his commission, or be placed on half-pay receiving no difference.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 43. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Lord George Germain [should be Gen. Howe].

1776, June 12. Whitehall. — Instances when he may make and fill up vacancies by sale. Appointments to the Foot Guards.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 60. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131 fo. 381; copy 431, fo. 148; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, June 14. War Office. — William Porter, deputy commissary of musters, to receive 5s. a day in addition to his pay upon the establishment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 44. 1 page.

George III. to Francis Rush Clark.

1776, June 18. Whitehall. — Commission as inspector and superintendent of the provision train of horses and waggons attending the army.
Copy. Vol. 25. No. 37. 2 pages.
Enclosed by F. R. Clark to Sir G. Carleton, 14 January 1783.

John Robinson to General Howe.

1776, June 20. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Informing him that Francis Rush Clark, gentleman, has been appointed inspector and superintendent of the provision train of horses and waggons, and is directed to repair to Portsmouth, take upon him the care of the horses now on board the transports, and proceed to America, there to receive such orders and directions as are necessary.
Copy. Vol. 4, No. 42. 1 page.

Page 46

Troops. Paymaster's Department.

1776, June 20. Pay Office. — Observations on the accounts of Mr. Apthorpe, deputy paymaster. Two pages, one shewing the amounts issued or sent to meet subsistence, the other extraordinaries. With a state of balances, the total amounting to £840,776 6s.
Vol, 25. Nos. 72, 73, and 74.
Enclosed by Secretary Robinson to Gen. Howe, 24 June.

Lord George Germain to General William Howe.

1776, June 21. Whitehall. — Satisfaction at supposed arrival of provision transports and of Highland troops. Hessians and other troops in readiness for New York. Sends returns. Transports to be sent home.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 76. 7 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 385; 431, fo. 149; Adm. Sec. I.L. 4132 ; Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.
Enclosures:—
Various returns of Hessians, Waldeckers, and German recruits, see 29 and 31 May, 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 June.
"Cloathinq of the 2nd Division of the Hessians."
Copy. Vol, 2. No. 63. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, German States, Vol. 106.

John Robinson to General Howe.

1776, June 24. Whitehall. — It gives their Lordships great concern that their endeavours to supply the army in the ample manner proposed should have been attended with so little success, and they are surprised that only one of the ships sailing between 28 August and 11 Nov. last, and which carried provisions with them for near 3 months for 12,000 men, should have arrived. It is some relief, however, to hear that several sent this spring are arrived. The whole set of ships appropriated for the first quarter are sailed and those for the second are now loading at Corke with provisions for 36,000. Convoys are sent with the victuallers; their destination is Halifax to receive there directions where to follow him. The country exhausted of ships which can be spared from trade, and the price of tonnage has been raised to 12s. 6d. per ton. The latest ships sent have English flour, not American. His wishes as to biscuit and beef have been attended to. Arrangement is made to send out before 1st September every species of provisions and complete rations for 36,000 men until 1 May 1777. Thereafter their Lordships hope he may obtain supplies from America itself. Further supplies of sour krout to be sent. £150,000 sent with this convoy notwithstanding the very large balances in the Deputy Paymaster's hands. "Their Lordships distrust not Mr. Apthorpe, but the balance of his account is very great and the circumstances attending such
Page 47
account, together with the mode of stating it, by carrying on his credit for payments down to 26 April, and not charging to his debit the large remittances sent him since the 8th of October last, altho' he has passed Paymasters Receipt therefor, as well as for the bills drawn by him is very alarming." With regard to Capt. Braithwaite's expectation of 2 per cent, for conveying money from Boston to Halifax, it is a question of favour, not of right, and 1 per cent, only is to be allowed him. 845 bat horses provided. Oats also sent. Contract entered into with Mr. Anthony Merry to again try to supply him with live stock. Endorsed:— — Recd. 11th March by the Thames. 3 enclosures.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 25. No, 71. 8 pp.
Enclosing Observations on Mr. Apthorpe's accounts, and, State of Balances, 20 June 1776.

Lord North to General Howe.

1776, June 25. Bushy Park. — "The Treasury Letter, which you will receive by the convoy of the Second Division of the Hessians, will have stated to you so fully every step that has been taken by the Board for supplying your army with cash and provisions, that it is almost unnecessary to give you the trouble of reading any more on the subject. I wish however to say a word upon the money which has been remitted to the Deputy Paymaster attending the forces under your command."
A statement follows showing the total received by Mr. Apthorpe as. £840,776 6s. "From this immense sum, . . no deduction is to be made except £50,000, the amount of the temporary warrants you mention in your last letters to the Treasury, and the expences of the army since that day in April to which Mr. Apthorpe made up his last account. Whatever sum these deductions may amount to the remainder in the deputy paymaster's hands will be very considerable indeed. I have not the least reason to mistrust Mr. Apthorpe or Mr. Barrow, who I suppose has by this time joined the army and acts for himself; but yet when I consider the extent and importance of the trust, I cannot help recommending to you to keep a watchful eye upon the state of your military chest and to direct the deputy paymaster's cash and accounts frequently to be examined and reported to you.
"It would, perhaps, have been safer to have furnished the military chest with smaller sums at a time, but, as we thought it would be most convenient to you to have a large supply at the opening of the campaign, and were not sure of having many other opportunities equally good of sending money to America, we have chosen to be very liberal in our first remittances. We hope that the cash already sent will be nearly sufficient for the rest of the campaign, as we shall not be able to furnish much more in the course of this summer. We will nevertheless endeavour to send you further, but smaller, supplies of money from time to time as opportunities shall present themselves.
"We expect before the end of August to have shipped from England and Ireland a sufficient quantity of provisions to feed your army (computed at 36,000 men) till May 1777. We will
Page 48
send out some more sour krout towards the end of the year, but I am afraid that there is some danger of your not being supplied with it in time, as the cabbages will not be ripe enough to make it till the month of September, and last year's experience has taught us the uncertainty of navigating the American seas after that time. Your army is, I doubt, now grown too large for us to supply it with porter, in the same proportion that we did last year. We hope, however, to assist you with it to a certain degree, so as to contribute materially to the comfort of the soldiers during their winter quarters, for which we trust that you will during the summer have been able to secure a sufficient quantity of coals from Cape Breton.
"As we were not certain that the failure of our live cattle last year did not proceed from the hurry in which they were shipped from the season of the year, and the bad weather they met with in their voyage, we listened to a proposal which was made to us of furnishing your army with some live cattle from Mogador, in ships fitted up for that purpose, and under the direction of a gentleman, used to convey live cattle from Africa to the West Indies, some difficulties having arisen, and put an end to the Mogador scheme, after five ships had been taken up, we thought the best thing we could do for the public was to send them to you with live cattle from Wales, having previously insured the cargoes. These five vessels, consisting of one armed ship (the 'Resolution,' Capt. Hawker), and four transports will have joined you before this letter, and have delivered into your hands a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, by which you will find that, after having delivered their cargoes, they are to remain under your command to employ as you shall judge most beneficial for the service of the army. Should you have any prospect of procuring live cattle from any quarter, you will find these ships well fitted to receive them, and we flatter ourselves that they will be of use to you at all events.
"I will now take my leave of you with my most hearty wishes for your success. War and peace, the honor and happiness of Great Britain and of British America are entrusted to Lord Howe and to you, and never were such great concerns placed in better hands. We know that the justice of the British arms will be maintained, and that, if tranquility is restored to America, it will be in such a manner as to do credit to all those who are concerned in it. The prosperous beginning of the campaign affords a fairer prospect of seeing an end put to the American disturbances than we could have flattered ourselves with a few months ago."
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 43. 4 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, July 2. War Office. — Capt. De Burgh, appointed to a company in 1st Regiment of Foot Guards, is to return to Great Britain. Ensign Colquhoun is ordered out to replace him.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 44. 1 page.

Page 49

Lord Barrington to Lieutenant Hastings, 12th Foot.

1776, July 3. War Office. — During his leave of absence he may go to America if he thinks proper.
Duplicate copy. Vol. 6. No. 163. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 24 June 1777.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, July 4. War Office. — Captain Gordon to be permitted to return to England, he having been appointed to the captain lieutenancy of the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 45. 1 page.

Congress Resolutions, &c.

1776, July 10. — Report of a committee upon the capitulation at the Cedars and a cartel between Capt. Foster and Benedict Arnold, with nine resolutions thereupon.
Copies. Vols. 1, No. 46; 3, No. 4. 8 pages each.
Enclosed by Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe, 15 July.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 471; Colonial Correspondence, Quebec 12. Printed in Force's American Archives.

John Robinson to Gen. Howe.

1776, July 12. Treasury Chambers. — To pay, from the extraordinaries of the army, Colonel Maclean for the clothing of his regiment of R[oyal] H[ighland] Emigrants.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 44. 1 page.

Commissioners Lord Howe and Gen. Howe.

1776, July 14. Staten Island. — Declaration.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 147. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 301, fo. 53; Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe.

1776, July 15. New York.
Autograph signed letter and copy. Vols. 1, No. 47 ; 3, No. 5. 49 words.
Enclosing Resolutions of Congress, 10 July.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 467. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1776, July 16. Head Quarters, Staten Island. — Answer.
Copies. Vols. 1, No. 48; 3, No. 6. 1 page each.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 479.

Page 50

Interview with General Washington.

1776, July 20. Staten Island. — Paper, not signed nor addressed, but apparently Col. Paterson's account of his interview with Washington.
"On being presented to G. W. I informed him that I had the honor to wait upon him from G. H. to acknowledge the receipt of his letter inclosing a narrative of transactions in Canada, with resolves of the Congress in consequence, that G. H. was surprised to find that some misapprehension in want of form had been the cause of G. W's not receiving his letter upon this subject of the 11th inst., and that I had that letter to present to him.
"G. W. with many expressions of great politeness and respect to G. H. said he could not possibly or consistently with his former declarations receive in the situation he held any letter addressed to him in a private character. This brought on a conversation too trifling to repeat, as it turned merely upon opinion with regard to form. At the close of it I expressed my apprehensions that all intercourse must consequently be cut off between us, but that my first and principal duty was to communicate to him the contents of that letter, which I immediately did. He was desirous to have it in writing, but that I begged leave to decline, as he had thought proper to refuse the original. That G. W. expressed some concern at the idea of all communication being at an end, as he was fully convinced how much we had already suffered for want of that free intercourse subsisting among all civilized nations though at war, and took this opportunity of complaining of our treatment of their prisoners taken at Charles Town heights. This charge, as it was totally unexpected, so it was easy to confute, as I could boldly affirm, from my own knowledge upon the spot, that every degree of humanity and tenderness was exerted upon that occasion to the unfortunate people who fell into our hands. As I was about to take my leave I told the General I could not resist the temptation before me of exceeding the limits of my commission by taking the liberty of pointing out the King's most gracious disposition towards the Americans so strongly manifested in the powers he had granted and the choice he had made of persons unconnected with ministerial arrangements, to whom his Majesty had thought proper to delegate the full and free execution of those great powers. After some pause G. W. answered this by expressing with the greatest politeness his sentiments of the high characters employed upon this very important occasion, and said something of the cause depending being a matter of right, to which when I replied that taking up the subject upon that ground was much too wide a field for the present occasion, the General heartily concurred with me, and with a great deal of marked attention and civility permitted me to take my leave."
Vol. 47. No. 227. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, July 23. War Office. — In answer to letter of 26th May with enclosures relative to bat, baggage and forage money paid
Page 51
to the 65th Regiment, the issue having been made to the officers before orders arrived for their coming home, the directions to refund may be dispensed with.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 49. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, July 24. War Office. — Letter received of 9th June relative to Major Dundas of 65th Regiment; his Majesty has approved his continuing in North America on account of the command given him.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 50. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, July 25. War Office. — Disallowance of several double appointments in the various regiments. Lt.-Col. Clerk approved as Barrack Master General. Is permitted to fix dates of commissions of field officers. Approval of his general orders on the publication of promotions. Purchase of lieutenancies.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 51. 4 pages.

John Robinson to Gen. William Howe.

1776, July 25. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 45. 1 page.
Draft in Lord Dartmouth's MSS. Printed in 11th Report of this Commission, Appendix Part V., page 411, dated 26th.

Gen. Washington to Gen. William Howe.

1776, July 30. New York.
Two copies. Vols. 1, No. 52; 3, No. 7. 1 page each.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 483. Printed in Sparks's Washington and in Force's American Archives.

Gen. William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1776, August 1. Staten Island. — Answer.
Two copies. Vols. 1, No. 53; 3, No. 8.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 487. Printed in Sparks's Washington and in Force's American Archives.

Capt. Thomas Pringle to John Falconar, commanding the "Polly."

1776, August 2. Brunswic Schooner at Chamblee. — Orders. To leave the ship and to bring her guns, &c, with nineteen men to assist in fitting out ships at St. Johns.
Copy. Vol, 2. No. 165. 2 pages.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21707, fo. 100.

Page 52

John Robinson to Gen. Howe.

1776, August 10. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Spruce beer to be distributed among the soldiers instead of porter.
Triplicate letter signed. Vol.
4, No. 46; copy No. 55. 1 page each.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 22 October.

John Robinson to Messrs. Nesbitt.

1776, August 10. — To account for the failure in their contract in supplying bad bread.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 54. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 22 October.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, August 15. War Office. — The return of Lt.-Col. Blunt to England to settle his private affairs, at such a time, surprises and displeases his Majesty. He is directed to return the moment he can settle these affairs.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 54. 1 page.

Captain Mackenzie to Mons. Lorentz.

1776, August 16, Staten Island. — General Howe has given orders to the treasurer to pay him £5,000 sterling for subsistence, in advance, of the Hessians, and also £1,000 in a bill of exchange on London. The Treasurer's office is on board the "Charming Nelly," anchored opposite the watering place.
Copy. In French. Vol.1. No. 147. 1 page.

John Robinson to Messrs. Nesbitt.

1776, August 16. — The Commissioners of the Treasury order them to send, at their own expense, a quantity of flour equal to the 256,376 pounds of bread which have proved bad.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 53. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 22 October.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe.

1776, August 17. War Office. — The King having been pleased to grant bounties to soldiers maimed in the war, and to the widows and orphans of such as may be killed in action, he sends the enclosed. These allowances are to have a retrospect so as to take in the affair at Lexington and Bunker's Hill. He is allowed a discretionary power in the exercise.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 55. 2 pages.
Enclosure :—
State of allowances and regulations. For the loss of an eye or a limb the commissioned officer shall receive a gratuity of one year's full pay, and the expenses relative to Itis cure. The commanding officer of the corps must deliver a certificate.
Page 53
The widow of a commissioned officer killed in action to receive one year's full pay and each child one third of what is alloiced to her. Persons dying of their wounds six months after are deemed slain in battle.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 56. 1 page.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21698, fo. 7.

John George Lorentz to Captain Mackenzie.

1776, August 17. Staten Island. — Has returned from the "Charming Nelly," where Mr. Barrow, the treasurer, has handed to him £4,546 6s. 7d. in Spanish money and a note for £453 13s. 5d., saying he had no more dollars or gold. It will be seen whether the troops will be contented — is doubtful, as the money is very heavy. For the bills of exchange he is referred to headquarters.
Copy. In French. Vol. 1. No. 146. 1 page.

Captain Mackenzie to Sir George Osborne.

1776, August 18. "Britannia" Transport. — In order to give General Howe every information respecting the subsistence of the foreign troops, begs to know the day to which they are paid up, also to have an abstract from each corps specifying their pay for one day. Sends form of a pay bill, of provision receipt and of warrant for payment, which will serve equally for the Guards as for the Hessians.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 145. 1 page.

John George Lorentz to Sir George Osborn.

1776, August 19. Staten Island. — Sends statement of the subsistence money required for the Hessian troops on Staten Island for each month, so closely reckoned that not a guinea remains for extraordinary expenses. The total sum from April to September will amount to £52,035 6s. sterling, of which he has only had from Mr. Barrow £4,546 6s. 7d. and a note for £453 13s. 5d. Begs more to satisfy the troops, one half in guineas and the other in silver, as they are unwilling to take the Spanish rix dolores. Annexed is an "Etat General" of subsistence for one month, enumerating the different companies and regiments, the total amounting to £8,228. Also an "Etat" for the hospital for the same period, amounting to £444 11s.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 158. 4 pages.

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Captain Mackenzie.

1776, August 19. "Royal George" Transport. — "Enclosed I send you as satisfactory answer to your letter of yesterday as it is possible for me to obtain. The pay bill for one day Monsr. Lorentz will absolutely not give. He says he is under an oath
Page 54
not to divulge what pay each particular rank receives. According to the English pay he gives a calculation for each regiment per month, which I likewise enclose with a separate one (as you desire) for the Etat Major. Mr. Barrow must sooner or later pin Mr. Lorentz down to the very exact sum each regiment would want even supposed complete. At present we are entirely in the dark to know how many men they have lost since Col. Faucett inspected them at Bremer Lehe. This calculation you will observe gives no stoppages for provisions.
"I have seen Mr. Apthorp concerning my own pay, who informed me that, as I have the Treasury's permission to receive it either here or at home, my mode will be to apply for the General's warrant quarterly for that purpose. If you would give me the proper form for such application you would much oblige."
Copy. Vol. 1. No, 144. 1 page.

Mr. Gordon, Commissary at Corke, to John Robinson.

1776, August 20. — "I received your favor of the 10th inst. this moment and am shocked to death almost at the thoughts of the bread in the Howe, Minerva, Lonsdale, and Lord Lewisham being bad, unfit for use, mouldy and shipped in bags short of weight, and I am obliged to you, Sir, for the very early information, but if my life was at stake and could be saved with more care I could not take it in everything I have to do relative to the provisions. I have kept a part of every parcel of bread shipped from hence, and it is perfectly good yet, but the Minerva's cargo was brought from England and remained in her and was not landed here, and when I get from you the particular accounts of General Howe's complaint I will answer your letter as full as possible. Be assured never less than three people besides myself examine every parcel of bread, &c, and after all I examine each species of provision myself. It leaves me then in good order, and except it be made of bad materials what will not keep, which I cannot discover by my taste or smell, or by soaking in water, it should keep twelve months. I even take several captains of ships at times to examine the bread, and Major Lushington and all my assistants are perfect judges of bread, and I have eat a great deal of bread myself in the service and know very well what it should be, and if I passed a bag that was not good I should be hanged above all men alive, as it is impossible to have better assistants than I have. If I mistake not the Minerva's bread came from the same person as that in the Tartar, which I condemned and which is yet in store. I have condemned this day 575 barrels of flour which came on board the Elizabeth from Chichester. I have also condemned some town bread here at the baker's and prevented the delivery of it in Corke to the agents who complained to me of it, and complaints will be made to the magistrates here of their mixing sand with it."
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 56.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 22 October.

Page 55

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, August 22. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.2. Nos. 79 and 81. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 451; copy 431, fo. 158; copy in Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.
Enclosure:—
Lord G. Germain to Sir Guy Carleton. 1776, August 22. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 80. 3 pages
. Also in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, 12; Sackville MSS.; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21698, fo. 14. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, August 22. Whitehall. — Three letters.
Duplicate signed letters. Vol. 2. Nos. 77, 78, 82. 1 page, 1 page, and 3 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131 and 431; in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to Sir Guy Carleton.

1776, August 23. War Office. — Officers of Artillery do not roll in duty with the officers of the line, therefore the command given to General Phillips as Major-General of the line is not to be considered as a precedent.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 218. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 6 Aug. 1777.

General Howe. Proclamation.

1776, August 23. Head Quarters on Long Island. — Offering protection to such inhabitants of the island as deliver themselves up at head quarters.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 164. 1 page.
Printed in Force's American Archives.

John George Lorentz to Captain Mackenzie.

1776, August 24. Staten Island. — Repeats the statements in his letter to "Col. Chevalier Osborne" of the 18th. "The troops not customed to the loss of a farthing on her subsistence money by changing them maked great difficulty to accept these dollars. I had a good deal of trouble to pay out this money, because they were believing the English troops are paid in guineas at 21s., Spanish dollars at 4½s. Our troops are before
Page 56
regularly paid by month and this always by advance, viz.: the 20th of the foregoing month, and I have certain assurances from the Paymaster-General, Mr. Righby at London, to have sent orders here and for paying all the money for our troops against my particular receipts and acquittances regularly by month on account of the whole establishment which will be settled in the Treasury at London with our Minister there. Upon my letter to Colonel Osborn I had to this very moment not any answer and by the want of money I find me forced Sir, to trouble you, begging instantly the favour to give me any notice how to get this money and to content our troops.
"I am a little incommoded by my legs and send my son for the answer, which will assure you of the respect with which I am constantly, Sir, etc."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 148. 2 pages.

Gen. Howe to Major-General Massey.

1776, August 25. — To enquire into particulars (not stated) and give such orders as may be necessary for the good of the service. The Commissary General sends directions by this conveyance to his correspondent in Nova Scotia relative to supplies from there. Asks that every assistance may be given him. As this applies to forage as well as provisions Capt. Handfield should immediately account for all the money he has drawn and not proceed in any thing connected with Mr. Chamier's department, but in consequence of orders from him.
Extract. Vol. 47. No. 194. 1 page.

Gen. Howe to Colonel Prevost.

1776, August 25. Head Quarters, Long Island. — The men employed on the works of the garrison to be paid according to the custom of the army and an allowance of rum while on duty, for which expenses, if there is no deputy paymaster on the spot, he is to draw bills. To give orders for necessary repairs to barracks. Declines doing anything respecting the rank he requests, not having received his Majesty's commands.
Extract. Vol.1: No: 134: 2 pages.

Gen. Howe to John Stuart
.
1776, August 25. Head Quarters, Long Island. — As to engaging the Indians in the defence of the Floridas.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 120. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 171.

Gen. Howe to Governor Tonyn.

1776, August 25. Head Quarters, Long Island. — Concurs fully in the measures he proposes for engaging the Indian
Page 57
interest, and recommends him to use every possible means to employ them in the defence of the Province or against the invaders in their own country. The letter accompanying this to Mr. Stuart enjoins him to be very active and forward in seconding his Excellency's endeavours.
Extract. Vol. 1. No. 138. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, August 26. War Office. — Major Campbell of the 44th regiment and Lieutenant Lane of the 22nd regiment have been allowed to dispose of their commissions at the regulated price. To fill up the vacancies. Some recruits intended for Canada having been sent out by mistake on board victuallers, he is to incorporate them and direct receipts for the drafts.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 57. 1 page.

Gov. Peter Chester to [Gen. Howe].

1776, August 30. Pensacola.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 193. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 182, fo. 175.

General Howe to Major-General Massey.

1776, September 3. Head Quarters, Newton, Long Island. — To grant Mr. Morden, the barrack master, sums necessary for the public service. To use as little wood as possible, it being more expensive than coal. Does not think the inhabitants from Boston ought to be supplied any longer with fuel from the King's stores at Halifax. Vessels will be sent for barrack stores, which will be wanted at this place.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 9. 2 pages.

Lord Geo. Germain to John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

[1776, September 5.]
Extract. Vol. 2. No. 90. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 6 November.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 280, fo. 197; copy 397, fo. 117.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe.

1776, September 6. New York. — Suggested exchange of Maj.-Gen. Sullivan and Brig. Lord Stirling.
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 58, and 3, No. 10. 1 page each.
Printed in Force's American Archives.

Page 58

Colonel Augustine Pkevost to Gen. Howe.

1776, September 9. St. Augustine. — "Sir, I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency the monthly return of the garrison.
"Since my arrival at this place I have not been honored with any orders, the one which brought me here I have had the honor to send you in original and was relative to the disciplining of the troops, but this Province being insulted by the rebels I find myself under a necessity to keep them (sic) recruits at works and to repair the neglected fortifications of this place, the soldiers of the old corps being most detached on the frontiers, where I cannot yet trust the recruits for want of commissioned and noncommissioned officer.
"The party which was on St. Mary has been obliged by a strong one of the rebels to abandon that river and to retire on the south side of St. John's river; the schooner that was there, not being able to protect them, had retreated. As there is no naval force, it makes the defence of so extensive a river very difficult. They took lately a Serjeant and 5 men of the party reinforced to 100 men, which has determined the Governor to hire and send there an armed shallop to support the party, to which I added one officer and 35 men, besides 12 upon the tender of the "Otter" that is to go there, besides some rangers and Indians. If they arrive before the depredations are made, they will prevent their planters to leave their plantations, their harvest, &c, to come here with their negroes without provisions, which is the project of the rebels, as they know we are not able to support them, having only 3 or 4 months' for the garrison.
"It would be of great utility for me to have your orders and not depend entirely from a Civil Governor and Council. I am sensible if this garrison don't receive the same favor as the rest of the army it is because we are not immediately under your eyes, but we shall contrive to deserve as well as them."
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 8.

Stores.

1776, September 12. London. — A list of barrack furniture and clothing to be sent out for the forces under General Howe.
A list of ships freighted to carry stores to America for the forces, &c.
Originals. Vol. 4. Nos. 50 and 51. 1 page each.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Gen. Howe. 22 October.

Mure, Son and Atkinson to General Howe.

1776, September 14. London. — Lay before him a general state of the operations under their care. Enumerate and explain several lists they enclose of transports conveying provisions, oats, furniture and clothing for the troops. [Similar lists seem to be transmitted by Mr. Robinson in his letter of 22 October.] "The ships wanted have been collected from
Page 59
every part of the kingdom and from Holland, and fitted to receive an armament. Their cannon was all to be cast, their gunpowder and gunners' stores to be made, and this in a variety of places, where alone many distinct parts of the armament were to be had, and the whole was to be assembled at Cork, under all the delays of contrary winds, perverseness of sailors not under military control, &c, &c, which are incident to such an undertaking. The whole would however have arrived at Cork by the last week in August but for a westerly wind which prevailed from the 25th July till that time, and which detained in the Downs the ammunition and stores for 8 of the out post ships which were otherwise ready at Cork. We mention these circumstances only for the purpose of shewing that if any inconvenience arises from the lateness of the season it has not been in our power to prevent it, and beg leave to add that from the information we have received of the state of things at Cork, it seems probable that the dispatch of the ships may be further delayed without any fault of the Commissary, for the workmen there as well as here are as much addicted to combinations for raising their wages and are upon the whole very unmanageable tho' rather less so by the last advices than before."
Remarks on the oatships, on the supplies of sourkrout, porter, small salad seed and vinegar.
"On the 17th August we received directions to provide the barrack furniture described in a return about that time received as wanted for 25,000 men, and that we should for the present send out about 2,500 chaldrons of coals and the same quantity in January. We were afterwards on the 30th of August directed to provide clothing for 5,000 provincials, and a pair of thick milled woollen mittens for every man in both armies ; and to take up and arm shipping sufficient to carry the whole, together with the camp equipage, shoes, stockings, and linen for the next campaign, as far as the agents could get them ready. In contradiction of all the clamours of faction respecting the decay of manufactures, &c, it is an absolute truth that there is scarce an article of all these things to be found ready made, that the price of everything is increased and still rising, and that we are obliged to obtain goods of all sorts from the makers as matter of favour and preference, whilst their workmen are universally engaged in combinations and all the licentiousness arising from a superabundance of employment. We have taken the steps which appeared to us most likely to secure what is wanted in the shortest time possible, and hope that nothing of the clothing kind except trifles will remain on shore at the end of this month."
.   .     .     As the War Office can only give us one single party of recruits for the whole of these ships we have agreed for extra seamen to be put on board so as to raise the complement of men to about 2½ to a gun for everything under six pounders, and three men to a gun for six pounders. The price of coals in this place is rendered so extravagant by the port duties that it was at first intended only to ballast the ships slightly with coals, and to supply the rest from the out ports by ships hired by the run.
Page 60
Some disappointments have arisen in getting ships upon that footing, so the ships here are to be given a little more than the ballast absolutely necessary in coals and the remainder is to be sent from Burry River near Swansea on the coast of Glamorganshire by some of the early victuallers and store ships arrived at Cork from Quebec and ordered over to Burry River for that purpose, and it seems probable that the January supply will be sent through the same channel."
Signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 48. 7 pages.
Perhaps enclosed by Mr. Bobinson in his letter of 22 October.

Commissioners. — Lord Howe and Gen. Howe.

1776, September 19. New York. — Declaration.
Copy in manuscript. Vol. 2. No. 145. 2 pages.
Printed copy in the Public Record Office, America & W. Indies 301, fo. 73 ; and in the Sackville MSS. ; MS. in the Lansdowne Collection 88, fo. 22. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Maj.-Gen. John Sullivan to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, September 19. Ship " Fanny." — " May it please your Excellency, when I was lately at Philadelphia I informed Congress that your Excellency was pleased to offer an exchange of Lord Sterling and myself for officers of equal rank ; whereupon they voted that Major-General Prescott and Brigadier-General McDonald should be exchanged for us, and issued orders for their being sent towards New York for that purpose, which I doubt not has been done, and the exchange might immediately be made, provided we were on shore to see it expedited. I must therefore intreat your Excellency to permit us to go on shore with a flag in order to get this business accomplished. Your Excellency may be assured we shall avoid every kind of connection with the American troops or army, further than is necessary for this purpose, and that in case any difficulties should arise to prevent the exchange taking place, we will immediately return again to such place as your Excellency will be pleased to appoint."
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 60 ; 3, No. 12. 1 page each.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, September 19. Head Quarters. — Exchange of Gens. Sullivan and Sterling.
Copies. Vol. 1, No, 59 and Vol. 3, No. 11. 1 page each.
Printed in Force's American Archives.

General Howe to Sir George Osborn.

1776, September 21. Head Quarters. — As the Hessian troops have not been mustered since their arrival in America he is
Page 61
desired to wait upon Lt.-Gen. Heister and fix with him the earliest date for mustering them in their different encampments.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 150. 1 page.

General Howe to General Washington.

1776, September 21. York Island. — Exchanges.
Copies. Vol. 1, No. 61 and Vol. 3, No. 13. 3 pages each.
Printed in Force's American Archives, in Sparks's Correspondence of the American Revolution and extract in his Life of Washington.

Gen. Washington to General Howe.

1776, September 23. Head Quarters, Heights of Harlem. — Same subject.
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 62; 3, No: 14. 4 pages and 3 pages.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

Lt:-Col; Sir George Osborn to General Howe.

1776, September 25. Camp, York Island. — Has made a muster and inspection of the 1st division of the Hessians and found their arms and accoutrements in good order. They are equipped with necessaries sufficient to last till the opening of the next campaign. It is Gen. de Heister's intention to send for from Hesse with the recruits of the next year what may later be wanting. Has procured medicines to supply their hospitals till Gen. Knyphausen's arrival. The clothing of many of the regiments begins to wear out, and without a representation from London to Hesse they have no assurance of being new clothed next spring. If they remain in the. field late in the year they will find their need of blankets.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 157. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Howe.

1776, September 30. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 83. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 503; copy 431, fo. 162, and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

General Howe. Proclamation.

1776, September 30. Head Quarters, York Island. — Concerning deserters.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 162. 1 page.
Printed in Force's American Archives,

Page 62

James Fitter to the Secretary at War [Barrington] .

1776, October 3. Pulteney Street. — Having received a letter from the Earl of Cavan, submits an extract therefrom. The extract follows, dated Dublin, 25 September:— That Ensign Joseph Gabbet, having been permitted to exchange from the 15th into the 30th in the room of Ensign John Speirs, he (Mr. Fitter) is asked to acquaint Lord Barrington and get the affair done as soon as possible.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 66. 167 words.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 16 October.

General Howe to General Washington.

1776, October 3. Head Quarters, York Island. — Exchanges.
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 63; 3, No. 15. 2 pages each.
Printed in Force's American Archives, dated 4th ; extract in Sparks's Washington.

Col. Guy Johnson.

1776, October 3. New York. — General review of the Northern Confederacy and Department for Indian Affairs.
1776, October 4. New York. — Return of officers in Col. Guy Johnson's department. (Perhaps accompanied his memorial of 30 October.)
Vol. 10. Nos. 204 and 203. 2 pages and 7 pages.

Robert Mackenzie to Col. Guy Johnson.

1776, October 4. Head-Quarters, York Island. — On the manner of making up and presenting accounts.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 205. 1 page.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, October 6. Heights of Harlem. — Concerning exchanges.
Copies. Vol. 1, No, 64 ; and Vol. 3, No. 16. 2 pages each.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

Ross and Gray to Lord Barrington.

1776, October 7. Conduit Street. — Arms and clothing for the 71st regiment were sent down to it in Scotland previous to its embarkation for North America.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 69. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 18 Oct. 1776.

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Captain McKenzie.

1776, October 8. Camp of the Guards, York Island. — As he has reason to believe that the monies issued to Genl. Heister
Page 63
have not been applied to the payment of the different regiments but appropriated by their treasurer, Monsr. Lorentz, to the Colonels of the several brigades only, apprehends that if General Howe were to desire that the Hessian soldiers should be settled with up to the last muster, the 24th September, receiving an acknowledgment from each regiment for their deductions for King's provision, it would be the means of stopping several claims which may in future give much trouble, and prevent a large sum of money being always ready (as is now the case) to purchase up the provisions of the country we are in possession of, and supplying open markets which are daily held at all their Brigades.
Vol. 1. No. 149. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to General Howe.

1776, October 9. Halifax. — Extract. Hopes he will not disapprove of half-a-crown a day being given to Mr. Banyan to keep the accompts of all the invalids left behind the army. As a general officer has not commanded at this place for some years, has struck off several articles brought in in the Town Major's account, such as £20 for an orderly-room, there being no such place.
Vol. 29. No. 8. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, October 16. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 65. 1 page.
Enclosing letter from James Fitter of 3 October.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1777 [should be 1776], October 16. War Office. — Transmits invoice of necessaries thought expedient to be sent for the use of the army, the men to be put under stoppages for shoes and shoe soles only. To direct these to be delivered, etc. 11,000 more pairs of shoes will be sent next month.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 67. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, October 18. War Office. — The arms and clothing for 71st Regiment were sent to Scotland as stated in the enclosed, but further enquiry shall be made relative to the deficiency mentioned. Four companies to be raised and added to Maj.- Gen. Fraser's regiment and being additional are to remain at home for the purpose of recruiting. Sends list of promotions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 68. 2 pages.
Enclosing Ross and Gray to Lord Barrington, see 7 Oct. 1776.

Page 64

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1776, October 18. Whitehall. — Compliments on the success at Long Island.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 84. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 545; copy 431, fo. 166; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1776, October 18. Whitehall. — Augmentation of Hessian Chasseurs, &c.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 85. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 541; copy 431, fo. 165; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

Stores, &c.

1776, October 21. London. — List of ships with their armaments. &c, employed in conveying provisions to America for the use of the forces. Endorsed:— No. 1. List of Victuallers.
Vol. 56. No. 25. 4 pages.
1776, October 21. London. — List of ships freighted to carry oats to America for the forces.
Vol. 4. No. 49. 2 pages.
Both these papers believed to be enclosed by Mr. Robinson to Gen. Howe, 22 October.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, October 22. Whitehall. — Sends duplicate of a letter of 10 August in respect to allowance of spruce beer to the army as more conducive to health. The intention is therefore dropped of sending out a greater quantity of porter. Sourkrout is being sent as it can be prepared. Refers to letter of Mure, Son and Atkinson, and various returns. Messrs. Nesbitt have been ordered to replace the bread said to be bad. Sends extract of Mr. Commissary Gordon's reply. The bread was ordered to be of the same sort as the very best King's bread. It is hoped this cannot occur again. However, the commissaries should be instructed to take the mark and numbers of the packages by which the particular contractor can be traced and the matter if necessary inquired into. The ships at Corke have been delayed by combinations amongst the workmen, but most of all by the sailors. When they are all sailed they will bring to him a supply of provisions for 36,000 men for 12 months. Transports to be sent back to Cork. Mr. Apthorpe's observations are far from being satisfactory. He seems to wish to confound the business by his observations about the exchange. Their Lordships are very sensible that it is for the advantage of government to draw bills of
Page 65
exchange when money can be had for such bills at par, but their objections were to the manner practised in drawing bills at Boston and the apparent business carried on in it, in sending out specie from hence (sic), to be advanced to Mr. Apthorpe for bills, at a great and disadvantageous exchange, and so going on, in circulation; and that Mr. Apthorpe should be drawing bills on the contractors at the same time that all the subsistence was actually sending out in specie; and also while their Lordships were issuing and sending out in specie, money to meet his Excellency's requisitions. He further confuses by not distinguishing the bills for subsistence or extraordinaries on the requisitions. A reply as to coals is awaited before taking any further steps.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 52. 5 pages.
Enclosing John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 10 August.
John Robinson to Messrs. Nesbitt, 10 August,
John Robinson to Messrs. Nesbitt, 16 August.
Commissary Gordon to Mr. Robinson, 20 August.
List of barrack furniture and clothing to be sent out. 12 September.
List of ships freighted to carry stores, 12 September.
Query. Messrs. Mure's letter of 14 September.
List of ships freighted to carry oats, 21 October.
List ofships with their armament, &c., 21 October.

Royal Warrant to Pay.

1776, October 23. St. James's. — Warrant for the pay of the general and staff officers in North America. Addressed to Richard Rigby, Paymaster General. Gen. Gage as Commander-in-chief is made out at £10 a day; Carleton, Haldimand, Howe, Clinton, Burgoyne, Earl Percy, Valentine Jones, and Cornwallis as major-generals at £2 10s. ; Colonels Prescott, James Grant, Eyre Massey, John Vaughan, Francis Smith, James Agnew and Alex. Leslie, as brigadier-generals at £1 10s. ; Capt. Wm. Dunbar as major of brigade at 10s; Capt. Urquhart as town major at Boston at 5s. ; Joseph Goldthwaite as barrack master at 10s. ; Lt. Ramsay as town adjutant at Boston at 4s.; and John Jones as chaplain at 6s. 8d. These are all for different periods, most of them down to 24 December, 1775. Total £11,511 6s. 8d.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 101. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 22 December, 1776.

Sir George Osborn to Captain McKenzie.

1776, October 28. Camp of the Guards. — Sir George Osborn presents his compliments to Capt. McKenzie and has just received an application in form from General de Heister for another £ 15,000 in advance to be sent to Mr. Lorentz for the pay of the Hessian troops.
Sir George hopes to be able to send Mr. Mackenzie the muster rolls very soon, as his servant has been gone some days to New York for that purpose. Mr. Barrow will be then able to ascertain
Page 66

the exact sums which will be wanting every muster, and Monsr. De Heister has consented to have the whole settled every two months. The Waldeck Regiment is upon an entire separate establishment, and will ask their pay to be separately issued to their order.
As this will probably be the last sums issued to Monsr. Lorentz upon account, Sir George will be obliged to Capt. Mackenzie if he will acquaint him when the general's warrant is issued for that purpose.
P.S. — I don't at present recollect what sums have already been issued to Monsr. Lorentz, the claim at present made for £15,000 I apprehend to be two months' subsistence, not allowing however for a deduction of King's provisions.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 159.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, October 29. War Office. — Captain Holmes of the 4th regiment to be placed on half-pay from 29th September.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 72. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, October 29. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 71. l page.
Enclosure:—
Paper containing extract of a letter from Gen. Fraser dated Edinburgh 22 October, and at the foot a note from Messrs. Ross and Gray dated Conduit Street, 29 October, sending that extract. Gen. Fraser states that though clothing and arms were amply furnished, such was the hurry of embarkation that many of the recruits did not join till two days or even one day before embarking, and it was impossible to clothe or arm them. Arms and clothing were sent off in transports, great part of them being captured.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 70. 2 pages.

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, October 29. Camp of the Guards. — Has just now received an application from Lieut.-General de Heister for the allowance of bat and forage for the last division of the Hessian troops, alleging that they had been in march, and were at sea at the time that the bounty of the 100 days was given to the 1st division under his immediate command, and that a distinction may be made in the number of rations allowed to the full colonel from that given by the quarter-master general in which there is no rank specified between the brigadier and lieut.-colonel.
"Whenever I shall have leisure from my duty in the brigade of guards, I propose under the order I had the honour to receive from your Excellency in New York Island to visit and muster the brigades lately arrived with Monsr. de Kniphausen as well as the Waldeck Regiment.
Page 67
"I have the pleasure to acquaint you that a very large supply of every sort of necessaries for the Hessian troops are arrived with their second division, shoes, shirts, and cloth, both white and blue, to repair their clothing.
"As the Waldeck regiment is upon a separate establishment in every respect to the Hessian troops, and independent of the command of General Heister, I beg the favour of knowing whether the orders I may have the honour of receiving from your Excellency from time to time will not include both apprehending that they will claim to be put exactly on the same footing. Lieut.-Colonel Hanxleden commanding the Waldeck regiment will acquaint me to-morrow what sums of money he wishes to have upon account until the establishment of the whole of the foreign troops may be settled up to the Christmas muster next."
Copy. Vol.1. No. 151.

Col. Guy Johnson to General Howe.

1776, October 30. New York. — Memorial. Recommending an annexed list for continuance of employment and pay. (Qy. see October 3 and 4.)
Copy. Vol.10. No. 202. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, October 31. War Office. — Another body of German recruits embarking for North America, sends distribution of these into various British regiments. A fresh distribution may be made if he thinks proper.
Duplicate signed letter, Vol. 1. No 73. 1 page.
Enclosing Distribution as above, 7 Nov. 1776.

Robert Cunningham, Maj.-Gen., Col. 14th Regt., to Lord Barrington.

1776, November 1. Dublin. — Recommending Capt.-Lieut. Ramsey for the company vacant by the death of Capt. Sutton. P.S, — Hopes he will consider favourably Laurie the eldest lieutenant and Adjutant Grant the eldest ensign, both on foreign service.
Copy, Vol. 1. No. 76. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 7 Nov. 1776.

John Robinson, Secy., to General Howe.

1776, November 1. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Requesting him to give orders for issuing the whole subsistence to the Hessian troops, whether complete or not, according to General Heister's demand.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 57. 1 page.

Page 68

John Robinson, Secy., to Sir George Osborn.

1776, November 1. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Their Lordships are of opinion that the demand of General Heister for the whole subsistence of the Hessian troops whether they are complete or not is proper to be complied with.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 178. 1 page.
Added to a letter from Sir G. Osborn to Capt. McKenzie, 13 March 1777.

John Robinson, Secy., to Wm. Knox.

1776, November 2. Treasury Chambers. — Copies of two letters the one signifying the approval of their Lordships of the commission to Capt. Mackenzie to act as Paymaster-General of the corps raised in America, the other that considering the demand of General Heister for the whole subsistence of the foreign troops proper to be complied with, a letter accordingly has been written to Sir George Osborn.
Vol. 2. Nos. 87 and 88. 1 page each.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 6 Nov. 1776.

Governor Martin to General Howe.

1776, November 4. New York. — Presents Maj. Alexander McLeod and Capt. William Campbell of the Provincials of North Carolina, who offer their services with five subalterns and a handful of volunteers. Recommends them for honourable provision. Certified 3 July 1779, by Robert Mackenzie, late secretary to Sir Wm. Howe.
Extract. Vol. 2. No. 153. 2 folios.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 6. War Office. — A fresh commission is preparing for Lieutenant Money of 63rd regiment to bear date 27 Nov. 1775, being the date of Mr. Bradford's commission, which was superseded.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 74. 1 page.

Col. William Faucitt to Lord Barrington.

1776, November 6. Fludyer Street. — According to the established practice of the late war in Germany, the pay of the Hessian Chasseurs was higher than that of the Infantry in general. Does not know exactly what would be the proportional difference, having left it to General Schlieffen to furnish all necessary information.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 103. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 24 Dec. 1776,
Page 69

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, November 6. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 86. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 577; copy 431, fo. 174; and in the Sackville MSS. Extract printed in Force's Archives.
Enclosures:—
John Robinson to Wm. Knox. 2 letters, see 2 Nov.
Lord Germain to John Stuart. Ext. see 5 Sept.
1776, November 6. — Extract of another letter from Lord G. Germain to John Stuart.
Vol. 2. No. 89. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 280, fo. 237; 397, fo. 126.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, November 6. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 91. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 131, fo. 571; copy 431, fo. 171; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

G. Studholme, Major of Brigade, to Maj.-Gen. Massey.

1776, November 6. Fort Edward, Windsor — "Fort Edward stands on an advantageous eminence and was intended to command both Newport and the River St. Croix, but from the great distance, and the rapidity of the tide, which would facilitate vessels very much in passing by, it cannot entirely answer either of those purposes, but as a post to give protection to the inhabitants (in case of an invasion) it is an exceeding good one and is convenient to the principal avenues from the country. The great inconveniences of its situation are three hills to the westward within cannon shot, which command the fort and enfilade some of its defences, but this cannot be very material as the parapet is only three feet thick which plainly shews it was never intended to hold out against a regular siege, but when finished will prove a compleat defence against musquetry.
"The fort is a regular square with four bastions, whose capital measures about 200 feet; it stands upon the top of the hill which gives it a natural and gradued glacis of about 1800 feet. The ditch is 7 feet deep and 24 broad. The parapet is 7 feet high from the brim, but the banquet is not yet begun, and the want of it renders great part of the works useless. The curtains are 104 feet, the flanks 29, and the faces 90, and along the scarp there is a complete palisade.
"The fort contains barracks (when finished) that will lodge six officers and about 150 men, and hospital that with convenience will hold 26 patients; a powder magazine nearly finished which will contain above one hundred barrels, and litterage sufficient to store about a year's provision.
Page 70
"The most material works now wanting for the defence of the fort is the finishing of the ditch, the sloping of the glacis, the clearing of the wall, and fixing the drawbridge and gate."
P.S. — "I hope very soon that Major Batt will enable me to send you an exact report of Fort Cumberland."
Copy. Vol 29. No. 10. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 7. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 75. 1 page.
Enclosing R. Cunningham to Lord Barrington, 1 Nov. 1776.

Lord F. Cavendish to Lord [Barrington].

1776, November 7. — Submitting case of Lt. Wood, eldest lieutenant of the 34th regiment, who had been obliged to remain in England while his regiment went to America, and who prays he may be considered as an officer detached on duty, not voluntarily absent.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 83. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Carleton and to Howe, 12 Nov.

Resolution of Congress.

1776, November 7. — Suggested exchange of Colonel Miles for Mr. Foxcroft and perhaps Colonel Atlee or Lt.-Col. Piper for Mr. Dashwood. At the foot is a note by Gen. Washington, 6 December. "If the above exchange should prove agreeable to his Excellency General Howe, it will be so to his most obedient servant."
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 96; 3, No. 24. 1 page each.

German Troops.

1776, November 7. Portsmouth. — Distribution of 278 recruits into thirteen different British regiments.
Copy. Vol, 1. No. 73. 1 page.
Enclosed in Lord Barrington's duplicate letter of 31 October.

General Howe to General Washington.

1776, November 8. Head Quarters. — Concerning the release of a servant of Major Stuart and on exchanges.
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 11, and Vol. 3, No. 17. 1 page.
Printed in Force's American Archives.

Treasury Minute.

1776, November 8. Treasury Chambers. — Business relating to memorials of Harley and Drummond as to bills drawn by Messrs. Apthorpe and Chamier and complaints of those accounts;
Page 71
as to the state of the Military Chest as per letters from Gen. Howe and the persons to be sent out by Harley and Drummond to adjust their accounts with Apthorpe.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 60. 5 pages.
Enclosed by [Secy. Robinson] to Gen. Howe, 25 Nov. 1776.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 9. War Office. — Sends list of ensigns appointed by purchase since his last letter and some vacancies. Further leave of absence granted to Ensign Pilkington of the 35th.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 79. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of ensigns and vacancies as above. 1 page.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, November 9. Head Quarters. — Answer to his of the 8th inst.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 78, and Vol. 3. No. 18. 3 pages.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

General Howe to General Washington.

1776, November 11. Head Quarters. — In reply to the above.
2 copies. Vol 1. No. 80 and Vol.8. No. 19. 3 pages and 2 pages respectively.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

John Robinson, Secy., to General Howe.

1776, November 11. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — The bill drawn to disburse the enclosed account is to be paid, but the account itself is to be examined to see if the charges are improper or too high.
Copy. Vol. 4 No. 58. 1 page.
Enclosing Account at Fort Gage, Illinois, see 31 Dec. 1775.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 12. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 81. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Lord Barrington to Sir Guy Carleton.
1776, November 12. — Transmitting copy of letter received from Lord Frederick Cavendish.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 82. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Erederick Cavendish to Lord Barrinqton, see 7 Nov.

Page 72

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 12. War Office. — If he thinks the subject of the enclosed memorial — Mr. Shireff — is deserving of further pay he is to make it in such proportion as he shall think fit.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 84. 1 page.
Enclosing Memorial of Col. Prevost to Lord Barrington, 10 June 1776.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 12. War Office. — That directions had been given to Sir Guy Carleton to incorporate with other regiments in Canada the remains of the 7th and 26th, but there now being a probability of an exchange of the officers and men taken at Chamble and St. John's, his Majesty leaves it to his determination whether to employ these corps under his command or follow the above directions to Sir Guy. Maj.-Gen. Prescott, however, may be placed on his staff.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 86. 2 pages.

Edward Winslow to Captain Mackenzie.

1776, November 13. New York. — "A report has been made of the quantity and quality of the goods in my care, by which you perceive that many of them, such as baizes, flannels, caps, mittens, and gloves, are calculated for this season, shoes (of which I have twelve large hogsheads) are not to be procured at any price, and are much wanted by the Army. I therefore conclude that it (sic) a matter of real importance that a distribution be made as soon as possible. I have repeatedly applied to Lord Percy to summon a meeting of the Board of General Officers, for this purpose. I dare not apply again. I have also conversed with all the gentlemen of the Board who are now in the city, but, as his Lordship declines calling a meeting, they will not concern themselves. Will not General Howe (in consideration of the inconveniences which attend assembling the General Officers at this time) give some orders relative to the issuing such goods as may be now wanted ? I have all the returns by which the Board were regulated at Halifax, and shall immediately obey any directions which I may receive.
"The molasses and essence of spruce I have delivered to a Mr. Honfield who brews for the army, he contracts to deliver me such quantity of good beer as it will produce, on demand. This is the only method I could contrive to save the molasses, as many of the hogsheads (by frequent removals) were irreparably injured, and the shifting it into other casks, would have been attended with considerable expence and waste.
"In this and some other instances I have reluctantly proceeded without proper authority, but I flatter myself I shall not be censured, when it [is] considered that my motive is only to preserve those things which would otherwise be entirely lost.
Page 73
"Mr. Bridgham (who will deliver you this) is one of the persons appointed at Halifax to inspect the cargo of the Renown, the other (Mr. Saltonstall) I dismissed at Staten Island, and paid him by order of Captain Balfour 5s. per day, which you afterwards reimbursed me. Mr. Bridgham was employed on the same terms, but has received nothing. His family is lately arrived from Halifax and he is in want of money. An order for his pay would much oblige him. Had it been in my power I would have advanced it without troubling you now. I am, &c."
10 puncheons, quantity 1,000 gallons molasses. 1 cask, quantity 3331bs. essence of spruce. 7 hogsheads, quantity 7,000 1bs. tobacco. 8,000 yards white baize. 4,000 flannel waistcoats. 7,000 pairs of mitts and gloves. 1 trunk, containing necessaries for making the waistcoats. 2,362 pairs of shoes. A ship came in yesterday or the day before with many other articles.
Copy. Vol. 2. No, 144. 3 pages.

Board of General Officers.

1776, November 14. Horse Guards. — Report on a question laid before them by the Judge Advocate General as to whether, in case of the reduction of an additional company, the older captain by rank in the regiment or the older captain of a company should be reduced.
Copy. Vol. 1. No, 91. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 2 December 1776.

Captain Mackenzie to Francis Rush Clarke, Esq.

1776, November 19. New York. — That Sir Wm. Erskine has orders to take under his direction as Q.M.G. the provision train from Britain. All representations should be made to and orders taken from him.
Copy, Vol. 2. No, 148. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, November 20. War Office. — The regimental surgeons belonging to the foreign corps are to be supplied with medicines from the general hospital in the same manner as those of the British forces.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol.1. No. 87. 1 page,

[Governor Chester] to [General Howe]
.
1776, November 21. Pensacola. — List of his troops for defence of the province. Batteries unserviceable. Has commanded the engineer to carry on temporary works. Is at a loss on whom to draw for expenses for these and for support of the Royal American Regiment which he was ordered to quarter. Recounts news received. Mr. Stuart and the Indians.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 192. 6 pages.

Page 74

Captain Mackenzie to Cols. Magaw, Attle, West and Burd.

1776, November 25. New York. — Signifies the Commander-in- chief's consent to Colonel Miles going to the Congress, since it is thought his presence will expedite the exchange of prisoners. To communicate the same to Colonel Miles.
2 copies. Vol. 1. No. 88 and Vol. 3. No. 20. 1 page each.

[John Robinson, Secy.] to Sir William Howe.

1776, November 25. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Transmits copy of Minute respecting the state of the military chest and the accounts of Mr. Apthorpe, late Deputy Paymaster. Desires him to give every assistance to Messrs. Gordon and Crowder, who are sent out by the contractors Messrs. Harley and Drummond to examine and adjust their accounts with Mr. Apthorpe ; also that directions be given to the Deputy Paymaster to receive and deposit safely in the military chest all such money as shall from time to time be sent out in specie to their agents.
Duplicate not signed. Vol. 4. No. 61. 1 page.
Enclosing Treasury Minute, 8 November 1776.

John Robinson, Secy., to Sir William Howe.

1776, November 27. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Refers him to the enclosed (not identified) letter and papers from Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson for a full account of the situation of the store-ships.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 62. 1 page.

Commissioners. — Lord Howe and Sir Wm. Howe.

1776, November 30. New York. — Proclamation.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 163. 4 pages.
Printed copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 301, fo. 95; and in the Sackville MSS. Printed in Force's American Archives.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, December 1. Head Quarters. — Acknowledges letter of the 11th ult. Exchanges. Proposed exchange of Gov. Franklin for Brig.-Gen. Thompson.
Two copies. Vol. 1, No. 89, and Vol. 3, No. 9. 1 page each.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, December 2. War Office. — Transmits the enclosed. Further leave of absence granted to Capt. Marsden. Death of Major Treby.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 90. 1 page.
Enclosing Report of Board of General Officers, 14 Nov. 1776.

Page 75

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, December 3. Head Quarters. — Concerning safe conducts.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 92; 3. No. 21. 1 page each.
Printed in Force's American Archives.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, December 4. War Office. — Desires names of majors in the army whose rank is prior to 1773, and who may be able and willing to purchase lieutenant-colonelcys, that their pretensions may be considered.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 93. 1 page.

Prisoners.

Narrative of Captain W. Home, Royal Fusiliers, of his treatment when prisoner. Not dated, but found with other papers about this date. On condition of being allowed to make choice of Reading in Pennsylvania for their residence he and others gave their parole. After remaining ten months at Reading, where they were frequently insulted, they were removed contrary to agreement to Lebanon, although it was previously known there was no accommodation for them in that place. The committee of that place wrote to Congress asking that they might be removed. On complaining of the insults and threats they received, the person who had charge of them answered that he was sorry for it, but durst not interfere lest he himself should be treated in the same manner. At last they were told they might be allowed choice of another place so long as it was not Reading or Lancaster. They replied to the effect that they had already been moved from the place of their choice and were determined neither to say nor sign anything until they were set down in a place where they could be accommodated and live like gentlemen. The person to whom this was addressed acknowledged that they were in the right. Being thus freed from the former parole their desire of taking active part in the service of their country made them attempt to make their escape. Their enemies, since that time, to vindicate themselves from the imputation of neglect, have thrown many illiberal and unjust reflections on them.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 94; 3, No. 22. 4 pages each.

General Howe to General Washington.

1776, December 5. New York. — "Sir, The persons mentioned in the inclosed list are sent in exchange for the officers and others against whom their names are placed, being of equal rank and station, altho' this partial mode of releasing a few at a time upon parole is by no means the mode of exchange which from your assurances I had a right to expect. The soldier has always a stronger plea for this justice than the officer, as his sufferings and wants from the nature of his situation must be felt in a higher degree, which I am sorry to own is too much the case with those in my possession from causes that cannot be removed.
Page 76
"The repeated applications I have made on this head, and the indigencies lately given to expedite an exchange as far as possible, need no comment. Humanity still urges me to one more, and that it is in favor of your sick and wounded, who, wanting accommodation, refreshments, and attendance, which the town or country in its present situation do not afford, or the surgeons of the King's army can give, are objects of real compassion. At the same time give me leave to observe that every measure in my power has been taken to alleviate their sufferings, and shall be continued, until you have had a reasonable warning to provide more effectually for their relief. The consequences will of course be hurtful to every feeling mind, but necessity must justify the measure, it is, Sir, to you only that I can apply for a performance of the agreements you have entered into, and since your honour and humanity are equally concerned in this compliance, I shall on that account also be sorry to find my expectations disappointed. — With due respect, I am, Sir, your most obedient servant."
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 95 and Vol. 2, No. 23. 2 pages each.

1776, December 6. — Note by AVashington on a Resolution of Congress of 7 November, which see.

Several American Officers to Gen. Howe.

1776, December 8. New York. — The state of the sick and wounded prisoners being too melancholy for recital they entreat that a proper place may be agreed on by his Excellency and Gen. Washington where these sick and wounded may be conveyed, pledging their faith to continue inactive until regularly exchanged or under such limitations and restrictions as may be thought necessary. Signed by Colonels Robert Magaw, Samuel Miles, and Samuel Attlie, and by Lieut. -Colonels Michael Swoope, James Piper, Peter Kacklin and Nicholas Lotz.
Two copies. Vol.1, No. 97; 3, No. 25. 2 pages each.

Hesse Cassel. Convention with Great Britain.

1776, December 11. Cassel. — To supply a corps of 1,067 men to serve in America. With "Etat du Corps de Chasseurs en entier."
Copy in French, Vol. 24, No. 88, in English, No. 90-1. 7 and 10 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, Foreign Office, Treaties.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 3 March 1777.

Monsieur Lorentz to Sir George Osborn.

1776, December 12. New York. — "Sir, It is with the greatest pleasure and thankfulness that I remember me your kindness of procuring us the last warrant from the 4th Nov. for 15,000 pounds sterling to pay the subsistance money for our troops.
Page 77
"I then believed our accounts would be settled before the end of the year; but many of our regiments being so very far from one another, and finding myself in want of the establishments of the Artillery General Staff Commissariat and Hospital, without knowing where they are to be had, there is not much hope that this affair will be finished this year.
"I paid the regiments that are gone away to the end of the year, and furnished all our Second Division the time since she arrived here, with money. Hence you may conclude, Sir, that the stock can't now be otherwise than very small. However, his Excellency, Lieut.-General de Heister has lately given orders to all our regiments that they should pay the duty to the soldiers every five days in ready money.
"'Tis for that reason I see myself obliged to come to you. Sir. and beseech you, Sir, and beseech you that you may request his Excellency General Howe to grant us another temporary warrant of £30,000, considering that we have had only 45,000 pounds in all for our whole corps, and yet the Second Division has nothing received in account of her subsistance money. By doing us this favour you will get rid for a good while of the petitions that will be made to you for money every day.
"If you would be so kind to let me know, whether you think to let pass our troops muster at the end of this month, you would oblige by it very extraordinary. — Sir, &c."
Copy, Vol. 1. No. 162. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Sir G. Osborn to Capt. Mackenzie, 14 Dec. 1770.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, December 12. Bucks County. — Exchanges.
Two copies. Vol 1. No. 98 and Vol. 3. No. 26. 2 pages each.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

Sir George Osborn to Captain McKenzie.

1776, December 14. Brunswick. — Begs him to lay the enclosed application before Gen. Howe and if he should grant another warrant for £30,000 on account for payment of the Hessian troops up to the 24th December he will carry it to New York when he visits the Hessian headquarters and settles the whole of the accounts to that date.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 161. 1 page.
Enclosing J. G. Lorentz to Sir G. Osborn, 12 Dec. 1776.

General Washington to Gen. Howe.

1776, December 17. Headquarters. — Exchanges.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 99 and Vol. 3. No. 27. 2 pages each.
Printed in Force's American Archives and, in part, in Sparks's Washington,

Page 78

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, December 22. War Office. — Sends the enclosed. Desires to know of any omission, that it may be made good in future. Also requests half-yearly certificates of persons to whom pay is due, that he may lay proper warrants before the King.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 100. 1 page.
Enclosures:—
Warrant for pay of General and Staff Officers, see 23 Oct.
Estimate of the Pay of General and Staff Officers and officers of the Hospitals for the Forces in America as voted by Parliament for the year 1777.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 105. 2 pages.

Recruits.

1776, December 22. Montserrat. — Account of a party of Recruits of the 8th Regiment embarked under Ensign John Piercy of the 47th for New York.
Recruits of Ensign Wilmott's party that were drafted at New York. — Sir Wm. Howe's army.
1776, December 22. Montserrat. — Account of a party of German Recruits of the 8th Regiment embarked under Ensign Piercy as above.
Vol. 6. Nos. 245, 246 and 247.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 28 Nov. 1777.

Lord Barrington to General Howe.

1776, December 24. War Office. — Some doubts having arisen here on claims made by the Landgrave of Hesse Cassel relating to higher pay said to be due to the Chasseurs, etc., asks for intelligence to enable him to do justice if the claim is well founded. It is represented that the Chasseurs do not precisely answer to the Light Infantry in the British Service, but have always been considered as of a higher rank. Sends copy of Faucitt's letter on the subject. Asks what number of Anspessades there are among the Hessians and rate of their pay.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 102. 2 pages.
Enclosing Col. Faucitt to Lord Barrington, 6 November 1776.

Sir George Osborn to Captain McKenzie.

1776, December 28. Broad Street, New York. — Requesting a warrant for his personal pay as Muster-Master General. He will endeavour to settle the pay of the Hessians up to the 24th inclusive and call on Capt. McKenzie to-morrow morning.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 160. 1 page.

General Washington to General Howe.

1776, December 29. Headquarters, Bucks County.
Two copies. Vol. 1. No. 104 and Vol. 3, No. 28. 1 page each.
Printed in Force's American Archives and in Sparks's Washington.

Page 79

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Captain Mackenzie.

1776, December 31. — "Sir George Osborn's compliments to Capt. Mackenzie, the allowance from Great Britain for Genl. Heisters is 10s. per day to Capt. Faucitt, and to Monsr. Bourmatrie, but Sir George has great reason to believe that a deduction is made of 5s. per day from all the aids-de-camp (not English), and that it reverts to the Landgrave."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 163. 1 page.

John Robinson, Secy., to General Howe.

1776, December 31. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — The things on the enclosed lists will be sent out with all expedition, the provincial soldiers to be put under stoppages for the buckles and articles not usually found the soldiers.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 65. 1 page.
Enclosures:—
List oj materials for clothing 3,000 men (Provincials) — Red cloth for coats, white for waistcoats and breeches; 5 dozen buttons to each suit; dark-brown cloth for "legungus"; "collers" buckles, cloth for facing — white, green or blue.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 64. 1 page.
List of camp equipage for 8,000 men, supposing them divided into eight battalions of 10 companies, each company consisting of 4 serjeants, 4 corporals, 2 drummers, and 90 privates.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 66. 1 page.
(Similar papers sent 14 January, 1777.)

Stores.

N.D. [1776.] — Return of bedding in possession of the troops from Boston. Twenty-six regiments, with the number of bedcases, bolster cases, rugs and coverlets, blankets and pairs of sheets to each.
Vol. 51. No. 104. 1 page.

Stores.

1777, January 1. London. — Draft of a letter to nine masters of ships. That as it seems probable his ship may not have reached Canada before winter, and this letter may find him in some port of North America, he is to proceed to New York or elsewhere as he may be directed by Sir William Howe, deliver this cargo and follow the orders of that General.
Vol. 4. No. 72. 1 page.

1777, January 2. Treasury Chambers. — Treasury minutes concerning the state of the military chest; Messrs. Harley and Drummond, &c.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 69. 2 pages.

Page 80

1777, January 4. London. — List of victuallers destined for Canada, of whose arrival at Quebec no advice has yet been received. Marked No. 2.
Original. Vol, 56. No. 30. 1 page.

1777, January 4. London. — List of provisions shipt from Cork for the use of the forces under Sir William Howe. Marked No. 4.
Original. Vol. 56. No. 29. 2 pages.
The above four papers appear to be enclosures in Mr. Robinson's letter of 14 January.

Lt.-Col. Clarke to Maj.-Gen. Frederick.

1777, January 6. — Mr. Colvill, being the eldest ensign, should precede Mr. Lane in the lieutenancy.
Extract. Vol. 6. No. 142. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 23 May.

Gen. Howe to Governor Arbuthnot.

1777, January 7. New York. "The clothing sent out for the Corps which Governor Legge attempted to raise is the same as is designed for the Provincials in general, wherefore I request you will be so good as to acquaint M. G. Massey that the effective men of Goreham's may be provided out of this clothing, giving receipts for the same, and I should think it would be necessary to appoint some person to have it in particular charge and to keep a regular account of the issues for the satisfaction of Government.
"It is signified to me by the Lords of the Treasury that the Nova Scotia Volunteers should be subsisted in the same manner as McLean's and Goreham's."
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 11. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, January 7. New York. — "The bat and forage money last granted to the troops here was intended as an extra gratuity to them, not only in consideration of their past fatigues in a campaign unusually long, but as they were likely to continue in some degree during the whole winter. If the liberty I have taken was to be extended to Halifax, the troops at St. Augustine and Pensacola might think themselves equally entitled, wherefore I cannot possibly grant the request of Major Souter, Captains McDonald and Ramsay.
" I must desire that you will by every opportunity send me returns of the troops under your command, always distinguishing their stations and including Governor Legge's corps equally with others. It is signified to me by the Lords of the Treasury that the men of this corps should be subsisted in the same manner as McLean's and Goreham's.
Page 81
"The clothing that was sent out for them, and which I understand by Governor Arbuthnot had arrived, will answer equally well for Goreham's Corps, and I have wrote to the Governor on the subject.
"I am obliged to you for your care of Mr. Bunyan and if you find him a useful and deserving man I can have no objection to your continuing him in any post wherein he can be serviceable."
Extracts. Vol. 29. No. 12. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 10. War Office. — "During the late war, when no deduction was made from the men on account of provisions, there was a stoppage of fivepence per diem made from the men's subsistence while in hospital, but as a deduction of twopence-halfpenny per diem is made in North America on account of provisions, I have the honour to acquaint you his Majesty has been pleased entirely to approve of the step, which it is understood you have thought proper to take in reducing the hospital stoppage to fourpence per diem."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 93. 1 page,

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 11. War Office. — Death of Lt. Wm. Gordon of the 52nd.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 94. 1 folio.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.
1777, January 13. War Office. — Acknowledges dispatches. Some further arrangement necessaiy over two successions. Sir James Baird's commission as cnptain of additional company in the 71st is cancelled, his appointment by the General bearing an earlier date. Encloses list.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 95. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Memorandum relative to the two successions in the 10th and 43rd regiments.
Vol. 6. No. 96. 2 pages.
"Additional companies 71st regiment."
Vol. 6. No. 97. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to John Stuart.

1777, January 13. New York. — With regard to the management of the Southern Indians.
Copy. Vol.1. No. 119. 6 pages. Extract. Vol. 8. No. 146. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 161.

Page 82

General Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 13. Head Quarters. — Concerning prisoners. Added is an affidavit by Lieutenant Yates dated Princetown, 9 January, as to illtreatment by a British soldier when lying wounded on the field of battle. (Printed, letter only, in Sparks's Washington.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 29; 5, No. 1. 3 pages each.
Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 14. Whitehall. — Nos. 1, 2 and Separate. Three letters.
Duplicate signed letters. Vol. 5. Nos. 4, 3 and 2. 8 pages, 3 pages, 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132 and 431; and in the Sackville MSS.

Messrs. Mure, Son & Atkinson to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 14. London. — Desiring directions what quantity of rum to provide and where to deliver it. Mr. Loring, their agent in New York, will engage for its delivery.
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 80. 2 pages.

Messrs. Mure, Son & Atkinson to Joshua Loring, Junr.

1777, January 14. London. — They write to the General by this conveyance that he (Loring) will undertake in their names for any quantity of rum he may require. The ships will carry about 1,800 puncheons at each trip and they can make at least three trips a season. They will still add to them, because if not wanted to carry rum they may be loaded home with sugar. As they expect the General may call upon them for more than one-fourth of the whole supply they request him to engage in their names for whatever he shall require.
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 81. 2 pages.
This and the above enclosed by Messrs. Mure to the Treasury, 24 June, and by Secretary Robinson to Howe, 6 August.
Extracts of both also in Lord Dartmouth's MSS., 14th Report Appendix, X, p. 432.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 14. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Acknowledges letters. It is a singular satisfaction to their Lordships to hear that the supplies of provisions are ample and satisfactory except the defect of the bread and part of the flour. The number and particular mark of such packages should always be given and with a certified survey. As the Commissary at Corke has strongly and repeatedly certified to the Board the good quality and fitness of the bread it is apprehended these articles must have suffered on the voyage from the packages not being adequate and proper. Impossibility at that time of getting staves for casks.
Page 83
This incouveniency is now in part remedied. As his Excellency's present situation enables him to carry on the bakery no more bread need now be sent. No provisions are to be sent but what are of the first quality and perfectly sound, and all risk (except danger and damage on the voyage) is to be at the hazard of the contractors. A fleet of transports will be sent out in the spring. Sends list of ships sailed since those of which advice has been received of arrival. It is probable owing to the long detention at Cork many ships may not reach Canada this year. Paper No. 2 contains list of the Canada victuallers and their cargoes of which no account has been received of arrival at Quebec. No. 3 is a copy of the orders sent to Halifax. General Massey is allowed to take out of the "Union" £12,000, part of the money on board. Captain Jacob's demand of 2 per cent, for carrying the money from Halifax to New York is not allowed any more than Captain Braithwaite's was. No. 4 contains an account of the four storeships for Canada. If these ships come to New York he is to appropriate what is necessary of both stores and provisions. Perhaps he might find an opportunity of sending to Canada the camp equipage and regimental stores. Orders are given as per list No. 5 to provide camp equipage for 8,000 Provincials, and clothing for 3,000 more as per list No. 6. Mr. Chamier states he is purchasing salt, pork, flour and other articles. Their Lordships have no objection if this is by his Excellency's particular orders, but if the Commissary makes purchases to any large extent there will be a double provision and risk of waste. The contracts for rum are left to his judgment. Regrets failure of endeavours to furnish by Lt. Hawker fresh provisions and draught horses. Sends minute of the Board paper No. 7 as to the military chest. Mr. Apthorpe continues to draw bills without explaining whether for subsistence or extraordinaries, notwithstanding repeated directions to make such distinction. To dispose if possible at New York of the tar oil which Mr. Chamier finds useless.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 67. 10 pages.
Enclosures:—
List of Victuallers destined for Canada of whose arrival at Quebec no advice has yet been received. Marked No. 2. See 4 January.
Draft of a letter to nine masters of ships. See 1 January.
List of provisions shipt from Cork for the use of the forces under Sir William Howe. Marked No. 4. See 4 January.
Treasury minutes. See 2 January.
List of camp equipage for 8,000 Provincials. (Same as that under 31 December 1776.)
Vol. 4. No. 71. 1 page.
List of materials for clothing 3,000 Provincials. (Same as that under 31 December 1776.)
Vol. 4. No. 70. 1 page.
Minutes relative to the supply of provisions to the troops in America.
Vol.4:. No. 68. 2 pages.

Page 84

General Sir William Howe to Col. A. Prevost.

1777, January 15. "By ye Lively Frigate," New York. — Acknowledges receipt of letters of 9th September and 12th October. Is glad the town of St. Augustine is in a state of defence. Hopes the province can be secured from insult. Mr. Stuart is directed to have the Creek and Chactaw Indians in readiness against invaders. Promises provisions, money and barrack furniture. Instructions relative to vacancies.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 133. 4 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gov. Chester.

1777, January 20. New York. — "I have the honour of your Excellency's letter of 30th August, 1776, giving a particular account of the situation of the province under your command in respect to the enemies of Government, who seem to pervade the whole continent.
"I have also received the fullest accounts from Mr. Stuart of the Indian nations and their dispositions. His influence with these people, added to your own strength, will, I hope, keep West Florida in quietness; and to give you the clearest idea of my conceptions on this head I have enclosed a copy of my letter to Mr. Stuart, and do refer you to the copy of another sent to Governor Tonyn, which I have put under cover to Mr. Stuart, from both which your Excellency will collect my sentiments regarding the Floridas, and know upon what you are to build your security.
"My principal recommendation is, that a perfect good understanding may be supported between the different branches of power, and that the most effectual exertions may be made for the suppression of the enemies, as well as for the preservation of his Majesty's government.
"I am perfectly satisfied of your Excellency's zeal to promote those desirable ends, and have the honour to be, &c.
"N.B. — My letters are sent under flying seals, that your Excellency may have every information they contain, not having time to take copies."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 108.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Col. Stiell.

1777, January 20. New York. — Desires him to acknowledge the receipt of letter and enclosure from Lt.-Col. Dickson. Encloses warrants for holding general courts martial and authorizes execution of any sentence short of death or cashiering of officers.
Extract. Vol.1. No. 113. 1 page.

General Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, January 20. Morris Town, Head Quarters. — Touching supplies for prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. IV., p. 287.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 30; and 5, No. 6. 2 pages each.

Page 85

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Colonel A. Prevost.

1777, January 21. "Per the Lively," New York. — Former letter empowering him to put in execution any sentence is not to be understood to comprehend the cashiering of commissioned officers.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 132. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1777, January 23. New York. — Concerning treatment of prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. 4, p. 555.)
Two copies. Vol.3. No. 29; and 5. No. 7. 2 pages each.

Sir George Osborn to Captain Mackenzie.

1777, January 25. Rariton Landing. — Returns estimates sent him to sign. Has taken notice in the general estimate that the pay of the general officers and hospitals as well as the commissariat is not brought to account. The reason always has been that the Hessians have ever wished to set up a claim for an establishment of Hospital and Commissariat. Has no authority from the "Nottes concernant l'argent de levee" and the "Etats" laid before Parliament. Has no instructions concerning the artillery, which they wish to have paid equal to the British, for which purposes encloses a letter to Lord George Germain, to be sealed and forwarded if approved. P.S. — An estimate for the Waldeck Regiment ought to go home and be signed with those of the Hessians.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 175. 1 page.

Troops.

1777, January 25. — List of officers of the Guards ordered for the American Service.
Signed copy. Vol. 6. No. 99. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 3 February.

General Sir William Howe to Lt.-Col. (William) Walcot.

1777, January 26. New York. — "The exchange of prisoners has been attended with such a variety of delays on the part of the enemy, that it is become absolutely necessary to send an officer of rank to expostulate on that head with General Washington." Minute directions as to his proceedings.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 47; 5. No. 9. 5 pages each.
Enclosure:—
1777, January 26. — Power from Sir William Howe to Lieutenant Colonel William Walcot. " To treat, determine and agree .... upon all matters relative to prisoners of war:'
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 8. 3 pages. (See also 3 February.)

Page 86

John Boddington to Brig.-Gen. Cleaveland.

1777, January 28. Ordnance Office. — Signifying his Majesty's commands that no engineer on service should act as aide-de-camp to any general officer. The commanding engineer under Gen. Howe at New York is directed to see the order complied with.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 10. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to William Newton, Esq.

1777, January 29. Philadelphia. — Authority to receive from Messrs. Gordon and Crowder, Agents to Messrs. Harley and Drummond such sums of money as they have raised, or may hereafter raise in this city by bills on their constituents for supplying the extraordinaries of the army.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 11. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, January 29. New York. — Has no objection to Mr. Lewis Pintard acting as agent, but it must only be for the purpose of receiving and distributing to the prisoners any necessaries sent in. So many American prisoners have been sent back that the sending from Pennsylvania supply of meat and flour can only be judged unnecessary.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 31; and 5. No. 12. 1 page each.

Brandenburg Anspach. Treaty with Great Britain.

1777, February 1. Anspach. — For a corps of 1,200 Infantry.
Copy. In French. Vol. 24. No. 96. 7 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, Foreign Office. Treaties.

Captain Mackenzie to Monsr. Lorentz.

1777, February 2. New York. — The officer commanding at Rhode Island is at a loss to know the sum that should be granted per month to the Hessian battalions on that service. Begs to be favoured with an abstract, as the warrants granted to them for pay will finally be cancelled by a general one to him (Lorentz).
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 164. 1 page.

Monsr. Lorentz to Captain Mackenzie.

1777, February 2. New York. — Answer. The Hessian regiments at Rhode Island are provided with money sufficient to the end of this month. Six thousand seven hundred and sixty-seven pounds sterling were sent 12th January by the "Greyhound" frigate. Not a farthing should be paid by the general on account of this month or before, but if any is required next month 300 to 340 pounds sterling should be paid to each regiment, for which he will take receipts.
Copy. Vol.1. No. 170. 1 page.

Page 87

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 3. War Office. — Captain Bosville of the Foot Guards to return to Great Britain on account of ill-health. Captain Hamilton to replace him. Encloses list of officers of the Guards under orders of embarkation (see 25 January).
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 98. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Col. Walcot.

1777, February 3. — Same as that on 26 January.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 13. 3 pages.

Captain Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. Walcot, 5th Regt.

1777, February 3. New York. — Information has been given to Gen. Howe of the detention and ill-treatment of sixteen men of Skinner's Brigade in Hartford Gaol, and of a soldier of the 37th regiment detained prisoner at Farmington. To be particular in his demands for the immediate release of these men and to enquire into the causes of their detention.
Two copies. Vol. 8. No. 48; and 5. No. 14. 1 page each.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 4. War Office. — As to payment of the officers of the Foot Guards.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 100. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 6. War Office. — Extra pensions to be provided for sergeants. One hundred more upon the Establishment of Chelsea Hospital are to receive one shilling a day.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 101. 1 page.

General Washington to General Howe.

1777, February 6. Head Quarters, Morris Town. — Sir, This will be delivered to you by Major Edmonston who was sent down by General Schyler to go to New York upon parole to return or send out an officer of equal rank.
If Major Williams of Colonel Rawlin's battalion has not been already sent out I desire he may be the officer in exchange. If he should have been sent out I shall be glad that either Major Browne or Major Wells of Connecticut may be released.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 33; and 5. No. 17. 1 page each.

Lord George Germain to John Stuart.

1777, February 7. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 21. 5 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, No. 5, 3 March 1777.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 5; copy 397, fo. 149.

Page 88

John Sullivan to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 8. Chatham. — Enclosing by order of General Washington a list of prisoners taken by the British Army within New Jersey. If exchange is consented to will send as many soldiers to New York, Amboy or Brunswick at such time as may be appointed.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 32; 5. No. 15. 1 page each.
Enclosure:—
List of prisoners taken in New Jersey, Caleb Potter, Zach. Seikell, James Lambert, John Haines and John Williams, confined in New York; John Melick and William Brookfield, confined in Amboy; Elias and Elihu Campbell taken at Springfield and supposed to be at New York.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 32o; and 5. No. 16. 1 page each.

Hanau Treaty or Ulterior Convention.

1777, February 10. Hanau. — To supply chasseurs.
Copy. Vol. 24. No. 94. 8 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, No. 3, 3 March, 1777.
Original in the Public Record Office, Foreign Office. Treaties.

Hospitals.

1777, February 15. New York. — Return of the weekly expenditure of wine and sugar in his Majesty's hospitals at New York. Adolph French, clerk.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 121. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 25 March 1777.

Provincial Troops.

1777, February 17. London. — Invoice of sundry materials for clothing shipped per Thomas Harley on board the "Friendship" transport, Captain Lumley, by order and for account and risk of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, with, on the facing page, invoice of materials for clothing shipped per "Howe" transport, Captain Atkins. Compare 31 December 1776, and under 14 February 1777.
Original. Vol. 54. No. 65. 2 pages.
Believed enclosed in Secy. Robinson's letter of 4 March.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 18. War Office. — There is a company vacant in the 52nd Regiment owing to the appointment of Captain Crawford to a company of Invalids.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 102. 1 page.

Page 89

Messrs. Cox & Mair to Lord Barrington.

1777, February 18. Craigs Court. — Concerning a disputed lieutenancy in the 57th regiment. Enquires what steps are to be taken in regard to Lieut. Thornhill.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 112. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 14 March 1777.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Schuyler.

1777, February 18. New York. — Answer to letter of 6th. Agrees to release either Majors Brown, Williams or Wells, provided Major Edmonstone, who is the bearer of this, be permitted to go to Canada.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 33o; 5. No. 17o 2 pages each.

Monsr. Lorentz to Captain Mackenzie.

1777, February 18. New York. — Finds that 340 pounds sterling is too little for the Hessian regiments at Rhode Island. Begs that the General be informed that he should cause £2,300 to be paid and distributed over the six regiments.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 169. 1 page.

Captain Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. Fanning.

1777, February 19. New York. — That Mr. William Dement is to join his corps with the rank of Supernumerary Captain; his pay to commence from 25 December 1776.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 18. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, February 24. War Office. — Arrangements concerning the officers of the Additional Companies.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 103. 2 pages.
Enclosure;—
Return of officers posted to the Additional Companies of various regiments, and the vacant officers accounted for belonging to Sir William Howe's army. Endorsed:— "Officers of the Additional Companies remaining in Great Britain."
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 104. 4 pages.

Robert Catherwood to Robert Adair, Esq.

1777, February 25. St. Augustine. — "I even can't be allowed by the garrison a spade, a shovell, or rake to keep the hospital properly clean, as the Barrack Master acquaints the Commanding Officer that his instructions from the Barrack Master General are, not to interfere in any manner with the hospital, yet they have frequently kettles from me for the different expeditions, having none but iron potts in the barracks."
Extract. Vol. 6. No. 138. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 21 May.

Page 90

Lord Barrington to Major Saxton, 45th Foot.

1777, February 27. War Office. — Cannot recommend him for further leave of absence, he having already been allowed two years. Should he wish to sell his majority, undertakes to satisfy the King that nothing but ill-health has obliged him to quit his profession.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 251. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 9 December 1777.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, February 27. Brunswick, Head Quarters. — Desires a cartel. Complains of treatment of Lt.-Col. Campbell of the 71st and others. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 556.)
Two copies. Vol.2. No. 46; and 5. No. 19. 2 pages each.

Sir George Osborn to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

N.D. [supposed Feb. 1777.] — "Sir George Osborn proposes to see Sternes Brigade in New York on Monday, General Kniphausens at his fort on Tuesday, and on thursday or Friday to go by Elizabeth Town in his return to Brunswick to pass the musters of the Waldeckers up to the 24th of December. If General How should wish to have any cheque made upon the two brigades in Rhode Island Sir George Osborn will give Mr. Porter (the commissary for musters) a deputation to do so when he goes there to muster the British regiments.
"Sir George will examine Mr. Lorentz's estimate with the last musters and sign it in order that it may be laid before Parliament, keeping that General de Heister has signd by his own voucher."
Vol. 1. No. 165. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 1. War Office. — Sends an embarkation return of camp necessaries for the forces with an invoice of hospital stores shipped on board the "Bute" on the 26th February.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 105. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 1. War Office. — One hundred recruits have been ordered to take care of the same number of horses to be sent out for the remount of the Light Dragoons. The paymasters to be directed to give these recruits an extra twopence per day while on this service. Repeats request for names of officers who received tents sent to Boston early in 1775, that the maker may receive payment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 106. 2 pages.

Page 91

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 2. War Office. — After consultation with Lord G. Germain and Mr. Adair it is agreed that Mr. John Napier be sent out as Superintendent General of all the hospitals. Refrains from speaking to his Majesty till Howe's approbation of Mr. Napier and his office has been obtained. Sends proposed instructions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 107. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
Copy of instructions proposed for John Napier as Superintendent of Hospitals.
Vol. 6. No. 108. 4 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 8. War Office. — Acknowledges letter.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 131. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 3. Whitehall. — No. 3.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 24. No. 87. 3 pages.
Enclosing:—
Treaty with Hesse Cassel, 15 Jan. 1776.
Treaty with Hesse Cassel, 11 Dec. 1776.
Treaty with Hanau, 10 Feb. 1777.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 205; copy 431, fo. 185; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 3. Whitehall. — No. 4.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 22. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 211; copy 431, fo. 187; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 8. Whitehall. — No. 5.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 20. 5 pages.
Enclosing Lord G. Germain to John Stuart, 7 Feb. 1777.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 215; copy 431, fo. 189; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 3. Whitehall. — Separate.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 93. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Sir R. Herries to Gen. Howe, 5 March 1777.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132. fo. 223; copy, 431, fo. 192; and in the Sackville MSS.

Page 92

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 3. Morris Town, Head Quarters. — Answer to his of 27th February. (Printed in Spark's Washington, IV., 557.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 49; 5. No. 23. 1 page each.

John Robinson, Secy., to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 4. Treasury Chambers. — Provincial clothing shipped as per enclosed invoice. Storeships sent. Mr. Chamier appointed Comptroller of Accounts, and Mr. Wier Commissary General. Returns and public accounts desired. Subsistence for the foreign troops has been regularly sent out in the same manner as for the British troops. Indian presents to be retained; others being sent out for Canada. Oats will be sent. Mr. Gordon ordered to put special marks and numbers on each cask and package of bread, etc., that it may be readily known by whom supplied and shipped. Approval of Capt. Robert Mackenzie as Paymaster of the Provincial Troops.
Marked:— Received by the Liverpool, 5th July.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 4. No. 73. 6 pages.
Enclosing:—
Invoices ofsundry materials tor clothing shipped per "Friendship" and "Howe" See 17 Feb. 1777.

Gen. Washington to Lt.-Colonel Harrison.

1777, March 4. Morris Town, Head Quarters. — To improve arrangements as to exchange of prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 348.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 53; and 5. No. 43. 2 pages each.
Enclosed by Lt.-Col. Wallcott to Gen. Howe, 11 March 1777.

Lord Barrington to Lieutenant Munro of the 28th Regiment
of Foot on board the Prince George Transport, Portsmouth.

1777, March 5. War Office. — Commands that £30 advanced by Mrs. Hewell be repaid to her before he leaves England on penalty of the matter being laid before the Commander in Chief in North America.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 125. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 9 April 1777.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, March 5. Whitehall. — No. 6.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 24. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 231; copy 431, fo. 195; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
List of prisoners taken by the rebels belonging to the troops and armed vessels raised and fitted out by the Earl of Dunmore, Governor of Virginia.
Copy. Vol, 5. No. 25. 1 page.

Page 93

Sir Robert Herries to Gen. Sir W. Howe, Knight of the Bath.

1777, March 5. London. — Introducing Mr. John Patterson, his chief agent in the business mentioned in the enclosed letter, and who will join two others who went out last September. Cannot guess how soon circumstances may permit them to act in the object of their mission, but if not soon this nation runs evident risk of losing the benefit arising from supplying the Farmers General with tobacco.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 92. 2 pages.
Enclosing copy of Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 3 March 1777.

John Robinson, Secy., to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 5. Treasury Chambers. — State of Lord North's health prevents him writing. "It gave Lord North the greatest satisfaction to hear from you that the army under your command are amply and comfortably provided for, and I am thoroughly persuaded that Lord North hath nothing more at heart than to contribute everything in his power to your and their enjoyment of every necessary. I have taken the liberty to explain this fully to Major Balfour, and permit me to add that nothing will give me greater pleasure than your signifying to me whereinsoever I can aid or be of any service.
"The account you give his Lordship that the rage of rebellion of late is considerably abated, and the belief you express that so many of the people are well affected and inclined to take the benefit of the proclamation was no less agreeable, for nothing whatever is more ardently the wish or could give higher satisfaction to Lord North than to see this war terminate with honour to this country and in a happy union with his parent State. Your successes have much promoted this desirable end, and his Lordship and your countrymen rested satisfied in your best endeavours to complete happily what you have so well begun. God grant that blessing; you will have the assistance of every exertion from this country with cheerfulness, but its means in men are not equal to its spirit or readiness to procure and pay for them. I am sorry that you will find this from your dispatches, but what can be done will be, and that all happiness and every success may attend you and Lord Howe is the prayer and wish of the nation, and of none more sincerely, believe me, than of, Sir &c."
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 74. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 6. War Office. — To test in the most proper manner the utility of some rifle barrel pieces of new construction. Capt. Ferguson of the 70th is placed in command of 100 men with proper officers and embarked for North America. A quantity of green cloth is sent if a distinctive dress is desired for this
Page 94
detachment. Gapt. Ferguson is to return to his own regiment in England at the close of the campaign unless Howe judges it expedient to continue him on this service.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 109. 2 pages.

John Robinson, Secy., to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 8. Treasury Chambers. — The Lords of the Treasury have ordered an allowance of £500 a year for the use of Gov. Wentworth to be paid to his relation, Mr. Wentworth in London, and they expect he will not draw any more bills on account of any salary.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 75. 1 page.

Lt.-Col. Wm. Walcott, 5th Foot, to Gen. Sir William Howe.
1777, March 11. Brunswick. — Encloses two papers. Narrates what passed between himself and Col. Harrison concerning the exchange of prisoners of war; Washington's intention seems to be to protract and delay the delivery of the prisoners. He suggested to Col. Harrison, as the General had mentioned, that Washington should propose terms of a general peace. Objections urged by the Colonel.
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 50; and 5. No. 37. 6 and 7 pages respectively.
Enclosures:—
Gen. Washington Power to Lt.-Col. Harrison, see 4 March. Statement of Lt.-Col. Harrison's objections with the answers given by Lt.-Col. Walcott.
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 51; and 5, No. 36. 3 pages each.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 13. War Office. — Signifies the King's pleasure that enquiries should be made into the surrender of the garrisons of Chamblee and St. John's and a report sent to him (Barrington). Enquiry has been delayed until exchange of prisoners had taken place. Had the garrisons when released returned to Canada, Sir Guy Carleton would of course have received the King's instructions on this head, but they have become part of Howe's army. In case the garrison made prisoners at Ticonderoga join his troops he must also enquire into the loss of that fort.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 110. 2 pages.

Sir George Osborn to Captain Mackenzie.

1777, March 13. Rariton, near Brunswick. — "Sir, Overleaf I have the honour of copying for the General's inspection an answer from the Board of Treasury [see 1 November 1776,] which I received by the last packets concerning the pay of the Hessian troops. The only present difficulty therefore remaining I apprehend to be the pay of the Foreign Artillery, Hospital, and
Page 95
Commissariate. I wrote at Christmas to Lord Geo. Germain upon the subject; till the arrival of his answer I apprehend we must still issue a certain sum upon account for these purposes. With respect to the direct pay of the several regiments, Mr. Lorentz may now be able to make out a regular estimate for every muster including two months, and the foreign accounts may be brought into a narrow compass. If you will be so good as to see Mr. Lorentz upon this subject I shall esteem myself greatly obliged."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 117. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 14. War Office. — Same subject as the enclosed. Arrangements for Mr. Thornhill.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 111. 3 pages.
Enclosing Cox and Mair to Lord Barrington. See 18 Feb. 1777.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 14. War Office. — Sends return of recruits embarked and embarkation return of remount horses for 16th and 17th Light Dragoons.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 113. 1 page.

Lt.-Col. Alex. Innes to the Adjutant General [J. Patterson].

1777, March 14. — Paper from the Inspector General of Provincial Forces, Lt.-Col. Innes, containing questions and statements with answers in the margin, as to the Provincial Forces. Mentioned in his report of 9 November 1779, as accompanying that report.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 82. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Sir H. Clinton to Lord G. Germain, 11 Nov. 1779.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 136, fo. 737.

Monsr. Lorentz to Captain Mackenzie.

1777, March 14. New York. — As no money is left to pay the Hessian troops, requests he will apply to Howe to grant a warrant for £15,000. Hopes no difficulty will be found in getting it, as three months' pay is already due.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 166. 1 page.

Captain Mackenzie to Thomas Barrow.

1777, March 14. New York. — By the enclosed extract his Excellency is of opinion and directs that no deductions are to be made from pay of the surgeon's mates in the General Hospital, until direct orders come from the War Office. The same to apply to officers paid by warrants upon the contingencies.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 210. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Gen. Gage, Ext. 21 March 1775.

Page 96

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, March 15. New York. — Offering pardon to every man and officer now bearing arms, by force or otherwise, against the re-establishment of constitutional authority, if they surrender on or before 1st May next.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 38. 2 pages.
Printed in the New York Gazette, see Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fo. 499.

Stores.

1777, March 15. — General invoice of the cargoes of 13 storeships dispatched to his Excellency General Howe.
Vol. 4. No. 63. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 17. Whitehall. — On the enclosed.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 39. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 239; copy 431, fo. 197; copy in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
Francis Legge, Governor of Nova Scotia, to Lord George Germain.
Memorial. That in 1775 he received orders to raise a corps of 1000 men in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. That his bills on the Treasury were protested. That later he received orders to limit the corps to 500. That only two companies have received pay since July last, and no clothing, arms, or accoutrements have arrived. Prays that the King's promise of pay, etc., be fulfilled, and their future duty be the defence of Nova Scotia.
Vol. 5. No. 40. 3 pages.

Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Massey.

1777, March 17. New York. — Extracts. — Is at a loss to account for any reason he could have to imagine his command confined to the care of the dockyard and town of Halifax. Expects he will protect and defend the province committed to his charge as commander of the forces and of the posts they do or may occupy. Employment of Lieut. Barron and Mr. Tongue. "Your ideas of the good effects that might ensue from an attack upon the eastern coast of the Bay of Fundy may be very just, but the force you will have this summer cannot admit of sending troops out of the province, the security of which may furnish sufficient employment, and at all events I should wish that you did not quit it in person."
Vol. 29. No. 13. 2 pages.

Page 97

Lt.-Gen. S. Hodgson to Lord Barrington.

1777, March 19. Old Burlington Street. — Recommends Major Ogilvie for the purchase of Lt.-Col. Blunt's lieutenant-colonelcy.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 116. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 22 March 1777.

Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, March 20. Head Quarters, New York. — Protecting all who should raise supplies of vegetables, hay and other forage for the use of the army, and charging that all trespassers on other's property be brought to punishment.
Copy. Vol. 5. No, 41. 2 pages.
Printed copy in the New York Gazette, Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fo. 499.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 21. War Office. — Signifies his Majesty's pleasure that Maj.-Gen. Jones repair to Canada to take charge of the 62nd Regiment there to which he was appointed and to serve on the staff. Has acquainted Sir Guy Carleton therewith.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 114. 1 page.

George III. to [Gen. Sir William Howe].

1777, March 21. St. James. — Warrant authorising the General or Commander-in-Chief to appoint courts martial, confirm sentences, etc., amongst the troops.
Original signed and sealed. Vol. 61. No. 8. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir W. Howe.

1777, March 22. War Office. — Lt.-Col. Blunt to be allowed to sell his lieutenant-colonelcy and remain in England in consideration of his good services in the Welsh Fusiliers. To settle the succession as he thinks expedient.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 115. 1 page.
Enclosing Lt.-Gen. Hodgson to Lord Barrington, 19 March.

Robert H. Harrison to Lt.-Col. Walcott, 5th Regiment.

1777, March 22. Morris Town. — Acknowledges receipt of letter of 20th instant. The Revd. Mr. Beech's house will be convenient for their meeting, which cannot take place before 12 o'clock next Friday. The objections previously made by him respecting prisoners to be accounted for, and case of Maj.-Gen. Lee will be insisted on and adhered to. Proposed exchange of Mr. Franklin for Mr. Allen cannot take place.
2 copies. Vol. 3, No. 52; and 5, No. 42. 1 page each.

Page 98

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Sir Geo. Osborn.

1777, March 22. New York. — Has communicated his letter of 13th instant to the General. If he is required to correspond with the Secretary of State or with the Treasury about the pay or establishment of foreign troops it is desired that he will also lay all wants and difficulties about them before the Commander in Chief. Monsr. Lorentz has made only one demand for £15,000 since 24 Dec. last.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 167. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, March 23. New York. — In compliance with the letter of 20th November the Inspector General of the hospitals is ordered to give the same supply of medicines to surgeons of foreign and British corps. Report of the Board of General Officers communicated in dispatch of 2nd December is made known to the army. The return of majors whose rank is prior to 1773 desirous to purchase Lt.-colonelcies will be sent if the same can be collected before the departure of this packet.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 117. 1 page.

Anspach Troops.

1777, Mars 25. — Etat du regiment d'Eyb a Nimeguen.
1777, Mars 25. — Etat du regiment de Voit de Salzbourg a Nimeguen.
1777, Mars 25. — Etat du detachement d'artillerie pour servir les 4 canons passes la revue a Nimeguen.
Copies. Vol. 5, part of No. 50. 1 page each.
Originals in Public Record Office, S.P. For. German States 187

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 25. War Office. — A requisition having been made by Mr. Mallet, purveyor, to Mr. Adair, Inspector General, for wine and sugar for the use of the hospitals, complains that the quantity seems very high. Directs enquiry to be made and strictest economy ordered.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 20. 1 page.
Enclosing Return of the weekly expenditure of wine and sugar in his Majesty's hospitals at New York, 15 Feb. 1777.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, March 25. New York. — In answer to his letter of 24 December states that the Hessian accounts have classed the Anspecades and private Chasseurs with the other privates. As the Lords of the Treasury are of opinion the foreign troops should receive pay for their full complement, complete or not, desires an exact state of their pay and establishment as a guide in the future.
Copy. Vol. 6. No, 118. 1 page,

Page 99

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 26. War Office. — Recommends that orders be given to commanding officers of each corps to make out a list of necessaries that may be wanted in the course of the campaign or during the winter by the private men of regiments. Directs as to the stoppages for such necessaries.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 122. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Guy Carleton.

1777, March 26. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 48. 6 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, 13; in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 161; Sackville MSS., Lansdowne MSS., &c.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Guy Carleton.

1777, March 26. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 49. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, 13; copies in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21697, fo. 158; 21698, fo. 3; 21781, fo. 4.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, March 27. War Office. — Concerning appointment of Capt. Le Maistre to the captain-lieutenancy of the 7th Regiment of Foot.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 123. 2 pages.

Capt. Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. Clerk, B.M.G.

1777, March 27. — To order the tickets given by Captain Laird for hire or pay of small craft in the Barrack Master General's department be discharged from the 25th inst., and on June 24 Captain Laird will take up all tickets and give one general voucher to be paid by the Quarter Master General.
Extract. Vol. 5. No. 45. 1 page.

Hessians.

1777, Mars 28. — Etat des Chasseurs commande pour L'Escorte des Recrues pour le Corps Hessois en Amerique a Dortrecht.
1777, Mars 28. — Etat des Rescrues pour le Corps Hessois en Amerique a Dortrecht.
Copies. Vol. 5, part of No. 50. 2 pages.
Originals in Public Record Office, S.P.For. German States 187.

John George Lorentz to Capt. Robert Mackenzie.

1777, March 28. New York. — Sends by bearer of this letter six packets with 986 Hessian letters directed to Mr. Buttemeister,
Page 100
agent at the Hague. Insists the}7 be delivered unopened. Complains this has not always been done, and begs that all post offices in England be recommended to forbid their being opened. Sixth packet, which contains letters to the Landgrave, particularly requires care.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 168. 1 page.

Sir George Osborn to Capt. Mackenzie.

1777, March 30. Rariton, near Brunswick. — "Dear Sir, As I apprehend it has escaped your notice to procure from the Waldeck Regiment an estimate of their pay, such as was delivered in from the Hessians up to last Christmas, I beg leave to suggest to you, whether it will not be the shortest method to have the Waldeck estimate included with the Foreign Forces we expect, and make one for the Hessians to Midsummer, another of the other of the Foreign Troops.
"By the Treaty Great Britain is to pay the Landgrave five pounds for every dead man and the wounded and disabled in proportion. If you was to procure the General's order for a return of dead and disabled before the opening of the campaign, and be so good as to forward it to me, I shall be much obliged, as well as to favour me with the notice when you apprehend another pacquet may sail for England."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 176. 1 page.

Prisoners.

1774, December 1 - 1777, March 31. — Fuel and candles issued by Capt. Seix (sic), Barrack Master of New York, to rebel prisoners between these dates, extracted from his account of Issues by Thomas Cheap, agent to the late Barrack Master General, New York, 28 December 1780.
Original. Vol. 31. No. 5. 1 p.

Gov. Montfort Browne to Lord George Germain.

1777, April 1. Flushing, Long Island. — Considers rank of brigadier no step at all. Asks to be major general.
Extract. Vol. 5. No. 69. 2 pp.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Gen. Howe, 20 May. Signed letter in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Bahamas 8; copy in America and W. Indies 366, fo. 8.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost
.
1777, April 1. New York. — Appointment as brigadier general.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 131. 1 page.
Copv in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 437.

Page 101

Lord George Germain to John Stuart.

1777, April 2. Whitehall.
Copy, Vol. 5. No, 46. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 125 ; copy 397, fo. 156.

German Troops.

N.D. [1777, April 2.] — A return of the transports with troops from Holland under the direction of Lt. Wm. Cumming. Carrying Anspach and Hessian troops.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 47. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, Admiralty, Sec. In Letters 1611; copy, S.P. Foreign, German States, 187.

Lt.-Col. Wm. Walcott to General Washington.

1777, April 2. Township of Hillsborough. — Demanding fulfilment of previous agreement as to exchanges, officers for officers, of equal rank, soldier for soldier, and citizen for citizen. The objections offered by Lt.-Col. Harrison cannot with any degree of reason be admitted. Gen. Lee's release may with propriety be demanded whenever Gen. Washington has an officer equal in rank to exchange. Endorsed:— "Paper by Lieut.-Col. Walcott sent to General Washington on the 2nd April, having been refused acceptance by Mr. Harrison, at a meeting with Lt.-Col. Walcott, and since transmitted to General Washington."
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 54 ; 5, No. 52. 4 pages each.
Enclosed by Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe, 9 April.

Col. Guy Johnson to Capt. Robert Mackenzie.

1777, April 4. New York. — Proposals for Indians. Question of operations in Canada.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 201. 4 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Col. Guy Johnson.

1777, April 5. New York. — To use his own judgment in remaining or proceeding to Canada.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 206. 1 page.

Col. Guy Johnson to Sir William Howe.

1777, April 5. Broad Street, New York. — Similar subject.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 200. 1 page.

Col. Guy Johnson to Sir William Howe.

1777, April 6. New York. — Respecting the time in which he could visit and march Indians to any given place.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 199. 1 page. Page 102

Sir William Howe to Col. Guy Johnson.

1777, April 7. New York. — To lay aside thoughts of going to Canada to join Indians of Six Nations.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 207. 1 page.

Sir William Howe to Col. Guy Johhson.

1777, April 7. New York. — To wait orders at New York.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 208. 1 page.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Maj.-Gen. Massey.

1777, April 8. New York. — "The enclosed memorial [not identified] has been presented to the General, and I am directed by him to transmit it to you, that the merits of it may be enquired into, the stores said to be saved at Canso secured and such reasonable indemnification made to the memorialists as you think they may deserve. By the General's order seventy pounds sterling has been paid to Mr. Forster Sherlock, which at settlement you will be pleased to deduct."
Extract. Vol. 29. No. 14. 1 page.

John Robinson to Genl. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 8. Treasury Chambers. — Concerning Mr. Chamier's complaints of bad quality of bread and provisions. Mr. Gordon furnishes proofs that the damage, if any, proceeds from other causes than inherent bad quality. It is asserted that the cargoes when landed were left exposed to the weather on the wharfs — it is even stated that after the bread and flour had got wet it was sold and bought again by the Commissaries and served out to the troops. An immediate enquiry to be instituted.
Endorsed, Received by the Eagle 16th August.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 76. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Grey.

1777, April 9. War Office. — Transmits copy of a paper delivered him by a tradesman at Chatham stating that several sums of money had been obtained from him by officers of the 28th regiment. Desires enquiry be made for the credit of the corps and relief of the injured party. Has written to Howe on a similar matter connected with Lt. Munro.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 60. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to [Sir H. Clinton] 1 Sept. 1778.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 9. War Office. — Mentions, and is similar to, the above letter to General Grey.
Signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 124. Copy. No. 61. 2 pages and 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Lt. Munro, 5 March 1777.

Page 103

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 9. War Office. — A party of recruits raised for the 48th Regiment now stationed in the West Indies is to embark for New York and be there incorporated into such corps as Howe thinks proper.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 126. 1 page.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 9. Morris Town. — In answer to Lieutenant- Colonel Walcott's paper. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. IV., p. 380.)
Two copies. Vol. 5, No, 51; 3, No. 55. 8 pages and 7 pages.
Enclosing Lt.-Col. Walcott to Gen. Washington, 2 April.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 12. War Office. — Promotion of Capt. Leigh of the Foot Guards to a company in the 3rd regiment and Ensign Wm. Stead to succeed Leigh. Both to be permitted to return to Great Britain. Capt. Swanton and Ensign Beauclerck ordered out to replace them.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 127. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 14. Whitehall. — No. 7. Gen. Heister's return to Europe.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 84. 1 p.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 261; copy 431, fo. 201; and in the Sackville MSS.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Capt. William Spry.

1777, April 15. New York. — As to the mode of rendering his accounts and vouchers.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 16. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 16. War Office. — To see that the spare arms and cartouch boxes lent the recruits during their passage to North America are returned to the stores of the Quarter Master General, as on joining they will be provided with the regimental arms.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 128. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, April 16. War Office. — Sixty men to be drafted from the Light Dragoons in Ireland into the 16th and 17th Light Dragoons under his command. Drafts to be assembled at Corke by 1st May and reckoned on strength of 16th and 17th regiments from the day of the embarkation. Orders given that the account
Page 104
of each man's debts, not exceeding 15s. per man, be given to the commanding officer on board, to be transmitted to the commanding officer of the corps to which they are allotted. Each corps to pay five guineas on the receipt of each man.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 129. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Thomas Barrow.

1777, April 16. New York. — In answer to application of this day relative to the sending of money to Rhode Island for the public service, Mr. Molesworth should first make disbursements out of the money he brought from Europe until the whole is expended. That he should afterwards be furnished by him with such sums as he may require, remitting all warrants to be included in general state of disbursements. Notice will be given of the first ship of war sailing to Rhode Island on board of which the money intended may be sent. The Lords of the Treasury as a matter of indulgence are willing to allow 1% on such sums as commanders of ships may receive and deliver.
Extract. Vol. 5. No. 53. 2 pages.

[qy. Captain Mackenzie] to Governor Tryon.

1777, April 16. New York. — Is directed by the Commander-in- Chief to signify his approval of Mr. Waddell's proposal for raising a battalion out of the militia of the City and County of New York, to receive pay, provisions, &c, in the manner set forth in his memorial.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 54. 1 p.

Messrs. Winthrop and Kimble or Kemble to Sir Wm. Erskine, Quarter-Master-General.

1777, April 18. New York. — Have received and agreed to his proposals to assist in furnishing Government with the use of drivers, horses and waggons at the following rates:— For one large waggon with driver and four horses per day, 11s. 9d.; a small one with drivers and two horses, 6s. 9d.; a single horse, 1s. 8d.; a driver, 1s. 8d. The drivers to be supplied by Government with rations daily, and the horses to be shod and allowed forage. If lost, taken, or dying of glanders, a large horse to be paid for by Government at the rate of £20, a small one £15. Three months' notice to be given before discharge. Mr. Winthrop will make it his business to attend the army to see that everything is kept as complete as possible.
Copy. Vol. 35. No. 88. 3 pp.
Another copy is entered in the Proceedings of a Board of General Officers, 25-27 March, 1782, Vol. 18. No. 28: 2.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 19. Whitehall. — No. 8. Capt. Emmerick's project to raise German Chasseurs disapproved.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 85. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 265; copv 431, fo. 202; and in the Sackville MSS.

Page 105

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 19. Whitehall. — No. 9.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 86. 6 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 269; copy 431, fo. 202; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to David Tate [Taitt].

1777, April 20. St. Augustine. — The time has now come to send the Creek Indians to his assistance.
Copy. Vol. 10. No, 179. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 263, fo. 387.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to David Tate [Taitt].

1777, April 20. St. Augustine. — To send to the Cherokee nation to invade South Carolina or Georgia, as the enemy is attacking East Florida.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 178. 1 page. Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 263, fo. 388.

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, April 21. Head Quarters, New York. — Promising grants of land to the Provincial troops.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 55. 2 pages.
Printed in the New York Gazette, Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fo. 499.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, April 21. New York. — Refuting the charges of ill-usage of prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 557.)
Two copies. Vol. 5, No, 57; 3, No, 56. 5 pages and 14 pages.

Provincial Troops.

1777, April 21. Flushing, New York. — State of the 1st Battalion of the Prince of Wales's American Regiment under Brigadier General Montfort Browne. Drawn up and signed by Lieut.-Colonel Thomas Pattinson.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 56. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 606, fo. 227; 147, fo. 440; 590, fo. 146; War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 24.

Prisoners.

1777, April 22. Long Island. — Memorial to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe from Robt. Magaw, Samuel Miles, Samuel Attlie, Michael
Page 106
Swoope, Moses Rawlings, and Thomas Bull on behalf of themselves and others asking permission for one of their number to go on furlough to Philadelphia to obtain relief necessary to their subsistence and recommending Col. Attlie for that purpose.
Copies. Vol. 3. No. 57; and 5. No. 58. 1 page each.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 24. War Office. — Requiring from the various corps certificates of receipts of clothing.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 130. 1 page.

[Gen. Sir Wm. Howe] to Maj.-Gen. John Balling.

1777, April 24. Philadelphia. — Succession of Lieut. Barrow, by purchase, into his Excellency's battalion.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 62. 1 page.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Lt.-Col. Stiell, 22 April 1778.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 27. Whitehall. — Permission to Lord Percy to return to England.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 60. 1 page.

Col. Guy Johnson to Capt. Robt. Mackenzie.

1777, April 28. New York. — Sends return of office of his department.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 198. 2 pages.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, April 28. St. Augustine. — Measures taken in view of an approaching rebel invasion of his province.
Extract, Vol. 1. No. 137. 2 pp.
The same in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 441.

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, April 30. New York. — All prices to be in currency according to specified rates.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 61. 1 p.
Printed in the New York Gazette, Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fo. 507.

Rebecca Howell to Lord Barrington.

[1777, April? about.] Chatham. — Petition. Is a widow and trader at Chatham. Asks reimbursement of an advance of £30 to Lt. Munro of the 28th for subsistence of his men.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 62. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to [Sir H. Clinton] 1 Sept. 1778.

Page 107

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, May 2. War Office. — Col. Pattison to act as Brigadier.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 132. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, May 3. New York. — An addition of 3s. per day to be given to Charles ShirrefT in consideration of his double duty as Fort Adjutant and Barrack Master.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 129. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, May 3. New York. — Is permitted to act as Brigadier- General. Sends copies of letters written to Gov. Tonyn and Mr. Stuart.
Extract. Vol. 1. No. 130. 2 pages.
Same in the Public P\ecord Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 133.

Gen. Sir William Howe to John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

1777, May 3. New York.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 118. 3 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 449.

Captain McKenzie to Doctor Morris.

1777, May 3. New York. — Is directed to lay a list before him that he may order a proper supply of medicines for the troops at St. Augustine. Directions will be given that such supply be received by a ship sailing to that place on the following Monday.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 62. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Wtilliam Howe to Gov. Patrick Tonyn.

1777, May 4. New York. — That the rank of Brigadier General has been conferred on Col. Prevost and the command of the troops in E. and W. Florida devolves on him.
Extract. Vol. 1. No. 136. 1 page.
Same in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 445.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gov. Peter Chester.

1777, May 6. New York. — Similar letter.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 107. 1 page.

Page 108

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Col. Alexander Dickson.

1777, May 6. New York. — Acknowledges letter of 22nd Dec. by Capt. Mulcaster. Col. Prevost's authority as Brigadier- General in both the Floridas. "The season of the year is too far advanced for operations in your warm climate, and there are more material objects elsewhere to engage the service of the troops at present, trusting that those provinces will be able from their internal force and the friendship of the Indians to protect themselves." P.S. — Desires him to acknowledge receipt of Captain Boyd's memorial.
Copy. Vol, 1. No. 109. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Col. William Stiel[l].

1777, May 6. New York. — To correspond with and take directions from Brig.-Gen. Prevost.
Copy. Vol, 1. No. 112. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to the Officer commanding the 55th Foot.

1777, May 7. War Office. — Sends the enclosed. Desires to know the terms on which Mr. Soubiran retired from the regiment.
Copy. Vol. 6. No, 133. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Petition of Lt. William Soubiran to Lord Barrington. Has been allowed ensign's half-pay, but since the departure of the regiment from Ireland, to America the English agents have had no credit given for him. Is nearly 60 years of age. Begs consideration of his case.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 134. 1 p.
Capt. Robert Mackenzie to John Stuart.

1777, May 9. New York. — The Commander in Chief thinks the hatchet and white wing from the Chickasaw, Chactaw and Creek Nations should be acknowledged, although they fell into the hands of the rebels. Encloses talk. Sends also invoice of Indian goods.
Extract. Vol. 1. No, 116. 1 page.
Same in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 465.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to the Cherokee and other Indians.

1777, May 9. New York. — Talk.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 117. 4 pages.
Same in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 457.

Indian Presents.

1777, May 9. New York. — Invoice of the Indian presents shipped on board the Union Transport .... Wallias, master, bound for St. Augustine.
Copy. Vol. 1. No, 115. 2 pages.

Page 109

Gov. Bernardo de Galvez to Capt. Thomas Lloyd, of H.M. frigate Atalanta.

1777, May 11. New Orleans. — Two letters.
Copies. Vol. 1. Nos. 124, 125. 4 pages and 1 page.
Both enclosed by Lt.-Col. Stiell to Gen. Howe, 3 June.
Both in the Public Record Office, Admiralty, Sec. In Letters, 240; S.P. Foreign, Spain 204; America and W. Indies 263, fos. 355 and 359.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gov. Patrick Tonyn.

1777, May 12. New York. — On the threatened invasion of the province.
Copy, Vol. 1. No. 135. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 453.

Hessians.

1777, Mai 15. a Cassell. — Detail des Pieces d'Amies, d'Uniformes, et d'Equipage de Compagnie envoyes en Amerique pour le Corps des Troupes Hessoises, le 14 du Courant a l'Occasion du Transport de Chasseurs et de Recrues, outre les Pieces qui ont ete specifiers dans la Liste du 3 du Courant.
Copy, Vol, 5. No. 17. 1 page,
Enclosed by William Knox to Gen. Howe, 12 June.
Original in the Public Record Office, German States 109.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, May 10. War Office. — Recruits of the 48th regiment to be transferred to the 26th.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 135. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Thomas Barrow.

1777, May 17. New York. — To appoint a proper person with full powers, &c, to attend the main army under his (Sir William's) command as acting deputy paymaster-general.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 63. 1 p.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, May 18. Whitehall. — Nos. 10 and 11. Two letters.
Duplicate signed letters. Vol. 5. Nos. 64 and 65. 1 p. and 5 pp.
Drafts in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fos. 335 and 339; copies 431, fos. 207, 208, and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gov. William Tryon.

1777, May 19. Whitehall. — No. 11.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 68. 3 pp.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fol. 249; copy 442, fo. 336,

Page 110

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, May 20. War Office. — Acknowledges letters of 24th March and 1st April with enclosed papers. Sends copies of the establishments of foreign troops, and has transmitted to the Treasury Board an extract on the subject of the Anspessades. The higher pay claimed by the Chasseurs was settled previous to bringing the charge before Parliament. Warrants for pay will be laid before the King.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 136. 1 p.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, May 20. Whitehall. — No. 12.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 66. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132 fo. 347; copy 431, fo. 211; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir W. Howe.

1777, May 20. Whitehall. — Separate.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 67. 1 p.
Enclosing Gov. Browne to Lord Germain, 1 April.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 351; copy, 431, fo. 211; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, May 21. War Office. — To give orders that the hospitals at St. Augustine be supplied with articles requisite to cleanliness.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 137. 1 p.
Enclosing Robt. Catherwood to Mr. Adair, 25 February.

Sir Guy Carleton to [Lord Barrington].

1777, May 21. Quebec. — Has nothing to charge either the garrison of Chamblee or St. John's with.
Extract. Vol. 6. No. 210. 1 p.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 17 July.
Original in the Public Record Office. War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 21.

1777, May 21. — General orders of this date, see under 2 May, 1779.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, May 22. War Office. — Respecting the case of Capt. Gilman. To enquire into the commission held by Capt. Moore and settle the grounds on which Capt. Gilman has been deprived of his rank. The affair of Ensign Graham waits his determination.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 139. 2 pages.

Page 111

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, May 22. New York. — Prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 559.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 58; 5. No. 70. 1 page each.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, May 23. War Office. — Acknowledges receipt of March and April dispatches. Camp equipage for the 7th and 26th will be sent. Alterations and promotions.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 140. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Lt.-Col. Clark to Maj.-Gen. Frederick, see 6 January,
List of promotions.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 141. l page.

Hessians.

1777, May 24. — Etat de l'Etat-major du corps de Chasseurs Hessois, et des Deux compagnies destinees pour raugmentation du corps de Chasseurs en general et des Chasseurs destines pour completter les Deux compagnies de ce corps, qui sont deja en Amerique, et des Recrues destines pour le Corps en General. Etat des Recrues pour le corps Hessois en Amerique a Bremer Lehe. Both these certified as mustered this day by Wm. Faucitt, colonel and commissary.
Vol. 5. No. 78. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Wm Knox to Gen. Howe, 12 June.
Originals in the Public Record Office, S.P. Foreign German States 188.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, May 26. New York. — That the Provincial corps, Graham's, Small's and Legge's have not been regular in settling the provision accounts with the commissary. Requests him to direct that this be attended to and the receipts transmitted.
Extract. Vol. 29. No. 17. 1 page.

Stores.

1777, May 26. — Invoice of one hundred and twenty-three casks of shoes consigned to his Excellency Sir W. Howe, &c, at New York shipped on the Fidelity and Hannah transports.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 157. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 6 June.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, May 28. War Office. — That none of the non-commissioned officers or private men belonging to the Foot Guards are to be discharged in America, but are to be sent home when unfit for further service.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 6. No, 143. 1 page.

Page 112

Maj.-Gen. Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, May 28. New York. — Instructions as to the rank of militia officers (in Nova Scotia). Transmits garrison contingent bill. P.S. — Militia officers not to interfere with the troops.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 18. 2 pages.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to George Turner.

1777, May 28. New York. — Concerning warrants for subsistence accounts chiefly relating to Goreham's and Maclean's corps.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 19. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Philip Schuyler to Gen. Sir. William Howe.

1777, May 28. Philadelphia. — Major Edmondstone "has been sent by the Convention of New York to this place, and the delegates of the States having claimed him as a prisoner thereof, he is now going to Reading on his parole, where he will remain until his Excellency General Washington can be consulted on the propriety of exchanging him for Major Payne, who was taken at Wards House in West Chester, and is now a prisoner with you."
2 copies. Vol. 8, No. 33b and Vol. 5, No. 17oo. 1 page and 2 pages respectively.

Hessians.

1777, May 31. — Etat des Chasseurs et Recrues apres leur embarquement a Bremer Lehe.
Vol. 5. No. 79o. 1 page.
Enclosed by Wm. Knox to Gen. Howe, 12 June.
Original in the Public Record Office, S.P. Foreign German States 188.

N.D. [1777, May.] — Paper not signed nor dated, endorsed:—

"Commerce up ye Mississippi and an account of the interruption to trade by the Spaniards." "A dispute hath lately broke forth between us and our neighbour the Spanish Governor of Orleans, which may be productive of some altercation between the two Courts; he having seized and confiscated all the vessels with their merchandize, and imprisoning the seamen then on board, which had a communication with the shore of the Island of Orleans, either by having spars placed from the shore to the vessels, or plank from the vessels to the shore; and some he seized who were at anchor at some distance. All this was momentary done, without any previous notice, on a supposition of their carrying on a contraband trade, a trade that hath for years past (on their paying a small share of the profits) been connived at, and even this Governor who hath not been long appointed to the Government, had connived at it, until this period. He had some time before given the fullest indulgence to the commerce of France, from the Islands, and elsewhere, to the prejudice of our trade; and in other respects was civil to our
Page 113
merchants and passengers, going into the territories of Spain. It is certain that this violent measure of the Spanish Governor at the time of profound peace with them has proceeded from some pique to individuals and not from any orders from his Court, for no vessel had arrived in the Mississippi, from any port in Spain, since the departure of our ships richly laden from the Mississippi to England; therefore if any such order had been given him prior to their departure, such order would have been carried into execution, as they had rich cargoes on board, and were in a similar situation with the other vessels, having usually the same communication with the shore. So well understood was the liberty of trading on board our own vessels in the river, that several of the principal merchants had converted their vessels into warehouses and were visited by the natives on all occasions. It sometimes happened that goods were seized, and even then great indulgence was shown to the person loosing his effects. This was the situation of our commerce before this period, and until an indulgence was given to the French, which I consider neither Spain or Great Britain had a right to tolerate if the spirit of the treaty is maintained; but I perceive that there is a strong inclination to injure the interest of our Country in the point of commerce for some time before this happened. Gunpowder was actually shipp'd and sent up the River Mississippi to be forwarded by the way of the Ohio to the Americans, and I am credibly informed it was also sent to Philadelphia by a vessel fitted out by one Pollock from New Orleans, to Welling and Morris, which vessel arrived safe. Many things clearly prove that these have an inclination to assist the Americans in their revolt. Gov. Chester sends a particular account to England by the pacquet and two gentlemen of his council are to go immediately to New Orleans to make particular enquiry into this affair, and to demand restitution of the vessels, &c."
Vol. 1. No. 123. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 1. War Office. — Concerning alteration in the mode of charging in the regimental accounts for the expense of retaking deserters.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 144. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Gage, see 23 March 1770.

Major Andrew Gordon to Lt.-Col. Dudley Templer, 26th Regiment.
1777, June 1. Staten Island. — That a number of tents and marquees for the regiment had just been discovered in the Quarter- Master-General's store, having been with the army nearly two
Page 114
years; those for the officers are mostly all ruined. Gives this information that the officers may not be put under stoppages for what they never received.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 249. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 28 Nov. 1777.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 1. New York. — Arrival of transports. Relieving of the guards, &c.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 150. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 1. New York. — Arrival of ships of war and store ships. Has given orders for extra pay of 3s. per day to Mr. Shirreff. Remount horses arrived in good condition. Encloses returns.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 146. 2 pages.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.
Enclosures:—
The pay of the Hessian Chasseurs as they are now paid. For a captain per month £12 10s. and 4 rations.     .     .     .    a private £1 a month.
Vol. 6. No. 147. 1 page.
Pay of the Hessian Chasseurs in the late war. For a captain 50 German dollars which is £8 6s. 8d. and 4 rations of forage, each ration worth 15 shillings . . . a private 4 2/3 dollars or 15s. 6 2/3d.
Vol. 6. No. 148. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 1. New York. — Orders given that deficiency of officers for the additional companies be supplied. Thanks for sending the list of the army.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 149. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 1. New York. — Touching Mr. Napier's appointment.
Copy. Vol. 6 No. 151. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Page 115

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 1. New York. — Explains delay in enquiry into case of Chamblee and St. Johns.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 152. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Troops.

1777, June 1. New York. — Return of bedding and barrack furniture in possession of various regiments (37 enumerated). Consisting of bedcases, bolstercases, blankets, sheets, tables, forms, buckets, grates, fire-irons, and tools. Signed, George Clark, B.M.G.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 71. 2 double pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe
.
1777, June 2. War Office. — Stating the commands of his Majesty respecting memorials of Lieut.-Colonels Harcourt and Birch for additional allowances.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 155. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 3. Whitehall. — No. 13. To effect the exchange of Captain Sinclair.
Two copies. Vol. 2. No. 94; 5, No. 72. 1 page each.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 355; copy 431, fo. 212; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lt.-Col. William Stiell to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 3. Pensacola. — The civil and military are on very good terms. Lt.-Colonel Dickson and himself agree in every sentiment. Sends list of corps, &c. [the 16th and two battalions of the Royal Artillery].
"I am now to lay before your Excellency a transaction that happened about the middle of April at New Orleans, the armed sloop 'West Florida,' commanded by Lieut. Burdon, sent from Jamaica by Admiral Gayton for the service of the lakes and in particular for the defence of that part of the province, having seized some small vessels with wine, tobacco, &c. on board. Upon this intelligence the Spanish Governor was so offended that on pretence of our having interrupted the usual intercourse and hospitality which he alledges he wished to be kept up between the two provinces, and an infringement of the free navigation of the lakes to Spanish subjects, directly sent up and down the River Mississipi, and seized all the English vessels within his reach, it is said to the value of near fifteen thousand pounds sterling, and next morning published a proclamation, copy of which I enclose for your Excellency's perusal. This hasty
Page 116
proceeding, it is supposed, the Governor of New Orleans would have been glad it had not happened, as he has since relaxed from that severity first announced by the proclamation, but it seems by the Spanish law there is no withdrawing the prosecution after certain forms are gone through, the Governor has given up his own share of the seizures.
"A few days after this Capt. Loyd in his Majesty's sloop of war 'Attalanta' arrived in the River Mississipi and forthwith demanded a release of the ships, cargoes and men seized, which the Governor refused, acquainting him by letter that it was not in his power as they had been regularly condemned by the Spanish laws for being on the contraband trade. The material points in dispute are two. First, whether he has a right to seize vessels and cargo afloat, should it be proved they had landed any part of their cargo. Second, whether they have a right to seize or even search vessels on the river upon suspicion. These two points are looked upon so essential for this province that Governor Chester with the advice of his council has taken the resolution to send in a few days two gentlemen of that Board to Orleans, with a long letter on the subject. These gentlemen are to enquire minutely into everything that has happened and endeavour to settle these two points if possible."
Extract. Vol, 12. No. 12. 3 pages.
Enclosing Bern. de Galvez to Capt. Lloyd, 11 May.
                   Bern. de Galvez to Capt. Lloyd, 12 May.

Treasury Minutes.

1777, June 3. Treasury Chambers. — Consideration of the contract with Rich. Atkinson for 100,000 gallons of rum, &c.
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 85. 3 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [General Howe], 6 August.

Major Francis Hutcheson to Lt.-Col. Campbell, 57th Regiment.

1777, June 4. New York. — Arrangements with regard to Lieutenant Thornhill's resignation.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 73. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, June 5. New York. — In answer to that of 27th March respecting successions in the 7th regiment.
Copy. Vol, 6. No. 153. 2 pages.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

[Gen. Sir William Howe] to John Smith (Treasurer of the Committee for the Relief of Soldiers' Widows and Orphans).

1777, June 5. New York. — "I have the honour to thank you for your letter of the 1st November last, accompanying the
Page 117
necessaries you have been so good as to send out in the 'Townshend' store ship for the relief of the poor women and children of the army left at Halifax. The greater number of them having been lately sent to this place by Major-General Massey I have thought proper to order the whole to be landed here and put under the direction of the Board of General Officers to supply the immediate wants of those people and to order a proportion to be sent to Halifax with your letter to General Massey to answer your further good intentions."
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 142. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, June 5. New York. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 560.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 59; 5, No. 74. 1 page each.

Alexander Macleod.

1777, June 5. — Account for £278 16s. 4½d, expended on the public service in North Carolina. For expresses, for guns, swords, &c, and money to distressed Highlanders, his own travelling expenses and funds to people who assisted him to make his escape. Sworn 5 June, 1777, before David Mathews, Mayor of New York. (Other papers of this claim are placed 10 August, 1779, under their covering letter.)
Copy. Vol. 20. No. 64. 3 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 10 August 1779,

Frederick George Mulcaster to John Stuart.

1777, June 5. New York, Head Quarters. — Forwarding by order copy of a letter from Lord Germain lest the original should not reach him. Congratulations on the royal approbation.
Autograph copy. Vol. 1. No. 115. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 6. War Office. — Sends invoice.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 156. 1 page.
Enclosing Invoice of shoes, 26 May, 1777.

The King to Parliament.

1777, June 6. Copy of the King's speech.
Printed. Vol. 5. No. 82. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe, 12 June.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 9. War Office. — Directions relative to the pay of hospital mates. Desires certificates of persons employed in the hospital, with periods of their service.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 158. 1 page.

Page 118

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 9. War Office. — That several deserters from the Anspach corps, named in the margin, are shipped for New York.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 159. 1 page.

Elias Durnford to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 10. Pensacola. — That Governor Chester was induced from the situation of affairs to direct him to complete as far as necessary the new barrack and to erect such temporary works as might enable them to make some defence in case of an attack. Gov. Chester has already expended in completing the barrack for the bare lodgment of the troops and the other works and repairs about £3,000, two of which have been drawn on the Treasury and one remains to be drawn for. All is quiet at present.
Autograph letter signed. Vol. 1. No. 122. 2 pages.

Elias Durnford to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 10. Pensacola. — Meeting with the Chactaws and Chickesaws at Mobile. Report of attack on East Florida. Flour greatly needed. Desires directions may be sent for expenditure of materials used in the works at Pensacola.
Autograph letter signed. Vol. 1. No. 126. 2 pages.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 10. Camp at Middle Brook. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 454.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 60 and Vol. 5, No. 75. 9 and 11 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 11. War Office. — Acknowledges receipt of letters of 24th and 25th April with enclosures. Is glad Mr. Blair is kept in the 10th regiment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 160. 1 page.

William Knox to Gen. Sir. Wm. Howe.

1777, June 12. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 76. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 883; copy 431, fo. 213; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosures:—
Detail des pieces d'armes     .     .     .     .     pour le corps des Trouppes Hessoises, see 15 May.
Etat de l'Etat-major du corps, &c, and Etat des Recrues     .     .     .     .     see 24 May.
Etat des Chasseurs et Recrues apres leur Embarquement a Bremer Lehe, see 31 May.
General state of the corps of Hessian Chasseurs.
Original Vol. 5. No. 79. 1 page.

Page 119

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to [Gen. Sir William Howe].

1777, June 12. St. Augustine. — Acknowledges letter of congratulation, also money sent by the Daphne for reimbursing Governor Tonyn. Wishes regulation might be made as to the freights to be paid; has been obliged to pay 2 and 2½ per cent. Medicines sent being insufficient, has directed the Surgeon to make a new application.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 11. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, June 12. War Office. — Capt. Parsons of the 10th regiment, who intended to join his regiment, is detained to attend a trial.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 161. 1 page.
Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, June 12. Whitehall. — Circular.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 80. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 239; copy 397, fo. 168.
Enclosures:—
King's Speech, see 6 June 1777.
Act authorizing the carrying of captures into any port of North America, &c.
Printed. Vol. 5. No. 81. 4 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, June 12. Whitehall. — Separate. Recommending Mr. A. Stewart, an American sufferer.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 95. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 379; copy 431, fo. 212; and in the Sackville MSS.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 14. St. Augustine. — Will attend to directions as to his conduct with the Governors of East and West Florida and Mr. Stuart. Sends copy of his letter to Mr. Stuart. Difficulty of penetrating into West Florida a reason for its safety. "This province can in the space of a few days be invaded either by land or by water by an army well supplied with artillery, provisions, &c, but nothing of that kind can be expected at Pensacola." The threatened invasion of the rebels has been baffled and they are now returned into Georgia. Little dependence can be placed on the Indians; is afraid the activity of the emissaries of the rebels amongst them has had too much influence. Suggests the raising of a troop of 50 good Rangers on horseback, who, being armed with their rifles or carabines and a good sword fixed to the saddle, could
Page 120
occasionally either engage on horseback or on foot. The keeping of horses is no material expense. Grass is to be had at all times, and a little corn when they are on duty would be sufficient in case of an engagement. Being kept as a reserve they would occasionally assist where necessary or pursue with great advantage. Major Prevost grieves much that he had not a small party of that kind with him in his last skirmish with the rebel horse, as few of them could have escaped, having a deep river to pass after they were defeated. The Rangers and Indians who were with him at the time not being looked upon as being under the major's command, when urged by him to pursue said their horses were too much fatigued. The Indians, entirely intent on plunder, thought of nothing but securing all the horses they could find and the King's troops, many of them barefoot and greatly fatigued and overcome with excessive heat, could not attempt to come up with people who fled with all possible swiftness and were on horseback. Expense of barracks and fortifications. News of capture of a brig bound to this place with Indian goods.
Extract. Vol. 12. No. 9. 4 pages.
Enclosing Brig.-Gen. Prevost to John Stuart, see 14 June 1777.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to John Stuart.

1777, June 14. St. Augustine.
Two copies. Vol. 10. No. 181; 12. No. 10. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 381.

John Stuart to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, June 16. Pensacola. — Indian affairs.
Vol. 10. No. 189. 4 pages.
Enclosure:—
Letter from Jos. Vann to Alexander Cameron.
Copy. Vol, 10. No. 188. 3 pages.
Treasury Minutes.

1777, June 18. Treasury Chambers. — With reference to a contract made by Gen. Howe for 350 gallons of rum.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 83. 2 pages.
Enclosed by J. Robinson to [Gen. Howe] 6 August 1777.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 19. Treasury Chambers. — The Lords of the Treasury approve the relief given to Mr. Glen, Comptroller of the Customs at Newhaven, but desire in future such officers be paid only sums due to them as their salary and a separate account kept.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 77. 1 page.

Page 121

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 20. Whitehall. — No. 14. On the news of the success at Boundbrook and at Danbury. Touching vacant ensigncies. Hopes the "Isis" and convoy have arrived.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 83. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 387; copy 431, fo. 215; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Capt. Mackenzie.

1777, June 23. Camp at Amboy. — "I have the honor of acquainting you that I mustered and inspected yesterday the two battalions of Anspach Brandenburg, and found them in perfect good order, their cloathing and their arms good, the 1st battalion with 534, the 2nd 492 fit for duty, they have but 30 sick.
"I visited the two company's of Hessian Chasseurs last arrived and found them to consist of 106 rank and file for the mounted troop, for the foot 123; they have among them a few old men; they lost 57 taken on board the 'Favourite' transport, and one Chasseur at Bonham Town, they are well armed and cloathed, their swords are complete, they expect their bridles and saddles in the next ships.
"I inspected the Waldeck recruits, whom I found to be 88 in number of a very low size, very young and very bad recruits."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 171. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, June 24. War Office. — Announcing the King's permission to Lieut. Hastings to go to North America.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 162. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Lt. Hastings, see 3 July 1776.

Messrs. Mure, Son & Atkinson to Lords of the Treasury.

1777, June 24. London. — With regard to the price of the rum to be furnished by them for the use of the army under Gen. Howe.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 79. 4 pages.
Enclosing Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson to Joshua Loring, Junr., 14 Jan. 1777.
Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson to Gen. Howe, 14 Jan. 1777.
Enclosure 1 in John Robinson to Gen. Howe, 6 August 1777.
Copy in Lord Dartmouth's Collection, 14th Report, Appendix X. 440.

Lord Amherst to the Secretary at War [Barrington].

1777, July 2. — In answer to a note of 30 June desiring his opinion on a letter to be sent to Gen. Howe, states that though the King has allowed him to make arrangements respecting
Page 122
commissions throughout the whole of the Royal American regiment and recommending the officers to the third and fourth battalion he had no thought of recommending to such vacancies as happened in the companies in North America which are immediately under Howe's command. His reasons for recommending Capt. Van Braam.
Extract. Vol. 6. No. 212. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 8 July 1777.

Rocheblave to Henry Stuart.

1777, July 4. Fort Gage. — Intelligence that at Fort Pitt a quantity of "Berges" are preparing to embark a body of men expected there and whose destination is not known. It may only be for Detroit or the banks of the Mississippi.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 164. 1 page.
Qy. Enclosed by John Stuart to Gen. Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.
Also in Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 264, fo. 176.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, July 6. New York. — Sir William Howe desires him to direct Lt. Clarke to discontinue the working of the colliery on the island of Cape Breton. Sufficient coals to be removed to Halifax for the winter's consumption, and the coal boats, buildings, and utensils which cannot be removed given into the care of the Barrack Master at Louisburg. Lieut. Clarke and his party then to return to Halifax and render account of expenses.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 20. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, July 8. War Office. — Respecting the appointment of Major Van Braam in 60th regiment vice Brown by purchase.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 211. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Amherst to the Secretary at War, 2 July.

.

Gen. Sir William Howe to George Turner.

1777, July 10. New York. — Requires him to receive warrants which shall be granted by Major-Gen. Massey as final for pay or subsistence and to grant such sums as he may authorize by temporary warrants for contingencies or incidental expenses.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 22. 1 page.

Capt. Robt. Mackenzie to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, July 10. New York. — The Commander-in-Chief desires him to appoint a general court martial to try Lieut.-Col. Goreham on the charges exhibited by Major Batt in the enclosed letter.
Page 123
Sends commission for Mr. Tonge as second lieutenant and promises to fill up other vacancies as ascertaiued. Concerning payments of the Provincial (Nova Scotia) Corps.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 21. 3 pages.
Enclosure:—
Major Thomas Batt to Lieut.-Col. Paterson.
1777, July 10. — Account of the debilitated state of Lt.-Colonel Gorehams regiment. Proposes that Lt. Connor be sent to Newfoundland to complete it.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 23. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, July 11. New York. — Has given orders to George Turner, D.P.M.G., at Halifax to receive his (General Massey's) warrants for pay or subsistence, and furnish moneys.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 24. 1 page.

John Stuart to Alexander Cameron.

1777, July 11. Pensacola.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 186. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 389.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gov. Peter Chester.

1777, July 12. New York. — Sends consigned to Mr. Stuart a ship loaded with provisions and another with Indian presents sent for use in his department. Suggestions as to attaching the Indians.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 106. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 545.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to John Stuart.

1777, July 12. New York. — Indian affairs.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 114. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 571.

Col. Guy Johnson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.
1777, July 12. New York. — Conference with the Monsok Indians. Would like an interview or commands.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 197. 1 page.

Page 124

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Lt.-Col. Wm. Stiell.

1777, July 13. New York. — To take into custody on the requisition of Gov. Chester or Mr. Stuart any person supplying spirits to the Indians contrary to regulations.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 111. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 553.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1777, July 14. New York. — Submitting an application in favour of the officers employed in bringing out drafts from the additional companies at home to regiments in America for consideration of the extraordinary expenses they are thus subjected to.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 154. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, Original Correspondence 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, July 14. New York. — Acknowledges receipts of letters of 14th and 22nd June. Thanks to Major Prevost. To leave to the Superintendent's experience the entire management of the Indians. Sends copies of his letters to Stuart, Chester and Stiell as to the Indian traders and restrictions upon the article of spirits. "The proposal you have made for for (sic) forming a corps of Rangers mounted, is a measure of which you must be the best judge: I shall only observe that Troops upon this plan are always most expensive, and nothing but inevitable Necessity can justify the Employment of them. But after the strictest injunction for the utmost Oeconomy, the Mode and Appointments of a Troop of Horsemen not exceeding 50 men exclusive of officers to be raised and employed as you may think most conducive to His Majesty's Service in the Province under your Command, desiring at the same time that you will be pleased to send me by the first Opportunity the Establishment you have determined upon and an Estimate of the Expence." Captain Mcintosh may quit the service and Captain Browne return to Europe. Bat and forage money for 200 days may be given to certain officers. Gives notice of provisions, recruits, etc., sent to the Floridas.
Copy. Vol, 1. No. 128. 6 pages.

Capt. Frederick George Mulcaster to Alex. Skinner.

1777, July 14. New York, Head Quarters. — Instructions to receive from the "Springfield" the Indian presents on the enclosed list.
Enclosure:—
List of Indian presents in the "Springfield" to be left at St. Augustine.
Copies. Vol, 1. No. 107. 2 pages in all.

Page 125

John Stuart to David Taitt.

1777, July 14. Pensacola. — Two letters.
Copies. Vol. 10. Nos. 184 and 185. 1 page and 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 401 and 405.

John Robinson to Vice-Adml. Lord Howe.

1777, July 15. Treasury Chambers. — Provision ships bound to E. Florida have applied to go with the convoys to New York; when they arrive he is desired to order a convoy for them to St. Augustine.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 78. 1 page.

[Qy. Capt. Mackenzie] to [Brig. Gen. Augustine Prevost].

1777, July 16. New York. — "In your letter of the 12th June which I had the honor to receive, you mention your having wrote to the General on the subject of public Expences, and directed Accompts of your Expenditures to be forwarded, yet I do not find that such Accots have been presented, therefore" the Dep. Pay Master Gen. has orders to remit to him for extraordinaries £2,500 in specie and the like sums in bills of exchange. Only 1 per cent, for freight of public money is allowed. When received, his requisitions for medicines shall be attended to.
Extract. Vol. 12. No. 7. 2 pages.

Beeston Long, Richard Neave, R. Glover, and W. Crichton to Lords of the Treasury.

1777, July 16. London. — Report on the contract for supplying rum entered into by the Treasury with Mr. Atkinson.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 86. 5 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen. Howe] , 6 August.
Copy in Lord Dartmouth MSS., 14th Report, Appendix X., 441.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to George Turner.

1777, July 16. New York. — By Sir William Howe's pleasure he is to act Dep. Muster Master of the Provincial Corps in the Province of Nova Scotia and receive 5s. sterling per day.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 25. 1 page.

Gen. George Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, July 16. New Jersey. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, IV., 496.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 61 and Vol. 5, No. 87. 1 page each.

Page 126

Richard Atkinson to Messrs. Beeston Long, Neave, Glover, and Crichton.

1777, July 17. London. — And note in answer 18 July.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 88. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen. Howe] , 6 August.
Also in the Dartmouth MSS., 14th Report Appendix X., 441.

Lord Barrington to Earl Harcourt, Nuneham, Oxfordshire.

1777, July 17. War Office. — Has laid letter of 13th inst. before the King, who has no objection to Lt.-Col. Harcourt's return at the end of the campaign provided it meets with Sir W. Howe's approval.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 242. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 6 August 1777.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, July 17. War Office. — Has received various letters by Major Dixon. Sends information concerning the pay of the army. Sends extract of Sir Guy Carleton's letter. His Majesty approves the exchange between Capts. Faucett and Loftus and a commission for the latter to a Lieutenancy in the 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards will be issued. Must wait for Mr. Adair's return from attending the Duke of Gloucester before defining the duties of hospital officials. Mr. Napier will be dispatched speedily.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 222. 2 pages.
Enclosing Sir G. Carleton to [Lord Barrington] . Extract, see 21 May 1777.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Andrew Elliott.

1777, July 17. New York. — Has appointed him this day Superintendent of imports and exports to and from New York, Long and Staten Islands. His deputies are Lambert Moore and John Nugent with a salary of £200 sterling. The officers are:— Richard Nicholls Colden, Searcher, at 16s. per day, New York currency; Michael Kearny, Warehouse Keeper, 10s.; William Tyrrel, Assister to the Searcher and Warehouse Keeper, 10s.; James Cogeshall, Wharf Officer, 10s.; Anthony Kendall, ditto, 10s.; Thomas Bayeux, Assistant ditto, 8s.; William Rescorla, ditto, 8s.; John Moore, first Clerk, 10s.; James Moron, second ditto, 8s. Instructions as to duties.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 90. 5 pages.
Enclosed by Capt. Mackenzie to Andrew Elliot, 19 July 1777.

Page 127

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, July 17. New York. — Announcing the above appointment and requiring entries and clearances, manifests of cargoes, permits to load, &c, &c.
2 Copies. Vol. 5, No. 89 and Vol. 2, No. 158. 4 pages and 5 pages respectively.
Enclosed by Capt. Mackenzie to Andrew Elliot, 19 July 1777.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, July 18. War Office. — Concerning promotions in 7th and 26th Regiments.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 221. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Sir Thos. Spencer Wilson.

1777, July 19. War Office. — The granting of leaves of absence at this juncture is left to the respective commanders-in-chief, but the King has no objection if Sir William Howe approves.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 241. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 6 August 1777.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Andrew Elliot.

1777, July 19. New York. — His salary as Superintendent of Exports and Imports is £365 sterling per annum, to be paid quarterly in dollars at 4s. 8d. To deliver the letters enclosed to Lambert Moore and John Nugent, and to wait on Sir Henry Clinton with the letter which relates to himself and the appointment covering the proclamation and the instructions.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 91. 1 page.
Enclosures:—
Proclamation by Gen. Howe, see 17 July.
Gen. Howe to Andrew Elliot, see 17 July.
Gen. Sir William Howe to Lambert Moore.

1777, July 19. Eagle, off Staten Island.Appoints him first Deputy-Superintendent to assist Andrew Elliot.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 93. 1 page.
Gen. Sir William Howe to John Nugent.

1777, July 19. Eagle, off Staten Island. — Appointing him Second Deputy-Superintendent to assist Andrew Elliot.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 92. 1 page.

Richard Atkinson to Lords of the Treasury.

1777, July 21. London. — On the report of the referees above.
Copy. Vol, 4. No. 87. 3 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen Howe] , 6 August.
Also in Lord Dartmouth's MSS.

Page 128

Mure, Son & Atkinson to Lords of the Treasury.

1777, July 23. London. — As to the variations from the estimate for the supply of rum, occasioned by the alteration of circumstances.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 82. 5 pages.
Enclosure No. 2 in John Robinson to [Gen. Howe] , 6 August.
Also in Lord Dartmouth's MSS.

John Stuart to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, July 24. Pensacola. — Measures and conferences with the Indians. Thinks he must stay at his post or the Indians would think it desertion.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 180. 8 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 409.

Troops.

1777, July 28. — Clothing shipped on board H.M. armed ship "Tortoise" for various regiments in America.
Vol. 6. No. 220. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe, 2 August 1777.

Treasury Minutes.
1777, July 29. — Resume consideration of the report of the referees on the rum contract.
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 89. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen. Howe] , 6 August 1777.

Treasury Minutes.

1777, July 31. — Same subject.
Extract. Vol. 4. No. 90. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen. Howe], 6 August 1777.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, July. — Recommends Lieut. John Grant for promotion to a company, he having at the beginning of the dispute been driven from his home near Lake Champlain by the rebels and lost all his effects.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 169. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 2. War Office. — Clothing as mentioned in the enclosed paper has been shipped together with 8,000 blankets for the use of the barracks.
Letter signed. Vol. 6. No. 219. 1 page.
Enclosing List of clothing for the regiments shipped on the "Tortoise," 28 July 1777.

Page 129

David Taitt to the Superintendent [John Stuart].

1777, August 3. Little Tallassie.
Extract. Vol. 10. No. 183. 3 pages.
Same in Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 417.

Treasury Minutes.

1777, August 5. Treasury Chambers. — Consideration of the rum contract made by Howe with the agents of Mure, Son & Atkinson.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 84. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Gen. Howe], 6 August.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 6. War Office. — Encloses letters relative to Lt.-Col. Harcourt.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 240. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Sir T. S. Wilson, 19 July.
                   Lord Barrington to Earl Harcourt, 17 July.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 6. War Office. — "As I understand that Major-General Philips of the Artillery is doing duty as Major-General of the Line in the Army under the command of Lieutenant-General Burgoyne, I think it proper to transmit to you a copy of a letter which I wrote on this subject to Sir Guy Carleton."
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 217. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Gen. Carleton, 23 August 1776.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 6. Whitehall. — No. 15. Receipt of news of Tryon's expedition.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 96. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 481; copy 431, fo. 217; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 6. Whitehall. — No. 16. His Majesty's concern that a diversion on the coasts of Massachusetts is not found consistent with other operations. Motives for postponing Gen. Lee's departure approved. He will have received every reinforcement of the Artillery that could be spared from this country, &c.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 95. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 485; copy 431, fo. 218; and in the Sackville MSS.

Page 130

John Robinson to [Gen. Sir William Howe].

1777, August 6. Treasury Chambers. — Sends papers relative to the rum contract. "By the letter from Messrs. Mure, Son & Atkinson it is stated that they were attempting the insurances at 12 guineas per cent, premium, they have since informed the Board that they have insured a part of the rum contracted for by you at that premium, but that this is only the risk of the cargo thither, and not on the return of the ship, which brings another risque and will occasion a further expence in insurance for the voyage. This account together with the papers will assist your Excellency in forming your judgement on the matter, and my Lords desire that you will thereon agree with the agent for the contractors at such price as shall appear to you to be reasonable according to the circumstances existing at the time of making the contract and according to the current rate of exchange, and pay them for the same agreeably to the minutes instead of taking cash from the military chest, they have agreed to accept of bills for payment from the agent of the remitters at the current rate of exchange."
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 47. 2 pages.
Enclosing:—
No. 1. Mure, Son & Atkinson to Lords of Treasury, 24 June 1777.
Mure, Son & Atkinson to Gen. Howe, 14 Jan. 1777.
Mure, Son & Atkinson to Joshua Loring, Junr., 14 Jan. 1777.
No. 2. Mure, Son & Atkinson to Lords of Treasurv, 23 July 1777.
No. 3. Treasury Minutes, 18 June 1777.
No. 4. Treasury Minutes, 5 August 1777.
No. 5. Treasury Minutes, 3 June 1777.
No. 6. Report of Beeston Long, etc., Referees, to Lords of Treasury, 16 July 1777.
No. 7. Richard Atkinson to Lords of Treasury, 21 July 1777.
No. 8. Richard Atkinson to Beeston Long, etc., 17-18 July 1777.
No. 9. Treasury Minutes, 29 July 1777.
No. 10. Treasury Minutes, 31 July 1777.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 6. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Orders relative to the payment of Mr. Sinnott's salary of £150 as Lt.-Governor of Niagara since his last payment by Gen. Gage, 3 November 1774.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 91. 1 page.
Enclosing Lt.-Gen. Gage to John Robinson, 1 April 1776.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 13. War Office. — Directions relative to payment for officers' tents sent in 1775, and also for those in store.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 216. 1 page.

Page 131

Colonel Beverly Robinson to David Mathews.

1777, August 13. Morrisiana. — Certificate to Abraham Teller, see 25 December 1781.

David Taitt to the Superintendent [John Stuart].

1777, August 13. Little Tallassie.
Copy. Vol. 10. No, 182. 4 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 281, fo. 421.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 18. Whitehall. — No. 17. Respecting the defence of the island of St. John.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 94. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 489; copy 431, fo. 219; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 21. War Office. — The King's permission to Captain Evans to remain in England until he can hear from Major-Gen. Grey.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 213. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 21. War Office. — Is directed by the Treasury to provide a supply of stores to be delivered to the regimental paymasters at prime cost. It will be ready for shipping by the 1st September.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 214. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of stores proposed to be sent to Sir W. Howe, comprising shoes, soles, shirts, black hair stocks lined, stockings, gatiers.
Copy. Vol. 6. No, 215. 1 page.

John Stuart to General Sir William Howe.

1777, August 23. Pensacola.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 187. 4 pages.

Gov. Peter Chester to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, August 25. Pensacola. — Trusts that the rapid success of H.M. troops in Northern Colonies will secure the Floridas. Will co-operate with Brig.-Gen. Prevost.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 191. 1 page.

Page 132

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe. Declaration.

1777, August 27. Head Quarters. — Protection to the inhabitants.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 88. 2 pages.
Printed copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 637.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 2. War Office. — Sends the enclosed. Major-Gen. Prescott's promotion is delayed until enquiry has been made into his capture. His Majesty directs that such enquiry be made and the result communicated.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 226. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Officers serving in America who were promoted by Brevet the 29th August 1777.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 227. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. War Office. — Col. Twistleton may have leave to come to Great Britain at the end of this campaign if there is no objection and the service will permit.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 224. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. War Office. — The King has appointed Tryon to act as Major-General.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 225. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. Whitehall. — No. 18. Respecting the questioned loyalty of Woodbury Langdon.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 98. 4 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 595; copy 431, fo. 224; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. Whitehall. — No. 19. On the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 99. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 601; copy 431, fo. 226; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
Memorial to Lord George Germain from Lord Wm. Campbell, Gov. of South Carolina, James Wright, Gov. of Georgia, Wm. Bull, Lt.-Gov. of South Carolina, and John Graham, Lt.-Gov. of Georgia. Urging reduction of these provinces.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 100. 4 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, America and West Indies 132, fo. 605.

Page 133

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. Whitehall. — No. 20. General Officers not to have leave. Aides-de-camp not to be taken from the corps of Engineers.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 101. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 609; copy 431, fo. 227; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. Whitehall. — No. 21. A long letter in answer to eight of his in June and July.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 103. 6 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 613; copy 431, fo. 228; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 3. Whitehall. — Separate question of exchange of Major-Gen. Lee.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 102. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 591; copy 431, fo. 223; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 5. Head Quarters of Army. — Sends duplicate of letter of 16th July respecting the exchange of Maj.-Gen. Prescot for Maj.-Gen. Lee and requests answer.
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 62; and Vol. 5. No, 104. 1 page each.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, September 6. Head Quarters. — Answer. Awaits fulfilment of his engagement as to general exchange. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 54.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 63; Vol. 5. No. 105. 1 page each.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, September 12, Head Quarters, Delworth. — That surgeons would be permitted to attend wounded officers and men. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 62.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 64; Vol. 5. No. 106. 1 page each.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 13. Head Quarters. — Sending surgeons. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 63.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 65; Vol. 5. No. 107. 1 page each.

Page 134

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 16. War Office. — Three vessels will be sent from Cowes conveying goods as per invoices. Directions for distribution and payment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 223. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
I. Invoice of camp equipage for 16 regiments of foot consigned to Gen. Howe.
(No number.) Invoice of sundry hospital stores packed for the army in North America and directed to Gen. Howe,
III. Invoice of necessaries — shoes, linen, worsted Jersey and thread hose, &c.
Abstract of the charge of the necessaries as specified in Invoice III. £7,279 7s. 10d.
Copies. Vol. 6. 228, 229 and 231, 230 and 232. 1, 3, 2 and 6 pages respectively.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 19. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 236. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
State of the distribution of the articles mentioned in his letter of 16 September.
Vol. 6. No. 237. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, September 21. Head Quarters. — "Sir, There being some wounded officers and men of your army at Howell's tavern and the neighbouring houses with whom a surgeon's mate is left, with orders to join me on the 23rd, if not sooner relieved by one of your surgeons, I am to request you will lose no time in sending whom you think proper for this purpose, with directions to give receipts for the wounded so delivered up as prisoners of war to be hereafter exchanged. — With due respect, I am, Sir, your most obedient servant."
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 66; and Vol. 5. No. 108. 1 page each.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, Sept. 21. Head Quarters. — "Sir, Your favor of this date was received this evening, and agreeable to your request, I have sent Dr. Willson to take charge of the wounded officers and men of the army under my command, who have fallen into your hands at Howell's Tavern and the neighbouring houses. The doctor has directions to give a receipt for all that are delivered, and they will be considered as your prisoners. — I am, Sir, with due respect, your most obedient servant."
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 67; and Vol. 5. No. 109. 1 page each.

Page 135

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.
1777, September 22. War Office. — If thought proper leave of absence to be granted to Lt. John Shuttleworth, 7th Regiment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 235. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, September 24. Whitehall. — Private.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 215. 1 page.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Maj.-Gen. Pigot, 26 April 1778.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 621; copy 131, fo. 232; and in the Sackville MSS.

Alexander McGillivray to John Stuart.

1777, September 25. Little Tallassie.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 176. 4 pages.
Enclosed by John Stuart to Gen. Howe, 6 October 1777.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 65 (dated 21 Sept.).

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, September 25. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Receipt of letters. Orders given for the supplies he has represented as necessary. By No. 1 he will see the state of the monies issued and sent out in answer to his two requisitions of 1 February and 19 May. On the supplies of specie sent. It is unfortunate his Excellency could not obtain a larger supply of coal from Louisburgh. Expense of sending it from home. Desires him if possible to relieve the country from the burthen of sending oats. Barrack furniture, &c, ordered. Their Lordships having taken into consideration the paper transmitted on the application of Chief Justice Smyth approve £200 being paid to him, and, like other judges driven from their situations, the continuance of his salary of £400, but as in Mr. Glen's case he (Howe) is to pay only the salary and the Deputy Paymaster is to keep a separate account.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 94. 5 pages.
Enclosures:—
No. 1. Requisitions and issues.
Articles of Agreement — endorsed, "Charter of Coal Ships."
List of vessels taken up by Anthony Bacon in August and September to carry coal to America.
List of vessels to carry oats.
State of the deficiencies of barrack furniture at New York. As per return in Gen. Howe's letter of 6 April.
Account of stores sent out in the "Friendship" "Howe " and "General Conway." — Vinegar, mittens, blankets, sheets, bolstercases, ironpots, &c.
Vol. 4. Nos. 93, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99. 9 pages.

Page 136

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, September 27. Treasury Chambers. — Suspicions regarding a Captain Lawrence who is constantly sailing between Great Britain and New York. His movements should be narrowly watched.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 102. 1 page.
Draft in the Abergavenny MSS. 10th Report Apx VI., p. 18, No. 150.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, September 27. Treasury Chambers. — Private.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 103. 1 page.
Draft in the Abergavenny MSS. as above, No. 151.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, September 27. Treasury Chambers. — The Lords of the Treasury have ordered £200 to be given to Mr. Neil Jamieson late of Norfolk, Virginia, a zealous friend and supporter of government. Desires that some employment or assistance may be given him which may afford him some temporary relief until the time comes when his great losses can be taken into consideration and recompence made him.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 100. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
Case of Neil Jamieson.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 101. 4 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, September 28. Head Quarters, near German Town. — Due consideration will be shown to all who have complied with the Declaration of 27th August. Only those who have availed themselves of said indulgences before this date will be entitled to the benefits thereof.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 110. 1 page.

Elias Boudinot, Commissary General of Prisoners, to Heman Allen.

1777, September 30. Camp, Pennsylvania. — Acknowledges a letter. Will be pleased to expedite the liberation of his brother and if Lt.-Col. Campbell will write to New York and accomplish the exchange, he promises to accede. Is uneasy at a paragraph in Col. Campbell's letter relative to his being improperly treated. It has been without his knowledge.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 162. ½ page.
Enclosed by Lt.-Col. Campbell to Gen. Howe, 15 Dec. 1777.
Forwarded by Maj.-Gen. Massey to Gen. Howe, 12 Jan. 1778.

Page 137

Gen. Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, October 1. Head Quarters, near German Town. — Enjoining persons who have complied with the Declaration of 27th August to take the oath of allegiance to his Majesty on or before 25th October.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 111. 2 pages.

John Robinson to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, October 1. Treasury Chambers. — Transmits a further account of the ships taken up to carry coal.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 104. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
State of the coal ships taken up by Anthony Bacon to the 1st October. Marked — "Received from Mr. Deane."
Vol. 4. No. 105. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, October 3. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 80.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 68; 5. No. 112. 1 page each.

John Stuart to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, October 6. Pensacola. — Conduct of the Americans to gain the Indians. Sends copies of two letters from Rocheblave.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 175. 6 pages.
Enclosures:—
Alex. McGillivray to John Stuart, see 25 Sept.
N.D. — Scale of distances of Indian towns from St. Augustine to Pensacola. [This is placed with the above, but it is thought it may belong rather to his letter of 24 July.]
Vol, 10. No. 177. 1 page.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, October 6. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 80.)
2 copies. Vol, 3. No. 70 ; 5. No. 113. 2 pages each.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to [Alfred] Clifton.

1777, October 7. Head-quarters, near German Town. — "Sir, I had the honor to lay your queries before the Commander-in- Chief, and to receive his sentiments respecting your proposal of raising a corps.
"It is understood that this corps is to consist of Roman Catholicks only on a presumption that they will prefer serving under an officer to whom they are naturally attached, and not inter
Page 138
fere with other levies; the Commander-in-Chief therefore means that in raising it you do engage none others but of the Roman Catholick Community. I am also directed to desire you will be pleased previous to your entering upon this business, to make known the number of men you think upon a moderate computation can be engaged for immediate service, and agreeable thereto to recommend a captain, lieutenant and ensign, for every fifty-seven men, which, including non-commissioned officers, will compose a company.
"The engagement of the men must be for two years, or during the continuance of the rebellion in North America, if required, they will receive pay, provisions, arms, and cloathing as soon as it can be got round from New York, in the same manner as his Majesty's regular troops, of course they are under the same order and discipline. The non-commissioned officers and men will be intituled to lands agreeable to the King's proclamation at the close of the last war.
"The men are to be approved by an officer who will be appointed for that purpose, and will commence pay from the date of their attestations, the officers also will receive pay according to their success in recruiting, and the full proportion of the different ranks is as follows:— A captain, thirty men; a lieutenant, fifteen men; an ensign, twelve men. A bounty of five dollars in specie will be given to every man approved of. I hope the above will satisfy all your doubts."
Vol. 5. No. 114. 2 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, October 8. Head-quarters, near German Town. — Promises free pardon to all deserters who voluntarily surrender to any of his Majesty's troops before 1st December next.
Copy. Vol. 5. No 115. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, October 8. Head-quarters, near German Town. — Promising vacant lands to those who enlist and continue to serve for two years in the Provincial Corps.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 118. 2 pages.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. George Clark, Barrack Master General.

1777, October 8. Head Quarters, near German Town. — "Sir, A complaint has been preferred by Dr. Catherwood, Surgeon of the Hospital at St. Augustine, to Dr. Adair, Director- General, and transmitted from the War Office to the Commander-in- Chief, that on account of the orders given by the Barrack Master General to the Barrack Master at St. Augustine, 'not to interfere with tlie Hospitals,' he could not be accommodated with several trifling articles, such as spades, shovels, picks, &c,
Page 139
which might promote the cleanliness of the wards or rooms alloted for the sick men. I am directed by the Commander-in- Chief to desire you will give such orders on this head as may remedy the inconvenience above stated, and in the meantime, it will be requested of Brigadier-General Prevost to see that the Hospital does not suffer for want of those things, untill your instructions may arrive."
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 116. 1 page.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, October 8. Head Quarters, near German Town. — Similar letter.
Copy. Vol. 5. No, 117. 1 page.

Captain Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. William Allen.

1777, October 12. Head Quarters, German Town. — The Commander- in-Chief approves his recommendation of the following officers:— Major John Delancey; Captains Francis Kearney and Thomas Stephens; Lieutenants John Young and Benjamin Baynton to serve under his command in the 1st Battalion.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 119. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. Alfred Clifton.

1777, October 14. — Head Quarters, German Town. — Signifies the Commander-in-Chief's approval of his choice of officers:— Major John Lynch; Captains Kenneth McCullock, Matthias Hanly, Martin McEvoy and Nicholas Weiregan ; Lieutenants Peter Eck, John Connell, Edward Holland and James Hanrahan; Ensigns John Glasshune, Arthur Baillie, Thomas Quin and Cornelius Leary to serve in his regiment.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 120. 1 page.

Saratoga,

1777, October 16. Saratoga Camp. — Articles of Convention between Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne and Major-General Gates.
Original signature of Gen. Gates. Vol. 9. No. 188. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Burgoyne to Gen. Howe, 25 October.
Copy in the Public Record Office. Colonial Correspondence, Quebec, 14.

David Holms and Thomas Scott to the Superintendent [John Stuart].

1777, October 19. Cusitaws.
Copy. Vol. 10. No, 168. 4 pages.
Qy. Enclosed by John Stuart to Sir W. Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.

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Lower Cheek Indians to John Stuart.

1777, October 19. Cusitaws. — Talk by Interpreter Edward Haynes.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 169. 2 pages.
Qy. Enclosed by John Stuart to Sir W. Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.

Lieut.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, October 20. Albany. — In conformity with his orders to proceed to Albany, he reached Saratoga 13 September. No exertions left untried. Details of the actions of 19th September and 7th October. Was at last obliged to open a treaty with Gates. Desires conveyance for Lord Petersham to England. (This is marked as having 9 enclosures, and as received by Lt. Valiancy 30th October.)
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 182. 3 pages.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, October 20. — Separate and private. Conscious that the precision of my orders both in the letter and spirit left me no latitude in abandoning my communications on the 13th of September, that the corps of troops I commanded was in the interest of government a corps to be hazarded for the great purpose of forcing a junction, or at least of making a powerful diversion in your favor, by employing the forces that otherwise would join General Washington, convinced that I can justify myself to my profession and to the world upon these points, I am in no pain concerning them. What I feel upon the unfortunate issue of my efforts is more easily to be conceived than described. For your private consideration, I have to add to the circumstances of my public letter, others of a very melancholy nature, viz.: a scandelous defection of the Indians, a desertion or timidity worse than desertion of provincials and Canadians, a very few individuals excepted, and a strong disposition in the Germans to be prisoners rather than endure hard blows. Had all my troops been British, I, in my conscience, believe I should have made my way through Mr. Gates's army. At Saratoga, destitute as I was of provisions I was not without resources to have opened a passage to Ticonderoga had my whole army been in a temper for hardy enterprise — even British troops declined. The utmost that the officers gave me to hope from the complection of their men, was, that they would light, upon that ground if attacked. The Germans fell short of that — it was notorious that they mean to have given one fire and then have clubbed their arms.
In short, my army would not fight and could not subsist; and under those circumstances I have made a treaty that saves them to the State for the next campaign, either by enabling the Mother Country to send forth the force at home in proportion to what
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she will receive from their return, or by your retaining them here, negociating an exchange.
Should you resolve upon the former measure, I trust you will order transports and convoy to Boston without delay. Should you be enabled and disposed to execute the latter, I confide in your justice and friendship not to leave me unexchanged, altho' in all events, I think my honor and my life in great measure depends upon my return to England for some months. I think it not impossible that the persons who are most bound to vindicate me will be the first to attack my reputation, those for whom I cheerfully undertook a forlorn hope, and who would have crushed me had I remained inactive, 1 expect to find my accusers for rashness. These men know I have it in my power to justify my conduct, and it is a duty to myself and my profession not to be absent when occasion calls upon me to produce that justification. As to my life, I am free from wounds, tho' my person you may imagine has not been spared, but my mind is broken down by agitation and my body with fatigue, and both are very unfit to endure the rigour of an American winter, at least in a northern part.
Gates has offered to send a ship of truce to me to England to be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Glover, who it seems is a seaman. I have told him I could give no answer without consulting you. Upon the whole, my dear Sir, I request you to consider thoroughly my situation; let no personal inclination of mine interfere with what you think right for the King's service. I have sacrificed much, I am ready to sacrifice all to it, honour excepted. I think it necessary to give my own account of my own conduct at home, and to precede the troops if it can be done with propriety. Be you my judge as my superior and my friend, and decide either upon Gates's proposal, or to send a frigate to receive me or direct my stay.
It is not a time to talk of private calamities. I have lost in Frazer a zealous friend, another, and of a most uncommon kind, in my aide-de-camp, Francis Clarke. Phillips still remains to me, and I beg to recommend him and his application to your notice as one of the most gallant and able officers now in being, and his exchange is most desirable.
All particulars relating to the proceedings between the 13th September and 13 October shall be sent you at large by Lord Petersham's conveyance.
The treatment of the officers and troops in general is of so extraordinary a nature in point of generosity that I must suppose it proceeds from some other motive than mere kindness of disposition. The terms obtained first surprizes me. The conduct of Gates in showing me his Army afterwards surprized me more. I have now as many witnesses as I have men in the Army to the number of the enemy.
I know not upon what I am to congratulate you, no intelligence having been received by me, but my hopes and wishes are as
Page 142
ever ardent for your glory and happiness. — I am, with the utmost respect and affection, &c.
P.S. — Forgive all confusion and inaccuracy. Upon reconsideration I am inclined to think Gates's proposal of a ship unacceptable; and in that case shall attend your decision for a frigate to precede or to accompany the troops, unless exchanged and enabled to serve under you to the southward during the winter.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 181. 5 pages.

John Stuart to Indians.

1777, October 20. Pensacola. — Talk to Philstouckie and the Lower Creek Deputies.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 167. 4 pages.
Qy. Enclosed by John Stuart to Sir W. Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1777, October 22. Philadelphia, Head Quarters.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 111. 2 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 132, fo. 729; copy 306, fo. 162; and in the Sackville MSS.

General Sir William Howe to [John Robinson].

1777, October 22. Philadelphia, Head Quarters. — Acknowledging letter of 15th June concerning Mr. Glenn. Has laid the papers relative to the business with Messrs. Mure, Son and Atkinson before the Commissary General. Sends the proceedings of an enquiry made at New York into the conduct of Mr. Chamier.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 96. 2 pages.

Lieut.-General Burgoyne.

1777, October 24. Albany. — Agreement with Major-General Gates for releasing officers.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 189. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lt.-Genl. Burgoyne to Genl. Howe, 25 October.

General Sir William Howe to Samuel Smith, Treasurer to the Committee for the Relief of the Soldiers, &c, in North America, London.

1777, October 24. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges receipt of letter of 6th August particularizing sundry articles which the Committee has been generously pleased to send out. Cannot at present answer enquiries as to his wishes owing to the Secretary to the Board of General Officers being at New York. Copy. Vol. 2. No. 140. 1 page.

Page 143

Captain Robert Mackenzie fco Jas. Chalmers.

1777, October 24. Philadelphia. — Signifies the Commander in Chief's approval of officers:— Captains Alexander Middleton, Ross Currie and Joseph Garnett; Lieutenants Walter Dulany, James Ingles and Thomas Boswell; Ensigns Adam Allen, William Ford and Thomas Hammond, chosen to serve in the 1st Battalion of Maryland Loyalists.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 121. 1 page.

Lieut.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, October 25. Albany. — I had fee honour to write to your Excellency by Lt. Vallancy five days ago and to transmit a copy of the Convention which the disappointments and distresses of the time; an investment of near seventeen thousand men; and impending famine, compelled me to conclude with Mr. Gates. I have directed Lord Petersham, who is proceeding to England, to leave a copy of my public dispatch with Sir Henry Clinton in order to its being transmitted to you and a duplicate of the Convention. You will see by the dispatch a detail of all events, and I trust the peremtory orders, under which I acted considered, you will construe what has happened not to be faults, but honourable misfortunes.
Gates' army, upon a nearer inspection, might finally be called twenty thousand men, upon a paper state, but rating them as we should our own for action, the solid, effective, well-armed rank and file, amounted the Day of Convention to nearer seventeen than sixteen thousand, a considerable part of them it is said were Militia, but they were Militia of the Green Mountains and Hampshire Grants, which I am sorry to have occasion to say are equal to any of their troops.
It is now demonstrable that even a relief from famine would not have effected my junction with Sir H. Clinton. His strength and his situation were not such as to oblige Gates to desist, and my force was much inadequate, and the country much too strong to cut my way thro' the whole. If my proceedings are considered in one point of view, that of having kept in employment till the 17th October a force that joined with Mr. Washington in operation against your ExceUency, might have given him superiority and decided the fate of ye war, my fall is not to be regretted, it has been a just and defensible sacrifise to the great objects of the public service; but if ministers blame me for this devotion of myself and troops upon the principle, and spirit, and letter of their measures and their orders, and such ingratitude in Cabinets is not uncommon — I am called upon by the acutest feelings of personal honour to exhibit my defence to my profession and to the world.
I therefore address myself to you, Sir, as an officer best able to judge of my anxieties by possessing the nicest sensations of professional honour in your own breast, and I further address you as my friend, to furnish me with means to effect my passage
Page 144
to England for these great personal purposes. I put my health as an inferior consideration tho' I really believe in my present state of mind and body an American winter, at best in the Boston climate, would finish everything with me, — should your mind go with the propriety of my application, I likewise entreat your written approbation of it. Should the season of ye year make the entrance of Boston difficult for a separate frigate for me, or for transports for the whole or any part of the troops, should you determine upon their return, I conceive an objection would not be made to the embarkation taking place at Rhode Island but that negotiation must be between your excellency and Mr. Washington. I mentioned in my letter by Vallancy the proposal of Gates for a flag of truce to carry me home, and I requested your sentiments with great doubts of my own. I am inclined still to look upon it as the last resource, and rest in confidence that if you approve of the measure Lord Howe will dispatch a frigate for me, as expeditiously as may be, my very profound and very sincere respects attend his Lordship. I would have writ to him personally had I known where he was. I set out immediately for Boston, where I shall spare no pains for the arrangement and convenience of the troops till your orders arrive.
Mr. Gates has consented to some exchanges, by which I have recovered all the captains who were prisoners of war and some who were prisoners of Convention. I enclose a copy, which I hope you will approve.
There are many vacancies of commissions. I cannot digest the recommendations in absence from the army, but shall send them in an open letter by an express from Boston. I dare say that measure will not be objected to by the enemy. I hold the army to be now under your Excellency's orders, and it is for you to decide upon the promotions.
I am with the truest respect and attachment, &c.
P.S. — Should Vallancey be set out I hope for a short answer to this letter by a drum to pass it unsealed thro' the enemy. I beg permission to recommend to your Excellency's protection the case of Major Ackland, who was first wounded at Hubberton, and now languishes under his wounds received the 7th inst. and prisoner here. His behaviour has been that of a high-spirited soldier of fortune, his rank and estate you know put him upon a high class as a patriot volunteer. Mr. Gates has got Ethan Allen in his head and will exchange no field officer unless he is given up. Any exchange for Ackland therefore must be negotiated with Mr. Washington. If your Excellency should have reasons against that measure Ackland and myself will be much obliged to you if you would procure him leave to return to England upon his parole, whenever he shall be in a state to undertake the journey.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 187. 6 pages.
Enclosing Articles of Convention with Gen. Gates, 16 Oct,
                   Agreement with Gates, 24 Oct.

Page 145

J. Galloway to Captain Robert Mackensie (sic).

1777, October 25. Philadelphia. — "Dear Sir, Did not indisposition prevent I should have done myself the pleasure to have called on you as well to enquire after your health as on the following business.
"A few days after coming to the city with Lord Cornwallis he requested that I would undertake to administer the oaths of allegiance to such persons as should come in under Sir William Howe's late proclamation. But as it was impossible for me to comply with his Lordship's request and perform a variety of other matters which seemed to be expected of me, he desired I would appoint some person to do it under my superintendence. I accordingly appointed Mr. Enoch Story who has conducted himself much to my satisfaction in that and many other things desired to be done by His Excellency Sir William Howe.
"It will now naturally suggest itself to you that it will be necessary to give Mr. Story a commission authorizing him to administer such qualifications and that to give solemnity as well as validity to the oaths administered. Indeed without it all that is done will be void. The commission must bear date the 29th of September the day before he entered upon the business.
"You will be so obliging as to communicate this business to his Excellency, that such order may be taken in it, as he shall think proper.
"I am informed by Mr. Story that such numbers crowd in upon him to-day as will render it impossible to qualifie them all. In which case, I should be glad to know, whether it will not be proper to continue to administer the oaths to all such as shall apply, for a day or two, notwithstanding the expiration of the proclamation. — I am, &c."
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 182. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1777, October 26. Head Quarters, Philadephia. — Sending enclosed copy.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 97. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Gen. Sir William Howe to Messrs. Gordon and Crowder.
1777, October 26. Philadelphia. — Notifying in accordance with the request of the Lords of the Treasury that £300,000 sterling will he wanted to defray the contingent and extraordinary expenses of the forces under his command.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 98. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Guy Carleton to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, October 27. Quebec. — "Inclosed I send the engagements of sundry rebels, taken prisoners on this side, not to do
Page 146
or say anything against his Majesty's interests, or those of his Government and to appear, whenever called upon by myself, or any other of his Majesty's Commanders in Chief in America, to be disposed of in the manner you shall see proper to direct. The rebels appeared before Ticonderoga about the 18th Sept., carried off several prisoners, and destroyed some of the craft, but were obliged to go off. We have no news from the southward, and very imperfect intelligence from Gen. Burgoyne's army." Signed letter. Vol. 11. No. 2. 1 page.

Andrew Elliot to General Sir William Howe.
1777, October 27. Superintendent's Office, New York — "Afraid of an ill-timed acknowledgment I have delayed offering your Excellency my warmest thanks for the appointment with which you was pleased to honor me.
"I have the honor to inclose copies of the method pursued and forms used in the execution of the Superintendent's duty, if anything has been neglected or done contrary to your Excellency's wish and intention, I shall immediately on receiving yonr orders, obey them.
"The returns are delivered to Sir Henry Clinton agreeable to instructions.
"As soon as the embargo is taken off every merchant ship in this port will be crowding to Philadelphia. If your Excellency wishes to prevent this, I must beg to be favored with your orders as soon as possible, the season of the year making it necessary for the supplies wanted to go directly for Philadelphia. Should your Excellency chuse to limit the number of vessells it will be necessary to send licences or for Sir Henry Clinton to grant them for the limited number. If there are any articles you would not chuse to have carried to Philadelphia, when your pleasure is known care shall be taken to prevent their being exported.
"To avoid as much as possible intruding on Your Excellency's time, I have wrote to Mr. Strachy on the subject of trade, requesting him to lay before you at a proper time what he may judge worthy your attention."
Autograph letter signed. Vol. 5. No. 122. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Form of clearance in accordance with proclamation of 17 July.
Form ofpermit to load.
Form of permit to unload.
Form of certificate of landing goods.
Paper headed "Exportation" of goods permitted or prohibited, tvith reasons adduced, and showing the measures adopted to prevent the supplies being conveyed to the rebels.
Paper headed "Importation" on the same lines.
Vol. 5. Nos. 123, 124, 125, 126. 14 pages in all.

Page 147

Colonel Guy Johnson to General Sir William Howe.

1777, October 30. New York. — Requests (after fate of the Northern Army) directions re his conduct for keeping up the spirits of the Indians.
Copy. Vol 10. No. 196. 2 pages.

Heman Allen to Lieut.-Colonel Archibald Campbell.

1777, October 31. Salisbury. — By perusing the enclosed he may judge what further measures are necessary to expedite liberation for himself. (See 30 September.)
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 162. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lt.-Col. Campbell to Gen. Howe, 15 December.
Forwarded by Maj.-Gen. Massey to Gen. Howe, 12 Jan. 1778.

Lieut. John Campbell to the Secretary at War [Lord Barrington].

1777, November 1. Ardilignach. — Complaining that two younger ensigns than his son had obtained lieutenancies without purchase and that he is now obliged to pay £550 for a lieutenancy.
Extract. Vol. 6. No. 239. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 19 Nov.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir William Howe.

1777, November 1. St. Augustine. — Acknowledges letter, recruits, Indian presents and camp equipage by Capt. Chinnery of the "Daphne." "What I wrote to Mr. Superintendent Stuart     .     .     .     .     was in no manner whatever as orders and directions to act contrary to his own opinion. I meant to urge his activity for the protection of the Cherokees, who were threatened with destruction for their attachment to the royal cause. I am sorry to hear that his agents amongst the Creeks have been obliged to fly to Pensacola, as the activity of one Galphin and his interest in some of the towns, has raised a party amongst them which threatened their lives and robbed them of great part of their effects     .     .     .     .     I beg leave to mention that nothing seems more conducive to retain the Indians in the interest of government than the confidence they have that in case of an attack made on them, or even the appearance of it, steps will be taken to defeat the attempt by making an immediate diversion on the lower and nearest settlements. I have desired Mr. Stuart to give them that assurance. At the same time it is my duty to represent the want of most necessary preparations for such an attack, that the money mentioned by Captain Mackenzie to be sent by the "Daphne" has not been sent, that there are no pack saddles and but few pack horses to be had, that the difficulties of sending
Page 148
troops by water for want of proper vessels, and naval force rendered both precarious and difficult. However every thing that can be done for their protection will not be neglected as far as lays in my power to forward it.
"Governor Tonyn having represented to the Ministry the necessity to raise some Rangers has received approbation to that measure and draws upon the Treasury for their pay; they amount to about one hundred and thirty, some of them are now stationed on St. Mary's River, the rest wherever they please to go, they have a lieut.-colonel, a major, four captains, four lieutenants, one surgeon, and one mate, but are under no kind of regulation or restriction; they receive cloathing, one shilling per day and provisions, and are allowed what they plunder. If a troop such as I took the liberty of mentioning in a former letter had been raised, it would be of more effectual service than double the number that are now in pay on such a footing."
Capt. Brown of the 14th Regiment gone to England. Question of the succession to Capt. Paule's company in the 3rd Battalion [60th].
P.S. — Want of money has prevented his complying with the permission to pay to the officers the allowance of 200 days' bat and forage money.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 2. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Brig.-General Prevost to General Howe, 2 March 1778.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Capt. Robert Mackenzie, Secretary to the Commander-in-Chief.

1777, November 1, with P.S. February 11, 1778. St. Augustine. — Has not acknowledged letter of 16th July owing to lack of safe vessels, but this with vouchers as far as June last will be sent by the "Daphne." Wishes the Deputy Paymaster General had transmitted money and bills according to order. The captain of the man-of-war which brought the last money has repaid the extraordinary demand he made for freight. Wishes Captain Bishop could be made to refund. Hopes to hear of progress in Pennsylvania.
P.S. — Vouchers cannot be sent on account of precarious conveyance. Necessity of money being sent. Arrival of Major Van Braam.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 12. No. 4. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 3. War Office. — Permission to Colonel Sir John Wrottesley to come to England at the end of this campaign on account of his private affairs.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 234. 1 page.

Page 149

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 4. War Office. — Acknowledges letters of 10th and 14th July. 18 recruits for the 14th Regiment sent to Pensacola to be disposed of as he thinks best. Further leave of absence granted to Quartermaster Lander. Two lieutenancies vacant in the 42nd by removal of Lieut. Stewart to the invalids and death of Lieut. Rose. Encloses list of ensigns. Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 233. 2 pages.

J. Money, acting as Qr.-Master-Genl. to Gen. Burgoyne's army, to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, November 4. Hartford. — "Since I have been a prisoner and on my parole at this place, several applications have been made to me by the prisoners cantoned at the farm houses in this neighbourhood for cloaths, shoes, &c, I think it my duty to inform you of it, as their distress will be great if they have no supply before winter, particularly those belonging to Gen. Burgoyne's army that were taken previous to the Convention. Many of them have no coats and very few blankets; here are also many sailors taken on Hudson's river, destitute of cloathing, &c.
"I need not perhaps inform your Excellency that the officers taken at Stillwater, the 7th of October, are not comprehended in the Convention for the Northern Army. We should be glad to be in the first exchange of prisoners that takes place, if it does not interfere with any arrangement your Excellency has made."
2 copies. Vol. 3. No. 69; 5. No. 129. 1 page each.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 4. Head Quarters. — Is, like him, willing for a general exchange on equitable terms or that officers on both sides should be released on parole. Can an equivalent be fixed for exchange of the Colonels? (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 136.) Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 72; 5. No. 128. 2 pages each.
Enclosure:—
General Washington to Lieut.-Col. Frazer.

1777, November 4. Head Quarters. — In respect to a general exchange of prisoners has written again to General Howe and will be happy if so desirable an object can be effected on proper principles. If this cannot be done has "proposed that it should be no impediment to the exchange of all the officers as far as circumstances of rank and number will apply, and if any should then remain that they may be released on parole."
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 71; 5. No. 128. 2 pages each.

Page 150

General Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1777, November 6. Philadelphia. — "I have repeatedly demanded of you a releasement of prisoners equivalent to those you have received     .     .     .     .     The officers I have already permitted to return to their homes on account of some peculiarity in their situations, and other indulgences, needless to mention, must sufficiently have evinced my desire to relieve the whole ; and, when this previous point before mentioned is adjusted by our respective Commissaries, I shall readily agree to make the exchange as general as possible, and to the return of all such officers and men as may afterwards remain unexchanged on either side, under obvious and reasonable conditions. Those at present prisoners with me are ready to be delivered on the shortest notice, and it rests solely with you to justify me in doing it." Asks returns of prisoners and their situation that their wants may be supplied. Complains of Mr. Boudinot's (American Commissary) inattention. "I am also to call upon you to redress the grievances of several among them, who I am well informed are most injuriously and unjustifiably loaded with irons." (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 518.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 73 and 83. 3 pages.

Brig.-Gen. John Campbell to Major-Gen. Jones.

1777, November 7. Head Quarters, Staten Island. — Recommends to his notice the wife and five children of Lieut.-Colonel Barton (now a prisoner with the rebels) who are in great distress on account of their loyalty to the King's cause.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 47. No. 50. 2 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, November 7. Philadelphia. — To ensure safety for property. Exemplary punishment to be awarded.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 177. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Captain Hovedon.

1777, November 7. Philadelphia. — The Commander in Chief approves the recommendation of the following officers:— Captain Richard Hovedon, Lieut. Samuel Chapman, Cornet Archibald McKendrick and Quarter-Master Thomas Woolbank to serve in the Philadelphia Light Dragoons.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 130. 1 page.

Commissary-General Jonathan Clarke to Colonel David Hendly, or Officer Commanding at Cambridge
.
1777, November 8. Cambridge. — Has received orders from Lieut-General Burgoyne to take up all the receipts and vouchers
Page 151
for provisions received by the British Army from the time of leaving Saratoga, and to give general receipts for the number of rations delivered in each month. Desires him to give such directions as may be necessary that the General's orders may be executed.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 204. 1 page.

[Gen. Sir William Howe] to [Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne].

1777, November 8. Philadelphia. — Concern at his misfortune.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 210. 1 page.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 265; 159, fo. 391.

John Stuart to Indians.

1777, November 10. Pensacola. — Introductory speech to the Upper Creek Indians.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 166. 1 page.
Qy. enclosed by John Stuart to General Sir William Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Colonel Chalmers, 1st Battalion of Maryland Loyal Volunteers.

1777, Nov. 11. Philadelphia. — Lieutenant John McDonald, late lieutenant in the 42nd, is appointed major to the corps under his command.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 131. 1 page.

Elias Boudinot, Commissary General of Prisoners, to the Commissary of Prisoners in the British Army in Philadephia.

1777, November 12. Camp. — Hessian prisoners in New Jersey require clothes and provisions. Complaints have been received by Washington that his men who were made prisoners are insufficiently fed, while full supplies are granted to British prisoners. Fears prisoners sent to Massachusetts Bay to be embarked for Europe will suffer from want of flour, and would wish passports for vessels to go from Maryland or Virginia to Boston with a load. Would have made the application sooner, but has been long absent from camp.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 74 and 84. 8 pages each.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1777, November 14. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 211. 1 page.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 269; 159, fo. 393.

Page 152

Captain John Lloyd, 46th Regt., to Lord Barrington.

1777, November 14. Pembroke. — Requests extended leave of absence to more completely recover from his wound. Copy. Vol. 6. No. 244. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 19 November 1777.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 14. Head Quarters. — "I am sorry to find, by the tenor of your letter of the 6th instant, that we still unhappily differ in our ideas of those just and reasonable terms upon which a general exchange of prisoners might take place     .     .     .     .     I am induced to accede to your proposition     .     .     .     .     that the officers, who are prisoners of war, on both sides should be released" on parole and will await his answer. But thinks exchange the more eligible mode. Asks some explanations. Encloses paper with regard to the charge against Mr. Boudinot. Asks particulars of any cases of persons injuriously loaded with irons. Counter grievances of treatment of American prisoners. Report of inhumanity of Mr. Cunningham, provost martial, etc. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 147.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 74o: and 160, also 85. 4 and 5 pages.
Enclosures:—
Elias Boudinot, Commissary General of Prisoners. Report.

1777, November 13. Whitemarsh Camp. — Denies that the prisoners under his charge have been in any wise ill-treated. Maintains that no answers have been received to his letters.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 76 and 86. 3 pages each.
Joseph Cloyd and William Dewees.

1777, November 15. Philadelphia. — Depositions of two prisoners released from PhiladelpJtia, as to their being confined in the Guardhouse in Philadelphia for some days without food except what the inhabitants brought to them.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 75 and 86. 3 pages each.

0. Fowles and other American Officers to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 17. State House, Philadelphia. — Memorial in answer to his message. State their complaints:— that though sometimes granted, the privilege of walking in the enclosed yard adjoining the House is frequently denied. That it is with great difficulty wives, relations or friends can see them. That though they cannot justly complain of the quality of provisions the deficiency is great, the sick are allowed to remain too long and money does not reach them. Mention that the officers of the Delaware frigate were confined in a small room without water or provisions.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos, 77 and 88. 5 pages each.

Page 153

General Sir William Howe to Andrew Elliot.

1777, November 18. Philadelphia. — Approves arrangements. Necessity for the embargo ceasing. Application is to be made to Sir Henry Clinton and the Commodore that the port of New York be made open. Rhode Island should depend on New York for its supplies.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 132. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 19. War Office. — Recommends the subject of the enclosed letter to Howe's consideration.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 238. 1 page.
Enclosing Lieut. J. Campbell to [Lord Barrington], 1 Nov. 1777.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 19. War Office. — Encloses letter and signifies his Majesty's permission to extend Capt. Lloyd's leave of absence to the 12th March next.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol, 6. No. 243. 1 page.
Enclosing Capt. J. Lloyd to Lord Barrington, 14 Nov. 1777.

Lieut.-Gen. John Burgoyne to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 21. Cambridge. — Refers to his letter of the 21st October. His impatience to hear from him is of the most anxious nature. Necessaries for the troops. His desire to return to England. Suggests a ship of war touching at Rhode Island.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 193. 3 pages.

1777, November 23. — A slip of paper with the following words:— "Each corps to receive one pair of shoes per man agreeable to the last returns of effectives the 10th hist." Dated at Head Quarters, Philadelphia.
Vol. 24. No. 120.
Query accompanied Lt.-Gen. Lossberg's letter of 4 Sept. 1782.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 23. Head Quarters. — Threatening to retaliate if he does not get redress of the grievances complained of by the prisoners. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 163.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 78 and 89. 1 page each.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, November 24. Philadelphia. — Proper manifests and permits required for entry of spirituous liquors. Copy. Vol. 34. No. 175. 1 page.

Page 154

General Sir William Howe to 0. Fowles.

1777, November 24. Philadelphia. — Answer that the officers were deprived of liberty of walking in the yard to prevent a second escape, but if the principal officers will be responsible for the security of the lower class every proper indulgence will be allowed. That the same allowance of provisions was made as is issued to British officers when on board transports, if insufficient they were at full liberty to purchase more. It is found that money sent to them was not sealed and may have been purloined. As to the treatment complained of by the officers of the "Delaware" it is entirely new to him, but is informed there was no suffering, as the prisoners were supplied by the inhabitants.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 82o and 92. 2 pages each.

Elias Boudinot, Commissary of Prisoners, to Captain Robert Mackenzie.

1777, November 25. Camp. — Sends letters, money and clothes, contained in two saddle bags for prisoners. The monies were for the 9th Virginia Regiment — Capt. George Gilchrist and Ensign Stockley £20; Samuel Weples 35$; Captain and Lieut. Snead £10 Virginia currency; Ensign Nath. Darby £19 6s. 3d.. Virginia currency; Lieut.-Ser. Teakle £6 13s. 6d.; Lieut. Thomas Parker £12; Lieut. Thomas Custor £9 11s. and Major Toyne £10 17s. 6d.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 82 and 93. 1 page each.

General Sir William Howe to Daniel Wier.

1777, November 25. Philadelphia. — His report of what is deemed a fair price for rum, whisky and spirits is approved and he is to regulate payment accordingly.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 133. 1 page.

Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, November 26. — In consequence of his sentiments relative to the difficulty of the transports making the port of Boston at this advanced season, has applied to Genl. Washington for his consent or that of Congress to embark the troops at Rhode Island or some port in the Sound. Can hardly conceive any objections, but should any arise and the troops be obliged to wait the passage of the transports to Boston, has requested passports for himself and suite to embark on a separate frigate at Rhode Island, both his business and health requiring his return to England. Submits with great earnestness a list of recommendations to the vacant commissions of this army. An addition to the letter explains that the rule followed as to lieutenancies has been to recommend two in each regiment to regimental succession where the ensigns have deserved it, and afterwards to consider the eldest ensigns of the army and officers who have
Page 155
particularly distinguished themselves, among the latter of which is classed Mr. Cox of the Artillery. The serjeant-majors are recommended for ensigncies upon his personal observation of distinguished conduct before the enemy. Lord Balcarres is in point of seniority the 2nd Major of the army, Major Irvyn of the 47th is the eldest, but Lord Balcarres commanded the Light Infantry thro' the whole campaign with great distinction, after the wound of Brigr. Frazer in the action of the 7th October, the command of the whole advanced corps devolved to his Lordship, and his gallant defence of the post which covered the right flank of the camp, and which was stormed with great impetuosity, saved the army. Capt. Lt. Scott was promised a company for voluntarily undertaking a difficult and dangerous piece of service.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 194. 3 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 273.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to General Washington.

1777, November 26. Philadelphia. — Will never agree to a partial exchange of prisoners till he (Gen. Washington) has on his part fulfilled the cartel agreed on. It rests with him whether an exchange takes place or not, and he is therefore responsible for the inconvenience which the officers and men on both sides are put to. The provisions issued to prisoners on board men-ofwar or transports is uniformly the same as that issued to British troops. Will allow a commissary with supplies for the prisoners at Philadelphia and expects in return passports for persons to carry supplies to the British prisoners, &c, &c. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 519.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 79 and 90. 3 pp. and 4 pp.

Lord Macartney to Lord Howe and Sir William Howe.

1777, November 26. St. George's, Grenada. — Question of licenses for vessels carrying stores and provisions.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 119. 2 pages.,
Enclosed by Sir W. Howe to Lord G. Germain, No. 84, 18 Jan. 1778.
Copy in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Grenada 13.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Elias Boudinot.

1777, November 26. Philadelphia. — Sends receipt showing the delivery of the money sent the previous day for the officers of the 9th Virginia Regiment.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 81 and 94. 1 page each.

Page 156

Captain Robert Mackenzie to John George Lorentz.

1777, November 26. Philadelphia. — The accounts relative to Hessian hospitals are to be delivered to Mr. Mallet, Purveyor to the British Hospital, for his inspection, and Sir Henry Clinton upon receiving his report will give the necessary orders thereon.
Copy. Vol, 1. No. 172. 1 page.
Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, November 26. Halifax. — Major Small having set out with a detachment to St. Johns River to meet the garrison of Fort Cumberland and to proceed to Machias and destroy that nest of pirates and afterwards to go to the Eastern Coast of New England towards Gouldsbury to cause an alarm in favour of Gen. Burgoyne, and as he failed in that expedition, sends him to explain the reason. Sir George Collier was the cause of the failure, which could not have happened had he (Sir George) told his intentions. Highly approves the Major's corps. He carries proceedings of court-martial against Lieut.-Col. Goreham and Major Batt. Does not like the people or place one bit better than he did.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 148. 3 pages.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Brig.-Gen. Montfort Browne.

1777, Nov. 27. Philadelphia. — Regrets that private affairs cause him to desire to return to Ireland. If he persevere in his request he must accede to the rule that no officer in the Provincial service is to be considered as such but during actual residence in America.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 134. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lieut.-Col. Joseph Gorham.

1777, November 27. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letters of 6 June. Promotions made accordingly. "The orders you have given for cloathing from England must be considered as an act of your own, having received no powers from me for so doing. The cloathing sent out for Governor Legge's corps was deemed, upon its reduction, sufficient to supply both for this year, and Major-General Massey has my orders on that head. For this reason you may conclude I cannot furnish you with money to make good your engagements to Alderman Harley."
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 26. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, November 27. Philadelphia. — Hopes the clothing sent for Legge's corps will be sufficient for it and Goreham's. Asks an exact return of the issues. Application made by Goreham for his off-reckonings is not admissable.
Extract. Vol. 29. No. 27. 1 page.

Page 157

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. Joseph Goreham.

1777, November 27. Philadelphia. — Taking exception to some of his proceedings. Cannot accept his drafts for clothing ordered. Promotions in his corps. His accounts have been submitted to Gordon and Crowder, &c, &c.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 145. 3 pages.

Stores.

General Invoice of Stores shipped by Mure, Son and Atkinson, by order of the Treasury, for the forces in Canada under Sir Guy Carleton. Marked as sailed about October 17 and November 26 and 27, 1777.
Original. Vol. 56. No. 81. 1 page.

Daniel Wier, Commissary General, to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, November 27. Philadelphia.
Signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 100. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to John Robinson, 30 Nov.
Copy in Lord Dartmouth MSS., see 14th Report, Appendix X., p. 448.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, November 28. War Office. — Sends memorial of Ross and Gray with a copy of a letter from Major Gordon of the 26th respecting a sum of £348 6s. said to have been paid for officers' tents. Asks that enquiry be made. Also transmits a memorial of the officers of eight companies in the 14th. Desires information. Sends further the accounts of debts of sundry recruits embarked for the 8th regt. in Canada but sent from Montserrat to New York and incorporated into his (Howe's) army. As these debts were intended to be discharged by stoppages out of the subsistence of the men directions are to be given to the regimental paymasters for that purpose.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 253. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Memorial of Messrs. Ross and Gray (late agents to the 26th) to Lord Barrington. Desiring reimbursementfor tents sent out in 1775, which as the regiment was taken prisoner and the army changed quarters, were damaged by accidents.
Vol. 6. No. 250. l page.
Memorial of officers of the 14th Regiment who served in East Florida, to Lord Barrington. For payment for bat, baggage     .     .     .     .     and forage from 1 January to June 1777, when in service in East Florida.
Vol. 6. No. 248. 1 page.
Account of debts of a party of recruits of the 8th Regiment embarked under Ens. J. Piercy; also of German recruits, and of the recruits of Ensign Wilmott's party, see 22 December 1776.

Page 158

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Messrs. Gordon and Crowder.
1777, November 28. Philadelphia. — Sends accounts and papers relative to Goreham's corps. The subsistence accounts are wrong throughout. Sends his letter to Goreham open for perusal, &c.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 144. 2 pages.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, November 28. Headquarters. — Accedes to his proposition and has directed measures to be taken for releasing all the British officers "upon the condition you mention."   "At the same time I wish that a more extensive relief had been agreeable to you." Mr. Boudinot sent to examine into state and wants of the prisoners at Philadelphia. Passports shall be granted for Commissaries. "When Major Stockton was first captured, I believe that he, and one or two officers taken with him, suffered the treatment which you mention. This was without my privity or consent. As soon as I was apprized of it, relief was ordered. But surely this event, which happened so long ago, will not authorize the charges in your letter of the 6th. In a word, I shall be happy, as I ever have been, to render the situation of all prisoners in my hands as comfortable as I can, and nothing will induce me to depart from this rule, but a contrary line of conduct to those in your possession. Captivity of itself is sufficiently grievous, and it is cruel to add to its distresses." (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V. 175.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 80 and 91. 2 pages each.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1777, November 30. Philadelphia. — No. 75.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 112. 2 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 23; copy 306, fo. 189.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain. 1777, November 30. Philadelphia. — Private.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 113. 3 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 27; 306, fo. 259; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1777, November 30. Philadelphia. — Sends the Commissary General's report on the rum contract. Declines the determination of a point so apparently out of his power. Hopes the interests of Messrs. Mure will be adjusted at home on equitable terms. "I beg leave to mention a circumstance for their Lordship's information, relative to the two Provincial Corps first
Page 159
raised in America after the commencement of the present rebellion, viz: The Royal Highland Emigrants and Royal Fencible Americans, commanded by Lieut.-Cols. McLean and Goreham.
"As their Lordships thought proper to make provision for the clothing of the provincial troops, it was not my intention that any of those corps should have connections with off reckonings, or be supplied otherwise than from the King's stores.
"Lieut.-Col. McLean's corps being a national one, and raised during the command of General Gage, the Lieut.-Col. ordered out his clothing from Britain, and in consequence of an order from the Treasury to Sir Guy Carleton, he received off reckonings to the 11th of June 1776, inclusive, by my warrant dated the 31st December 1776; the second battalion of the corps was commissioned by me, and separated from the first under the command of Major John Small, who, by pursuing the same measures, may very probably make the same demand.
"Lieut.-Col. Goreham from this precedent has, I understand, commissioned his clothing from Alderman Harley, which was expected out this autumn to the 24th June 1776. I ordered payment for all the clothing bought for this corps; for the present year, the clothing sent out for Governor Legge's proposed regiment to Halifax was deemed sufficient for both; and it was my intention to have provided for the next from the stores sent out for this purpose; however, I understand Lieut.-Col. Goreham has undertaken to provide for himself, wherefore I should be pleased to have their Lordships' directions, whether they would chuse the off reckonings to be allowed to those corps upon the proper certificates, or that the original cost of the clothing so ordered, should be paid on account of Government."
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 99. 3 pp.
Enclosing Daniel Wier to Gen. Howe, 27 November.
Extract in Lord Dartmouth's MSS.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. William Allen.

1777, December 1. Philadelphia. — The Commander-in-Chief approves the recommendation of Mr. Ross Currey as lieutenant in his (Allan's) battalion.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 136. - 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. Chalmers.

1777, December 1. Philadelphia. — The Commander-in-Chief approves of Captain Ross Currey's resignation and of "Captain Garnet's receding from the Rank of Capt. to that of Quarter- Master, he has also approved of your Recommendations of Captains Dulany and Kenedy, vice Curry and Garnet, and of Mr. Chas. Wm. Clark, and Mr. John McPherson being Ensigns vice Hammond and Ford."
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 135. 1 page.

Page 160

Promotions.

List of promotions from the War Office, received at Philadelphia 1 December 1777. In the Books of the Army 13 December 1777. E. Hutchinson, Deputy Adjutant General.
Vol. 87. Nos. 10, 11. 2 pages.

Troops of Convention.

Return of provisions from November 7 to December 1 received by Lieut.-General Burgoyne's Troops at Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 198. 2 pages.

General Sir William Howe to Joseph Galloway.

1777, December 4. Philadelphia. — Having appointed him Superintendent-General of the Police in the City and its environs and Superintendent of Imports and Exports to and from Philadelphia, gives detailed instructions for the discharge of this important trust. His deputies are — Smith, esq., and Enoch Story.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 178. 6 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, December 4. Philadelphia. — Appointment of a police — Galloway, Superintendent-General.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 172. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, December 4. Philadelphia. — Galloway to be Superintendent of all Imports and Exports. Regulations to be observed.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 173. 4 pages.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 6. Treasury Chambers. — George Brindley, Deputy-Commissary, at 30s. a day, and Gregory Townshend, Assistant-Commissary, at 20s. a day, having applied to be paid in England, care is to be taken that no payment is made to them in America.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 106. 1 page.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 6. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Mr. Wier will be able to give every information relative to the supply of provisions. Investigation to be made into complaints of defects and badness of previous supplies.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 107. 1 page.

Page 161

Daniel Wier to Francis Rush Clark.

1777, December 8. Philadelphia.
Abstract. Vol. 25. No. 36. 2 pages.
Enclosed in Francis Rush Clark's memorial to Sir G. Carleton, 14 January 1783.

General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 8. Philadelphia. — Regulations as to sale of rum, molasses, salt, medicines.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 167. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Major Blakeney, 23rd Regiment.

1777, December 9. War Office. — Has received a message from Sir Wm. Howe desiring that he (Blakeney) may be ordered out to his duty. No further indulgence can be granted.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 6. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 7 January 1778.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 9. War Office. — Is surprised to find Major Saxton still absent. Has directed strict enquiry to be made thereon. Major Blakeney has been told his services can no longer be dispensed with.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 254. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Lord Barrington to Major Saxton, see 27 February.
List of Promotions.
Vol. 6. No. 252. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Major Saxton.

1777, December 9. War Office. — Must lay the subject of his absence from duty before the King. Desires to know anything that may be put forward in justification.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 7. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 7 Jan. 1778.

Andrew Elliot to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 9. Superintendent's Office, New York. — Agreeable to directions he showed the letter of 18th November to General Clinton, who desired him to clear out vessels for Philadelphia. Forty-two cleared between 27th November and 5th December. "General Clinton on that day ordered an embargo on the Philadelphia trade — this restriction was taken off yesterday so that still greater supplies will go in the course of a few days." Encouragement given to supplies for Philadelphia. Due attention will be paid to the wants of Rhode Island.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 137. 2 pages.

Page 162

General Sir William Howe to Andrew Elliot.

1777, December 10. Philadelphia. — "Upon a revisal of your letter of the 27th Oct., and particularly that part of it respecting the exportation of certain commodities from New York which has been permitted for reasons therein set forth, I have to observe that such permissions are contrary to Act of Parliament, and therefore cannot admit of any exportation whatever from the port of New York to Great Britain, Ireland, or the West Indies, which you are to make the rule of your conduct in future. — Such articles as it may be found necessary to be sent from time to time to Philadelphia, Rhode Island, Nova Scotia, East and West Florida     .     .     .     .     will only be permitted by particular application to Sir Henry Clinton."
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 138. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to Joseph Galloway.

1777, December 10. Philadelphia. — Similar letter.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 176. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, December 11. Whitehall. — No. 22.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 140. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 747; copy 431, fo. 236; copies in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, December 11. Whitehall. — No. 23.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 139. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 755; copy 431, fo. 238; copies in the Sackville MSS.

General Sir William Howe to Lieut.-Colonel George Clerk, Barrack-Master-General.

1777, December 12. Philadelphia. — Has received letter of 17th. The enclosed answer to different heads will be his direction relative to them. Finds that barrack furniture, utensils, &c, for 16,000 men will be sufficient instead of 23,000.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 145. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Paper in two columns containing the "Points on which Lieut.- Colonel Clerk wishes to be determined on" and the answers. With reference to lodging or furniture money, supplies of wood, candles, dec, to be allowed to officers, &c, not in barracks, and whether the regiments are to pay for deficiencies of barrack furniture or bedding.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 59. 3 pages.

Page 163

William Knox to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1777, December 12. Whitehall.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 142. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 132, fo. 759; copy 431, fo. 239; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
Intelligence received from France.
As soon as it was known that General Howe would proceed for Philadelphia the chief supporters of the rebellion withdrew and called in their agents who had been employed in different provinces, who are to remain in Philadelphia pretending to be excellent friends to Government ; they are to give intelligence as a Coup de Main is to be attempted on Philadelphia and New York at the same time as soon as the frost sets in, if Bnrgoyne's army could be beat back, which they had no doubt ofaccomplishing. Alas! it is worse than that. Willin and Morris, of Philadelphia, who have been the chief agents for establishing correspondencies for arms, ammunition, iOc, all over Europe, and in the Dutch and French Islands, have called to Philadelphia Sam. Inglis and Marshall from Virginia, who have been considerable buyers of tobacco for the Congress under Willin and Morris ; these with several others are to remain in that city, the first a Philadelphia)!, the last a Scotchman. The pay given those people is high beyond conception. I here find they liave a number of Americans, English, Scotch and Irish, as well as two or three foreigners ; my friend says they don't mind destroying the two cities, but would be glad to bum them.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 141. 1 page.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. William Allen, 1st Battalion Pennsylvania Loyalists.

1777, December 12. Philadelphia. — The Commander-in-Chief approves Mr. J. Swift being captain, and Mr. Cristall surgeon's mate in his battalion.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 143. 1 page.

Major W. Blakeney, 23rd Regiment, to [Lord Barrington].

1777, December 13. Newcastle-upon-Tyne. — Explaining that his constitution had received a shock from his wounds. Is in treaty with Major Dundas for an exchange. If this does not take place he will punctually obey orders received.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 5. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 7 Jan. 1778.

General Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1777, December 13. Philadelphia. — Lieut.-Governor Sinnott's salary will be paid to his agent on demand. A superintendent and subordinate officers appointed to regulate imports to New
Page 164
York. Similar arrangement made for Philadelphia. Sends for their Lordships' information, his proclamation, instructions and material correspondence on these institutions.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 101. 2 pages.

Joseph Galloway to [General Sir William Howe].

1777, December 14. Philadelphia. — That as the instructions were that no exportation whatever should be allowed, he has sent his Deputy to stop the transport "Fanny" loading staves for Ireland. Answer received shall be the rule for future conduct. All vessels though in H.M. service should enter and clear at the Superintendent's office.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 34. No. 174. 2 pages.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 14. Head Quarters. — Requesting blank passports for vessels to supply Burgoyne's army with wood and provisions from places on the coast.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 95 and 97. 1 page each.
Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. 5, p. 188.

Lieut.-Col. Archibald Campbell to Sir William Howe.

1777, December 15. Concord. — Mr. Heman Allen of Salisbury has transmitted the enclosed letter from the Commissary General of Prisoners offering exchange of Col. Ethan Allen for himself. Begs his Excellency's approbation may be signified to Mr. Boudinot.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 161. 1 page.
Enclosing Heman Allen to Lt.-Col. Campbell, 31 October.
                   Elias Boudinot to Heman Allen, 30 Sept.
This and enclosures forwarded by Maj.-Gen. Massey to General Howe, 12 January 1778.

Lt.-Col. Sir George Osborn to Lord George Germain.

1777, December 15. Philadelphia. — Has appointed William Porter, Esq., as Muster-Master-General of the Foreign Troops, to act during his absence in Europe. Will prepare a state of the strength and condition of foreign troops to lay before the King.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 173. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1777, December 17. Philadelphia. — "The Bearer Captain Farrel has represented to me that he can raise a Company of Provincials in Nova Scotia, you will therefore be pleased to give him such Authority as you think necessary to enable him to execute this Service, and if he succeeds in raising a Company it is my Design to attach him to Goreham's Corps. In the mean Time he must receive Subsistence for the Men, and five Dollars Bounty for each Recruit attested and approved."
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 28. 1 page.

Page 165

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, December 17. Philadelphia. — Licences required for selling liquor.
Copy, Vol. 34. No. 168. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Colonel Sir George Osborn.

1777, December 17. Philadelphia. — "I had the Honor to lay before the Commander in Chief your open Letter to Lord Geo. Germain, which I received last Night, and am directed to signify to you, that it is proper all points of Information relative to the Foreign Troops should be reported through him to the Secretary of State, wherefore I take the Liberty to return your dispatch to his Lordship; and to add that I presume upon a Letter from you to the General expressing your intention to make Mr. Porter your Deputy and to prepare the State of the present Strength and Condition of the Foreign Troops to lay before the King — a public Letter will be written to that purpose."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 174. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1777, December 18. Philadelphia. — No exceptions to be made in case of transports or Government vessels in regulations for imports or exports as per that of 4th.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 171. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne.

1777; December 19. Philadelphia. — "I have received the Honor of your Letter of the 26th Novr. with several Enclosures by a Flag of Truce.
"Flattering myself you will obtain Liberty for the Embarkation of the Troops at Rhode Island, and that you will have received my Letter from hence by the Convoy to the Transports, I am only to repeat my Wishes for your speedy Removal to England, either at the Time the Troops embark, or in a separate Frigate, if you should be permitted to carry them to Rhode Island; but in Case of Refusal to that Proposition, you will be so good to give the necessary directions to General Phillips (to whom I write by this Opportunity) to desire he will wait to return to England with them.
"His Request to me is to go to Canada to settle some Accounts there; but as it is requisite a General Officer should go home with the Troops, I must beg he will not think of Canada before that Service is accomplished. The Season is now too far advanced for his thinking of such a Journey this Winter, and he will be as early there from England in the Spring as he can possibly be from New York, even if he got permission to take York in his Way to Canada.
"I return herewith a List of Promotions with the Commissions which are given according to your Recommendations, excepting
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only Lieut. Geo. Foster of the Marines, which from a late Letter from the Secretary of State respecting the two Services, I am informed the King considers them as separate, and does not approve of their coming into the Army. I have therefore given the 2d Lieutenancy of the 21st, vice Turnbull, to Mr. Gordon from the half-pay, who has been very strongly recommended to me, which I hope you will approve and believe, that I shall ever be happy to pay the most entire Obedience to your Commands."
P.S. — Finding the Commissions cannot be completed in time for this Conveyance, they will be sent to the respective Agents in England.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 212. 2 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fo. 277.

Joseph Galloway to [                   ].

1777, December 20. Philadelphia. — As to applications for shipping to New York tobacco, mustard or indigo. No injury will be done to the army or navy here if tobacco is sent hence to New York. Mustard and indigo ought not to be exported, as they are required here.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 170. 1 page.

John George Lorentz (Commissary- General and Superintendent to the Hessians and their Hospitals) to Dr. Mallet.

1777, December 20. New York. — Concerning the accounts and expenses for support of the Hessian hospitals.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 152. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gov. Tonyn.

1777, December 20. St. Augustine. — Arrangements for the Corps of Rangers raised.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 142. 2 pages. Copy in Vol. 12, No. 6.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe 24 Feb. 1778.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. I. 248, fo. 25.

1777, December 20. — Proclamation by Maj.-Gen. Robertson, see date of re-issue 27 March 1779.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1777, December 21. Philadelphia. — Awaits promised list of prisoners. "I hope you will excuse my compliance with your request of the 14th inst. for granting passports to vessels carrying provisions and fuel for the troops under the articles of the convention, conceiving it would not be possible to prevent the passports from being improperly used, and being hopeful that the troops may be permitted to embark at Rhode Island, agreeably to Gen. Burgoyne's request, which will make such provision unnecessary. The transports designed for that service sailed
Page 167
from hence some time ago. In consequence of a former letter from you, a vessel was ordered to be laden at New York, and to proceed with flour to Boston for the troops. This want being supplied, I trust that fuel may be procured without any great inconvenience, or a necessity for passports from me, even though the troops should not embark so soon as I expect." (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 520.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 96 and 98. 2 pages each.

Jonathan Mallett to John George Lorentz.

1777, December 21. New York. — Explaining the way in which the accounts of the Hessian hospitals must be kept and the stoppages deducted to show what is due from the Crown.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 153. 2 pages.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1777, December 23. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No, 109. 1 page.
Endorsed:— Duplicate John Robinson, Esq., to General Sir William Howe, 23 December 1777. Peter Paumier at 30s. and F. W. Hecht at 20s. Commissaries to receive their payments in England.
Received by the Mercury Packet at Phila. 9th April 1778. No. 40.

John George Lorentz to [Jonathan Mallett].

1777, December 24. New York. — A long and peremptory letter maintaining that "Great Britain don't allow the Landgrave any fix'd sums of money for supporting the Hessian hospitals as you imagine; but that every thing shall be allowed them what his Majesty allows to his own troops." Claims for rations, provisions, allowances for nurses, washing, &c, the pay of their physicians, surgeons, apothecaries, mates, purveyors and clerks to be allowed as the English. Concludes "my superiors defend me expressly, to make any further advances for the hospital account but order me to demand and expect those sums from the British paymaster in advance."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 154. 4 pages.
Enclosing 12th Article of the Treaty of Hesse Cassel with Great Britain, 15 January 1776.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1777, December 24. St. Augustine. — The corps of Rangers. Plan of Captain Fanshawe to supply H.M. ships on the Southern station with water from St. Mary's Eiver, &c.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 140. 5 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe 24 Feb. 1778.
Copy in Vol. 12, No. 6. Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 29.

Page 168

Jonathan Clark, Commissary General, to Colonel D. Henly or Officer commanding at Cambridge.

1777, December 25. Cambridge. — Subjoins an order from Dep.-Adj.-Gen. Kingston requiring for Gen. Burgoyne a stated account from the Provincial Commissary of all demands against the Troops of the Convention from the time of their arrival to the end of November.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 205. 1 page.

Jonathan Mallett to [John George Lorentz].

1777, December 26. New York. — Sir H. Clinton will not grant a warrant for money for the supply of the Hessian hospitals until the accounts are audited. Will compare an abstract of expenses with vouchers when produced. Other matters mentioned cannot be settled without authority from the General.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 155. 1 page.

John George Lorentz to [Jonathan Mallett].

1777, December 28. New York. — The purveyor having partly locked up and partly taken along with him to Philadelphia the most necessary vouchers of the Hessian hospital accounts is unable to lay them before him as soon as he wished. Begs him to give enclosed Memorial to Clinton and represent matters so that he will give a warrant for £2,000 sterling.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 156. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Tryon to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1777, December 28. Kingsbridge District. — Waits orders for his command and destination.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 169. 1 page.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Lord Barrington, 6 Mar. 1778.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 187, fo. 353; War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, 20.

Brigadier-General Augustine Prevost.

1777, December 31. St. Augustine. — General account with Brigadier-General Augustine Prevost for the year.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 3. 1 page.

Troops of Convention.

Return of provisions from December 2 to 31 received by Lieut.-General Burgoyne' s troops at Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 198. 2 pages.

Page 169

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Robert Mackenzie, Esq.

[N.D. 1777.] Head Quarters, German Town. — Authority and directions as to raising a regiment to be styled the First Battalion of Pennsylvania Loyalists, of which the Commander-in-Chief is colonel. Signed by order of the Commander-in-Chief, Robt. Mackenzie, secy.
2 copies. Vol. 5. No, 144. 2 pages each.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

[qy. 1777.] Friday afternoon, 3 o'clock. — Begins: "Major McLeod from North Carolina     .     .     .     .     of whose sufferings, &c." Thinks an extract from the enclosed letter [not identified] as ticked off will be of service to him. Note of Sir William's answer approving the same.
Copy. Vol. 20. No. 69. 1 page.

Thomas Eyre, Lieutenant 23rd Regiment, to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 1. Philadelphia. — Complains of insults while a prisoner on parole at Frederick Town. Was constrained to subscribe to an extorted parole at Sharpsburg where the prisoners were limited to one quarter of a mile and thrown into a cold stable for resenting a blow given by one Bradford who styled himself Captain of the Guard. Hearing all British prisoners were to be confined on board ship and considering his parole void has made his escape and awaits his Excellency's determination concerning his case.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 103 and 112. 2 and 3 pages respectively.
Enclosed by General Howe to General Washington, 8 Jan. 1778.

Prisoners.

"A Return of the Prisoners, Offrs of Bedford Township from the time they were Billeted on the Inhabitants unto the first day of Jany 1778 Exclusive of Twelve Days on Ship Board." Shows the names of the inhabitants, officers' names, when they came (the earliest date is April 1777), when they went away, the total weeks and the amount. Total sum, £275 8s. 3¼d. Marked : "No. 6. The Bedford Copy."
Original. Vol. 31. No. 100. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 2. Halifax. — "The 22d November we received here the disagreeable news from Quebec, of General Burgoyne's misfortune: soon after the Lieutenant Governor and Council sat, and wrote me a letter to apply for the removal of the Rebel Prisoners.
"I wrote to Sir George Collier to inform him, as it was reported that General Burgoyne's Army were brought Prisoners to Boston : I gave it as my opinion; the sooner the Prisoners were sent
Page 170
from this the better, that they might be exchangd: the Lieut- Governor wrote to me to make the requisition, which I refus'd, as I had your Orders to receive them on shore: but would give them up when requir'd by the Commanding Naval Officer. But thus have they been delay'd from early in November to this day and it is hard to say how much longer. I am quite happy to remain in any Command, your Excellency is pleas'd to have prescribed to me; but why am I to be left with an Officer; that does everything in his power, to retard the Service and make me unhappy, by such frequent delays.
"Brigade Major Studholme's & Mr Franklin's Expedition from Saint John's to Machias, was stop'd by Captain Fœtus of the Vulture; telling them, he had Orders from Sir George Collier not to assist them.
"With the concurrence of the Lieutt Governor I order'd Major Small to reinforce that Detachment; & the reason Sir George Collier prevented Captain Fœtus from cooperating with Major Studholme, was that Sir George wanted the whole honour of destroying Machias with his Ships: the failure of which has given fresh spirits to the Rebels.
"Major Small will inform your Excellency of every Particular During the General Court Martial. I thought it highly necessary to send Major Souter to take the Command of Fort Cumberland he went in very severe weather, and is now return'd; after performing that disagreeable journey with great chearfulness and effected with the greatest judgement; everything I wish'd. He has reported to me the vast expense of that Post, & what little use it is of, for the protection of this Province. As there are sixty Yorkshire families there, who are without doubt good Subjects, and would all be destroy'd were we to abandon that Post, which is my only reason for continuing it: in the last War it was usefull to the French as they came there from Canada by the Bay of Verte.
"Since Captain Barron was taken Prisoner, I appointed Captain Collett an Assistant Engineer; but on Captain Spry's Complaint of the extraordinary expences of that Gentleman; I have sent one there of Captain Spry's recommending: so that I hope the works will go on the better.
"I reported to your Excellency that I had sent Captain Spry there this Summer to push on the Works: and as the whole of Lieutt Col. Goreham's Corps is there I beg your permission to withdraw the Light Infantry Company of Marines, which I ordered there, when the place was invested: and which I did not think I could recall without your permission, after having reported it to you.
" Without doubt if Major Studholme can keep his ground at Saint John's which he tells me he will do, this Province must be safe from any harm by the Bay of Fundy; as it is exactly opposite Anapolis.
" I hope your Excellency approv'd of my continuing the Coal Works.
Page 171
"When I heard of the number of small pirates, that were on the Coast, I sent the Deputy Quarter Master General to apply to Sir George Collier to protect the Coal vessels; he sent me word the Albany was at Canso: she might as well be in England: I then purchased a small arm'd sloop, which I call the Howe and sent her & the Gage, which brought in all the vessels except one.
"Sir George Collier told the Officer that commanded the Howe, that General Massey may send them out, but the first Man of War would take their Prizes from them: this has damp'd the Officers, & I have mention'd to my Lord George Germain, to pray he will send me Two Letters of marque.
"I beg to report to you the Gage took one of these little Pirates, which mounted twelve swivels, and had taken many Merchant men on this Coast.
"I have officer'd and mann'd those two little vessels mostly with Governor Legge's Corps.
"As I return'd you Captain Shaw's Commission, which has had a good effect: you will please to send me a Commission for Captain Daniel Cunningham, who has got half his Company: and an Adjutant's Commission for Lieutt Thos. Green, who now acts by my Order.
"Notwithstanding my complaints of Sir George Collier's conduct: Major Small will do me the justice to say he never heard me speak a disrespectfull thing of Sir George Collier since he interfer'd & settled matters: and I promis'd you I would not trouble myself about him: but, Dear Sir, how unkind Lord Howe is, not to send here some other Officer.
"My Lord in his Letter said there must be a publick hearing; I do not care how soon; but I cannot be insulted, by any Man, for so I must call it, when my letters to you are dated from the 20th November to this date; for so long ago, has he informed me, a Ship of War was to sail for the Grand Army; & five have been fix'd & counterorder'd since.
"I have had the honour to be under your immediate Command; I therefore appeal for my perseverance in every point of Duty.
"I am at this time high up in Rank & have not a Colonel's Command here.
"Do not be surpris'd if your Excellency sees me in the Howe sloop: for either Sir George Collier must be recall'd or myself for I can never serve with any Man who occasions such delays to the King's Service in time of Rebellion.
"I again repeat to your Excellency that I am ready to serve my King, wherever you order me.
"As my Lord Howe is pleas'd to say, Sir George Collier must have a publick hearing, I say for that; it is by no means the method to conquer the Rebels, no more than it was for a two Decker, to cut out of Sheep's Gut River ten little Lumber boats, which were sold for thirty Pounds each; & leave a large French Mast Ship there, in which there are Masts that would sell for Three hundred Pounds each, at Portsmouth, which the present Master of the Gage offer'd to effect, and bring to this Port.
Page 172
"The Troops under my Command are furnish'd with most excellent provisions.
"The King's Molasses have been expended for some time.
"As I this moment have heard, the Cabbot is to sail in the morning, I hope you will pardon me, for not writing this letter myself, and also forgive the contents."
Signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 152. 4 pages.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, January 3. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 208. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 71.

William Gaull to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, January 3. Newcastle upon Tyne.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 173. 2 pages.
Enclosed by General Howe to Lord Barrington 12 April.
Original and copy in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, 21 and 20.

Lieut.-Colo. Jos. Goreham to Capt. Robert Mackenzie.

1778, January 3. Fort Cumberland. — Sees from Sir William Howe's letter the determined line and footing the clothing is fixed on. Relies on consideration of Government. Requests reimbursement of money advanced before they received Provincial clothing. Would be glad to know if the officers are to pay for their uniform clothing. Will write to Admiral Harley and countermand order. Should it arrive will take the steps recommended, otherwise thinks they might be disposed of at private sale in this province. Narrates that Alderman Harley early in 1776 shipped goods to the value of £800 for the regiment. The ship being driven on to the Western Islands and condemned; the goods were carried to England reshipt and arrived at Halifax. Some mischievous person having hinted to Maj.-Gen. Massey that there were goods for trade concealed under that direction they were given no convoy and were captured. Receiving a very peculiar letter from Gen. Massey, he sent him Alderman Harley's invoice consisting of leggings, shoes, shirts, &c. never more wanting in the regiment. As they were insured loses only the charge — not £50. Lt. Sutherland acquaints him there are alterations relative to the pay of the regiment. Will rectify, what he has done before and comply with whatever regulations are made.
Signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 147 and Duplicate No. 146. 4 pages each.

Lieut.-Col. Jos. Goreham to Capt. Robert McKenzie.

1778, January 3. Fort Cumberland. — Thanks for promotions in the corps and for intentions regarding his son. The names of
Page 173
two of the officers promoted should be Samuel Denny Street instead of William Denny Street and Joseph William Goreham instead of Joseph Amherst Goreham. His second son is Amherst Goreham. Should be glad if he could succeed his brother. Mr. Dixon is the eldest volunteer in the regiment and has been some time on the River St. John's and Machias command. His father is an inhabitant of this country and served in the late war, and from his particular services recommends the son to a vacancy. The next is a son of Capt. Burns, who came about a year since from England and entered the corps. Is about 15 years of age and would make a good officer.
Signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 150; Duplicate No. 149. 2 pages each.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1778, January 3. Boston, Head Quarters.
Three copies. Vol. 9. Nos. 184, 207; 3, No. 132. About 2 pages. Extract. Vol. 8, No. 8; 9, part of No. 192.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, f. 317; and 159, fo. 75.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1778, January 3. Boston, Head Quarters.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 209. 1 page; Extract, part of No. 192.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 73; and 133, fo. 365.

Thomas Wiggins, Serjeant of 16th Regt. of Light Dragoons, to Joseph Galloway, Superintendent-General.

1778, January 3. Philadelphia. — Deposition. That he was fired at by Americans of Colonel Morgan's Battalion on the Lancaster road whilst endeavouring to deliver to them a letter and packet under a flag of truce.
Two copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 104 and 113. 1 page and 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington, 8 Jan. 1778.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

1778, January 4. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 212. 1 page; Extract 9, part of No. 192.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fo. 369; and 159, fo. 77.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. Sir Robert Pigot.

1778, January 4. Cambridge. — Accompanied by a message to the same by Mr. Geddes.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 185 and 186. 1 page and 3 pages.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Pigot to Gen. Howe, 12 January.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W, Indies, 133, fo. 281; and 159, fo. 345.

Page 174

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

[1778, January 5.]
Two copies. Vol. 9. No. 210; part of No. 191-192. 3 pages each. Extract. Vol. 8, part of No. 8.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fo. 373; and 159, fo. 81.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1778, January 5. Boston, Head Quarters.
Two copies. Vol. 9. No. 211; part of No. 192. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fo. 377; 159, fo. 79.

Andrew Elliott to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 5. Superintendent's Office, New York. — Has stopped exports to Great Britain, Ireland and the West Indies agreeably to his orders. Explains reasons for his measures heretofore. The exportation to Philadelphia is allowed and encouragement to ships to Rhode Island agreeable to the orders of General Clinton, General Pigot and Sir Peter Parker. These goods are on vessels in H.M. service. Permission refused to merchant vessels. No duties paid in New York. His difficult situation. Encloses case of Brig. "Betsy." Hopes no steps will be taken till he has received his Excellency's determination.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 1. 5 pages.
Enclosure:—
1778, January 5. Superintendent's Office, New York. — Case of Brigantine "Betsy." Seized and brought into port hy order of Captain Appleby of H.M.S. "Preston." This vessel had on board 100 bushels of salt without any permit for shipping or for leaving the port.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 2. 3 pages.

Andrew Elliott to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 6. New York. — By Captain Appleby's orders the Brig "Betsy" was libelled the previous day in the Court of Admiralty. Imagined no further steps would have been taken before Howe's orders were received. Has not since seen Commodore Hotham.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 3. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wtilliam Heath to Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne.

1778, January 6. Boston.
Copies. Vol. 9. No. 206 and part of No. 191. 1 page. Extract in Vol. 8, part of No. 8.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 381; 159, fo. 85,

Page 175

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 7. War Office. — Concerning the absence of Majors Saxton and Blakeney and exchange of the latter with Major Dundas. Captain J. Thompson died 13th December, 1777.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 4. 1 page.
Enclosing Major Blakeney to Lord (Barrington), see 13 Dec. 1777. Lord Barrington to Major Blakeney, see 9 Dec. 1777. Lord Barrington to Major Saxton, see 9 Dec. 1777.

Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, January 7.
Extract. Vol. 8, part of No. 8. 7 lines.
Letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 87.

William Knox to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, January 7. Whitehall. — Circular. Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 137. 1 page.
Enclosure:— An Act for continuing an Act made in last session of Parliament, entitled An Act to impower H. M. to secure and detain persons charged with or suspected of the crime of high treason committed in any of H. M. colonies or plantations in America or on the high seas, or the crime of piracy.
Printed. Vol. 4. No. 138. 3 pages.

Jonathan Clarke to Colonel David Hendly.

1777 [should be 1778] , January 8. Cambridge. — Is directed to repeat his application for a stated account of all demands against the Troops of the Convention. Desires they be immediately furnished or a reason given for so great a delay.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 202. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1778, January 8. Philadelphia. — Acquaints him of the coming in of Lieut. Eyre from his confinement in Maryland. Encloses representation of treatment he received. He is still considered a prisoner of war, and if he remains, an officer of equal rank will be sent out. Complains of a man accompanying a flag of truce manifestly from curiosity. Deposition enclosed shows need of security for flags of truce.
P.S. — A sloop with flour for prisoners received, but desires that no more flags of truce be sent up or down the river without previous leave being obtained.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 102 and 114. 2 pages each.
Enclosing deposition of Thomas Wiggins, 3 Jan,
Lieut. Eyre to General Howe, 1 Jan.

Page 176

Major-Gen. Eyre Massey to Captain Robert Mackenzie.

1778, January 8. Halifax. — "Dear Sir, — As I have given Sir W. Howe so many letters, that I know I shall have his Curses, but let him remark, they are from the 20 November I therefore enclose you three Returns, which you may shew him or not, as you like, as my ambition is to shew my desire to please him.
"I am happy to tell you, I think our Friend Hall on the mending hand, I wish for the Benefit of us all, you had sent him to me sooner, for he was fairly worn out in the Service, before he arriv'd here.
"As he is the pen of a ready writer, and my Eyes the worse for use, I refer all matters to him, but must tell you as well as I have my Commander in Chief that I am heartily tir'd of my Command here; we never hear any good news, and nothing but the cursedest Lies that can be sent about, and never hear from the Grand Army."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 158. 2 pages.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, January 8. Head Quarters.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 99, 100. 1 page. Extract, 4. No. 124.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 143; extract 133, fo. 241.

Prisoners.

1778, January 9. Halifax. — Return of prisoners in hospital at Halifax with memorandum by Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.
Original. Vol. 10. No. 151. 2 pages.

John Robinson to [General Sir William Howe].

1778, January 9. Whitehall. — Acknowledges receipt of various letters. The papers relative to rum supplied by Mure, Son and Atkinson, and the observations as to the off reckonings and clothing of Maclean's and Goreham's corps have been laid before Lord North. These businesses shall be speedily taken into consideration.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 127. 2 pages.

Captain William Spry to Major-General Eyre Massey.

1778, January 9. Halifax. — Report of the Guard Houses constructed for the protection of the Half Moon Battery and Powder Magazine.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 157. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 10. War Office. — That a lieutenancy is vacant in the 4th Regiment of Foot.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8, No, 9. 1 page.

Page 177

Lord Barringtox to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 10. War Office. — Acknowledges receipt of letters of 30th November and 2nd December. The adjustment of affairs respecting Lieutenants Paplay and Ord is approved by his Majesty. Captain Gilman to take Captain Moore's place.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 10. 1 page.

Elias Boudinot to Hugh Ferguson.

1778, January 10. — Prisoners to be supplied solely from their respective lines.
Extract, Vol. 8. No. 45. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington, 19 January.
The same in Vol. 3, Nos. 108 and 119, and in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fo. 293.

Governor Peter Chester.

1778, January 10. Pensacola. — Proclamation.
Copy. Vol 10. No. 170. 3 pages.
Enclosed by John Stuart to Gen. Howe, 4 February.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 243; B. of T. W. Florida 21, fo. 55.

Sir Grey Cooper to General Sir William Howe:

1778, January 10. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — To order the demand for payment for provisions supplied by Nesbitt, Drummond and Franks to be examined, liquidated and settled. Future supplies for prisoners to be contracted for in America and paid out of the military chest.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 108; and extract, Vol. 29. No. 129. 1 page each.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to [Gen. Sir William Howe].

1778, January 10. Halifax. — Has given Major-Commandant Small 4 months' leave of absence. He has done as much as man could do to establish a useful corps. Introduces Captain Maclean, who will deliver his dispatches. "I have ordered three sloops and a schooner with coals to go with this convoy which have been ready to sail for eight and twenty days; I would have sent you more, could I have got vessels. I beg you will not suffer any Contracts to be made for Coals without my knowing of it first; as there are proposals going from this, that will not answer. At this time there are twelve hundred Chaldrons dug up, which Captain Clarke will ship at the same rate he has done. I think it necessary to inform your Excellency, that the Pyrates which have done all the mischief on the Coast of this Province, appear as fishing boats, and have concealed arms; and all the Sea Officers have said, that Lord Howe has desir'd that they shall not be molested; for they take the Merchant men, which
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the Ships of War speedily retake: in this situation appear'd the Pyrate which the 'Gage' lately took. This, please to keep to yourself, as I got this intelligence from the Master of the 'Gage,' who is the best Pilot for the Eastern Coast, as well as Guide, in case of a landing; and whom I have found faithfull upon all occasions."
Signed letter. Vol. 10. No. 159. 2 pages.

Stores.

1778, January 10. — Return of camp equipage shipped on board the "Greenwich" armed ship for the British forces in America under Sir William Howe.
Vol. 6. No. 7. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 20 February.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 11. War Office. — The Corporation of Liverpool having engaged to raise 1,000 men for foreign service and named Major Pole and Captain Stanley for the Lieut.-Colonelcy and Majority respectively, signifies the King's command that they be allowed home as soon as the service permits.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 11. 1 page.

German Troops.

1778, January 11. Cambridge. — "List of German officers, prisoners with the enemy taken from the army under the command of Lieut.-General Burgoyne before the Convention of Saratoga." Showing those taken 16 August at Bennington, and 7 and 8 October at Freeman's Farm.
List of Hessian officers and officers of the Regiment of Waldeck prisoners with the enemy. No dates given.
Recapitulation of the above two lists.
2 copies of each. Vol. 3. Nos. 41, 42, 40. Vol. 5; 34, 35, 33. 4 pages.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe. Proclamation.

1778, January 12. Philadelphia. — Requiring declaration of all the naval stores possessed by persons in the city.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 169. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, January 12. Halifax. — "Last night arrived here the 'Favourite' Brig a Cartel from Boston, which has brought most of the Officers of the 'Fox,' Cornet Grant and four Men of ye 16th Dragoons, and some of Fraser's Officers with a few Men, the whole in great distress for Clothing. Mr. Oglive of Fraser's Regt. deliv'd me the enclosed from Lt.-Col. Campbel, which he prayed I would open. I did in the presence of Major Small, and as I had Captain Baron and Doctor Cullen exchang'd, and that through a Correspondence with General Ward, who I
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knew last War, I have now inform'd him, that if he orders Lt.-Col. Campbell on board any Frigate cruising in Boston Bay, sends him to Bohde Island or to Halifax, I have pledg'd my Honor, your Excellency will send Lt.-Col. Ethen Allen in Exchange for him, which be so kind as to order.
"By the 'Favourite' last night I find Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne and his Army are still at Cambridge.
"Why Sir George Collier does not send the Flag of Truce to Boston he best knows, but he has neither consult'd the Lieut.-Governor on that or anything else, my plan was for the Cartel to have Remained under the Convoy in the Bay, and sent a Boat, that if there was not Man for Man given up, she should return to Halifax, or go to the Grand Army. Upon Resolution of my last letter to your Excellency wherein I hint to you the great mischief that is done on this Coast, by the fishing Boats having a Protection, I most humbly pray, you will not think me impertinent in such a Report, I did not mean to say his Lordship showed the least countenance to such Reptiles, but to shew the necessity of more small vessels here.
"I have order'd Lieut. Needham to Cloth the Men who arriv'd last night, which are about thirty. I ought to send your Excellency the Returns of those people, but cannot get it as the Cabot is just under way."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 10. No, 160. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lt.-Col. Campbell to Gen. Howe, 15 December 1777, with extracts from Heman Allen and Elias Boudinot of 31 October and 30 September.

Maj.-Gen. Sir Robert Pigot to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, January 12. Newport. — Papers enclosed will show Gen. Burgoyne's distressed situation. Has spared £20,000 for the use of the troops. Mr. Geddes' opinion has been asked relative to part of Burgoyne's letter. Supplies have been forwarded to Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 183. 8 pages.
Enclosing Major-Gen. Heath to Lieut.-Gen. Burgoyne, 3 Jan. 1778.
                   Lieut.-Gen. Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. Pigot, 4 Jan. 1778.
                   Lieut.-Gen. Burgoyne's message by Mr. Geddes to Maj.-Gen.Pigot [4 Jan. 1778.]

Lieut.-General John Burgoyne.

1778, January 13. Boston. — Account with the United States of America. For supplies of provisions November 6, 1777, to December following including 1 January, 1778, for the German Troops.
Copy. Vol. 9. No 213. 1 page.
Enclosed by Com.-Gen. Clarke to Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne, 17 Jan. 1778.

Page 180

Com.-General Jonathan Clarke to Colonel Lee, Commanding Officer, Cambridge.

1778, January 13. Cambridge. — Renews his application for a stated account of all demands against troops of the Convention.
Copy. Vol, 9. No. 203. 1 page.

Commissary General Jonathan Clarke to Lieut.-General John Burgoyne.

1778, January 14. Cambridge. — Stating objections after careful examination of the accounts of provisions furnished to the troops of the Convention. Submits that the only just and clear and decisive method of stating this account is, as the number of rations received by the troops from 6 November to 31 December is clearly ascertained to amount to 311,633 rations, "those Rations be charged at a certain fixed Price upon presumption of the Account being paid in hard Cash, and that the Charge of Candles, Soap and Wood be made in a separate Account, so as to preclude any further demands for that Period."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 201. 2 pages.

Gov. Patrick Henry to the Governor at New Orleans [Bernardo de Galvez].

1778, January 14. Williamsburg.
Copy. Vol, 11. No. 104. 3 pages. Vol. 20, No. 4; part omitted.
Autograph signed letter in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21844, fo. 93; copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 284, fo. 281; and Cornwallis MSS.; Spanish translation in Seville Est. 87. Caj. 1, leg. 6.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj-Gen. William Heath.

1778, January 15. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol, 9. No. 200. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 139.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, January 15. Philadelphia. — Concerning promotions in 60th Regiment and new raised battalions of that regiment. Has acquainted Major Stopford that no further enquiry will be made into his conduct at the surrender of Fort Chamble.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 164. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 15. Philadelphia. — No. 78.
Duplicate copy. Vol. 4. No. 114. 2 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 119; copy 306, fo. 195.

Page 181

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, January 15. Philadelphia. — To clean before each door on penalty of 5s. Fines imposed for chimneys taking fire. Signed J. Galloway, Superintendent General.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 165. 2 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, January 15. Philadelphia. — To cross only by the Old and New Ferries in Water Street and then only by pass.
Copy. Vol. 84. No. 166. 1 page.

Major John Saxton to Lord Barrington.

1778, January 15. Au Buis en Dauphine. — Details relative to his health, absence from his regiment and his endeavours to exchange. Hopes his Lordship will represent to his Majesty his unfortunate case and situation.
2 copies. Vol. 6. No. 5 and Vol. 8. No. 21. 3 pages each.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 4 Feb. 1778.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, January 16. Philadelphia. — In answer to letters of 16th and 19th September, the "Howe" and "Friendship" are arrived at New York and the "General Conway" parted with her convoy eight days after leaving Plymouth. Directions relative to distribution of necessaries and mode of payment shall be obeyed.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 165. 1 page.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 16. Philadelphia. — No. 80.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 115. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 127; and 306, fo. 197.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Hugh Ferguson.

1778, January 16. Fryday. — The General in a letter to Washington has taken notice of that part of Mr. Boudinot's letter respecting the restrictions upon the supply of provisions to the British prisoners. He has also in a former letter desired that no flags might pass by water to this place from above or below; and the General expects you will repeat this in your answer to Mr. Boudinot's letter which is enclosed.
If you will call upon me before dinner, you shall see the letter to General Washington, which will explain to you Sir William Howe's ideas.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 106 and 116. 1 page each.

Page 182

Governor Peter Chester to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 17. Pensacola. — His Majesty's Council for this Province have agreed with him as to the necessity of adopting the plan for stoppage of Indian trade, particularly the sale of rum to Indians. Encloses copy of a Proclamation to that purport which he has been advised to issue. Hopes for a speedy end to the rebellion.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 190. 2 pages.

Commissary General Jonathan Clarke to Lieut.-General John Burgoyne.

1778, January 17. Cambridge. — I have the honor to acquaint your Excellency that I have received from Mr. Charles Miller an account of provisions furnished the troops of the Convention (including the charges referred to in the last account) amounting in the whole to £37,494 lawful money of the State of Massachusetts.
I beg leave to observe upon the account:— That the proposal I had the honor to submit to you and Major-General Heath of estimating the ration at a certain fixed price is rejected.
That altho' it's acknowledged this whole account has been paid for in the currency of the country and your Excellency has been assured that it was intended that the State should gain no advantage by the supplys of your army, yet any abatement upon presumption of the account being paid in solid coin is also refused.
That according to the price at which the provision is charged, if paid in solid coin, will amount to one shilling and ninepence sterling per ration.
As the price is so exceeding great I beg leave to submit to your Excellency whether it will not be best to return the same quantity of provisions to the United States which I understand General Heath is ready to accept of.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 199. 1 page.
Enclosing Lieut.-Gen. Burgojme's account with the United States of America, 13 Jan.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 17. Philadelphia. — No. 81.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 116. 2 pages.
Duplicate signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 131; copy 306, fo. 199; extract in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 17. Philadelphia. — No. 82.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 117. 1 page.
Duplicate signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 135; copy 306, fo. 200.

Page 183

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, January 17. Philadelphia. — Licences required for trading; money to be applied for nightly watch and lamps for city. Signed Jos. Galloway, Sup. Gen.
Copy. Vol. 34. No, 159. 3 pages.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, January 18. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol, 9. No, 190. 3 pages.
Enclosing six letters between himself and Major-General Heath, see 3, 4, 5 and 6 January.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 353.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 18. Philadelphia. — No. 84.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 118. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Macartney to Lord Howe and Sir W. Howe, 26 Nov. 1777.
Duplicate signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 151; copy 306, fo. 202.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, January 18. Philadelphia.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 101 and 111. 1 page each.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 147.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Several regiments having applied for relief on account of loss by fire, captures by the enemy and other unavoidable incidents, asks whether allowances should be made to them.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 166. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — No. 85.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 120. 1 page.
Duplicate signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 155; copy 306, fo. 202.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Separate.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 121. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 175; duplicate in the Sackville MSS.

Page 184

General Sir William Howe to Jonathan Mallett.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letter of 29th December, with enclosure. Desires him to attend to passing Hessian accounts in same form and similar in other respects to the British. Agreeable to treaty he is also to furnish medicines. Any plan he may think fit for payment of the lower servants in their hospitals will doubtless meet with approval. Expenses of their hospital previous to their arrival at Statin Island, August 1776, he may not settle. Vouchers necessary. "As the Hessian Hospitals are to be supplied by us with all necessary Articles, etc., it will be I hope needless for Mr. Lorentz to receive more Money by Warrant upon that Account, nor do I perfectly understand how it comes that you have not informed Sir Henry Clinton that you was to provide Stores, etc., for their Hospitals which you could not I think be ignorant of from my former Directions to you on that Head."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 12. 3 pages.

General Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Arrival of oat and store ships. Harley and Drummond's bills. Fuel may be procured in America. Fresh contract for 100,000 gallons of rum from Antigua and Barbadoes at 3s. 6d. per gallon.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 102. 4 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — On the impracticability and inhumanity of Mr. Boudinot's proposal, &c.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 44, 107, 117. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 289.
Enclosures:—
Extract of a letter from Ellas Boudinot to Hugh Ferguson, see 10 January.
Prisoners.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Quantity oj provisions issued to one man per week at two-thirds allowance according to the victualling regulations, agreeable to which the prisoners in Philadelphia are victualled. 4 lbs. 10 2/3 oz. bread; 2 lbs. 10 2/3 oz. pork; 2 pints pease; 4 ozs. butter; 5 1/3 oz. oatmeal. Or without the smaller species, 4 lbs. 10 2/3 oz. bread ; 3 lbs. 8 oz. pork.
3 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 43, 109, 118. 1 page each.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. George Clerk, B.M.G.

1778, January 19. Philadelphia. — Instructions relative to the payment of vessels employed in his department. Desires notice to be given to the Superintendent when any vessel employed is no longer required.
2 copies. Vol. 5. No. 5.; and Vol. 24. No. 7. 2 pages each.

Page 185

Promotions.

1778, January 20. Philadelphia. — List of promotions. Signed Robert Mackenzie, Secretary.
Original. Vol. 28. No, 171. 2 pages.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 20. Head Quarters. — Acknowledges letter of 8th. Is inclined to think Mr. Eyre's conduct not so discreet as it should have been. Cannot wonder at any insults as the accounts generally received of treatment of American prisoners are replete with indignities, &c. If Mr. Eyre is not considered a prisoner expects some gentleman in return. The conduct of the officer who followed the flag of truce was reprehensible.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 115 and 105. 2 pages each.
Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. 5, p. 218.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1778, January 21. Boston Head Quarters.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 170. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne to President Laurens, 11 Feb.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 153; extracts 133, fo. 405; 159, fo. 197.

General Sir William Howe to [Andrew Elliot].

1778, January 22. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges receipt of letters of 5 and 6 January. Approves his conduct. Explains his refusal to admit of any exportation not admissible by Act of Parliament. Upon same principle approves his (Elliot's) refusal to merchants to carry cargoes to Nova Scotia and the Floridas, unless in absolute want. In the case of the brig "Betsy," as it is now in the court of Vice Admiralty it is too late to enter into the contention. "One of my principal objects in appointing you to the Office of Superintendent, was to prevent the Conveyance of necessaries to the Rebel Army, or to the Inhabitants in Rebellion in the Neighbourhood of New York. The Proclamation I thought proper to issue on that occasion, was calculated to assist and enforce the purposes of the restraining Act, by providing, conformably to the Spirit thereof, against such clandestine attempts to illicit Trade, as were either clearly beyond the Cognizance or probably would not fall within the immediate Notice of the Navy in the harbour of New York. It was also calculated for the detection and seizure of such prohibited Articles as might from the smallness of the object, escape the Vigilance, or not be deemed worth the attention of the Captains of Men of War                    I thought it necessary in my Official Instructions to caution you concerning Seizures and Confiscations, and absolutely to prohibit the latter until you should, upon Report of the particular Circumstances have received my
Page 186
directions thereon.                    Your Conduct in the Case of the 'Betsy' is a proof that you do not suffer your Interest to come in Competition with an object of public Concern; and I approve much of your endeavours to prevent any Dispute upon the Occasion with the Officers of the Navy."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 13. 6 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, January 22. Philadelphia. — Prohibiting persons who forestall, buy up and exorbitantly sell provisions between the wharves or entrances and the market places. Signed, Joseph Galloway, Superintendent-General.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 163. 2 pages.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

1778, January 24. Cambridge. — No. 4.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 171. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne to President Laurens, 11 Feb.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 409; 159, fos. 157 and 199.

Colonel Philip Skene to General Sir William Howe.

1778, January 27. Cambridge. — "Sir, — My Fate has placed me here, under the Articles of Convention in the Class of the Followers of the British Army. I am told Judge Fell or Mr. Wynant Vanzant will be received for me. I am induced to give this Trouble because I wish to return to my Family after that I have attended General Burgoyne to Europe."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 168. 1 page.

General Washington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, January 30. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 230.)
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 110 and 120. 2 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 297.

Provincial Troops.

Return of a Troop of Light Horse Men of Loyal Refugees commencing 1 January, 1778, to the 31st January commanded by Alexander Cameron.
Similar return. Commanded by Richard Pearis.
Vol. 10. Nos. 173, 174. 1 p. each,
Both enclosed by Mr. Stuart to Gen. Howe, 3 February.

Page 187

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Jonathan Mallet.

1778, January 31. Philadelphia. — Is sensible of the difficulty and perplexity in settling the Hessian Hospital accounts. Recommends him, instead of asking orders, to propose a mode for the adjustment of these accounts and transmit it. Submits as a prudent step to ascertain fixed allowances for certain branches of expense per month to prevent altercation.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 14. 1 page.

John Steel, Ensign 63rd Foot, to Lord Barrington.

1778, January 31. London. — Memorial. Requesting leave to purchase a lieutenancy.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 19. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 4 February.

Troops of Convention.

Lieutenant-General John Burgoyne, Dr. to Thomas Chase, Deputy Quarter-Master-General to the Continental Army. Account for wood, cartage, transport and forage, from November 1777, to January 1778, £12,547 19s. Commission £627 7s., total £13,175 6s.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 197. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, February 3. War Office. — "The Cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow and the Town of Manchester having undertaken to raise Regiments at their own Expense, and having requested the King to appoint the Commandants from among the Field Officers who have distinguished themselves on the American Service : His Majesty has been graciously pleased to confer the command of the said Battalions on Sir William Erskine, Colonel Leslie and Colonel Mawhood.     .     .     .     .     They are left perfectly at Liberty to accept or decline.     .     .     .     .     Lieut.-Colonel Gunning of the 43rd, Lieut. Campbell of the 55th, and Lieut. Lloyd of the English Fuziliers being named for Promotion in the new Levies, and it having been represented that their Attendance here is necessary, I am to desire, if you have no objection, that you will also permit these Officers to return home."
2 copies. Vol. 6. No. 1.; and Vol. 8. No. 15. 2 pages each.

John Stuart to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 3. Pensacola. — Has been able to form two companies of refugees. Encloses returns. Mr. Cameron his deputy appointed to the senior company. Has been obliged to allow them £2 sterling per month and rations. Capt. Pearis's Company furnished with horses and employed for the present in suppressing the rum trade round Mobile Bay.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 172. 1 page.
Enclosing Return of Capt. Cameron's Company of Regulars and Return of Capt. Pearis's Company, Jan. 31, 1778.

Page 188

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 4. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
2 copies. Vol. 6, No. 2; and Vol. 8, No. 16. 1 page each.
Enclosure:—
List of Promotions.
2 copies. Vol. 6, No. 3; and Vol. 8, No. 17. 1 page each.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.
1778, February 4. War Office. — Sends Memorial of Ensign John Steel [see 31 January above] for his consideration.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 18. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 4. War Office. — Encloses copy of Major Saxton's answer [see 15 January above]. By his Majesty's command has signified to the Major that unless he embarks before end of March another will be appointed to the 45th Regiment by purchase.
2 copies. Vol. 6, No. 4; and Vol. 8, No. 20. 1 page each.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, February 4. Whitehall.— To take the command.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 1. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 55; copy 431, fo. 242; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, February 4. Whitehall. — No. 24.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 142. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 45; copy 431, fo. 239; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, February 4. Whitehall. — No. 25.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 4. No. 139. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 51; copy 431, fo. 241; copies in the Sackville MSS.

Hardy Perry to [Farquhar Bethune].

1778, February 4. Chactaw nation.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 234. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 231.

Page 189

John Stuart to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 4. Pensacola. — Received letter of 12th July. Communicated it to Gov. Chester, who issued the enclosed proclamation. Has given instructions to all who have not given in lists of their stock of rum. The bad behaviour of the Creeks obliged him to withdraw all traders from that nation. This alarmed the friendly Indians, who came to confer on the subject. It was arranged that they should not be diverted from their winter's hunting, but leave word where they would be found in any emergency. Immediately after the Upper Creeks had left 600 of the well-affected towns of the Lower Creeks with all their traders arrived with Messrs. Holmes and Scott. They were accompanied by a deputation from the Cupitalis. "At our Meeting I reprehended the Ingratitude of the Cupitalis Oakfuskus & Towns which misbehaved, and at the same Time applauded the Behaviour of the Cowetalis and other friendly Towns. These called upon the Deputies to stand forth and answer for themselves, the Principal came forward but was so abashed that he coud not utter one word, another fellow came forward and said "That their Eyes were now opened, that they were sorry for what they had done, that they were sent to ask Forgiveness and that Traders might be permitted to go amongst them," when I represented the Necessity of their receiving the Commissaries as a Preliminary without which we cou'd not possibly come to an Understanding.
"After many private Conferences with the Deputies the principal named Hycoat offered to accompany Mr McIntosh back to the Nation, provided the Traders cou'd be suffered to return to the Nation with a Supply of Goods, I thought best however to dispatch him with one of the Interpreters, promising that if he returned with agreeable Accounts, the Traders shou'd be permitted to return.
"About the middle of last Month Mr McGillivray assistant Commissary arrived here with a Message from the Oakfuske Chiefs, declaring their Sorrow for their Behaviour, and desiring to be forgiven, & that the rest of the Nation might not be punished for their Fault, that they had no Objection to receive any beloved Man except Mr Tait, who was obnoxious to them, in answer to which I invited them down to Confer with me, as the only way of coming to a thorough good Understanding and Mr. McGillivray returned fully persuaded that they wou'd accept of the Invitation, I have since received Information that the Rebel Agent Galphin has sent three Men as Traders with about twelve pieces of Strouds into some of the Rebel Towns.
"Two days ago I had a Message from the Ketchita Chief who was here as a Deputy acquainting me that since his Return he had gained over the principal disaffected Chiefs, & that they were making a strong Party to seize the Rebel Traders & bring them here, & that I might expect good News from him very soon.
"Many of the Creeks remain here the whole Winter for the sake of Provision, & ever since November about five hundred Cherokees
Page 190
have lived here, which hesides the Parties which come upon Business have caused a very great Expence of Presents and Provisions, which still continues.
"The Provisions which your Excellency was pleased to order here by the 'Sarah & Elizabeth Foote,' & which arrived with the 'Daphine' came in good Time, for without this Supply I cou'd not have continued to feed the Indians, as my Stock was entirely exhausted.
"Agreeable to your Excellency's Directions I have appointed Mr. Kirkland my Deputy for the District of the Seminollu Creeks with an Appointment of fifteen shillings Sterling Pr Day, & last Week he set out on a Tour through his District, with several of their Leading Men who had been here to visit me. They are extremely well disposed Indians & ready to be employed when called upon. Mr. Kirkland has Instructions to call a Meeting of the Chiefs for which purpose I have supplied him with a Quantity of Presents, the object of which is to engage those Indians to be ready when called upon to enter upon Action, he is to carry a few Head Men with him to St. Augustine, and if any plan is concerted by Gen. Prevost, he is immediately to summon his Indians who amount to a thousand Gun Men by the best Accounts.
"The Cherokees were perfectly well affected & notwithstanding the severe Chastisement which they lately received, are ready to act when called upon, they came here in a naked and forlorn Condition, I have plentifully relieved them & they are now upon the point of returning into their Nation. They will be immediately followed by Mr. Cameron, who will hold them prepared for any Service which may be required of them, I have lately received Assurances from those who live near and pretend to be in Friendship with the Rebels that they wish for an Opportunity of acting which they will embrace whenever it offers.
"The Chactaws & Chackasaws continue perfectly well disposed parties from both Nations are now scouting upon the Mississipi under the Direction of their Commissaries & some white Persons employed for that purpose.
"As the Creeks are daily returning from hunting, I shall most probably by next Packet be enabled to lay before your Excellency more agreeable Accounts of them. The London Ships with Supplies for the Trade have not as yet arrived, I sincerely wish that they may escape the Rebel Privateers who are in wait for them, their falling into the hands of the Rebels, at this Time wou'd create much trouble. The Creeks are a mercenary People, Conveniency & Safety are the great Ties that Bind them. From the imperfect Accounts which we have received by Land from the Rebel Provinces and from Jamaica, we conclude the last Campaign to be most successful & glorious, upon which I beg leave to offer your Excellency my most sincere Compliments of Congratulation."
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 171. 5 pages.
Enclosures:—
Rocheblave to Henry Stuart, see 4 July, 1777.
David Holmes and T.Scott to [John Stuart], see 19 Oct. 1777.
Page 191
Talk from the Lower Creek Indians, see 19 Oct. 1777.
John Stuart to the Lower Creek Deputies, see 20 Oct. 1777.
John Stuart to the Upper Creek Indians, see 10 Nov. 1777.
Gov. Chester. Proclamation, see 10 Jan. 1778.
Talk from John Stuart to the Head Men and Riding Chiefs of the Oakfuskees and Great Tallassies. Further talk to the Chiefs of the Upper Creeks at Pensacola.
Vol. 10. No. 165. 7 pages.

John Stuart to Captain Robert Mackenzie.

1778, February 4. Pensacola. — Mr. Skinner of St. Augustine has received articles mentioned to him in Captain Mulcaster's letter of 14 July last. As to his salary. Concludes 18 months will be due next 4th of April.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 163. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne.

1778, February 5. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 213. 1 page. Extract. Vol. 8. No. 22.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 325.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, February 5. Philadelphia. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 535.)
Two copies. Vol. 3. No. 131, 121. 4 pages.
Enclosing Maj.-Gen. Heath to Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne, 3 January.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 313; and 159, fo. 357.

Joshua Loring, Commissary of Prisoners, to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 7. New York. — "I beg leave to inform your Excellency that Mr. Boudinot, Commissary of the Rebel Prisoners, came to New York by permission of Sir Henry Clinton a few days ago, to visit the Prisoners and settle his accot with Mr. Pintard, I have been with him thro' the Hospitals, Sugar House and Provost, and he is perfectly satisfied in the Treatment they meet with. By him I learn that nothing prevents a general Exchange but a wrong Impression Mr. Washington has reced respecting the seventeen Hundred men which your Excellency sent home last Winter on parole and which from the interview we had he thinks can be settled and offers on his return to Jersey to obtain Mr. Washington's Leave for me to wait on your Excellency for that purpose, and being of Opinion that the present is a very favorable Opportunity, I shall embrace it the moment I receive their permission, and your Excellency may depend on the greatest Caution and Attention in this Business."
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 129, 139. 1 page each.

Page 192

Joshua Loring, Commissary of Prisoners, to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 10. New York. — "I did myself the Honor to write your Excellency on the 8th inst., informing you of my having an interview with Mr. Boudinot Commissary for Rebel Prisoners, since which he has been to visit the Officers on Parole on Long Island, and is willing to pay their Board, provided we will reimburse what has been paid for our Officers on the same Occasion.
"He is perfectly satisfied respecting the Men your Excellency sent home on Parole and thinks Mr. Washington can no longer dispute the payment of them as his own Officers have assured Mr. Boudinot that by their particular desire the Men were suffered to go out, and in their opinion, they should be accounted for.
"I could wish for many Reasons the Exchanges of those on Parole might not take place 'till I have the Honor of seeing your Excellency as from this interview together with such Vouchers as I have in my possession respecting these Men, I am of opinion (with defference to your Excellency) that a more Beneficial one might be effected."
2 copies, Vol. 3. Nos. 130 and 140. 1 and 2 pages respectively.

Gen. Geo. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, February 10. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 234.)
Copies. Vol. 3. No. 123, 133. 4 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 321; 159, fo. 361.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to President Laurens.

1778, February 11. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 175. 9 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 385; 159, fo. 203.
Enclosures:—
No. 1. Report by Lieut. Wm. Noble, acting A.D.C. to Maj.- Gen. Phillips.
Vol. 9. No. 172. 1 page.
Copies in the Record Office as the covering letter.
No. 2. Statement concerning the Conversation between Maj.- Gen. Gates and Lt.-Col. Kingston of 17 Oct. 1777.
Vol. 9. No. 173. 1 page.
Copies in the Record Office as the covering letter.
No. 3. Extract from Maj.-Gen. Heath's letter, see 21 January.
No. 4. Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne to Maj.-Gen. Heath, see 24 January.
No. 5. Extracts from Remonstrances made to Gen. (Burgoyne) by Officers of the Troops of Convention soon after their arrival at Cambridge.
Vol. 9. No. 174. 2 pages.
Copies in the Record Ofice as the covering letter.

Page 193

Lieut.-Gen. John Burgoyne to President Laurens.

1778, February 11. Cambridge.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 165. 4 images.
Copies in the Public Kecord Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 417; 159, fo. 187.
Enclosure:—
The names and ranks of Officers for whom passports are requested — Lt.-Col. Kingston, Capt. Stanley, Lt. Willford, Dr. Wood, Lt. Bibby, Lt. Wheat, Capt. Willoet Capt. Vigors.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 166. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 421.

General Sir William Howe. Regulations and Proclamation.

1778, February 11. Philadelphia. — As to rum, molasses and salt. Proclamation as to donations for the poor. Persons appointed to receive. Signed, Jos. Galloway, Sup. Gen.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 164. 4 pages.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, February 12. Philadelphia. — Commanding all having oil in their possession to make return thereof unto the Quarter Master General's office. Followed by a notice by E. Story, inspector, dated 10 February, to all purchasers and importers of rum, molasses or salt to settle their accounts and return permissions.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 158. 2 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir William Howe.

1778, February 12. St. Augustine. — Necessity for intercourse and supply of money. Reports of an expedition by the rebels against this Province. Gov. Tonyn having completed the four companies of Rangers he (Prevost) has taken them under his command. Submits enclosures and begs positive orders. "The little service they are of in the way they are at present is sufficient to evince the impropriety of having such a corps without almost any control or regulation." Recommendations for succession. P.S. — Capt. A. Prevost is arrived.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 5. 3 pages.
Enclosing Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Gov. Tonyn, 20 Dec. 1777.
                   Gov. Tonyn to Brig.-Gen. Prevost, 24 Dec. 1777.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. A. Prevost to Gen. Howe, 2 March.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, February 14. Philadelphia. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 537.)
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 122, 134. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 329; 159, fo. 365.

Page 194

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Robert Adair, Inspector General of the Hospitals.

1778, February 14. Philadelphia. — Is directed by Gen. Howe to acquaint him that he has granted Mr. Croker, apothecary, six months' leave of absence.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 23. 1 page.

Thomas Franklin, Agent for American Prisoners in Philadelphia.
Declaration.

1778, February 16. Philadelphia. — That neither cruelty nor insult are offered to prisoners. Has reason to believe the allowances are faithfully served out to them. The sick are well cared for and officers on parole are allowed to walk out every day.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 125 and 137. 1 and 2 respectively.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington, 21 Feb. 1778.

George Thompson, Serjeant 63rd, Deposition before John Potts, Magis. Police.

1778, February 16. Philadelphia. — That on the 27th December the brig "Symmetry" with soldiers and invalids ran aground in the Delaware, was discovered by the rebels, fired on and all taken prisoners, the sick and wounded beaten with clubs, some thrown overboard, all robbed of blankets and property, conveyed to Lancaster and closely confined. That two sergeants who had accompanied the British flag were also captured and thrown into jail and were to be tried as spies.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 127 and 137. 3 and 2 pages respectively.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington, 21 Feb. 1778.

Andrew Elliott to [General Sir William Howe].

1778, February 18. New York. — Appreciation of letter of the 22nd. Acknowledges his error in writing about the "Betsy." Assures of the thorough unanimity with the Navy and other departments. As to Gardiner's appointment as Wharf Officer at Staten Island, it was the only effectual mode that could be devised to stop supplies going from there to the rebels. All goods carried to Staten Island must now be landed at Coles Ferry under Gardner's immediate inspection, whence if agreeing with my permission they are to be transported by land only to the different inhabitants to whom they belong. Subjoined is a paper containing alterations it has been found necessary to adopt since his first plan of proceeding.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 24. 10 pages.

Page 195

Lord George Germain to Gen Sir William Howe.

1778, February 18. Whitehall. — No. 26.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 140. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 59; copy 431, fo. 251; copies in the Sackville MSS.

Thomas Wileman, 17th Dragoons. Depositions sworn before John Potts.

1778, February 18. Philadelphia. — That on being taken prisoner by the rebels he was stripped of clothes, watch, money and books and marched to Lord Stirling's quarters, who, on complaint being made of such usage, answered it was a maxim taken from the British troops. That he was sent to Washington's quarters at Valley Forge, kept 4 days without food, was sent thence to Lancaster where the bread served to them was very bad. That he had seen a rebel paper, which gave an account of a chimney taking fire by reason of its being foul, but a suspicion arising that it had been done by the British prisoners there the rebel soldiers with bayonets killed 8 and wounded 18 of them.
2 copies. Vol. 8. Nos. 126 and 136. 2 pages each.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Gen. Washington, 21 Feb. 1778.

Lieut.-Col. Thomas Brown to Governor Patrick Tonyn.

1778, February 19. St. Mary's River. — Twelve men of loyalty selected for Government service in South Carolina. Agreeable to directions he has two trusty Carolina Palatines who will give instructions to their relatives to tamper with their countrymen in the Georgia service and conduct them into this province. Suggests sending the Rangers and Indians over the Altamaha to collect cattle for the garrison and province. The Rangers are improving in discipline.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 143. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe, 24 Feb. 1778.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, February 19. Whitehall. — Circular.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 3. 3 pages.
The same addressed to Sir Wm. Howe. Vol. 4. No. 141.
Draft and copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 282, fo. 77; 397, fo. 200.
Enclosure:—
Copy of the two Conciliatory Bills presented to the House of Commons, as to the question of taxation and on the appointment of Commissioners to quiet the disorders, &c.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 4. 9 pages.

Page 196

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, February 20. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 6. 1 page.
Enclosures:—
Return of camp equipage, see 10 January.
1778, February 20. — List of Articles of camp equipage, bell tents, tin kettles, waterflasks, hand hatchets and 20,000 blankets for the British Forces acting in the field on the coast of the Atlantic over and above the compleat proportion for the Campaign 1778 already sent or embarkedfor America.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 8. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 21. War Office. — Ensign Litson, of 37th, appointed to a Lieutenancy in the Royal Liverpool Regiment, which he is at liberty to accept or refuse. To allow him to come to England.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 9. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 21. War Office. — Lieut.-Col. Murray, of the Foot Guards, approved for command of a corps of Highlanders. To be permitted to come home if he desires and the service allows.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 10. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, February 21. War Office. — Capt. James Stuart, of the 64th, nominated one of the Majors of Lord Seaforth's corps. He is to have leave to come to England if he accepts.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 11. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne.

1778, February 21. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 10. No, 214. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 355.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, February 21. Philadelphia. — A long letter refuting the charges of illtreatment of prisoners, and citing instances of the injustice shown to the British.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 124, 135. 15 pages.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 333.
Enclosing.— Declaration of Thomas Franklin, 16 February. Deposition of Serjeant Thompson, 16 February. Deposition of Thomas Wileman, 18 February.

Page 197

Natchez.

1778, February 21. — Capitulation by William Hiorn and seven others, delegates for the Natchez district, West Florida, to James Willing, captain under the United States.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 242. 3 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 264, fo. 353; 282, fo. 177. Board of Trade, West Florida, 21.

John Patterson to Sir William Howe.

1778, February 24. Custom House, Philadelphia. — Arguing that this Custom House has never been removed or shut by Parliament, and that if the port is open at all duties are still levyable on dutiable articles. £40,000 sterling in duties have been already lost to the Crown on goods imported into New York and this city.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 183. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Sir W. Howe to Atty.-Gen. Allen, 27 Feb. 1778.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 24. St. Augustine. — "I have the Honor to inform your Excellency that since the Defeat of the Rebels in May last this Province has remained unmolested. The 60th Regt is improved and the Rangers are properly trained for Service with the Indians and are fit for scouring the Woods.
"The Rebels in Georgia continue to persecute the Friends of Government they strip them of their Property & expel them the Province Mr. Galphin their Superintendant has been too successfull in spreading Disaffection amongst the Creek Indians. Mr. Stuart no doubt has informed your Excellency of the late Disturbances and that Affairs now wear a better Aspect.
"I am Sir most assiduous in keeping in Humour & well disposed those in my Neighbourhood, they are useful and ready to go into Georgia, indeed rather desirous of being employed. I have a Considerable Number of them in Town and I expect more Daily. They and the Rangers guard the Frontiers and occasionally make Incursions into the Province of Georgia, they will be particularly serviceable in Case of a Fresh Invasion of this Province which is threatened.
"The Superintendant seems desirous of drawing all the Indians towards Pensacola, they are no doubt within Mr. Stuart's Province, but Sir, I feel great Inconvenience from the Want of the Service of those who were employed by me last Spring, and I submit to your Excellency whether they might not at all Times be beneficially engaged in infesting the Southern Frontiers of Georgia. The Rangers accompanying them wou'd prevent their butchering the innocent and harmless.
"General Prevost, Sir, tells me, that he intends writing to your Excellency concerning the Rangers, this obliges me to trouble your Excellency with a few Observations concerning, which otherwise I shou'd not have mentioned.
Page 198
"In 1776, when continual Inroads & Depredations were made upon our Settlements upon St Mary's River, a Post was formed of the King's Troops upon that River and Lieut Grant of His Majesty's Schooner St John & an armed Sloop were stationed there. The Rebels with an inconsiderable Force advanced toward the Eiver, broke up the Settlements & your Excellency was informed the Troops and armed Vessels retired, although the Detachment was under the Command of a spirited & judicious Officer Captain Graham now a Major.
"For the purpose of making Incursions into Georgia to procure Intelligence & Provisions and scouring the woods, I formed Woodsmen into Companies of Rangers, they are entirely a provincial Establishment, & under my Command, but Sir, I have always told the Brigadier they were in the King's Pay, and for his Service and whatever he desired shou'd be performed, that in the most extensive View I had the King's Service alone at Heart and hoped ever to act in Concert and Harmony with him. For my Sentiments on this Subject, I beg leave to refer your Excellency to Brigadier General Prevosts Letter & my Answer which I take the Liberty to enclose to your Excellency.
"Mr. Brown Sir, whom I commissioned a Provincial Lieut Coll that he might have a rank superior to a Major Robinson of South Carolina is a Gentn of Education and Fortune. He was early persecuted by the Rebels for his Principles & has evinced a most exemplary & daring Spirit by going into the Indian Nation to animate the Savages against the Rebels by warmly engaging in the King's Service. He Commanded the Indians & Rangers at the taking of Fort McIntosh, when they were engaged for some Hours before the Regulars came up. He dislodged a Party of the Rebels who had taken Post near St John's River, he advanced and attacked their Main Body who were in the Act and Moment of a Flight before Major Prevosts Corps arrived, on whose appearance they dispersed & fled. His Spirit and Conduct were much commended by Major Prevost in a Letter to the Brigadier General although for what reason I know not, I cou'd not procure a Copy of that Paragraph, nor has the General thought proper to mention to Mr. Brown the Approbation of your Excellency, which you was pleased to signify in your Letter to him. This, Sir, has hurt Mr. Brown, but he is determined that no Usage shall divert his Attention from the main Object, and I am confident Honour is his great Pursuit, and that whatever Representations of Mr. Brown & the Rangers, General Prevost may make to your Excelly, I could not have found a more proper Person than Mr. Brown is for that Service and although I honour Regular Troops, I will venture to assert, that had there been no Rangers in the Province the King's Service wou'd have suffered considerably. We shou'd not have had three Thousand Head of Cattle brought from Georgia for the Supply of fresh Meat to this Town and Garrison, and I cou'd hardly have employed the Indians to lay waste Georgia, butchering indiscriminately Men, Women & Children, which wou'd have been the Case had they
Page 199

acted by themselves. Although I mean no Reflection upon Regular Troops in whose honour I have an Interest; I will venture to affirm, that the Regulars in this Garrison, when sent forth on an Expedition into the Woods must act to disadvantage without Rangers.
"I have long meditated taking Possession of Georgia, which I assure your Excellency would be easily effected, and were the Forces in the Floridas properly exerted in conjunction with the Indians great advantage would be derived from it, but I find the Brigadier General not disposed to such Measures without positive Orders from your Excellency.
"The Upper Creek Indians from our indeterminate Conduct towards them, have not been able to form a firm Resolution in what manner they shou'd act, & a few Towns of them are lost to the King's Service.
"The Cherokees for want of timely Support have been drove out of their country & mostly dispersed.
"The lower Creeks that are within my Reach, and the Seminolies, who domiciliate in this Neighbourhood have been preserved firm to Government & have cooperated whenever I called upon them, and have frequently sent to me Deputations for Intelligence & to enquire if I required their Services.
"I shall esteem it an Honour and Happiness if my Sentiments Correspond with your Excellency's, and I shall ever pay the greatest Attention to your Excellency's Suggestions.
"By Intelligence on which I can depend I am informed near four Hundred German Deserters and Prisoners from your Excellency's Army are arrived in Georgia and are incorporated in one of the Rebel Corps.
"Lieut Coll, Brown has my Directions to send proper Persons to assimilate amongst these People.
"Some German Refugees from Georgia that are in our Rangers have undertaken to effectuate it. They are instructed to persuade them to march in a Body with their Arms, and they will conduct them to our advanced Posts, or to concert with them upon any possible Project to quit the Rebel Service. I have promised them a favorable Reception and Reward. I trust your Excellency will approve of it and in Case the Plan succeeds that they may be pardoned. The enclosed Copy of a Letter from Lieut- Coll, Brown from St. Mary's River will acquaint your Excellency with some circumstances relative thereto."
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 139. 6 pages.
Enclosing Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Gov. Tonyn, 20 Dec. 1777.
                   Gov. Tonyn to Brig.-Gen. Prevost, 24 Dec. 1777.
                   Lt.-Col. Brown to Gov. Tonyn, 19 Feb. 1778.

Page 200

Sir William Howe to Andrew Allen, Attorney General.

1778, February 27. Philadelphia. — Requests his opinion upon points of law in the enclosed paper, particularly whether vessels being private property are liable to pay duty as they were before the passing of the Prohibitory Act.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 181. 1 page.
Enclosing John Patterson to Sir W. Howe, 24 Feb.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, February 28. War Office. — Sending the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 12. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Return of the officers of the brigade of Foot Guards on service in America, who are to be relieved, with names of the officers who are to relieve them     .     .     .     .     (sic) 1778.
Vol. 6. No. 13. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Colonel Clerk.

1778, March 1. Philadelphia. — The Commander-in-Chief directs that all surveys upon stores should be taken by persons on oath reporting not only the damage but the cause, to prevent recurrence. Damaged rugs and blankets received to be surveyed again in this way. The damaged blankets may be distributed amongst refugees, soldiers' wives and children, and those remaining to be made to answer for barrack and hospital use. Transports will be sent to Halifax to bring off the 1,200 chaldron of coals. Coal ships to be discharged 21 days after arrival. Wood for New York and its dependencies to be supplied ready for the winter for at least 10,000 men.
P.S. — Gen. Massey is desired to settle Mr. Clark's accounts and give him passage to England.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 28. 3 pages.

W. Newton, Acting Deputy Pay Master General.

1778, March 1. Philadelphia. — State of the military chest.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 104. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Sir W. Howe to John Robinson, 16 March 1778.

Troops.

1778, March 1. — Order to Commanding Officers of Corps. To direct the Regimental Paymasters to make stoppages of all pay for non-commission officers and soldiers prisoners with the rebels which may have been hitherto credited to the Companies for effectives and to lodge the same with the agents. The commanding officers of companies are to deduct only for money or necessaries sent to the prisoners since their capture, and in future a deduction is to be made in the subsistence account of each regiment for the prisoners as aforesaid, of whom particular lists are to be transmitted to the agents.
Copy. Vol. 37. No. 38. 1 page.

Page 201

[                   ] to Mr. [Donald] Campbell.

1778, March 1. Point Coupee.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 236. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 173; Board of Trade, W. Florida 21, fo. 115.

Andrew Allen, Attorney General, to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 2. Philadelphia. — That the case can only be judged in the light of the Prohibitory Act.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 179. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
1778, March 2. Philadelphia. — His opinion respecting the power of the Custom House. This is framed on the question whether all vessels being private property, coming into this port with licenses, as directed by the Prohibitory Act, are subject to all the laws and regulations of the customs, and all goods so imported, under whatever denomination, liable to the payment of such duties as they were before the passing of the said Act.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 180. 3 pages.

Lord Barrington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 2. War Office. — Appointment of James Napier to be Superintendent-General of the hospitals in North America with an allowance of £3 a day. Dr. Morris continues to do the duties of Physician and Inspector of Regimental Hospitals. Observation on the purveyors' duties, those of the physicians and the apothecaries.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 14. 3 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, March 2. Philadelphia.— Commissioners to exchange prisoners appointed.
Two copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 128, 138. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fos. 341 and 457.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, March 2. Philadelphia. — Encouraging his Majesty's subjects to exert themselves in raising vegetables, etc. for use of the troops and inhabitants of Philadelphia and assuring them of all possible protection to the lands enclosed for that purpose.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 155. 2 pages.

Page 202

Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 2. St. Augustine. — Transmits copies of his letters of the 1st of November and 12th of February with several enclosures, the monthly returns, and many letters from Pensacola. Captain Mcintosh has leave to go to New York. Sends memorials of Capt. Miller and Lt. Sutherland. Lt. Barrow, 16th, has leave to go to New York. "The reports of the preparations of the Rebels against this place have subsided lately, I can not think that as long as their Ports are shut up by our Frigates, they can design any attempt against this place the distressing the Settlements on the river St. John is not so easily prevented as small struggling parties could effect it, and cannot be so easily discovered but the parties of Indians which now and then go to War against them and pass that way, deter them from the attempt. Your Excellency will have received the latest accounts of the State of Indian affairs by the 'Daphne,' by the letters I had from Mr. Stuart about the same time the 'Daphne' sailed from Pensacola, he had great hopes of bringing the Creeks to reason and to give him a proper satisfaction for the insult offered to his Agents amongst them.     .     .     .     .     A Serjeant of the Royal Emigrants with three privates and a Soldier of the 14th who were prisoners amongst the Rebels, having been returned in exchange for some of the Prisoners made at Fort Mcintosh, I ordered one of the Paymasters here to subsist them and supply them with what they wanted, I have sent them under the care of Lieut. Barrow, who has the Account of what money has been advanced to them, that the same may be credited by the Paymasters and repaid to the Agents of the 60th Regiment, as it has been necessary to issue provisions to the Rangers raised in East and West Florida by Governor Tonyn and Mr. Superintendent Stuart; I beg to receive your Excellency's commands to know in what manner those extra rations are to be accounted for, whether to the Contractors at the Contract price or to the Commissary at the usual stoppage of two pence halfpenny, no stoppages have as yet been made." Requests bat and forage money for the troops in this district as living is very expensive.
P.S. — "I this moment received information that Rebels are Arming their Gallies in order I suppose to prevent our Men-of- War taking in water at St. Mary's river, where they can do it with more expedition than here."
Signed letter. Vol. 12. No. 13. 4 pages.
Enclosures:—
Copy of his letter of 1 Nov. 1777, which see.
Copy of his letter 12 Feb. 1778, which see with 2 enclosures.
Memorial of Capt. Midler to General Howe. His services. Is over 60 and infirm, begs leave to sell on the same terms as the rest of the army.
Signed duplicate. Vol. 12. No. 1. 1 page.
1778, March 2. St. Augustine. — Copy of the above letter.
Vol. 8. No. 25. 4 pages.

Page 203

Major John Saxton.

1778, March 2. Montpellier. — Physician's certificate respecting his health.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 17. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 18 March 1778.

General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 3. New York. — Appointment of Overseers of the Poor. "Whereas there are many houses and stores in this city belonging to Persons not under the protection of government which are occupied by merchants and others not entitled to quarters as constituting part of this garrison and whereas large sums of money are requisite towards assisting the poor, lighting the lamps, repairing the pumps, cleaning the streets     .     .     .     .     and there being no reason why the aforesaid persons should not pay rent I have     .     .     .     .     thought fit to authorise and appoint     .     .     .     .     John Smyth to demand ½ year's rent ending 1st of May next     .     .     .     .     rents when received are to be paid by said John Smyth into the hands of Mr. Elias Desbrosses     .     .     .     .     treasurer."
Copy. Vol. 20. No. 190. 2 pages.

Troops.

1778, March 3. — List of Serjeants discharged from the army under Howe and recommended for his Majesty's royal bounty of one shilling per day.
Vol. 6. No. 171. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Genl. Howe to Lord Barrington, 6 March.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 3. Whitehall. — That their Lordships have directed £10,000 to be paid to Messrs. Nesbitt, Drummond and Franks on account of the demand for £11,261 16s. 9d. for provisions supplied by them to prisoners among the rebels in the provinces of Pennsylvania and Virginia. To take credit for this as well as £4,523 2s. 6d. before advanced to them for a like service.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 125. Signed letter. Vol. 2. 126. 1 and 2 pages respectively.

Major John Saxton to Lord Barrington.

1778, March 3. Montpellier. — Encloses doctor's certificate. Begs further leave of absence to re-establish his health. Ardently wishes to remain in the service. Will rather exchange on half pay than quit it. Acknowledges receipt of letter dated 4 February.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 16. 5 folios.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to General Howe, 18 March.

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Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 3. St. Augustine. — Arrival of Mr. Kirkland after passing through part of the lower Creek Towns as Deputy of the Superintendent. Rebel commissioners and agents have a powerful influence in the nation. Semonolies preserve their attachment. Will fulfil intentions in commissioning and embodying companies of Refugee Rangers. Hopes his Excellency will continue to approve the steps respecting a Provincial Corps of them long since established for defence of the province.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 141. 2 pages.

Capt. Donald Campbell to John Stuart.

1778, March 5. New Orleans.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 235. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 181.

Gen. Sir William Howe to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. — Cols. O'Hara and Stephens and Capt. Fitzpatrick.

1778, March 5. Philadelphia. — Private. The sufferings of prisoners have been so great and of such long continuance from the want of faith and from objections started on the part of the enemy which could not be removed that he has been induced to agree a second time to a General Exchange of prisoners and to nominate Commissioners to meet others appointed by General Washington. Commits this trust to them with ample powers to treat on all matters relative to Prisoners of War. Explains lists and returns with which they are provided.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 154 and 173. 4 pages each.
Enclosures:—
Powers to the above Commissioners.
Copy. Vol. 3. No. 155. 2 pages. Also in Vol. 3. No. 174; in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fos. 345 and 461.
Memorandum (of equivalents) in case there should not be an equality in the ranks of officers to be exchanged. Also as to the mode of treating prisoners, exchanges of persons in civil employment, hospitals, etc.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 156 and 175. 3 pages each.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, March 5. Philadelphia. — No. 87.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 122. 4 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W Indies 133, fo. 231; copy 306, fo. 205.

Page 205

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, March 5. Philadelphia. — No. 88.
Copy, Vol. 4. No. 123. 1 page.
Enclosing Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe. Extract, 8 Jan.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 237; copy 306, fo. 209.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Maj.-Gen. William Tryon.

1778, March 5. Philadelphia. — On the question of his rank of Major-General in America.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 168. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Howe to Lord Barrington, 6 March.
Copies in the Public Record Office, War Office, I.L. Orig. Correspondence 20, and in America and W. Indies 187, fo. 361.

Alexander Ross to Col. John Stuart.

1778, March 5. New Orleans.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 237. 3 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 185.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, March 6. Philadelphia. — Desires his Majesty's commands respecting the point referred to in enclosed letters. Circumstance relative to Hessian invalids.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 167. 1 page.
Enclosing Gen. Howe to Maj.-Gen. Tryon, 5 March 1778.
                   Major-General Tryon to General Howe, 28 Dec. 1777.
Original in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters. Original Correspondence 20.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, March 6. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 170. 1 page.
Enclosing List of Serjeants discharged and recommended for his Majesty's bounty of 1s. per day. 3 March.
Original in Public Record Office, War Office, Original Correspondence 20.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Col. Clerk, B.M.G.

1778, March 6. Philadelphia. — The Commander-in-Chief desires information concerning the practicability of procuring coal for the army from the colliery in the Island of Cape Breton.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 27. 1 page.

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Captain R. Mackenzie to Major-Gen. James Robertson.

1778, March 6. Philadelphia. — Postscript only. "With Respect to the Provisions for Prisoners; I can only say that it is drawn here as usual and their Agent Mr. Franklin issues to them as much as he thinks proper in Addition. Upon Application to the General upon this Part of your Letter, he is of Opinion, that they should Continue to be victualled from the King's Stores, unless it be desired by their Agent to the Contrary. He entirely approves of the Mode you propose for furnishing them with Blankets to be paid for by my Mr. Pintard, and to remain for the use of Prisoners who may be under his Care in the District of New York."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 26. 1 page.

Loyalists.

1778, March 7. Halifax. — A list of poor persons on the Charity List for Provisions. Seventeen names.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 29. 1 page.

Charles Stuart to [John Stuart],

1778, March 7. Mobile. — Had a meeting yesterday of the head men of the Chactaws. The substance of their speeches is that they would now perform their promise. Is getting Mr. Bethune fitted out as fast as circumstances will admit. Ammunition should be well supplied to the [Chactaw] Nation and to the Chickasaws, to whom Mr. Bethune is to send deputies.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 239. 2 pages.
Extracts in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 201.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 8. Whitehall. — Most Secret. (Reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles No. 1,062.)
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 2. 19 folio pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 69; copy 685, fo. 1; and in Admiralty, Secretary, In Letters 4135, No. 47; Sackville MSS.

William Wilton to Col. John Stuart.

1778, March 8. New Orleans.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 238. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 189.

Alexander McGillivray to Colonel John Stuart.

1778, March 9. Creek Nation. — Desires Euply chiefs be allowed to purchase necessaries. Friends uneasy about the trade. Will have a meeting soon. "The Cowetas behave well; they still
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attack the Rebels and large Parties are now out; an Abeeootehie Party will turn out before long: In short all that has come in from hunting declare themselves much in our favor. — I can now assure you that our Party is far beyond the Oakfuskees and hope by May to make them look small. While the Cowetas, Chehaws and Obekas are for us they will carry their point from the whole Nation. Nothing material on the Rebel Sides happening as I watch them very closely."
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 240. 2 pages.

Prisoners.

1778, March 9. — "List of Prisoners taken at Quebec and Trois Rivieres, and sent home on Parole by Sir Guy Carleton." Officers and one chaplain, 11 names.
"List of wounded officers delivered over by Sir William Howe to the American surgeons at Brandewine." 6 names.
"List of officers at home on Parole by permission of Sir Wm. Howe." 9 names.
"List of officers who have deserted the parole from New York." 1 major, 8 captains, 24 lieutenants, 4 ensigns, an adjutant and a commissary.
"Return of the Number and ranks of the Officers and Privates set at liberty who remained unexchanged, 9 March 1778." This includes the totals of the first three lists above, adding the privates. Another item is that of 1,701 privates and 8 officers returned by Sir Wm., "for whom none have been sent back in exchange." The total of officers, etc., is 35, and privates 2,036.
"List of Officers Prisoners in the District of New York." Giving ranks and names.
"Return of officers who are or have been Prisoners at New York to be Exchanged, 9 March 1778." Giving rank and names.
"Return of Officers who are or have been prisoners at New York to be exchanged, 9 March 1778." A recapitulation of numbers only of the foregoing showing those on parole on Long Island, sick in the hospital, in New York, and who had deserted the parole. Including privates, 500 of whom were on shipboard, 130 in the hospital and 11 in New York. Major-General Lee not included.
Vol. 3. Nos. 34 to 39; and the same in 5. Nos. 26 to 32. 11 pages.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 9. Whitehall. — Colonel John Burgoyne appointed commissary for mustering foreign troops in North America at an allowance of £4 a day, viz.:— £2 for himself, 20s. for a deputy in Canada, 10s. to his deputy in New York and 10s. to his assistant. These accounts to be paid out of the extraordinaries.
2 duplicate signed letters. Vol. 2. Nos. 113 and 114. Copy. Vol. 37. No. 143. 1 page each.

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Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 9. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 263.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 141, 159. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fos. 349 and 465.

Gen Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, March 10. Philadelphia. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 538.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 142, 161. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, 133, fos. 353 and 469.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 11. Whitehall. — No. 2.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 5. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 111; copy 431, fo. 256; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain. Circular to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 11. Whitehall. — Sending late Acts of Parliament.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 6. 3 pages.

John Robinson to the Commander-in-Chief [Howe].

1778, March 11. — Recommending the bearer, Mr. Bartlett Goodrich, who had a commission in the Queen's Rangers under Lord Dunmore in Virginia and lost property to the amount of £80,000. He will endeavour to be of service.
Signed letter. Vol. 14. No. 35. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 12. Whitehall. — Separate. Recommending Mr. Fisher.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 7. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 431, fo. 243; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 12. Head Quarters. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 272.)
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 143, 162. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fos. 357 and 473.

Page 209

Thomas Brown, Lt.-Col. of the Rangers, to Gov. Tonyn.

1778, March 13. Altaruaha. — Capture of Fort Barrington by the Rangers and Indians. Detachments of Rangers sent into S. Carolina and Georgia.
Copy. Vol. 8. No, 44. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Gov, Tonyn to Sir W. Howe, 31 March.
Copy in Vol. 8. No. 46; copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248. fo. 227.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, March 15. Philadelphia. — (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., 539.)
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 144, 163. 1 page.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fos. 361 and 477.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 15. Halifax.— Has found all manner of goods brought here from the old country instantly purchased and sent to the rebellious colonies. Is certain nothing can prevent it but honest men in the revenue and a few small armed vessels upon the coast. Fort Howe on St. John's River a great safe-guard to the province. Fort Cumberland attended with many expenses. Commissions desired for Legge's corps. "By the last Accounts I had from Mr. Studholme he has great hopes of gaining the good Will of the St. Johns Indians as you desired me not to interfere with Indians I have communicated that Part to Lt. Governor Arbuthnot that tribe of Indians was led by Allen, who has been proclaim'd here by the Govr. and Council, and 200£ offerd for his head. The 16 instant, Captain Fitzherbert arrives here, for to take the Command, I am now content to remain here, with 100 men or to Serve in any part of the King's Dominions and now return you ten thousand thanks, for I shall ever be happy with any Man that will carry on the Service with Spirit for this shall be the last time I shall ever mention Sir George Collier and beg ten thousand Pardons for taking up your time so much as I have done, For surely, Sir, I could not serve with any Man, who could Act so vile a part, for after the Lieut. Governor and I had fix'd every appointment with good Guides at a great Expense for a Grand Stroke and while Major Small was prancing at St. John's River, the place of Rendezvous for the Troops from Cumberland and Windsor Sir George Collier stole out of Halifax, made a futile Attack at Machias, was most shamefully drove from thence, and as he publish'd a great number of Manifestos which coming to Major Small's hand, thought in honor he could not proceed — which prevented the Eastern Coast of New England from being Alarm'd which was my orders to Major Small, and which if they had been executed might have prevented the Misfortunes that attend'd Lt. Genl. Burgoynes Army, for it was
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at that critical time." March 25th. — Capt. Fitzherbert agrees to having a small schooner at the N.W. corner to prevent smuggling to the rebellious colonies.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 17. 3 pages.

General Sir William Howe to Thomas Barrow.

1778, March 16. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letter and enclosures of 2 March. Has written to Clinton, Pigot and the remitter's agents pointing out the only probable means he can devise of recruiting the military chest at New York. Hopes the remittances expected by Messrs. Gordon and Crowder will remove difficulties.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 31. 1 page.

[General Sir William Howe] to John Robinson.

1778, March 16. Philadelphia, Head Quarters. — Sending the enclosed.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 105. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
[Gen. Howe] to Messrs. Gordon & Crowder.

1778, March 16. Philadelphia. — Notifying that about .£500,000 sterling will be wanted to defray the contingent and extraordinary expenses of the forces.
2 copies. Vol. 2. No. 106 and Vol. 8. No. 30. 1 and 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1778, March 16. Philadelphia. — "This accompanies my Official Letter of Requisition of the same Date for £500,000 Sterling on Accot of Extraordinaries during the Approaching Campaign. One Inducement for Requiring so large a Sum at this Time, is the additional Supplies which I may be called upon to furnish for the Troops under the Convention of Saratoga, in Case by the Perfidy of the Rebels they should not be permitted to embark, which there is too much Reason to suspect. One hundred thousand Pounds have been already remitted to Genl Burgoyne, in order to obviate any Obstacles that may be started to his Departure, which Money can remove. Besides I judge it advisable to make this further Requisition before the opening of the Campaign, that His Majesty's Service may not run the risk of suffering by a Want of this necessary Article, in any Events which may arise, as well as to support the Value of Government Bills against the Combination of the Merchts who are Watchful to take the Advantage of every temporary Scarcity to lower the Exchange, which I am informed by the Contractor's Agents is the Case at this Time. In this last Article I have directed the Contractor's Agents to give their Constituents the necessary Advices by every Opportunity, as it often depends upon Circumstances, which do not fall under my Notice.
"I have the Honor to enclose a State of the Military Chest at this Place to the 1st Inst , which is all the Information respecting
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Money I have it in my Power to transmit at present, and 1 wish I could ascertain this Part of my Duty more to their Lordships satisfaction."
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 103. 2 pages.
Enclosing State of the military chest, 1 March.

[General Sir William Howe] to Thomas Barrow.

1778, March 17. Philadelphia. — To repair to Philadelphia as the head-quarters of the army, leaving someone to officiate in New York as Assistant Deputy Paymaster-General. In case his health prevents such removal he is to enclose a copy of this letter to the Paymaster-General that measures may be taken for receipt and distribution of public money by Deputies of his own appointment.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 32. 1 page.

Isaiah Robinson to [General Sir William Howe].

1778, March 17. New Prison, Philadelphia. — Complains that he has been made prisoner while taking provisions to prisoners under a flag of truce. His name was inserted as master of the shallop owing to a mistake. His wife came with him to visit her relations. Capt. Gait of the State Navy, who came with him to assist, is in the same predicament.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 153 and 172. 2 pages each.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 18. War Office. — As he is the best judge how far the Major's absence can be dispensed with, his Majesty leaves it to him to act as the necessity of the service may require.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 15. 1 page.
Enclosing J. Saxton to Lord Barrington, 3 March.
                   Physician's certificate respecting Major Saxton's health, 2 March.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, March 18. Philadelphia. — Inhabitants to clean the streets before each one's door. Signed Jos. Galloway, Sup.-Gen.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 161. 2 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to General Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, March 18. St. Augustine. — Has only time to mention Colonel Kirkland's application for leave to go to New York on private affairs and to lay before his Excellency a project for an invasion into Georgia and western frontiers of South Carolina. Observes that the time for preparation is too short, "the consequence would be to arrive in that Country in the very Season when sickness and fever abound, that if a plan of that kind or anything of near the same purpose was to be adopted, the Winter
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season is the most proper for many reasons, the Troops could proceed with Safety and ease to themselves, the Rivers have less water, the Swamps with which the Country abounds are drier and more easily passed, the Rebels in all probability will then be less provided and their inducement to submission of course greater. To answer the object and to insure success the Men-of- War on this Station should be ordered to co-operate with the troops, Money and a few small field pieces should be sent as well as provisions, and if any troops could be added to the numbers to be sent from this district, they ought to arrive in the course of next Autumn; with respect to the Indians and the great dependance which the Colonel puts upon their assistance, I am afraid to be rather Sanguine, however many of their parties might harrass the frontiers, and contribute to the success of the expedition."
Signed letter and 2 copies. Vol. 8. Nos. 29 and 34; and Vol. 47. No. 203. 2 pages each.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 18. St. Augustine. — Mr. Kirkland has had a conversation with Mr. Stuart upon a project to bring the Chactaw Indians to act with the forces of this province. He conveys this letter. Some light field artillery will be serviceable here. Store of provisions greatly short of quantity he had reason to expect but has suffered no great embarrassment on that account.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 33. Copy. Vol. 8. No. 35. 2 pages and 1 page.

Andrew Elliot to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 19. New York. — Refers to a paper enclosed which he has not signed. Two vessels arrived here from West Indies with sugar and rum, no licenses, on board for Halifax. They have been sent on. Desires to know if such vessels would have permission granted to go to Philadelphia when that port is again opened.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 36. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1778, March 19. Philadelphia. — That a passport, to convey provisions, had been issued for the shallop "Polly," Isaiah Robinson, master, manned with 3 hands. On arrival of the shallop it was found that Mr. Robinson was in fact captain of the "Andrew Doria" frigate and Capt. Nathl. Gait of the "Argus" gun boat one of the shallop's hands. As Captains Robinson and Gait appeared in assumed characters they were detained agreeably to established rules of war.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 145 and 164. 1 page and 2 pages.

Page 213

Alexander McIntosh. Affidavit.

1778, March 19. Pensacola. — As to the seizure of Monsr. Rabicot's batteau by Spaniards.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 238a. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 282, fo. 193.

Gov. Peter Chester to Maj.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1778, March 21. Pensacola. — "In the month of January last, one James Willing of Philadelphia, Robert George, and Thomas Mclntyre, the first a Captain the other two Lieutenants in the Rebel Army, left Fort Pitt with about 35 Men, and on their way down the Ohio, and Mississippi, were joined by a Banditti, making in the whole about 100.
"This body after having passed two parties of White Men, and Indians undiscovered (which Colonel Stuart had posted in different parts on the banks of the Mississippi, to prevent the Rebels penetrating by that Rout into the Colony) arrived at the Natchez on the 20th of last Month at Night, and nearly at the same time, by sending different detachments into the Country, surprized all the Magistrates and people of influence in that settlement who after some days Conference entered into an engagement of Neutrality with the Rebels; they then proceeded down the River taking with them the Negroes and property of a Mr. Hutchins and himself a Prisoner he being particularly obnoxious to them.
"An advanced party on the 23d ultmo in the morning surprized a Ship called the 'Rebecca' at Manchack mounted with sixteen carriage Guns, four pounders, besides Swivels, and made the Inhabitants of that Settlement prisoners on their Parole: The main body soon after joined by three or four People of the Natchez settlement, and a number of French and Spanish Batteau Men and other Banditti laid waste all the Settlements from Point Coupe to Manchack, burning several houses and seizing upon all the Negroes and property of the Inhabitants, a very few excepted with this booty a party of them have proceeded to New Orleans, where it is said their plunder is to be disposed of at Public Auction, by one Oliver Pollock, who has declared himself an Agent for the Congress. They also seized a Brig called the 'Neptune' loaded for Jamaica about 11 leagues below New Orleans, and by the last accounts had increased their numbers to between three and four hundred.
"Upon this information, I sent Captain Ferguson of His Majesty's Sloop of War 'Sylph' to. the Mississippi in order to intercept any of the Vessels they may have taken in attempting to get to Sea, and to demand Restitution from the Governor of Louisiana of all British property, brought by the Rebels into his Colony, and I have remonstrated against his giving them any protection or furnishing them with supplies.
"I have also requested Capt. Nunn of the 'Hound' Sloop of War lately arrived here to join the 'Sylph,' in the Mississippi, and desired that one of the Sloops may proceed to Manchack, to
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prevent their Return up the River and obstruct the passage of a body of Rebels, who it is reported consist of 2,000 (others say 3,000) men and were to follow this party from Fort Pitt, under the command of Colonel George Morgan in that Service, and are expected to arrive here in May.
"The Inhabitants of the Natchez have sent to me, desiring the assistance of 100 men from this Garrison, and promising with this support to break their Neutrality, and join the troops against the Rebels, but I found upon consulting Lieut.-Colonel Stiell and other Officers of the Garrison, that such a Detachment could not be spared from hence, without endangering the safety of this place, should the Rebels come against it in any force. I have had the like application from the Inhabitants of Mobile to reinforce that Post, the loss of which would greatly distress us here and cut off our supply of Fresh Provisions, however it is not thought prudent to detach a Man from our present Strength ; altho. I have the measure much at heart, and if Willing should be prevented, by the King's Ships in the Mississippi, from geting to Sea, and return to take post at the Natchez, He will continue with his Banditti to Keep possession of that Country, unless the Chactaw Indians and what white men can be procured in their Nation, March against him.
"Colonel Stuart has sent one of his Commissaries upon this service, and expects the Indians are all in motion, however we find after the great expence which it has cost Government in supporting these Savages, that they cannot be depended upon; one of his Commissaries Mr. Alexander Cammeron having declared to me in Council, that he did not think the Indians were to be depended upon, or could be brought to act, unless they had troops sent with them.
"I am endeavouring, if we can find Men to raise a Provincial Corps under the Command of John McGillivray Esquire, who has greater influence about Mobile, and with the Traders in the Indian Country, than any other Person in the Province: I however still doubt, whether he will be able to collect more than 100 Men, and that they will not agree to be embodied longer than for the Expedition to the Natchez; so that should this Party of the Rebels be drove out of the Colony and no Men Kept up at the Natchez in future, to support the Inhabitants; they will not only abandon that Settlement but all the Inhabitants on the banks of the Mississippi, and in the Western parts of the Province, will in my opinion, also, remove, least a second plundering party should come against them, and which one hundred troops would have prevented.
"There is great ground to believe the Rebels are meditating an attack upon us with considerable force, as I have intelligence from Mr. Rocheblave, Commandant of the Illinois Country, also by a Deserter who arrived in the Province in February last, that there were a great number of large Batteau's lying in the Ohio at Fort Pitt, intended for some Expedition which must be against this Colony. I have therefore to request that you will send us what number of troops you can spare, at least to return the three
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Companies of the Sixteenth Regiment, which will not only enable Lieutenant Colonel Stiell, to make a Vigorous defence here, but afford to send such a Detachment to Mobile as will secure that Post, from falling into the hands of the Enemy.
"I have so short notice of the present opportunity that it will not be in my power to write to Governor Tonyn, I therefore beg you will communicate the Contents of this letter to his Excellency."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 63. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Major-Gen. Prevost to Sir W. Howe, 27 April.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 21. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 10. 1 page.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 187; 685, fo. 20; copy in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 21. Whitehall. — Most secret. (Reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles, Nos. 1068 and 1069.)
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 1. No. 9. 3 1/3 pages.
This, with the enclosure, also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies, Vols. 133, 589 and 685; Admiralty, Sec, In Letters 4135; in the Dartmouth MSS. and the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
George III. to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, March 21. St. James's. — Secret instructions.
Duplicate signed and sealed. Vol. 7. No, 8. 6¾ pages.

General Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1778, March 21. Philadelphia. — Demands immediate release of a trumpeter who was detained while attending the Serjeant of Light Dragoons, bearer of his letter of 19th. Calls upon him a second time to release Sergeants McMahon and Cameron or assign real cause of their detention.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 146 and 165. 2 pages each.

M. Morris, Inspector General, C. Blagden and J. Mervin Nooth, Physicians, to [General Sir William Howe].

1778, March 21. Philadelphia. — Beg to know how far it is incumbent on them to comply with demand for medicines and stores made by physicians and surgeons of Hessian hospitals. The demand is unexpected. Suggests that they draw up an account of such things as they need and that these be sent out directly to their hospital staff.
Copy. Vol. 5. No. 44. 2 pages.

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Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir William Howe.

1778, March 21. St. Augustine. — Colonel Kirkland detained by contrary winds. "An account arrived last night to the Governor that the Corps of Rangers which he keeps the Command of, had in a late excursion surprized a small Post on the Altamaha River, the report says there were three Officers and twenty men in the fort, one of the former and three men were killed, the rest are taken prisoners and brought here, as it was an expedition fitted and ordered I suppose by the Governor, he will I conceive acquaint your Excellency with all the particulars ; as I never considered the destruction of that Post as an object of any consequence, and that its distant Situation from our frontiers did not render it the least detrimental to us; but as I had very good reason to think, that if they had not had that Post ready built, they would have had another on the Sattilla River, forty miles nearer to us (a plan which they have had long in agitation, and which would have prevented our success in the excursions for Cattle) I was on that account induced to leave them unmolested untill a more extensive plan and some more favorable circumstance offered to strike a blow which might be attended with some advantage; for which purpose I take the liberty to sollicit your Excellency's determination with respect to that truly independent Corps of Rangers, and whether or not I ought to have any controul over them."
Letter signed and Copy. Vol. 8. Nos. 38 and 37. 2 pages each.

Gov. William Tryon to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, March 21. New York. — Question of his rank.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 176. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington, 13 April.
Copies in the Public Record Office, War Office, I.L. Original, Correspondence 20; and America and W. Indies 187, fo. 365.

Colonel Guy Johnson to Captain Robert Mackenzie.

1778, March 22. New York. — Refers to previous letters and proposals. Desires him as an old friend to contribute to his obtaining his Excellency's orders that if he approves the going to the Northward he may have the necessary passage for himself and officers, instructions for himself and messages to the Indians, Believes it is in his power to render some services to Government.
Copy. Vol.10. No. 195. 2 pages.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 22. — Is by no means sensible of the propriety of so rigorous a proceeding as he has adopted in the case of Captains Robinson and Gait. Captain Robinson was out of employment by the destruction of his armed brig and the taking
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command of the shallop can only be deemed an instance of his condescension. Demands immediate restoration of the former and desires release of the latter.
Extracts. Vol. 8. Nos. 95 and 97. 2 pages each.
Enclosed by General Washington to Gen. Howe, 27 May.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 22. Head Quarters. — That Ethan Allen is Lieut.-Col. only. Expects him in exchange for Mr. Campbell. Justifies and approves detention of the trumpeter who was a deserter from the American Army. His action added insolence to perfidy.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 147 and 166. 4 and 6 pages.
Printed in Sparks's Washington, Vol. V, p. 293.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 23. War Office. — "Lieut.-Colonel Murray of the Detachment of Foot Guards under your Command, Lieut. James Campbell, and Lord Willm Murray of the 42d Regt and 2d Lieutenant Charles Cathcart of the 23d Regiment of Foot, likewise under your Command being approved, the former as Commandant, and the three latter as Captains in the Athol Regiment of Highlanders; I have the honor to desire you will be pleased to permit the said Officers to return to Great Britain by the first Opportunity if the Service will permit, and You have no objection."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 18. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 23. War Office. — The appointment of Majors to the rank of Lieut.-Colonel stopped at first with the brevets of 1772, but has since been extended to the end of that year. Major-General Prescott and Major Stopford of the 7th Regiment have been given rank in the army. His list of promotions are approved. Two supernumerary ensigns, one in the 9th and one in the 62nd, to be considered.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 19. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
1778, March 23.— List of Promotions. Vol. 6. No. 20.

Messrs. Gordon and Crowder to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 23. New York. — State of cash for extraordinaries — £241,502 10s., being the deficiency to draw for.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 112. 1 page.
Enclosed by Sir Wm, Howe to J. Robinson, 19 April.

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General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, March 23. Philadelphia. — Protecting property of loyal subjects. Signed, Jos. Gallowav, Superintendent General.
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 162. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, March 23. Philadelphia. — No. 90.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 127. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 435; copy 306, fo. 214.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, March 24. Philadelphia. — No. 89.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 125. 3 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 257; copy 306, fo. 210.
Enclosure:—
Schedule of the papers enclosed in the above despatch No. 89, consisting of correspondence with Burgoyne, with Washington and other papers relating to prisoners.
Vol. 4. No. 126. 2 pp.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 261.

General Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1778, March 24. Philadelphia, Head Quarters. — Transmits general account of monies required from the Deputy Paymasters General by warrants from 1 October to 31 December 1777, for carrying on the public works, services and other contingent or extraordinary expenses.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 108. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Joseph Galloway.

1778, March 24. Philadelphia. — "That in consideration of the extraordinary Trouble and Attention to Business necessarily bestowed by yourself and the Magistrates of the Police, in the Preservation of Peace and Order each of them is to receive Twenty-five pounds Sterling, every Quarter, in Addition to their respective Salaries to be paid by you out of the Monies received in your several Offices of Superintendent of the Port and of the Inspector of Prohibited Goods, while that Fund continues to afford it."
Copy. Vol. 34. No. 148. 1 page.

Andrew Elliot to Captain Robert Mackenzie.

1778, March 25. New York. — Pointing out what he thinks the consequences would be if he published the desired proclamation. Will wait to hear from the Commander-in-Chief. This
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day by order of Sir Henry Clinton has begun to give permissions for merchant ships to take in supplies for Philadelphia.
Qy. autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 39. 4 pages.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, March 27. New York. — Will observe orders for 4d. a day stoppages of men while in the General Hospital. Awaits orders as to deductions from pay of hospital mates.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 119. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20, dated 27 March 1777.

General Sir William Howe to Major-Gen. James Dalling.

1778, March 27. Philadelphia. — Congratulates him on being confirmed in Government of Jamaica. Thanks for attention paid to request to prevent shipping of rum and molasses. Lieut. Byrd's appointment. No opening left for his (Dalling's) son. Captain McIntosh's retirement. Due regard will be paid to recommendation of Mr. Dennis.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 40. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, March 27. Philadelphia. — Arrangements for a meeting of commissioners to exchange prisoners.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 148, 167. 1 page each.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 481.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Colonel Shirreff.

1778, March 27. New York. — "That the Expence of small Craft in the different Departments may be accurately distinguished, the Commissary and Barrack Master Genls are directed to take up Capn. Laird's Tickets for Pay or Hire in their respective Offices for all Vessels employed by them, and at the Close of each Quarter to send into the Quarter Master General's Office an Accot attested by Capn. Laird for the whole."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 41. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 28. War Office. — Acquaints him of vacancies caused by the officers to bear commissions in the 72nd regiment or the Royal Manchester Volunteers. Order for embarkation of officers of the Foot Guards for the relief is countermanded.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 21. 1 page.

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Gen. Washington to Commissioners Col. Grayson, R. H. Harrison, A. Hamilton and E. Boudinot.

1778, March 28. Valley Forge. Head Quarters. — Powers to exchange prisoners.
Copy. Vol. 3. No. 158. 2 pages.
Enclosed by the Commissioners to Gen. Howe, 11 April.
Copy in Vol. 3, No. 177; copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 493.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, March 29. Headquarters. — Agrees that German Town be considered neutral during meeting of Commissioners and only guards mutually sent to attend them be allowed to enter.
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 149 and 168. 1 page each.

Major-General Phillips.

1778, March 30. Cambridge. — Extract from General Orders. On Burgoyne's approaching departure; requisitions to be made to him if necessary before that event. 1 May. To render returns of officers desiring exchange in case of a cartel. 11 June. Various leaves of absence, &c, &c, &c.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 15. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to Colonel Guy Johnson.

1778, March 31. Philadelphia. — "I have received your letters of 30th Octor. 1777 and of the 8th Inst in both which you represent the good Consequences that would arise from your presence among the Indians of the Northern District, and your Desire to repair thither by way of the River St. Lawrence. Your Knowledge of the Disposition of the Indians, of their present State, and Experience of your personal Influence over them, leave me no Room to hesitate upon your Proposal; and I have written to Sir Henry Clinton to desire that he will confer with the Commodore; and furnish you and the Persons of your Department whom you may think it advisable to take from New York, with a suitable Conveyance, in a Transport or otherwise.
Altho' you do not mention it, you may probably incline to take with you an Assortment of Indian Goods, and there may be some particulars relative to your Plan which you would wish to have communicated by me to the Commander in Chief in Canada. From Lieut. Col. Shirreff you will learn the State of the Indian Stores in his Possession, and I am to desire you will by the earliest Opportunity be as explicit as you can in satisfying me as to the aforementioned Particulars, and in communicating any other Matters wherein your Exertions for the good of the Kings Service may be assisted."
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 209. 2 pages.

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Gov. Patrick Tonyn to Sir William Howe.

1778, March 31. St. Augustine. — Report of rebel invasion gradually subsides. Communicates all intelligence to Prevost. "Captain Fanshawe has chearfully given every assistance and has ordered Captain Jordan of the 'Galatea' to protect the province, Lieut. Ellis of the 'Hinchenbrook,' and Captain Mowbray of the 'Rebecca' will scoure(sic) the inland passage, and frustrate the designs of the Rebels, and I hope destroy the Gallies. I ordered Lieutenant Colonel Brown of the Rangers to penetrate as a Corps of observation the province of Georgia. He with a party of Rangers and a few Indians with very little loss has taken by assault Fort Barrington with twenty-three prisoners, and destroyed the cannon and burned the Fort." Begs to mention Mr. Johnson a son of Dr. Johnson of Georgia, who first entered the fort. Major Gardner delivers this letter.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. Nos. 42-43; copy No. 45. 3 and 2 pages.
Enclosing Lieut.-Col. Brown, Report to Gov. Tonyn. See 13 March 1778.

Lt.-Col. Samuel Birch to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, April 1. Philadelphia. — Memorial. Commands the 17th Regiment. As he has no troop till one becomes vacant, he receives less pay than other officers of the same rank. Asks a bounty.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 180. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Sir Wm. Howe to Lord Barrington, 20 April.
Copy in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, April 1. Whitehall. — No. 3.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 11. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 207; copy 431, fo. 243; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord Le Despencer and H. F. Carteret to Lord G. Germain.

1778, April 1. General Post Office. — As it is apprehended there will soon be occasion for packet boats to be employed between Gibraltar, Lisbon, Oporto and other parts, submit whether instructions might not be given to have these, instead of other vessels, bring back dispatches from America.
Copy. Vol, 7. No. 18. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton 4 May 1778.

Lieut.-General John Burgoyne.

1778, April 2. — Articles of Agreement with Major-General William Heath as to the payment of provisions, fuel, &c, furnished to the Troops of Convention.
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Copy. Vol. 9. No. 179. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Morrison to Peter Paumier, 9 April.
Copy in the Public Kecord Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 295.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Gen. Washington.

1778, April 2. Philadelphia.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 150, 169. 2 pages each.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 489.

Gen. Sir Wm. Howe to Maj.-Gen. Massey.

1778, April 4. Philadelphia. — The enclosed orders will, he hopes, rectify irregularities. To attend to the punctual execution of them. To order the agents, the muster master and others to report any deviations.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 154. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
General orders respecting the Provincial Corps in Nova Scotia.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 155. 3 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Sir William Howe.

1778, April 4. Cambridge. — "I cannot suffer my Friend General Burgoyne to leave this Country, without offering by him my Respects to your Excellency; the nominal Command of the Troops devolves on me, and I shall do everything in my Power to keep them free of Disputes with the Americans, and for preserving their Healths. The Clothing for the Effectives will be sent for from Canada, and I shall report its arrival to your Excellency.     .     .     .     .     I have no doubt of your Excellency's Protection when an opportunity offers."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 167. 1 page.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, April 4. Headquarters.
Copies. Vol. 3. No: 151, 170. 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 485, dated 11th.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 4. St. Augustine. — Private and secret. "Mr. Drayton the late Chief Justice being at the head of a faction against administration; I have been obliged to suspend     .     .     sic a second time, but the seeds of discontent are not eradicated.
"Great pains has been taken to prejudice the mind of General Prevost against my measures, and nothing but a fixed resolution not to differ with him could have prevented a breach and induced me to put up with rough indignities.
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"What I chiefly regret, Sir, is his backwardness in supporting the Rangers or assisting with a few regular Troops.
"He would not co-operate in a plan of Captain Fanshawe's to enable His Majesty's Frigates to water in Saint Mary River, nor has defensive works been made at Saint John River, the Lines at the Barrier of this Town are suffered to moulder down, and are much damaged since they were put into order.
"I have, Sir, taken the Liberty to mention to your Excellency my sentiments concerning the conquest of Georgia, I am confident it might be easily effectuated, at least a road might be opened between this and the back Settlements of the Southern provinces, where there are many well affected to His Majesty.
"I apprehend, Sir, that Brigadier General Prevost is greatly influenced by his brother Major Prevost, who fell in with Drayton's faction. It will be of use, if this could be remedied, to His Majesty's Service; there is only three companies here incomplete of the 2d Battalion, to which he belongs, of the 60th Regiment. I have felt unfavourable expressions impressed by his conversations on the manner of the operations carried on against the rebels, and I think I have heard Major Gardner express as much being impressed upon him. I would not Sir mention this to your Excellency, but from the desirable motive to preserve harmony with General Prevost.
"Their prejudices against and jealousies of Lt. Colonel Brown is highly ungenerous and hurtful, but I will not trouble your Excellency with particulars." Recommends Major Gardner.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 47. Copy, No. 48. 4 and 3 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir William Howe.

1778, April 5. St. Augustine. — "I think it my duty to represent to your Excellency that notwithstanding my sincere wishes to maintain the strictest cordiality with the Governor of this Province, inconveniences daily arise from his assuming the sole command of the Rangers stationed on the frontiers of this Province and their being independant of the person who by the King's orders ought to have the Supreme Military command, prevents me from carrying on his Majesty's Service as I could wish, for want of that unanimity and harmony of the different branches of the Military in concurring to the public advantage.
"I take the liberty therefore to request your Excellency's commands on that head and to be made acquainted whether the rank of Lt. Colonel Brown (a young man who commands the Rangers) intitles him to command the Majors of the King's Troops, as it has been made a matter of doubt whether the Governor could at present give him a legal commission for that purpose.
" As the Men of War and Privateers bring in prisoners constantly both Rebels and French and Governor Tonyn was desirous that they should be kept in the Fort, the danger that
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might arise from a surprize of the only Magazine of Arms, Ammunition, Artillery and Provisions, and that the stench of a number of Prisoners, confined in such a place in this hot country might occasion epidemical distempers; and notwithstanding the Governor's assertion that the Fort was his, and would say so to your Excellency, I could not think of admitting but very few in it, at the same time I must observe that such a number of disaffected people in a place where there are no accommodations nor places of security for them might become dangerous, and as it appears from the information of some people who lately made their escape from Georgia and some intercepted letters from South Carolina, that the Rebels have in view to attack this place, and that their General who commands in the Southern Colonies is come to Savannah for that purpose: — Should the accounts prove true I should be obliged to hire Vessels to carry them off. I shall not fail to transmit to your Excellency the earliest information that can be depended upon of the motions of the enemy and their designs."
Leave of absence to Major Gardner. Want of money. The captain of the "Lizard" declines to take on board the prisoners taken on the Altamaha and convey them to New York. Engineer desired.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 49. Copy, Vol. 8. No. 50. 3 pp. each.

Lieut.-Colonel Brown to General Patrick Tonyn.

1778, April 6. Fort Tonyn. — Intelligence, brought by a Quaker, of Washington having met with a total defeat and his scattered troops reduced to the last extremity. Counter report of an attack on General Howe who had 12,000 killed, himself escaping by skating up on the ice. "The rangers from South Carolina inform me, the North Carolina Provincials, and Thompsons Regiment of South Carolina Light Horse, have marched to the Northward. The present force of South Carolina is supposed to consist 2,000, and of Georgia five hundred and sixty. The Charlestown fleet was in a great degree manned by draughts from the different regiments to act as marines. The Forts at Sullivans Island, and on the river are Kept in good repair. At the Fort at Beaufort they have mounted Twenty one pieces of Cannon.     .     .     .     .     At Cat Island, the Rebels have six, nine and twelve pounders for the defence of the passage. From Savannah the Rangers have brought me intelligence, that Whites turbulent Gentry have a second time broke open the stores, compeled their Officers to give them Rum — hurra'd for His Majesty, and drank success to his Troops. Twenty were sent to Tybee to Garrison the Island, who boarded a French Snow laden with rice and Indigo, and have conveyed her 'tis supposed to New York or Augustine. A Fire broke out in Savannah a short time after our affair at Fort Barrington, destroyed a public Store with cloathing, ammunition &c. &c. and ten houses — the Court house narrowly escaped as it was fired in three places. The Rebel
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General (Howe) told one of his Colonels that they were so perpetually harrassd in Georgia, he apprehended before Summer it would be a King's Province.     .     .     .     .     The Gallies are laying manned entirely with Governor Wright's Negroes at the following places — One at Sapelo high point — One at Sunbury — one at Ossabaw opposite to Shannons point, and the other at Savannah. Two vessels, a Ship and a Brig with rice and Indigo are laying in the Mouth of Ogechee river without a gun. Three at Beaufort with the same Cargoes — a Ship and two Brigs, one the property of John Hancock, the other a Frenchman. I have sent to acquaint Captain Jordan of the 'Galatea' with every material occurrence. One hundred and twenty plantations with the Negroes, and Stock will be peremptorily sold."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 55. 5 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Sir W. Howe, 8 April.

Joseph Galloway to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 6. Philadelphia. — Combating Mr. Elliot's objections to publishing the last proclamation.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 53. 6 pages.

General Sir William Howe to Colonel E. Cole.

1778, April 6. Philadelphia. — Explaining that his motive for withdrawing the warrant to raise a Provincial Corps was induced by seeing from the situation of the country he was not able to enlist the men expected. An allowance of 7/6 a day will be made as a subsistence for the present.
Copy. Vol. 8. No, 52. 1 page.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 6. St. Augustine. — 1,700 Indians promise to be at St. Mary's next Moon.     .     .     .     .     looks for directions.     .     .     .     .     "Upon the invasion in '76, these Indians came down readily, drove back the rebels and penetrated the province of Georgia. In '77 a part of them were at taking Fort Mcintosh and another party of them at the affair of Nassau in May. I was obliged, Sir, to check their impetuosity, and have been at great pains to keep them well disposed to act against the rebels.     .     .     .     .     I will not trouble your Excellency with innumerating the amazing expence of their maintenance or with conjectures concerning the motives from which they act, or the capriciousness of their temper, or the necessity of employing them in some shape. Your Excellency must perceive numberless inconveniencys from acting always on the defensive. With this Garrison the Rangers and Indians, the province of Georgia may be taken in possession, which will give a fair opportunity to the loyalists in South Carolina to show themselves, if they are what they have pretended to be, and if they prove as numerous as hath been given out, I should apprehend that province would soon be compelled to subjection and to own their allegiance to the King.     .     .     .     .     Eleven men of the
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Battalion formed out of prisoners conducted by a Pilot have surprized a French Vessel off Tyby, that was ready to sail laden with rice and indigo and have brought her into St. John's River, a french artillery officer now a rebel Captain, was on board, I have sent him to Monsieur D'Britigni and his Corps of Officers prisoners in the Stathouse.     .     .     .     .     only two field pieces six pounds caliber are in this Garrison."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 51. 4 pages.

Colonel Guy Johnson to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 7. New York.— Submitting plans and proposals for acting with the Six Nations Indians.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 194. 3 pages.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 8. St. Augustine. — Sends the enclosed.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 54. 1 page.
Enclosing Lt.-Col. Brown to Gov. Tonyn, 6 April.

Lt.-Gen. John Burgoyne to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, April 9. Khode Island. — Maj.-Gen. Heath insists that the payment of expenses of the Convention Troops must be in solid coin. Arrangement come to. Is disappointed that the contents of the military chest only amounts to £56,000 and of that some is to be returned to New York. Anxiously solicits four months' subsistence for the troops according to an estimate sent. Asks bat and forage money for the officers. Concerning brigadiers. Suggested disposition of the troops if exchanged. Recommends Gen. Phillips, &c. P.S. — Explains some enclosed cyphers for correspondence with Phillips.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 195. 9 pages.
Also (not in full) in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 159, fo. 301.

Lieut.-General John Burgoyne to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 9. Rhode Island. 2nd letter. — Finds since his despatch of this morning, he cannot send an exact account of expenditure of the army lately under his command. Care has been taken to keep separate the subsistence and extraordinaries. Finds also there is an idea that further payment of provisions in kind may be more prejudicial to Government than even an exorbitant rate in hard money. Believes notion that ready money received here is remitted to France is a mistake. Thinks subsistence for troops will amount to £25,000. P.S. — Apologises for not writing in his own hand.
Copy. Vol. 9. No, 196. 2 pages.

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Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, April 9. Whitehall — Private. Recommending Messrs. Grafton and Walter Dulany.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 12. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 211; copy 431, fo. 244; and in the Sackville MSS.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Colonel Gunning.

1778, April 9. Philadelphia. — That he is named for promotion in the new levies and has the Commander-in-Chief's permission to return home the earliest opportunity.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 56. 1 page.

John D. Morrison, Commissary General, to Peter Paumier.

1778, April 9. Newport. — Arrangements taken relative to the repayment in kind of the provisions, &c, supplied to the Convention troops. Beef is to be delivered in that very article since "the American ration is 24 ounces of beef or 18 of pork and if pork is tendered in lieu of beef they expect to receive it in this proportion which in paying their enormous balance of 723,710 lbs. of beef will occasion a loss to Government of upwards of one thousand pounds."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 177. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Agreement between Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne and Maj.-Gen. Heath. See 2 April.
Return of provisions landed from the transports ordered for Lt.-Gen. Burgoyne's army. Also:—
Account of provisions and liquor supplied to Gen. Burgoyne's army by the provincial commissary as taken from his account, 1777 to February 1778.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 176. 4 pages.

Thomas Brown to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1778, April 10. Fort Tonyn. — "I have the honor to acquaint you that Messrs Tyrer and York arrived this day with a few friends.
"They inform me that the Loyalists upon the point of assembling, thought proper to postpone their insurrection to a more favourable opportunity, as the rebels upon receiving intelligence of the March of Murphy and Gregory's party had embodied themselves in every district; for as the loyalists are very indifferently provided with Arms and Ammunition, they are under a necessity of disarming the Rebels by surprize.
"Mr. Robert Cunningham an active loyalist of the first influence in South Carolina, acquaints me that 2,500 Men between the forks of Saluda and Broadriver are ready to accompany me on any Service whenever orders are sent for that purpose.
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"One thousand men upon the south fork with a considerable party in the Congarees and on the Ridge, have offered their Service.
"Sixteen hundred upon the rivers Pedee, Inneree and the line with twelve hundred upon Green river (North Carolina) contiguous to the Northern frontiers are ready to embody themselves and act within North and South Carolina whenever required.
"The Crops of Corn for two years last past these people have preserved for his Majesty's Service.
"The inviolable fidelity and attachment of the Men above mentioned, the various instances they have given of their zeal and affection for his Majesty's person and government, place the truth of their professions beyond a doubt, to most of those loyalists I am known, and with all their principals personally acquainted.
"By the assistance of those Men so powerful a diversion might be effected in favor of General Howe, that the Rebels would be effectually prevented from sending their quotas of troops to Washington as their attention would be engaged by their more immediate concerns.
"The regular provincial establishment in South Carolina consists at present of 2,000 men.
"It is reported that 450 of Thompson's rangers were drowned off Charlestown and that Andrew Williamson (a quondam cattle driver in General Grant's campaign), and late Commanding Officer against the Cherokees was mortally wounded by some person unknown within 3 miles of Charlestown.
"By a letter from Capt. Mowbray I have received the following intelligence — April 13th.
"The new created General Elbert is on his march with about 700 Men, and 2 thirds of the Militia was at the Altamaha last night, he has seven field pieces with him.
"The Galleys and Transports are advanced to Sapello, and that his intentions are to destroy Fort Tonyn.
"It is confidently reported that 800 men are on their march from the back parts of the Carolinas as friends, and whether this Armament is to stop them or take you, time will tell, this is so confidently affirmed, that it is beyond a doubt; I wish you success, we will endeavour on our parts to give the Gallies their deserts.
"Poor Ellis is no more, he was unfortunately drowned on the 8th instant in crossing the sound, after being on the boat's bottom five hours; I escaped by swimming upon an oar with great difficulty.
                                                                                               "I am, &c, (sigd) J. Mowbray.
"The number of Elbert's party consists of three hundred men — upon receiving information of the march of the Carolinians, he set off from Savannah for the Altamaha, in order to intercept or harrass them on their march.
"Part of the South Carolina and Georgia Militia marched to Ogechee and returned."
2 copies. Vol. 8. Nos. 66 and 67. 3 pages each.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Sir W. Howe, 27 April.

Page 229

Major John D. Morrison, Commissary General, to Peter Paumier.

1778, April 10. — Has nevertheless agreed with the Provincial Agent to deposit pork on board the victuallers bound to Boston to make up for deficiency of beef. It is to remain on board forty days from 7th instant and if beef is sent within that time they are to receive it and return the pork. Directs efforts be made to accomplish this.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 178. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Robert Pigot to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, April 10. Newport. — "General Burgoyne writes fully to you on the Subject of the Money, on the Agreements he made with General Heath for Payment of Fuel, &c., and for receiving Provisions in lieu of what was issued for the Use of the Troops. "The Rebel Commissary is come here to receive about £27,000 in Money, and to settle with Major Morrison for Provisions issued to the 1st March, which he is pretty near able to pay by the Quantity sent by Sir Henry Clinton for the Use of those Troops. After paying the Rebel Commissary £27,000 there remains £60,000 in Mr. Molesworth's Hands, of which I have sent £20,000 to New York for their immediate Necessities; To General Burgoyne's Paymaster for Subsistence and Extraordinaries for that Army £20,000. The Rest I have kept for our own Use. I understand that a considerable Sum is wanted for General Burgoyne's Army, there being many Warrants to pay and a great Sum in Arrear to the Brunswick Troops and Artillery, all these Matters the General will acquaint you with, and of the Necessity there is for an immediate Supply. Sir Henry Clinton not having sent me any Directions and only referred me to your Letter, I have acted as I thought was best by giving each Army a little; which I hope you will approve of. I have received Orders for to pay 165 Days Bat and Forage Money to the Hessians as well as to the rest of the Garrison, and I find that the Hessian Paymaster has sent a distribution for their Staff here, and therein charges for three Major-Generals and their Aid de Camps as I imagine it is with your Knowledge and Approbation, I shall not object to signing their Warrant. General Sulivan is arrived at Providence to succeed General Spencer in the Command, and we hear two Regiments are coming upon the Coast in the room of the Bay Troops, whose Time expired the 31st March, and are gone home. Several of the Inhabitants from the Narraganzet Shore are come over to us, and enlisted with Colo, Wightman and Days are fixed for bringing off more of them. Negroes likewise come to us for protection, their Masters wanting them to enlist in a Regiment raising at Boston upon Terms of granting them their Freedom after three Years Service. I think it my Duty to inform you that Mr. Clarke who was lately with you at Philadelphia is of Opinion that it would be better to pay hard Money when you conveniently can than send Provisions to Boston,
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for that it will be immediately carted away to General Washington's Army, who stand in great Need of Salt Provisions, whereas the hard Money coming amongst them depreciates greatly their Paper."
Recommends Mr. Hickson for an Ensigncy. "General Burgoyne appears in better Health and Spirits than I expected. I have the Honor to be with Great Truth," &c.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 180. 3 pages.

Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners (Col. O'Hara, Humphrey Stephens and R. Fitzpatrick) to Gen. Howe.

1778, April 11. New Town.
Copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 157, 176. 2 pages.
Also (with the enclosures) in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133.
Enclosures:—
Washington's powers to his Commissioners, see 28 March.
1778, April 10. New Town. — Objections to treat. Offered by Washington's Commissioners to those of Gen. Howe.
Copies. Vol. 3, 158o, 177o. 3 pages.
1778, April 11. Newtown, — Answer of Howe's Commissioners.
Copies. Vol. 3. No. 178; 47, No. 210. 2 pages.

Colonel J. Burgoyne to Sir H. Clinton.

1778, April 12. London. — That having leave to act by deputy as Muster Master General to the foreign troops has appointed Mr. Porter to that office.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 47. No. 237. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, April 12. Whitehall. — No. 4.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 13. 2 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 219; copy 431, fo. 245; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, April 12. Whitehall. — No. 5.
Copy. Vol. 7. No, 14. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 223; copy 431, fo. 246; and in the Sackville MSS.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, April 12. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 172. 1 page.
Original, with the enclosures, also in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.
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Enclosures:—
                   W. Gaull to General Howe, see 3 Jan. 1778.
Report upon tents and marquees for the 26th regt. Out of the total of 17 each, 3 tents and 9 marquees were rendered unserviceable by wet on the passage. Signed by T. Gilfillan, Assistant Dep, Qr. Mr. General; Henry Prowse, Qr. Mr. 4th Regt.; Thos. Taylor, Qr. Mr. Royal Fusileers, and dated on the 18th April.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 174. 1 page.

Earl Cornwallis to Lord Barrington.

1778, April 13. London. — Requesting that Mr. Abraham Lawton, appointed ensign in 23rd Regiment, be superseded, nothing having been heard of him since 1775.
Copy. Vol. 6. No, 23. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 16 April 1778.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, April 13. Whitehall. — No. 6.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No, 15. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 227; copy 431, fo. 248; and in the Sackville MSS.
Enclosure:—
Clause of the Commission devolving the Powers of Sir William Howe on Sir Henry Clinton (given this day to the Commissioners for restoring peace — Lord Carlisle, Mr. Eden, Gov. Johnstone and the Commander-in-Chief).
Vol. 7. No. 16. 2 pages.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, April 13. Philadelphia. — "In my letter of the 6th March I had the Honour to enclose to your Lordship Copies of two Letters to and from Major-Genl. Tryon respecting his Rank in this Staff. I have since received his determination not to serve untill his Majesty's pleasure is declared, and that your Lordship may have the Generals sentiments more clearly I herewith transmit A Copy of his letter."
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 175. 1 page.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

General Sir William Howe. Proclamation.

1778, April 13. Philadelphia, Head Quarters. — Against all imports without special licence. Signed, F. Mackenzie, Secretary.
Copy. Vol. 34. No, 160. 2 pages.

Page 232

Lieut.-General John Burgoyne.

Received, 1778, April 14. Paper brought by Mrs. Higgins.
"Copies of the Dispatches from Generl Burgoyne to the Congress were transmitted to you Sir, from York Town, the Generals Aid de Camp returned to Cambridge the 19th Inst, with three Resolves.
"1st   To abide by the Resolve of 8th Jany relative to the Suspension of the Embarkation of the Troops.
"2nd   To permit General Burgoyne to go to England on Account of his Health, and by the most expeditious Route, &c. &c.
"3rd   To permit Capt. Willoe to return to Canada by the Route of Halifax.
"General Burgoyne immediately applied to General Heath for Passports for himself and Family, but was told that it did not appear that the Vote of Congress in his Favor cancelled the old Vote of December last; whereby he is ordered to be detained, together with the Troops 'till all Accounts were settled and paid in Specie; and General Heath added an observation that General Washington in his letter to Sir Wm. Howe had declined taking any Cognizance of that Business by His Commissaries; and that he took for granted no Settlement was made at that meeting. He has also repeatedly insinuated that it would be impossible to support the Troops without an immediate payment in Money, as the Cash of this State was exhausted.
"It was strongly insisted on the other Side, that it was most unjust to fetter the Vote of the Congress, which was plain and unconditional, with a former Vote to which it had no Reference ; that the Congress, by using the words 'on Account of Health' and 'most expeditious Route' evidently marked their design of the General's Departure without Delay; — that nevertheless if the Accounts were produced in such a State, as that they could be justified in signing them, and were produced expeditiously, he would consent.
"General Burgoyne could not refuse paying for the Provisions, provided the charge was just for two Reasons.
"1st   The Enemy would have declared the Breach of the Treaty to be directly made on our side, which they only call suspended on theirs, and however unjustly would have put it out of the Power of Government to ratify it.
"2nd   Any Scarcity of Provisions tho' but for a week would increase the Desertion of the Troops, which has already been alarming at some Periods, tho' I am far from believing the Majority of Deserters to have gone off with any other view than to assist themselves by work and meaning to return.
"It being thought that the most economical Measure for Government was to repay the Provisions in kind, it was proposed to land from the Transports the Quantities destined for the Troops on their Voyage, which was agreed to, and a Requisition has been made to Captain Dalrymple accordingly but the Weather having been bad no answer is returned.
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"Requisition has also been made to Capt. Dalrymple to land the Money Chest, General Heath having given an Engagement for its safe Delivery. Should he have none on board (which yet is not known) the Troops will be in great Distress for Pay, and every part of the Public Service suffer, and in that Case the most speedy Supply to the Amount formerly mentioned by Sir William Howe to Clarke, and Lord Howe to Geddes, is requested from Rhode Island, or elsewhere.
"The Suspence of General Burgoyne in Regard to his personal Embarkation, and the Vexation such unheard of cavilling excites are lost in the greater Objects that Regard the Public. It was thought no way could be found less subjected to inconvenience than the present to convey these Matters to you, Sir, and the person who will deliver this, has further Communication to make by word of Mouth."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 169. 3 pages.

[Major-General Sir William Howe] to John Robinson.

1778, April 15. Philadelphia, Head Quarters. — Transmits a general account of all monies required from the Deputy Paymaster- General by warrants from 1 Jan. to 31 March 1778, for carrying on the public works, services and other contingent and extraordinary expenses.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 109. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 16. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 22. 1 page.
Enclosing Earl Cornwallis to Lord Barrington, 13 April.

Lieut.-Col. Brown to Governor Tonyn.

1778, April 16. Fort Tonyn. — Similar information to that in his letter to Brig.-Gen. Prevost of 10 April, and written apparently on the same day though the date differs.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 77. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe, 1 May.

General Sir William Howe to Messrs. Gordon and Crowdeb, Agents to the Contractors for supplying Money for His Majesty's Forces in North America.

1778, April 16. Philadelphia. — That £400,000 sterling will be wanting to defray contingent and extraordinary expenses of the forces under his command.
2 copies. Vol. 2. Nos. 107 and 110. 1 page each.

General Sir William Howe to General Washington.

1778, April 16. Philadelphia. — "Sir, At the earnest Request of Mrs. Higgins who desires to have the Honor of waiting upon
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you, I am induced to trouble you with this Letter by her to offer Mr. Lawrie (one of your principal Commissaries) in exchange for her Husband and Mr. Clarke, both Deputy Commissaries and under the Convention of Saratoga. If this proposal meets with your approbation, I shall immediately give up Mr. Lawrie's Parole, and trusting that the fair Lady will be a more prevailing Advocate in obtaining your Compliance for the Return of her Husband than I can possibly presume to be, I decline urging anything further in favor of her request. — With due Regard, I am, &c.
P.S. — Mrs. Moore, a Relation of Mrs. Higgins's, will attend her, in which I hope you will not see any Impropriety."
2 copies. Vol. 3. Nos. 152 and 171. 1 page each.

John Robinson to Arnold Nesbitt, Adam Drummond, and others.

1778, April 17. Whitehall. — Orders for the supply of provisions. Accompanies Mr. Robinson's letter of 30 April.
Copy. Vol, 2. No. 122o 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 18. War Office. — Officers in enclosed list being intended to be promoted in the regiment now raising by Lord McLeod and going to the East Indies they are to be allowed to leave the army under his command immediately.
Signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 24. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of three names — Captain George Mackenzie, Lieut. G. Mackenzie and Lieut. Hugh Lamont.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 24o. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to Lieut.-Colonel Innes, Inspector General of Provincial Forces.

1778, April 18. Philadelphia. — It is the Commander-in- Chief's desire that the Corps of Pioneers be inspected and mustered in same way as other Provincial Troops, as from 25th December 1777, they are to be paid by Messrs. Gordon and Crowder.
2 copies. Vol, 8. Nos. 59 and 60. 1 page each.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to Lt.-Col. Thomas Brown.

1778, April 18. St. Augustine. — Asking him, as Prevost will not send officers to be under him, to submit to be under orders of Major Glazier.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 76. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe, 1 May.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 299.

Page 235

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, April 19. Philadelphia. — No. 92.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 128. 4 pages.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 451; copy, 306, fo. 215; extract in the Sackville MSS.

List of enclosures in the above letter, being correspondence with Washington and the Commissioners for exchange of prisoners.
Vol. 4. No. 129. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, April 19. Philadelphia. — No. 93. Private.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 130. 3 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 509; copy 306, fo. 220; and in the Sackville MSS.

General Sir William Howe to John Robinson.

1778, April 19. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letters.
"The Accompts of Messrs. Nesbitt, Drummond and Franks for Provisions furnished by their Agent, to subsist Prisoners in Virginia, Maryland, and the upper Parts of Pennsylvania, are ordered to be laid before the Commissary General for his Inspection, and upon his Report they will be liquidated and settled to the latest Period. Their Lordships Directions in regard to a proper Contract being made for furnishing the Prisoners in future will be submitted to my Successor in the Command; at the same Time I may remark that the late Resolutions of the Rebels, respecting the Support of Prisoners in their Possession, leave little Cause to think that Commissaries for the Crown will be able to act among them."     .     .     .     .    
"Upon the Receipt of the enclosed State of Cash for Extraordinaries from the Remitters Agents, by which it appears that after Money is issued from the Treasury to pay all the Bills drawn, there will be only a Balance of £241,502 to complete the Requisitions already made, I have thought proper to make another of the 16th Instant for £400,000, supposing the present Balance may be raised here by Bills of Exchange, for which Reasons I humbly submit to their Lordships the Expediency of sending the Amount of this last Requisition in Specie from England, and a Proportion of it as soon as possible."
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 111. 2 pages.
Enclosing Gordon and Crowder, State of Cash, 23 March.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, April 20. Philadelphia. — Submits the enclosed. Lt. Wm. Stewart is dissatisfied with his appointment to the Invalids.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 177. 1 page.
Page 236
Signed letters with the enclosures, in the Puhlic Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.
Enclosures:—
Memorial of Lt.-Col. Birch. See 1 April.
Memorial of Lt. Wm. Stewart of the 42nd regiment.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 179. 2 pages.
List of Promotions.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 178. 2 pages.

1778, April 20. New York. — Estimate of the quantity of candles necessary for 40,000 men for 26 weeks (winter months). George Clark, Barrack Master General.
Two copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 5 and 20. 1 page each.
Enclosed by Sir H. Clinton to John Robinson, 4 August.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gov. Peter Chester.

1778, April 20. St. Augustine. — "The daring invasion of the Rebels who have committed such depredations on the Mississippi, gives reason to suspect that if it had not been on a firm persuasion on their part of being joined by many of the inhabitants on that river, and the lukewarmness of the rest, they would not have adventured on such an attempt; therefore if the disposition of the inhabitants was or is doubtfull, I should apprehend that a Post on that river (or perhaps more) might have been the means of preventing the mischief that has been done and I must now leave it to your Excellency's determination whether in the present circumstances it will not be too late to send so small a party as the State of the Garrison may admit of sending and whether the dependance on the Inhabitants of the Natchez is sufficient to authorize sending a body of troops to their assistance and future support: I write to Colonel Stiell accordingly with regard to the application for a detachment from this Garrison; it is a measure which many reasons render impracticable at this present juncture that the Rebels are assembling in force on the Altamaha and that a Spirit of defection seems to have seized great numbers of the inhabitants of the neighbouring Colonies who want only to be supported to retaliate on the Authors of their misfortunes the many ill treatments they have received for their loyalty and attachment to Government; a timely assistance may encourage that Spirit and be the means of restoring some of the Southern Colonies to His Majesty's Government; there are neither transports nor a convoy at this place to send you any reinforcement, the want of money is another difficulty."     .     .     .     .    
"I shall suggest to Colonel Stiell the propriety (that in case a reduction of his Garrison is admissable by contracting his works) of affording the necessary assistance to the distressed inhabitants of the river Mississippi. I have little doubt but the Spaniards will discountenance the Rebels and return the property carried to New Orleans to the legitimate Owners; in which case Mr. Willing may soon be made to repent of his rashness and be brought to condign punishment
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"I should apprehend that Mr. Rocheblave the Commandant at the Illinois might easily be induced to send some of his militia from Fort or Poste Vincennes to assist in the protection of the inhabitants who remain loyal to Government and will be willing to assist in punishing the invaders and restoring peace and tranquillity in that part of the Country; he ought also to be very watchfull of any attempts that may be made hereafter by the Rebels and harrass them in their way down should they come again, your application to him on that head might have that effect."
Copy, Vol. 8. No. 64. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Gen. Howe, 27 April 1778.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, April 21. — Philadelphia. No. 94.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 131. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 513; copy 306, fo. 222.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Major Glazier.

1778, April 21. St. Augustine. — To return to this side of the River St. John, &c.
Copy. Vol 8. No. 78. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe, 1 May.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 303.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 22. War Office. — Cornet Sloper, 17th Dragoons, approved as aide-de-camp to his father, and to be permitted to return to Europe.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 25. 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, April 22. Philadelphia — No. 95.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 132. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 517; copy 306, fo. 223.

General Sir William Howe to Lieut.-Colonel Stiell.

1778, April 22. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges receipt of letter dated 3rd June last. Conduct of Spanish Governor at New Orleans seems very extraordinary. Defence of West Florida must principally depend upon harmony between civil and military branches. Lt. Byrd appointed to vacancy caused by Capt. Paulis' succession, This letter will. probably be his last, as
Page 238
he is permitted to leave his command. To address Sir Henry Clinton in future.
Copy, Vol. 8. No. 61. 2 pages.
Enclosing [Sir W. Howe] to Maj.-Gen. Dalling, see 24 April 1777.

Gen. Sir. Wm. Howe to Major-Gen. Sir Robert Pigot.

1778, April 26. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letter of 10th by the "Camilla" accompanied by letter from Gen. Burgoyne. Sends his sentiments to Phillips as to future supplies of money and provisions. Thinks provisions should be sent, provided they can be received at Boston and distributed by the British Commissary, but until these supplies are sent round payment should be made in cash for whatever may be issued. Will write to Sir Henry Clinton. Is not empowered to grant pay to the supernumerary Hessian Major-Generals until the King's pleasure is known. Commissions of Officers promoted in the new corps are not to be issued until the corps are formed. Mr. Payne the apothecary to come to this place. The Commanding Officer at New York will have directions to encourage the sending supplies to Rhode Island. His own resignation. Sir Henry Clinton is to succeed.
P.S. — Sends copy of a letter from Lord G. Germain respecting Mr. Elam. Mr. Morrison, Deputy Commissary General, to come here or to New York by first opportunity.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 216. 3 pages.
Enclosures:—
Lord G. Germain to Gen. Howe. Private. — See 24 September 1777.
Gen. Sir William Howe to Major-Gen. Phillips.

1778, April 26. Philadelphia. — Has received his letter of the 4th inst. announcing General Burgoyne's departure and of his being left in charge of the Troops of Convention. On resigning will give copies of papers to Sir H. Clinton. Is informed by General Burgoyne that the expenses incurred on the march from Saratoga and all charges for ertraordinaries are settled and paid to a late period, and the £20,000 has been left with him (Phillips) on account of subsistence. Will recommend to Sir Henry Clinton to send further supplies of money till provisions can be sent. To oppose any overtures to disperse the troops or remove them to a distance from Boston, not only from the inconvenience of conveying supplies but from the stipulation in the convention. Hopes that with the late settlement of accounts and engagements to settle future demands, preparations for their departure may take place. Has not authority to grant bat and forage money, but lodging money may be paid. Brigadiers to continue as at present. General Burgoyne will solicit in England continuance of their
Page 239
pay. Allows him a Secretary. Subsistence to be kept separate from extraordinaries in the accounts.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 217. 3 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir William Howe.

1778, April 27. St. Augustine. — Unfavourable accounts from the Mississippi by Governor Chester's letter enclosed. Could not comply with the Governor's request for the reasons stated in his letter to him, likewise enclosed. The "Hinchinbrook" armed vessel and a sloop destroyed by the rebel gallies. Enclosing a memorial from the deputies of a body of 350 refugees from Carolina who notwithstanding the many difficulties in their way have effected their escape and agreeable to the engagement to Lord Wm. Campbell are now determined to join the King's forces and demand to be embodied. Has formed them into such a corps as desired in their memorial. Is in want of provisions and arms. Enclosing a letter from the Commanding Officer of the Rangers. The service suffers from want of money. A return of things wanted by the Officer of Artillery enclosed.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 69. 3 pages.
Enclosures:—
Governor Chester to Brig.-Gen. Prevost, see 21 March 1778.
Thomas Brown to Brig.-Gen. Prevost, see 10 April 1778.
Brig. Gen. Prevost to Governor Chester, see 20 April 1778.
Memorial of Geo. Dawkins and Ed. Lane on behalf of themselves and other refugees from South Carolina. That having forced their way into a province in allegiance to H.M. where they desire to render themselves serviceable and having signified their desire of being considered as part of the 2nd Battalion of Provincial Forces raised for service in South Carolina to which desire he was pleased to agree as far as present circumstances would admit, they thank him for the reception and hope to regain their possessions. Are satisfied to remain on the footing of refugees embodied under command of the Honble. Col. John Stuart and shall rely on his representations to secure what Lord William Campbell intended — the same pay as provincials in South Carolina had in the late war. Will subject themselves to to his (Prevost's) command, but pray their officers may be chosen from amongst themselves.
Vol. 8. No. 65. 8 pages.
Artillery wanted 1 May, 1778, at St. Augustine. Round for 4 pounders howitzers and travelling carriages with ammunition. Signed Jno. Fairlamb, Lt. Royal Artillery.
Original. Vol. 8. No. 68. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 28. War Office. — Enclosing copy of a list of additional camp necessaries shipped on board the "Lioness" armed ship for the army under his command.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 26. 1 page.

Page 240

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 28. War Office. — Acknowledging letter of 6th March enclosing list of Serjeants recommended for the twelve-penny list. Directions have been given for their being placed thereon as soon as examined by the Chelsea Board.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 27. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 28. War Office. — Officers in enclosed list being intended to be promoted in the Regiment raised by Lt.-Col. Campbell are to be allowed to leave the army under his command that they may join the regiment on its arrival at Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 28. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Officers approved for Colonel Campbell's Regiment of Highlanders.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 29. 1 page.

John Robinson to [Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, April 28. Whitehall. — Referring to him a memorial of George Boyd of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, praying payment of the value of a cargo of lumber delivered at Boston in 1775 for H.M. service, for hire of ship and losses sustained by detention.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 123. 1 page.

John Robinson to General Sir William Howe.

1778, April 28. Whitehall. — Col. John Burgoyne's allowance, as Commissary of Musters for foreign troops, to be paid in England, his deputies to be paid in America.
2 copies. Vol. 2. No. 124 and Vol. 28. No. 207. 1 page each.

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, April 28. St. Augustine. — Refers to message from the lower Creeks that a large body of Indians were to come down at this time. Perrymount is arrived and says a hundred Indians are following him to Saint Mary's. That seventeen hundred were on the point of accompanying him when Messrs. Tait and Mackintosh delivered a Talk from the Superintendent that all was peace. Perrymount came to ask if it was peace or war. Will endeavour to get them to help in guarding the frontiers. "Our scouting party of Rangers have conducted, Sir, into this province near four hundred loyalists, that have mostly been forced to Shelter in the woods in Carolina and Georgia. Brigadier General Prevost proposes to embody them; I approve of the plan, and shall give every assistance in my power."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 70. 2 pages.

Page 241

J. De Bitiniere to Lieut.-Gov. Henry Hamilton.

1778, April 29. Preston, Lancashire. — "In passing thro' Dublin lately I had the pleasure of seeing your brother     .     .     .     .     I did not expect when I left Detroit to have so long delayed my return, altho' my inclination is as much as ever bent on that manner of disposing of myself, the late turn of Affairs in America leave me less hopes than formerly, of being able to accomplish my wish.
"I passed the greatest part of a year, since I have been home, at Lisburn, recruiting; where you have a great many friends, particularly the Miss Closes, and Doctor Jones's family; who spoke frequently of you, and with the greatest affection, as well as many others.
"Should I return to Detroit I shall bring with me an acquaintance of yours, whom perhaps you scarcely remember, Dr. Jones's third daughter, now my wife, who notwithstanding her extream youth, when you knew her, retains the most affectionate remembrance of your kindness to her, and is as desirous, as I am, of seeing you at Detroit.
"I have lately got a Company in a new regiment, called the Liverpool Volunteers, raised by that town, on the late threatening posture of Affairs; which are yet in as equivocal a Situation as ever. The Nation in general have been disappointed in not being already at war with france — I believe not disagreeably tho.' Altho' every appearance at this instant portends it, — such as Camps forming in both England and Ireland; and fleets collecting: yet there are some who say there will be no war. Those who have no better information can only judge by appearances, and they are hostile.
"A few days ago I opened a paper the Duplicate of which I left with you sealed. It was a will, I had the precaution to make on my leaving Detroit. It contained an instance of imprudence, done with a good intention, that amazed its author; for that part of it escaped my memory. I beg as the greatest favor, that you may destroy the will without opening it, as soon as possible, I should be uneasy were it in any other hands than yours. Were I with you to explain my motive, I should shew it you; but in the present case, the matter being only interesting to myself, I should not wish it to be seen; nor is it worth troubling you with and I am perfectly assured that you will do with it, as I request, that is commit it to the flames. And also do me the favor to let me hear from you after. Don't take it ill that I should trouble you with a repetition of this request by another conveyance, perhaps more than one for fear of miscarriage. How does Perdiac ? I must beg the favor of you to establish his emancipation at the age of 21 by a record in the Office of your province, if necessary, for I shall never myself claim him; but the will being no more, in case of my death, others might. This my request is no doubt sufficient without a regular power of Attorny(sic) .
Page 242
"Be so good as give my Compliments to my friends Mr. Hay, and Comodore Grant and Believe me with the most sincere attachment and esteem. Dear Sir, your faithfull and Obedient Servant."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 12. No. 44. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Major-Gen. Phillips to Sir Henry Clinton, 29 May 1779.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Capt. Robert Mackenzie.

1778, April 29. St. Augustine. — That the want of supplies of money lays him under the greatest inconvenience. The great increase of public expenses arising from the support of the unfortunate refugees from the neighbouring colonies will require an addition to the sum to be sent last July, as the opportunities of sending are so scarce and bills on New York or Philadelphia are seldom or never negotiable and those on the Treasury not without some loss. Regrets delay in the transmission of Mr. Shirreff s accounts of public expenditure.
Signed letter. Vol. 5. No. 97. Copy. Vol. 8. No. 11. 2 pages each.

John Robinson to [Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, April 30. Whitehall. — That the Treasury has agreed with Nesbitt, Drummond, Franks, Henneker, Wombwel and Devaynes merchants for a supply of 12 months' provisions for 24,000 men with Bacon and Durand for 8,000 men and with Robert Mayne for 4,000, to be delivered at Cork. Sends copy of the letter written containing the orders given to them (see 17 April).
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 122. 2 pages.

Chaplain Michael Schlater to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, April. Philadelphia. — Memorial.
Autograph signed. Vol. 6. No. 184. 2 pages.
Enclosed by General Howe to Lord Barrington, 6 May 1778.
Two copies in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters Original Correspondence 21.

Sir William Howe to Brig.-Augustine Prevost.

1778, May 1. Philadelphia. — Promotions. Resigns command to Sir H. Clinton. Is vexed at difficulties arising between Governor Tonyn and himself.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 220. 2 pages.

Sir William Howe to John Stuart.

1778, May 1. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letters copies of which will be left with Clinton, who is to succeed in the command. Is sensible of his difficulty in managing the various dispositions
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of the Indians, and counteracting the intrigues of the rebels. This will be increased if Britain enters into a war with France. The minds of the Creeks, are, he fears, already too much poisoned. Refers him to Sir H. Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 73. 2 pages.

Sir William Howe to Governor Patrick Tonyn.

1778, May 1. Philadelphia. — Is vexed at any point of difficulty arising between Brig.-Gen. Prevost and himself. Military affairs must be vested in one command.
Copy, Vol. 10. No. 219. 1 page.

1778, May 1. — Extract from general orders of Major General Phillips. See with those of 30 March.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 1. War Office. — Two discharged soldiers, Dennis Thurley and John Shade, lately belonging to the Provincial Regiment of Queen's Rangers, have lately been sent to England, recommended to the Royal Bounty of Chelsea Hospital. No provision having been made here for discharged soldiers of the Provincial Corps, he is to issue orders that no more such men may be sent here.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 30. 1 page; also copy Vol. 14. No. 8. 1 page, enclosed by Jenkinson, 5 April 1780.

Sir William Howe to Governor Peter Chester.

1778, May 1. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letters. Thanks for his acquiescence in the suggestions for regulating the Indian trade and for his zeal in co-operating with the military department where necessary. His future correspondence will be with Sir H. Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 72. 2 pages.

Govr. Patrick Tonyn to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, May 1. St. Augustine. — "In support of the authority with which his Majesty has been graciously pleased to honor me with, in justice to Lieutenant Colonel Brown's merit and as it may in future be of use to His Majesty's Service, I beg leave to mention, to your Excellency, the following circumstances relative to the Rank of provincial troops.
"Upon being informed, Sir, that the rebels were marching to St. Mary's river, I waited upon Brigadier General Prevost, and communicated the intelligence I had received. The Brigadier General determined to send a detachment of the Kings Troops to support Lieutenant Colonel Brown who with the Rangers was stationed at a Fort they had thrown up on St. Mary's river, the northern boundary of this province. When the detachment was on the march to St. John's river, the Brigadier General told me,
Page 244
he would send no Officer of the Garrison to be commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Brown, and that the King's Troops should not pass St. John's River, that Mr. Brown might stay at St. Mary's, and when the rebels had drove him and the Rangers from thence, they would find the King's Troops at St. John's.
"That the public service might not suffer by any misapprehensions of the King's Servants, I gave up for a time what I thought my right, and by letter desired Lieutenant Colonel Brown to give up the command; although by his Majesty's orders expressed in the Articles of War, he was entitled according to his Rank.
"Upon presenting this letter to the Brigadier General for his perusal he ordered the detachment to march to St. Mary's, and upon hearing of the Hinchenbrook and Rebecca being taken by the Rebels he recalled them.
"Lt. Colonel Brown desires to resign his Commission. I cannot accept of his resignation at this alarming crisis, and he still continues to act. I have the honor to enclose copies of my letter and General Prevost's to Major Glazier, and Lt.-Colonel Brown's.
"I have in several letters had the honor to mention to your Excellency Mr. Brown's conduct and services: facts, Sir, speak for themselves. His warm zeal for His Majesty's Service, his intrepid resolution and activity claim singular attention. He is a Gentleman of family and of liberal and genteel education. He received a very considerable patrimony which is greatly reduced by the rebels. He suffered unparalleld(sic) insults and injuries from them in Georgia, and since he has been in this province he has undergone great hardships, and submitted to great drudgery and fatigue in his Majesty's service.
"I only beg leave to observe, Sir, that I became acquainted with Mr. Brown, as a persecuted Refugee, I felt for his suffering and admired his spirit. I appointed him to command the Rangers and such of the Indians as occasionally might act with them, because I thought him the best qualified, and indeed the only person that I could get at the time, and should he now give up his commission, I know not another person, who is fit for supplying his place."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 74. 3 pages.
Enclosures:—
Lt.-Col. Brown to Gov. Tonyn, see 16 April.
Gov. Tonyn to Lt.-Col. Brown, see 18 April.
Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Major Glazier, see 21 April.
Lt.-Col. Brown to Gov. Tonyn.

N.D. — Desiring to resign.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 75. 4 pp.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 307.

[General Sir William Howe] to Lord Barrington.

1778, May 2. Philadelphia. — "Upon the receipt of your Lordship's Letter of the 4th of February enclosing a Memorial
Page 245
from Ensign Steel of the 63rd Regiment praying for a Purchase, I took the earliest opportunity of preferring him vice Lieut. French who had purchased his Commission and begged Leave to retire from the Service on Account of the Situation of his private Affairs. As Mr. French has not any Security for his Money here I am induced to trouble your Lordships with this Notification of Mr. Steel's Succession to the Lieutenantcy."
Copy. Vol. 6: No. 181. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, May 2. Cambridge. — "In Consequence of your Order of the 1st May, that the Commanding Officers of Regiments and Corps should send in a return of those Officers who wished to be exchanged; and their reasons for it     .     .     .     .     I have made an enquiry among the Officers of the Regiment of Brunswick, and although there are several who might be induced by family Considerations to wish to return to Europe, they rather prefer submitting to some temporal inconveniences in common with their men, than to separate themselves from them.     .     .     .     .     There are here a few men of the Regiment of Dragoons under the Command of Capt. Schlagenteuffel, and Lieutenant Bourneman, whom I wish to be exchanged, particularly as there is a Detachment of Upwards of 60 men in Canada under the Command of a Sub-Lieutenant only. I should esteem it as a favor if you would be so good as to effect the exchange of this small body of men, whom Capt. Schlagenteuffel may carry back to Canada, and there take the Command of the whole, which would then make a considerable body, and render the Accounts of the Regt more regular.     .     .     .     .    
"Should my request be granted, this small body, might be sent to Canada by the Ships which bring the Baggage of the Army, and which most probably will return there."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 111. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Hanau Regiment.

1778, May 3. Cambridge. — Etat du Regiment de son Altesse Serenisme Monseigneur le Prince hereditaire de Hesse Cassel. Signed, W. R. de Gall.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 112. 1 page.
Brunswick Troops.

1778, May 4. Cambridge. — Return of the officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of the Regiment of Dragoons belonging to the Convention. Signed, Riedesel.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 114. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe. Circular.

1778, May 3. Philadelphia. — To Governors of Jamaica, St. John's, Nova Scotia, East and West Florida, Dominica and
Page 246
Bermudas. "His Majesty having been pleased to signify his Royal Acquiescence in my request to resign my Command in America, I have the Honor to acquaint your Excellency, that Sir Henry Clinton is appointed to be my Successor as Commander in Chief of all His Majesty's Forces within the Colonies lying on the Atlantic Ocean, from Nova Scotia to West Florida inclusive, and that before this may reach your Excellency's Hands, I shall probably have taken my Departure for Britain."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 79. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to Lord Macartney.

1778, May 3. Philadelphia. — Is concerned to learn that the request made by the Admiral and himself in the letter of 20th April 1777, should have been the cause of loss or disappointment to the merchants of Grenada, but an unrestrained liberty to import rum and molasses to this continent would certainly have been attended with many bad consequences. His resignation and the appointment of Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 80. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 4. Whitehall. — No. 7.
Triplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 17. 4 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo., 249; copy 431, fo. 257; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 4. Whitehall. — Packet boats not to be detained.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 19. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Le Despencer and H. F. Carteret to Lord G. Germain, 1 April.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 133, fo. 245; copy 431, fo. 256; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, May 6. Philadelphia. — Promotions. Concerning the appointment of Ensign Lindegreen to a lieutenancy.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 185. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord Barrington.

1778, May 6. Philadelphia. — On the enclosed.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 182. 1 page.
Original in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.
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Enclosures:—
Memorial of Chaplain Schlater, see end of April, 1778.
Memorial of Lt.-Col. Stirling to Gen. Howe. To rectify dates in a commission.
Copy, Vol, 6. No. 183. 2 pages.
Two copies in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir W. Howe.

1778, May 7. St. Augustine. — Sends monthly returns of both Floridas (for February and March). "The consumption of provisions has augmented since my last of one hundred men daily, Governor Tonyn having demanded provisions for that number who are to Man some Armed Vessels that are to replace those lost near Frederica, where in my opinion they had nothing to do."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 81. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 7. St. Augustine. — "The dispatches for your Excellency were not gone but a few hours on Board of a Vessel that I have been obliged to hire on purpose to carry them when I received a letter from Captain Fanshawe informing me that before the return of the 'Carrisfort' to this place, he may find a conveyance for New York, had I been informed of it sooner it wou'd have been a saving to Government, however I shall trouble him with this letter and the annexed Copies as Duplicates."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 82. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Capt. Bobert Mackenzie, Secretary to the Commander-in-Chief.

1778, May 7. St. Augustine. — "Not being acquainted time enough that there wou'd or was to be an Opportunity to convey my Dispatches to the Northward I have hired the Schooner 'Bell,' Captn Smith to carry them to Philadelphia, I hope he has been with you before this, but at all events I annex here Copies of my Letters to his Excellency and to you, with an Intention of sending them on Board of the 'Carrysfort' as duplicates."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 83. 1 page.

John Weir, Surgeon and Acting Purveyor, to Major-General William Phillips.

1778, May 7. Cambridge. — "When the Army arrived here, the daily Expectation of embarking for England made me decline applying to General Burgoyne concerning some necessary regulations in the Hospital Department; and his sudden departure with the multiplicity of business on his hands at that time, occasioned a farther delay, which obliges me now to apply to you.
Page 248
"The Purveyor having gone from Saratoga to Canada, General Burgoyne ordered me to take the charge of the Hospital Accounts and to employ a Clerke. The time of acting promised to be so short and the state of affairs appeared so improper to apply for an allowance to this appointment that I declined mentioning it to the General.
"As the duty is attended with a good deal of trouble and some expense, I have to request you will be so good as to take it into consideration and grant such allowance as you may think proper."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 11. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Gen. Howe, 10 May.

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, May 8. Philadelphia. — "I received your Accompts for Disbursements at St. Augustine on Account of the military Services of the Garrison amounting to £4,364 15s. 2¾d, for which the Commander-in-Chief has granted his Warrant on Thomas Barrow, Esqr., Deputy Paymaster General, who is directed to detain the Sum of £651 2s. 3¼d., for a partial Warrant granted the 5th May 1777, in Part Payment of those Accompts, also the sum of £3,000 remitted to you by His Majesty's Ships, 'Lively' and 'Daphne,' the Balance then remaining due to you of £713 12s. 11d, he will remit to you, together with the Sum of £10,000 on a new Accompt, to enable you to carry on the contingent military Services of the Garrison.
"I enclose you an Account of Sundry Extraordinary Expences incurred for Military Services in his Majesty's Province of East Florida from the 25th December 1776, to 24th June 1777, which you will be pleased to pay to Mr. Skinner.
"The Commander in Chief has also directed me to signify his Pleasure that you do pay to Captain Bruere and the Officers who were with him at New York Bat and Forage Money equally with the rest of the Officers at St. Augustine."
Copy, Vol. 8. No, 84. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 9. Cambridge. — Lt.-Col. Sutherland being desirous to go to Europe for the recovery of his health Major Mersereau, the American Deputy Commissary, has proposed an exchange between him and Col. Webb, now a prisoner in New York, with such other officer or officers as shall make such an exchange equal, and that both should have liberty to go out on parole, one to Europe, the other to Boston or Connecticut, until an actual exchange takes place.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 9. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 9. Cambridge. — The Rev. Mr. Morgan, deputy chaplain, desiring to go to Europe, requests that an American
Page 249
clergyman be sent out in exchange. Desires to know if clergymen are considered prisoners of war.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 6. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 9. Cambridge. — Major Mersereau having consented that a number of British officers should go to Europe on parole, encloses copy of his parole and a list of officers, and requests an equal number of American officers may be liberated.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 8. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 10. Cambridge. — That he would make no change in the situation of the Army without his orders. Encloses a list of officers who desire to go to Europe. Claim of Mr. Weir, surgeon, as purveyor to Gen. Burgoyne's army. That Lieut. Murray, 9th Regt., may have leave to resign the Quartermastership to Ensign Lesslie.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 10. 2 pages.
Enclosing John Weir to Major-General Phillips, see 7 May 1778.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, May 11. Philadelphia.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 133. 8 pages.
Original in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 15; copy 306, fo. 225.
Enclosure:—
1778, May 11. Philadelphia. — Report by Major John Maitland of an expedition up the Delaware.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 134. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 19.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Major-General Massey, Governor Tonyn and Brig.-General Prevost.

1778, May 12. Philadelphia. — Circular signifying his succession as General and Commander-in-Chief.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 1. 1 page.

Major-General William Phillips.

1778, May 12. Cambridge. — List of officers who have applied for leave of absence from Cambridge (Troops of Convention).
Signed original. Vol. 53. No. 28. 1 page.

1778, May 12. Cambridge. — List of officers at Rhode Island on parole with note dated 9 May as to exchanges.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 30. 1 page.

Page 250

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 12. Cambridge — "Sir, I take the Liberty of returning my humble thanks to your Excellency for the Letter with which I was honoured." Thanks for generous declaration relative to an impartial exchange of prisoners of war. This assurance has satisfied the German officers who were much alarmed at Gates' answer to Burgoyne that "he could exchange any British Officers, but no Germans, without particular leave from Congress." Gates denies this answer, though it is an undoubted fact. Several Brunswick soldiers have absented themselves, some having enlisted in the American service, intending to join Howe's army, and others have reached New York. Entreats his Excellency that they may be brought together at one place and be furnished with money, &c. (the expenses of which he will repay) and that they may be put under the direction of a Hessian officer. Would esteem it a favour if these people could be sent to Canada, where there are 1,400 men of the troops of the Duke of Brunswick. Orders on this head will prevent these men enlisting into the service of other nations.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 117. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 14. War Office. — Has laid before the King copies of his correspondence with Major-General Tryon. His Majesty approves his reasoning that local commissions on the spot will take place of all commissions for similar rank though upon the establishment of the army if bearing subsequent date. That General Tryon should not serve under officers in America to whom he would be senior in the line at large, the King has granted him a commission as Major General in America only, bearing date 1 Jan., 1776. He is to be employed in any line of service Howe thinks proper. The Secretary of State will take care of any Hessian invalids sent to England to be conveyed to Cassel.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 31. 2 pages.

Stores.

1778, May 14. — Articles of Agreement between the Treasury and Robert Mayne for victualling 4,000 men in America.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 30. 7 pages.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1778, May 15. Philadelphia. — "As the 70th Regt with those of Maclean and Campbell, may be daily expected to strengthen the Garrison of Halifax; I am to desire, that upon the application of the Commanding Officer of His Majesty's Ships at that place on the arrival of the several Regiments above mentioned, You will permit the Battalion of Marines now there to Embark for Europe.
Page 251
"Having directed Major Genl Robertson to carry a Plan into Execution for working the Colliery on Spanish River at Cape Breton, in order to obtain a supply of Coals for the Garrisons of the Middle Provinces; and as such of the Transports as are not wanted for the conveyance of the Marines to England, may be usefully employed in transporting the Coals to New York, You will consult with the Officer Commanding the King's Ships at Halifax, with regard to the time and manner of their being sent to Louisburg for that purpose; as well as Co-operate, as far as may be in your power, in every measure that may tend to fullfil the intention of this business.
"I could Wish that on the arrival of the Regiments before mentioned at Halifax, You found it convenient to Yourself to join this Army, where Your Services, as we have but few Major Generals, might be essential, leaving Colonel Maclean in Your present Command." P.S. — If however, You still Continue in Your desire of going to Europe, I can have no objection ; and You have my leave to go thither upon the arrival of Coll Maclean, who, as I have already said, You will in that case leave in the Command at Halifax.
Copy. Vol, 21. No. 2. 2 pages.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 15. Philadelphia. — "Since I had the honour of writing to your Excellency, we have had various reports of the rebels of Carolina and Georgia's intentions, to invade this province with considerable force.
"It is now past a doubt from the best information ordered by the Continental Congress, and the enclosures I have the honor to convey will prove that the design is not without foundation, and the progress they have made towards the execution.
"They are of opinion in Carolina that they have nothing to apprehend from the King's troops from the North; and encouraged by this notion they are to employ their whole strength against this province, reserving a small force for their own defence; the artillery and mortars they bring have lately arrived in a vessel from France.
"I am endeavouring to repair our unfortunate loss of the 'Hinchenbrooke' and 'Rebecca' by the construction of Gallies and floating Batteries, to mount twenty four pounders; these may be provided out of the Fort, which I wish to avoid as it reduces the number for its defence; I have mentioned this to Lord Viscount Howe more particularly and have requested of his Lordship, if he can spare me some to reinstate them it will be very convenient.
"All the Indians agree in confirming the peacable talk given out to the Creek Nation by Mr Stuart's Agents, and some of them aver, a talk to the very same effect, was given to the confidential men in private by the Superintendent at Pensacola.
"The bad effects of this talk is now most sensibly felt here. The Indians that are come do not exceed a hundred. They
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also tell me the same measure has been recommended by Mr. Stuart to the Ocony King, Cowkeeper and all the Seminolies. Thus the object, formed by the rebels, is attained, to make the Indians neutral, as they failed in their attempts to persuade them to take a decisive part against his Majesty's loyal Subjects.
"I shall notwithstanding exert my utmost to bring them down, I will despatch expresses to the Commissaries in the Nation, to Mr. Stuart; and to the Indians to invite them to fall upon the rebels and co-operate with us.
"I have issued a proclamation desiring all the Inhabitants who are not incorporated to take arms and be aiding and assisting in every capacity to His Majesty's service.
"The Brigadier General has embodied two hundred and fifty of the Refugees lately come into the province under the care and direction of his Brother Major Prevost, who is to discipline them.
"General Prevost and myself are making all possible preparations for the enemies reception."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 85 1 pages.(sic)
Enclosures:—
1778, May 14. East Florida. — Affidavit of John Imrie.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 86. 3 pages.
Proclamation by the Governor and Council of the State of Georgia inviting volunteers to proceed against East Florida. Signed Saml. Stirks.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 87. 2 pages; also 29. No. 241. 1 page.
Copies of both these enclosures in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fos 817 and 321, — Admiralty, Sec, In Letters, 488, No. 167 and 168.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 16. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 32. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of promotions made in the Regiment of Foot Guards.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 33. 1 page.

Captain Robert Mackenzie to [Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey].

1778, May 16. Philadelphia. — Acknowledging receipt of letters enclosing various accounts for which he sends three warrants on the Deputy Paymaster General at Halifax. Temporary warrants to be settled every three months by their own departments. The Commander-in-Chief will grant final warrants to the principals of the departments, cancelling the others. Warrants for salaries to be considered final. Refers him to letter of 12 April 1777, for an answer to accounts in general. Sends forms for warrants. Mr. Smith appointed for the payment of the Provincial forces. — "Royal Fencible Americans, Royal Highland Emigrants and Nova Scotia Volunteers, &c.     .     .     .     .     they must apply to and settle with him." Encloses six
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commissions for officers in the Loyal Nova Scotia Volunteers, viz.: — Two for Captains Daniel Cunningham and Thomas Green; two for Lieutenants Charles Morris and John Fawson; one for Ensign John Needham, and one for Adjutant Thomas Fitzsimmons.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 88; and extract Vol. 29. No. 15. 2 pages each.

Josiah Martin, Governor of North Carolina, to Lords Commissioners of the Treasury.

1778, May 16. New York. — "Sir William Howe, not having yet thought proper to ordain any mode of paying the Provincial Officers of No Carolina,     .     .     .     .     I have been under the Necessity of drawing a Set of Bills upon you of this date, for the further Sum of Twelve hundred pounds Sterling in favor of Mr. William Donaldson, at thirty days' Sight, in order to raise Money for paying such of those Officers, who by escape, or exchange, are freed from their long Captivity among the Rebels, and are from time to time coming into the Quarters of His Majesty's Army." Will transmit specific accounts of the application of all Monies and make to Sir Henry Clinton the same representation made to Sir William Howe touching the payment of the No. Carolina Provincials.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 118. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Sir H. Clinton], 6 Aug. 1778.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, May 16. St. Augustine. — Intelligence of an expedition against this Province. Informs him in order that provisions and other relief judged necessary may be sent. Will throw all possible obstructions in the rebels' way. Has drawn on him for 5,680 dollars in favour of Theophilus Beach, Yeats and Co., merchants, as he could not be any longer without money.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 89. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 18. War Office. — Acknowledges letters. Sir James Murray approved for a majority of the Edinburgh regiment. In case he should purchase in America his Majesty has given him his option between the two commissions. Lt. Monro named for a company in the Glasgow regiment. Is sorry that recruits unfit for service should have joined the army. As many of the men were sent off as soon as enlisted it is almost impossible but that some should be embarked whose defects had not been discovered. Believes every recruit has been examined by a field officer and surgeon previous to embarkation (one parcel excepted that were sent from the north) and care will be taken in future to prevent the same inconveniences.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 34. 2 pages.

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Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 18. War Office. — Officers holding commissions in the Regulars and Provincials are to make their option between the two. Lt. Pettener of the 6th to do so. Lt. Piper will not be ordered home if he is useful. His Majesty thinks it would be right to exchange him to some regiment on the spot. Encloses list of promotions. Two lieutenants wanted for the additional companies of Haviland's regiment.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 35. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Two lists of promotions.
Copies. Vol. 6. Nos. 36 and 37. 2 pages and 1 page.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, May 18. Philadelphia. — William Burnam's sentence respited.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 135. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 29; copy 306, fo. 227.

Gen. Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, May 18. Philadelphia. — Execution of Lee, soldier in 22nd, deferred for royal clemency.
Copy. Vol. 4. No. 136. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 33; copy 306, fo. 228.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 20. Cambridge. — Congratulates him on his advancement as Commander-in-Chief. Declares his wish for peace, but if it must be war hopes it will be attended with all possible humanity. "Rumour in many tongues, cries out a French War. Should it be so, I shall hope to join you in Fields where we have fought and conquer'd. There conquest becomes a gratification and the mind exults. Here pity interposes and we cannot forget that when we strike we wound a Brother."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 12. 5 pages.

Congress Resolution.

1778, May 21. — As to exchange of prisoners.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 92. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe, 23 May.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 65; and 589, fo. 81.

Page 255

Capt. Robert Mackenzie to Lt.-Col. Alexander Dickson.

1778, May 21. Philadelphia. — Encloses copy of a general order and other papers rectifying a mistake in the appointment of Mr. Lindegren, who of right succeeds Lt. Bird promoted in the 60th.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 93. 1 page.

Congress Resolution.

1778, May 22. In Congress. — Concerning troops of the Convention of Saratoga. Approving Heath's proposals as to provisions, and all assistance is to he paid for.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 21. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 14 June 1778.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 22. Cambridge. — Renewing a request made to General Howe concerning his exchange. There are two brigadiers, Thompson and Waterbury, a Colonel Hale and Lt.-Col. Berrenger, taken by the Northern army. Enquires whether he might not be exchanged against such of those as might equal his rank of Major General. Requests in the meantime permission to visit Philadelphia. Desires the consent of Congress and passports.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 13. 2 pages.

Troops.

1778, May 23. Philadelphia. — Abstract of pay for Supernumerary Officers in the 47th Regiment under General Howe from the dates of their appointment till they are otherwise provided for to 20 September 1777, the date appointed by Sir W. Howe. Certified by R. Mackenzie, 23 May 1778.
Vol. 11. No. 1. 1 page.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, May 23. Valley Forge, Head Quarters.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 91. 1 page.
Enclosing Congress Resolution, 21 May.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 69; and 589, fo. 82.

Maj.-Gen. James Robertson to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 24. New York. — Has consulted with Commodore Hotham as to providing fuel from the mines of Cape Breton (Spanish River) for the troops. The Commodore must receive orders from Lord Howe before detaching any ship. In the probability of a French war submits some considerations. That there are about two hundred families French and Acadian on the island all inveterately in the French interest who by allying themselves with the Americans might cut off the supply and
Page 256
destroy the transports. Suggests that 200 soldiers and some labourers should be sent from the continent under an experienced officer and man of business. If speedily gone into, 6,000 chaldrons might be brought here in 8,000 tons of transports the season being too late to make two trips.
Signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 4. 3 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, May 25. Cambridge. — Requesting leave for Capt. Shrimpton, 62nd Regiment, wounded at Hubberton and in a dangerous condition to go to Europe.
Duplicate extract. Vol. 53. No, 31. 1 page,

St. Augustine.

1778, May 25. St. Augustine. — Returns of provisions in store, consisting of flour, pork, butter, peas and rice, sufficient for victualling 1,500 men for some weeks. Signed, Spencer Man.
Signed duplicate. Vol. 8. No, 111. 1 page.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Gen. Howe, 8 June 1778.

General Washington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, May 27. Head Quarters. — Desires answer on the subject of Captains Robertson and Galt.
Signed letter. Vol, 8. No. 94 also copy. No. 96. 1 page each.
Enclosing Gen. Washington to Gen. Howe, 22 March.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to General Washington.

1778, May 30. Head Quarters. — Requesting an audience for Colonel Paterson that he may deliver certain Acts of Parliament in favour of America, which have lately received the Royal assent, and also dispatches from Lord Howe and himself.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 98. 1 page.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May 31. Head Quarters. — "I am sorry that I cannot see the necessity of the interview you propose. If you, or Lord Howe, have any despatches for Congress, and think fit to transmit them to my care, they shall be forwarded by the earliest opportunity. If you have any for me of a military nature, for none other can come properly under my consideration, I wish them to be communicated in writing, and in the usual way. This will prevent any trouble on the part of Colonel Paterson." (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., p, 394.)
Signed letter Vol. 8. No. 99. 1 page,

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir William Howe.

1778, May. Cambridge. — Enclosing monthly returns for May. That an officer had gone to Canada for the clothing.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 14. 1 page.

Page 257

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe.

1778, June 1. War Office. — List of vacancies happened in some regiments by the appointment of the officers therein mentioned to Lieut.-Col. McDonnel's corps.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 88. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of vacancies.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 39. 1 page.

[Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Sir Henry Clinton.]

1778, June 1. — A long paper, not signed nor addressed, but endorsed "Maj.-Gen. Phillips." "There seems in our present situation to be but three modes of acting in regard to the Troops. First: To declare the Convention at an end. Second: To exchange all the Officers that are already gone away on Parole, as also all the Officers and soldiers dispersed over America who are Prisoners of War, and to keep the present situation of the Troops of Convention entire waiting for future events. Third: To exchange all the Officers, British and German, except a certain number to be left in charge of each Corps." Discusses the third. "The strength of every Corps is so very considerably reduced as to render them no longer objects of consideration as Battalions and I apprehend it would be more eligible for the Service to have the Staff of each Corps and the greater part of the Officers exchanged and sent, the British to Europe and the Germans to Canada, where they might absolutely form afresh the several Battalions to which they belong and by degrees the King again would have the Service of the several Corps, which at present are totally broken and separated from the Army. In this case the present and future strength of the Convention Troops might be considered as Detachments from the Several Regiments or as Supernumerarys." Suggestions for drafting the men of the eight Canada companies and arrangements for the Germans. "As the American Congress seem determined not to release the soldiers this Plan may probably seem calculated to render futile their intention of distressing the Army. The Soldiers will be undoubtedly lost, but the Expense will be saved and the Regiments brought again upon an Establishment. . Further     .     .     the Officers will be ruined if they remain in the present situation." Supposing one of the three modes is adopted gives three sentences to be used in writing to him which he will understand. Fears letter or letters have been stopped. "It is not possible for me to describe the very severe disappointment I have received by the Cartel breaking off. I had imbibed hopes of serving under you this Campaign, and that at the head of these unfortunate Troops, I should have done you service. These hopes are over and bitterness and sorrow are again my portion     .     .     .     .     Captain England writ me an account of Thomson, Waterbury and four Colonels being sent out, and a desire that Reidesel and I should
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go in on Parole, but I imagine it has been refused. I really think after such Conduct you have no reason to keep terms with these People     .     .     .     .     Collier has informed me that upon my receiving a letter from you signed with your Christian Name at length as Henry Clinton, I was then to conclude that all further negotiation for a General Exchange was over and I was at liberty to write to you in application of a Partial Exchange     .     .     .     .     You cannot doubt my wishes for your success and honour. Would to Heaven I could serve with you. I think you would now and then like to talk with me. My friendship for you is unalterable. Do for me what you can, but do not anything improper for me     .     .     .     .     I leave myself in your hands and at all Events let me hear from you. Affectionately yours."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 19. 13 pages.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 14 June 1778.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to "Henry Laurens, Esq., &c. &c."

1778, June 3. Head Quarters, Philadelphia. — Transmitting the Conciliatory Bills.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 103. 1 page.
Also in the Carlisle MSS., 15th Report, Appendix vi., p. 399.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, June 3. Philadelphia. — A sudden opportunity offers for writing. As to the unhappy dispute between him and Governor Tonyn confirms General Howe's opinion of 1 May. Approves of 400 refugees originally engaged by Lord Wm. Campbell being formed into a corps under Col. Innes. Asks for a proper list of officers.
Rough draft. Vol. 15. No. 137. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Governor Tonyn.

1778, June 3. Philadelphia. — First part the same as to Prevost. Col. Innes is to command the Carolinian refugees. This will be delivered by Capt. Keith Elphinston of the "Perseus." The preparations against the province are no doubt alarming, but trusts he will be able to protect it effectually till a reinforcement can be sent. Capt. Moncrief is ordered to repair to St. Augustine.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 138. 2 pages.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to General Washington.

1778, June 3. — The resolves of Congress relative to the exchange of prisoners cannot possibly be assented to in every respect. The Commissary of Prisoners has received particular instructions on that head when he meets the person authorized by him (Washington .
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 101. 1 page.

Page 259

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

1778, June 3. Philadelphia. — "Sir, I am directed to transmit to Congress and the Commander in Chief of their Troops, printed Copies of three Conciliatory Acts of Parliament, let me add my most sincere Wishes that they may produce the desirable effect which is hoped from them. — I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient and Most humble Servant. Signed, H. Clinton."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 102. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 3. Whitehall. — Circular.
Copy. Vol. 1. No. 20. 1 page.
Same in the Carlisle MSS. (15th Report, Appendix VI., p. 340), and in the British Museum, &c.
Enclosure:—
1778, June 8. — The King's Speech to Parliament. Printed.
Vol. 7. No. 21. 4 pages.

Nova Scotia.

1778, June 3. Halifax. — Orders given at Halifax containing copy of letter from Gen. Howe to Gen. Massey, Philadelphia, 4 April, and abstract of general orders of that date. Endorsed:— "Abstract of General Orders relative to the Regiments stationed in Nova Scotia. Received Jany. 12th 1779."
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 35. 1 page.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, June 3. St. Augustine. — "The preparations of the Rebels leave no doubt of their intentions, a Camp of two thousand men, South Carolinians and Georgians is formed near the place where fort Barrington stood under the command of Generals How and Elbert, another under Andrew Williamson of eight hundred North and South Carolinians on the river Ahoopy, near the continence of the Oconey and Ocmulgee rivers, and forty Catawba Indians; each Camp have Artillery. Six Gallies are at Darien in the Altamaha.
"I had the honour to inform your Excellency I had dispatched an express to the Creek Nation, the first Towns he reached are immediately to set out for Saint Mary's river, he is gone forward, I trust he will prevail in sending down a large Body.
"I am making all possible efforts to establish an internal naval force to keep pace with the enemy, I have wrote to Lord Viscount Howe more particularly on this subject, and have requested his Lordship's support, as we are without any naval force, the Galatea has lost her rudder and goes direct to New York. The express has sent accounts of Mr. Mackintosh the Superintendent's Agent in the lower Creeks being returned to Pensacola, he
Page 260
arrived in time to prevent a very large Indian Army to come this way, at a most seasonable Juncture and made a short stay amongst them."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 100. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, June 4. Philadelphia. — A sum of money will be remitted to St. Augustine to Mr. James Penman, appointed agent for paying the corps of Carolina Royalists, but in the meantime he is to be furnished with money for their subsistence from 25th May last.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 139. 1 page.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, June 4. Philadelphia. — This with his despatch of yesterday will be delivered by Capt. Keith Elphinstone of the "Perseus." (The remainder is same as last part of June 3rd to Tonyn.)
Rough draft. Vol. 15. No. 140. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, June 5 and 13. Philadelphia. — No. 4.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 105. 3 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and West Indies 600, fo. 4; and 134, fo. 45; copy, 306, fo. 229.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 5. Whitehall. — Sailing of the French squadron from Toulon.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 22. 2 pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and West Indies, 685, fo. 36 copy in Sackville MSS.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir Wm, Howe.

1778, June 5. St. Augustine. — "Lieut.-Colonel Stiell informs me of his having sent a detachment of the Garrison at Pensacola consisting of Seventy five Men to go and take post at the Manshack on the river Mississipi; this party was joined by a small body of loyal Carolina refugees in that Province, that two of their parties had had an Encounter with some of the Rebels, who they entirely defeated near the Natchez and that they were very busy in adding Fortifications to Pensacola to secure it of any insult against the threatened Invasion.
"By our last advices the body of Carolina and Georgian troops, reported to be two thousand two hundred and fifty Men who were coming to invade this Province have halted on the other side of the Altamaha river, the preparations with
Page 261
the Augmentation of our Forces, I suppose has deterred them from proceeding in their operations, intentions was to let them advance as far as St. Mary and by no means save them any trouble, there we should have begun to oppose them and disputed our ground every step. Governor Tonyn's Rangers was to have opposed their passage over that river and were to be supported by about two hundred and fifty loyal Carolinians, part of them Light horse Men, Commanded at present by Major Prevost of the Second Battalion of the Sixtieth Regiment, who with great trouble and perseverence has embodied and introduced a little order and discipline amongst them, the retreat of this body was secured by a small Fortification on the Northside of the river St. John, and that post by an armed Vessel; on the Southside of this river, I have erected Batteries at such places as it was probable and practicable for them to cross the river, supported by two detachments of the Regulars, and ten miles behind them, I proposed taking post with all the Men from this Garrison, leaving only the number to garrison the Fort. This last body would be so situated as to be able to secure the retreat of the whole, or to fall upon them whenever they should attempt to form. — In that situation, I expect (should they still persist in advancing) to retard their March, and if the Naval force prepared by Governor Tonyn is properly stationed in the river, then I am persuaded they will do little or no hurt to the Province as what is between St. Mary and St. John was abandoned before I came here.
"I have besides a number of Negroes employed to repair the Lines, making of Redoubts and finishing the Outworks of the Fort, in short I hope to oblige them to make a Siege, consequently to bring heavy Artillery which is very troublesome, if they cannot effect to bring it by Water." Want of money.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 104. 3 pages.

Henry Laurens, President of Congress, to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, May [should be June] 6. York Town. — (Reproduced in B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles 1096.)
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No, 106. 1 folio page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 299, fo. 129; and in the Carlisle MSS.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 6. Head Quarters. — Acknowledges receipt of two letters of 3rd inst. The packet addressed to the President of Congress has been forwarded. Had authorised Lieut.-Col. Hamilton to meet Mr. Loring and make such propositions for an exchange as the situation of the prisoners would justify. These he finds have not met with concurrence. As an exchange is mutually wished has requested Mr. Boudinot to meet Mr. Loring to-day at German Town and discuss the point more fully.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 107. 2 pages.

Page 262

William Porter to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 7. Philadelphia. — Begs his Excellency's approbation of his appointment (as Deputy Muster Master General to the foreign troops) by Col. Burgoyne.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 47. No. 238. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir William Howe or Officer Commanding his Majesty's Forces at Philadelphia.

1778, June 8. War Office. — List of vacancies in the regiments occasioned by the appointments of officers to the new levies.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 40. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of vacancies.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 41. 1 page.

Maj. Henry Harnage, 62nd Regt., to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, June 8. Cambridge. — Memorial. Recommendation for promotion of Capt. Lieut. Hy. Harrington, Lt. Geo. Vallancey, and Ensign Geo. Hervey.
Original. Vol. 53. No. 27. 2 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 8. St. Augustine. — Sends the enclosed memorial. Really thinks the gentlemen are injured in the dating of Capt. Bird's commission so far back.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 108. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Memorial of Captains Prevost and Bruere, 3rd Bat. 60th Regt. to Sir Henry Clinton. Protesting against a young officer of the l6th being promoted over their heads to the vacancy hy the death of Capt. Pauli.
Original. Vol. 8. No. 109. 2 pages.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir William Howe.

1778, June 8. St. Augustine. — At this critical time of invasion the stores are well nigh exhausted. Cannot have from the Brigadier-General a supply of provisions for the Provincial Rangers or for the Marine Department of the Province. Applies for assistance. Has written to Lord Howe.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 110. 2 pages.
Enclosing Return of provisions in store at St. Augustine, 25 May 1778.

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

1778, June 9. Head Quarters. — Requesting a passport for Dr. Ferguson, Secretary to the King's Commissioners, to deliver a letter to Congress. (No. 1102 of B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles.)
Copy in the hand of W. Eden. Vol. 8. No. 113. 1 page.

Page 263

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 9. Head Quarters.— Does not conceive himself at liberty to grant the passport desired for Dr. Ferguson until instructed by Congress. (Printed in Sparks's Washington, V., p. 397.)
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 112. 1 page.

John McNamara Hayes to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 10. New York. — "Sir, Agreeable to my Instructions from Lieutenant-General Burgoyne, I applied in the course of the Winter to Mr. Gates for the removal of the remainder of the Hospital left under my care to New York — Many difficulties arising in consequence of charges of the most exorbitant nature being made, my endeavours were not attended with Success — however, upon a new Application, and that refered to Mr. Washington, I at length obtained his permission, thro' Mr. Gates, without any other restriction, than that of returning an equal Number of Men in ten days after my Arrival in New York — On the 3rd instant I embarked 110 Men, (50 of whom are disabled) on board of two Sloops at Albany, and on the 7th arrived here, when I waited on Major-General Jones, with the proper returns, and informed him of the nature of my engagement. I am unhappy in not finding your Excellency here, whose humanity would relieve those brave unfortunate sufferers from the rod of Tyranny and Persecution, which they and myself were for these months past experiencing without distinction; and had not management and a little dexterity on my part taken place I fear his Majesty would have lost some brave and usefull Soldiers. I have applied to Mr. Gates for a further ease of my Engagement, till I could know your Excellency's pleasure; and therefore take the liberty of praying your Excellency will be pleased to order a Number of Prisoners of equal Rank to be sent for those Men, I have brought with me here. It will be the means of relieving their distresses, being mostly naked, and a Considerable Saving to Government."
Has obtained leave for his own exchange with Mr. McHenry, should his Excellency approve.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No, 3. 2 pages.

Lieut.-Col. John Hill to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 10. Cambridge, New England. — Requesting to be exchanged. Has received letters from friends in Cornwall which inform him that at the most numerous meeting of the gentlemen of the county that was ever remembered his name was mentioned in so particular a manner as to leave no doubt if troops were subscribed for to be raised he would be proposed to be at the head.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No, 1. 2 pages.

Page 264

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 10. Cambridge. — "Enclosing monthly returns for May. Requesting his answer about officers who desire to be exchanged, and in future general exchanges begging Sir H. to think of the detached troops of G. Burgoyne's army. Respecting Lord Balcarres's exchange. Relative to bat and forage money, mentioned by G. Burgoyne to Sir Wm. Howe. That he had given his parole for the re-delivery of prisoners of war who had been confined in prisons and guard-ships [at Boston] , and who were now in barracks with the Convention troops. In case Captain Campbell, 62nd, and Captain Ramsay, 21st, should be appointed Majors in the new corps recommending the successions to go in the regiments, and Mr. Thos. Hill, nephew of Col. Hill, for an ensigncy in the 9th Regiment. A 2nd-lieutenancy, 21st, submitted through Earl Balcarres. He has received accounts of several vacancies in the troops under his command, but not upon sufficient authority to report them — will take the earliest opportunity of doing that — when confirmed — and hoping they may be bestowed on that Army."
Signed letter. Vol, 53. No. 29. 4 pages.

Major George Forster to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, June 11. Cambridge. — Recommends two officers for preferment or promotion.
Signed, Vol. 9. No. 17. 1 page.

Major-General William Phillips.

1778, June 11. — Extract from general orders of Major-Gen. Phillips. See with those of 30 March.
Vol. 9. No. 16. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 12. Whitehall. — No. 8.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 23. 3 pages. Extracts 8. Nos. 138 and 150.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and West Indies 134, fos. 1, 309; 431, fo. 260; 589, fo. 56, and in the Sackville MSS.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord Barrington].

1778, June 13. Philadelphia. — Acknowledging letters.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 57. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters. Original Correspondence 20.

Page 265

General Sir Henry Clinton to [? John Robinson].

1778, June 13. Philadelphia. — Acknowledges letters of 3rd and 9th March 1778, addressed to Howe, with duplicate of the same, to the contents of which due attention will be paid.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 14. 1 page.

General Sir Henry Clinton. Proclamation.

1778, June 13. Philadelphia. — Supplies will be paid for and the persons protected, but if supplies are withheld the persons will be treated as enemies.
Copy. Vol, 15. No. 121. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 13. Halifax. — Acknowledges letter of 15th May. Will co-operate with Major-General Robertson as to the colliery. "I received the honour of a letter from you, directing Lieutenant Colonel Hierlihy's Independent Companies, to be forwarded to the Island of Saint John's; while they remained here, and there being at the time so much ice in the gut of Canso, that they could not pass, information was brought to me that two Pirates were preparing to make an attack on the Colliery, set fire to the Mines, and destroy the Wharfs, with all the tools at Spanish River: upon which I made application to Captain Fielding who Commands the Royal Navy here, who with the greatest chearfulness ordered a King's Ship, and I sent Lieutenant Colonel Hierlihy, with such of his Independent Companies as were in health, with two pieces of Cannon for the protection of the Works at Spanish River.     .     .     .     .     By his Report I find he got there time enough; aud he shall remain there, till I hear further from you. In my Reports to Sir William Howe I have mentioned the great utility of having taken post, at the entrance of Saint John's River, which is commanded by my Major of Brigade Studholm     .     .     .     .     in his last Report he tells me, he is likely to regain the affections of the Saint John's Indians, who had entirely left the English interest: and may be of great use to us if there is a French War." Has recalled the Light Infantry Company for embarkation. Has "taken Post at Cobequid, which adds much to the tranquility of the Province. As Lieutenant John Solomon of the Loyal Nova Scotia Volunteers, has got the complement of Men fixed on by Sir William Howe, I have appointed him to a Company from the 1st June, and therefore beg you will please to send me a Commission for him: a Lieutenancy for Mr. Trake (?) Bulkely; and an Ensigncy for Mr. Foster Hutchinson; the latter is the son of Judge Hutchinson, who is a Refugee here, from Boston and is in great distress. Upon the arrival of Colonel McLean, I shall with pleasure obey your Excellency's Orders." P.S. — Sends "Memorial of Doctor Jeffry who has taken unusu'l pains in the execution of his Duty here, had all the Soldiers' Wives and Children of the Army under his Care, and by my orders Inoculated above 500 Children, since
Page 266
which he had all the Rebel Prisoners under his Care with Yallow Fever and horrid Disorders, I think he Merits the Attention of your Excellency as he was promis'd to be provided for by General Howe."
Signed letter. P.S. Autograph. Vol. 21. No. 18. 3 pages.
Enclosure:—
William Spry, Commanding Engineer.

1778, June 13. — Report of the defences of Halifax. Addressed to Major General Massey.
Signed. Vol. 21. No. 19. 4 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Sir Wm. Howe.

1778, June 13. St. Augustine. — By latest accounts the rebels are yet on the north side of the river Altamaha and supposed to be joined by the last division of the Militia of Georgia and to amount to 1,900 men. The division of the S. Carolina Militia is no longer expected, as it appears that the disaffected spirit of the frontier inhabitants gives them so much uneasiness as to require a corps of observation to watch their motions. Is under little apprehension of the enemy being able to effect anything of consequence through the difficulties they will meet with. Repeats request for bat and forage money. Want of provisions. Has drawn bills on him for £373 6s. 8d., and requests him to order payment as stipulated.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No, 111. 2 pages.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey, or Officer Commanding his Majesty's Forces at Halifax.

1778, June 14. Head Quarters, Philadelphia. — To provide fuel in the Coal and Wood Yards to serve for the numerous garrisons through the winter. Suggests Cape Breton mines, but fetters him with no instructions.
2 copies. Vol. 10. No, 153 and Vol. 21, No. 3. 2 pages each.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 14. Cambridge. — Encloses a return of officers of the Troops of Convention of Saratoga, for whom he has given his parole for endeavouring to procure their being exchanged. Only Captain Shrimpton, of the 62nd Regiment, goes by special permission. Hopes his reasons for putting Lieut. Poole England's name down to be exchanged will be approved. The names of the Deputy-Quartermaster-General and Deputy-Adjutant-General of the German troops with the aide-de-camp of Major-General Riedesel are inserted at the special request of the General, and as a mark of respect and attention to him personally. Captain O'Connell alone goes to Europe, the rest, except Captain Willoe, who has been sent to Canada, remain with their general. Hopes his Excellency will approve these officers being exchanged.
Page 267
Requests that he will direct the officer or commissary who regulates these private exchanges to procure certificates from the American Commissary-General of Prisoners, and that these certificates or copies may be sent to him, otherwise he will be long ignorant on the subject.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 18. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 14. Cambridge. — "I have just now received the enclosed paper from Major General Heath.
"When the agreement was making for supplying the Troops of the Convention with Provisions, I made a particular exception against what appeared to me an unjustifiable article, the paying for the Transport of Provisions by land, other than in the Current Money circulating at present in this Country, namely, Paper Dollars. Major General Pigot was pleased to adopt my sentiments upon this Subject, and Major General Heath did not absolutely insist upon it, but sent to the American Congress for orders, which he has signified to me to have received by the inclosed paper.
"It is to be observed that in this inclosed Paper the word Prisoners is twice mentioned, first "who surrendered Prisoners under the 'Convention of Saratoga,' next, 'Convention Prisoners.'
"I think it my Duty to represent to your Excellency, that the American Congress, as well as many others of the Americans, have industriously used the word Prisoners as explanatory of the situation of the Troops of the Convention. Lieutenant General Burgoyne always asserted the Contrary — that we were not Prisoners — I have ever both in sentiment and conduct done the same. Whether the Troops of the Convention being called Prisoners by the American Officers and the American Congress proceeds from accident, from pride, from assurance or from policy, I am as Senior Officer of the Troops of the Convention, under a necessity of protesting against the term. By the Treaty of Convention of Saratoga, we were to have a safe passage to Europe, and to march through the Country to the Port of Boston under the protection of the parties with whom the Treaty was formed and executed, we have Considered ourselves as passengers under the sanction and virtue of a Treaty, not as Prisoners."
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 20. 2 pages.
Enclosing Resolution of Congress, 22 May.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 14. Cambridge. — Requesting that if he obtains leave to be exchanged or to go to New York, that it may be sent through General Washington, as the conduct of commissaries is not always regular.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 22. 2 pages.

Page 268

Major-General William Phillips.

1778, June 14. — Return of officers going on parole (Troops of Convention).
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 26. 1 page.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Lord [Barrington]
.
1778, June 15. Philadelphia. — Appointment of Lord Rawdon as Adjutant-General.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 58. 1 page.
Duplicate signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

Major-General William Phillips. General Orders.

1778, June 18. Cambridge. — Thanks for behaviour previous day. Court of enquiry to be held on murder of Lieut. Browne, of 21st Regiment, by an American soldier.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 7. 1 page.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 20. Head Quarters. — Transmitting letters from General Phillips and from Congress to the Commissioners, also a note for a sum of money from a Mr. Gwin to a Mr. Boyce of the British Army, of a merely private nature. (No. 1111 of B. F. Stevens's Facsimiles.)
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 115. 1 qto. p. and 4 lines,

1778, June 21. — Paper containing extracts of letters between Maj.-Gens. Phillips and Heath from this date to 2 October. See the latter date.

General Sir Guy Carleton.

1777, October 25 - 1778, June 24 — Abstract of subsistence received by (following) loyalists from Sir Guy Carleton. The first six are specified as gentlemen, Peter Van Alstine, Enos Cande, John Claw, James Fulton, Laurence Leadings, Robert L. Fowles, Joseph Skinner, Abel Waters, the other 22 are characterized as ordinary men. Signed, John Johnson, Lieut.-Col. Comdg. King's Royal Regt., New York.
Copy. Vol. 11. No. 6. 1 page.
Enclosed by Genl. Haldimand to Commander of His Majesty's Forces at New York [Clinton] . 5 July 1778.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, June 26. Cavendish Square. — Recommends Lieut. Chapman, of the 37th Regiment, son of the Mayor of Bath, for promotion.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 42. 1 page.

Page 269

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June 29. War Office. — Promotions, &c, approved. Lieutenant Wm. Stewart, who complains of having been removed to the Invalids, may exchange with any old lieutenant who may be desirous of doing so. Major Saxton is dead — his commission to be sold for the benefit of his family.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 43. 2 pages.

Lt.-Col. Thomas Brown to Gov. Patrick Tonyn.

1778, June 30. Alligator Bridge. — Had met, with assistance of Major Prevost's Regulars, and driven back the rebels.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 123. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Sir H. Clinton, 25 July.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 381.

John Robinson to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, June 30. Treasury Chambers. — Having laid before the Lords of the Treasury a Memorial of Andrew Pepperill praying payment of the value of a ship and her cargo seized by the "Greyhound" and carried into New York, where the cargo was disposed of for the service of Government, he is commanded to transmit a copy of the Memorial and desire his Excellency to enquire into, and inform the Board of, the state of this case, the value of the cargo and upon what grounds the ship and cargo were sold, by which Mr. Pepperill was prevented from laying in his claim and making his defence.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 121. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June. Cambridge. — Sends returns of the Convention Troops under his command for the month of June. 9th Regiment has moved from Cambridge and is with the Artillery and Flank Companies of the 29th, 31st, 34th and 53rd Regiments in barracks at Rutland. Soldiers continue healthy. Clothing not yet arrived from Canada.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No, 24. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, June. Cambridge. — Lord Balcarras, exchanged, goes from here with hope of obtaining permission to serve in this campaign.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 23. 2 pages.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to General Washington.

1778, July 1. Head Quarters. — Acknowledges letter of the 20th ulto., with enclosures.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 117. 1 page.

Page 270

Lord George Germain to the General Officer commanding in West Florida [John Campbell].

1778, July 1. Whitehall.
Copy. Vol. 10. No. 108. 7 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton, 1 April 1779.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 264, fo. 463; copy 438, fo. 181.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 1. Whitehall. — No. 9.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 24. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 23; copy 431, fo. 261; and in the Sackville MSS.

Major-General William Phillips.

1778, July 1. Boston. — Account current with the United States of America, chiefly for transporting flour, wood, provisions, etc., and for materials and provisions, £23,305 12s. 5d.
Vol, 9. No, 32. 5 pages.

Capt. Alex. Shaw, 60th Regt., to Gov. Tonyn.

1778, July 1. Cowford, St. John's River. — Account of the encounter with the rebels at Alligator Bridge.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 124. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Gov. Tonyn to Sir H. Clinton, 25 July.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 248, fo. 385.

Lord Barrington to Captain St. George, 44th Regiment.

1778, July 2. War Office. — Signifying his Majesty's permission to remain in Europe until he is recovered of his wound.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 50. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to [Sir H. Clinton], 5 Aug. 1778.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, July 5. New York. — No. 5. Battle of Monmouth.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 118. 8 pages.
Signed letters and copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 55; 589, fos. 8, 10, 13; 306, fo. 232, and in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21807, fo. 5.

General Sir H[enry] C[linton] to [John Robinson].

1778, July 5. — Acknowledging letters.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 15. 1 page.

Page 271

Gen. Haldimand to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

N.D. [1778, July 5.] — Announcing his arrival, &c.
Autograph signed letter. French, Vol. 11. No. 3. 1 page.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21807, fo. 10.

General Haldimand to the Commander of his Majesty's Forces at New York [Clinton].

1778, July 5. Quebec. — Several persons belonging to Province of New York and neighbouring colonies who last campaign formed Lieut.-Genl. Burgoyne's army, being desirous of getting nearer their families and habitations, embrace the opportunity of a vessel going to New York to effect this design. As since their arrival in the province they have behaved in a manner becoming honest men, doubts not they will have every assistance in his power. Enclosed are abstracts of the subsistence paid and advanced by Sir G. Carleton and himself, no information having been received from Burgoyne of what was to be paid for their services.
Signed letter. Vol. 11. No. 4. 2 pages.
Enclosing Pay-roll of party of Royalists under P. Van Alstine, 24 August 1778.
Abstract of subsistence received by Loyalists from Sir G. Carleton, 24 June 1778.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, July 8. War Office. — Lieut. James de Courcy, of the 40th Regiment, has leave of absence for six months from the expiration of his former leave.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 45. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 11. Cowford, St. John's River. — Acknowledges dispatches. Congratulations on appointment. The rebels have advanced to this side of St. Mary's river. Has therefore repaired to this place, leaving directions for troops to post themselves in various situations. The garrison left in charge of Lt.-Col. Fuser, of the 60th regiment.
"Major Prevost the Field Officer next in seniority and who had been some time on th'other(sic) side endeavouring to bring the South Carolina Royalists into some kind of order was reinforced with One hundred and Seventy Regulars with direction to advance towards St. Mary as near as he could prudently venture in order to favor the retreat of Governor Tonyn's Rangers, to cover a few Inhabitants on the Branches of Nassau in bringing off their effects, and if a favorable opportunity offered to check or cutt off any partys the Enemys might push forward and to throw every other obstacles possible in their way to advance. The Rangers, who probably were never so numerous as represented, were by this time reduced by desertion and otherwise
Page 272
to fifty or Sixty Men, and as their situation was such as only made them liable to be cutt off without affording any prospect of advantage, to ballance this risk they were directed to fall back on Major Prevost who was appointed to take the command on that side of St. Johns. This the Rangers with some reluctance, founded on the Idea that they were not under my Command, complied with, and at length effected their junction with Major Prevost very critically indeed, for a Select Corps of Rebels to the number of one hundred and twenty, composed of Officers and Volunteers that had been sent out on purpose to cut them off came up with their rear, so that they had just time to save themselves in the swamp occupyd by Major Prevost. The Rebels pressing eagerly for the pass in order to cut the Rangers from it were immediately check'd by the appearance of a Light Company posted there, and soon afterwards retreated with as much speed as they advanced. As the Major did not know how this body might be sustain'd he did not judge prudent to hazard an obstinate pursuit and indeed as his Carolinian Cavalry were at some little distance posted in his rear the rebels being all well mounted were soon out of his reach; they left however eleven dead on the Spot, their wounded were carried off. Our loss was of the 60th one Private Killed, one Wounded, and of the Rangers, one Captain, one Lieutenant, one Private wounded — this happened on the 30th Ulto. Since when the Rebels have kept themselves close at and near the post formerly occupy'd by the Rangers.
"The principal object for which Major Prevost was advanced being effected as far as circumstances wou'd permit, and finding it difficult to maintain a proper communication with him at the distance of Twenty-three Miles, from the Smalness(sic) of our Number, he was directed to fall back to a Strong Situation within Six Miles of this place and from thence to endeavour by smal Scouts to gain intelligence of the motion of the Ennemies and to allarm and harrass them as much as possible. In this way our partys hitherto have been pretty successful, carrying off at different times with some prisoners about Ninety horses besides disabling many more, and by firing at their Sentrys keeping them in constant alarms.
"I cannot take upon me to say with certainty whether the Rebels will advance or not — if they do I think now that the 'Perseus' and 'Otter' are arrived to our assistance in guarding the coast I may venture to assure your Excellency that we shall preserve the Province until reinforcements arrive, when I hope we shall be able to attempt something further. The Rebel land forces do not exceed 2,500 to 3,000 Men, their Naval now near the mouth of St. Marys consists of five Gallies, two Flatts and two petty angers carrying about 30 pieces of Canon of from 18 to 4-pounders, besides boats carrying Swivels, some Small crafts with Provisions and Stores and Man'd in all with 350 Men.
"With regard to Governor Tonyn, tho' I cannot say that he ever treated me on that footing of Confidence or Candour that I thought my Rank claimed or my Zeal for his Majesty's Service
Page 273
Merited, yet our disputes never arose to a height productive of any misfortune to the Province. Wild Schemes I believe he has sometimes entertained of conquering Georgia, of which as he wished to reap all the glory he would not have deminished by communicating any part of his Plans to me, and which indeed if he had I must have objected to first because my Orders positively restricted me to a defensive Plan and next because our force or resources of any kind did by no means point out the propriety of a contrary line of conduct or hither to afford any feasible prospect of success to an Offensive even if any thing had been left at my discretion. His Rangers he also wished to keep distinct from my Command for I apprehend more reasons then one, but among others that under his Orders only they might proceed to acquiring the undivided glory of the conquest of Georgia, but since by this invasion of the rebels, these high ideas have been at least suspended, even the predatory Incursions of his Rangers unmeaning in any publick view, he had agreed before the arrival of your Excellency's or Sir William Howe's dispatches to put the remains of this corps under my orders during the present emergencies and we are now for any thing I know to the contrary on very good terms."
Recommends his brother Major Prevost for the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He had served 23 years, and by disappointment had retired on half-pay. On the present disturbances he purchased in again and while he is serving, his wife and children, plundered of their effects, are kept in a species of confinement in the Jerseys, liable every instant to indignity.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 119. 6 pages.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, July 15. War Office. — Capt. Saml. Cleaveland of the 16th Regiment has leave of absence for six months.
Copy, Vol. 6, No. 46. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, July 16. War Office. — Sends list of vacancies occasioned by the appointment of officers to the new levies.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 47. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of vacancies.
Vol. 6. No. 48. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 16. Cambridge. — Transmits list of departments unprovided with lodging money by Sir Wm. Howe. Requests him to order their allowance. Endorsed, "What has been customary."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 27. 1 page.

Page 274

Sir Henry Clinton to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, July 18. — Has requested from Gen. Washington a passport for him (Phillips) to pay a visit to New York. Sends a Quarter Master's commission for Ensign Leslie of the 9th Regiment vice Murray. Begs him (Phillips) to recommend to a vacant company in that corps. If he thinks Thos. Hill old enough he will send commission in the 21st.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 120. 1 page.

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

[1778], July 18. — Requesting a passport for "his old friend" Maj.-Gen. Phillips to pay a visit to New York. Endorsed:— "Sent by a flag of Truce the 31st July 1778."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 121. 1 page.

Carolina Royalists.

1778, July 20. Trout Creek. — The corps of Carolina Royalists approved of to consist of 400 men, would be expeditiously completed, and with the further approbation of the Commander-in-Chief should consist of 8 companies of 50 rank and file, and 1 colonel, 1 lieut.-colonel, etc. etc. Submitting a list of names for commissions. Signed, Josh. Robinson, lieutenant-colonel of the Carolina Royalists.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 126. 1 page.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. Prevost to Sir H. Clinton, 26 July 1778.

Jonathan Clarke to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, July 20. Cambridge. — Report. On the accounts of provisions supplied the Troops of Convention from 1 March to 30 June. Transmits an abstract of the provisions received, for which he has given monthly receipts. By the continental accounts just exhibited there appears an overcharge of 240 lbs. of bread, 940 lbs. of beef, 135 lbs. of pork, 16 of rice and 4 of candles; 1,910 lbs. of flour, 3,682 of beef, 1,133 of pork and 380 of rice are charged as wastage, which is unprecedented; the pay of the continental commissaries and their rations and rum are also charged. Bread for the hospital at Watertown in November last is included and the provisions for the prisoners stationed on Prospect Hill which should not be brought against the Troops of the Saratoga Convention.
Signed copy. Vol. 9. No. 47. 3 pages.

Lt. George Vallancey, Assistant Quarter-Master-General, to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, July 21. Cambridge. — Report. On the American Quarter-Master-General's accounts for the Troops of Convention from March to June. Objects to 12 articles for transporting
Page 275
provisions, &c, the Commissary-General in charging by the ration being supposed to include all expenses, as in previous accounts; to back charges, the accounts to December being finally settled and paid by Burgoyne; to charges for guards, escorts for prisoners etc., that being an American expense; to a back charge by Mr. Chase for procuring quarters for officers as he has never known Mr. Chase do any business with the troops and Major Hopkins is paid for such duties; to charges for teaming and carting wood while the market price of wood includes all transportation; and to charges for wages and rations for persons employed in the American Quarter-Master-General's Dept. as unnecessary. Out of 41 articles he would only allow 5 as of a proper nature, amounting to £15,918 4s. 3d. No vouchers of any kind have been produced.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 49. 3 pages.
Enclosed by Major-Genl. Phillips to Maj.-Genl. Heath, 12 Sep. 1778.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord Barrington].

1778, July 22. New York. — Sends promotions.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 187. 1 page.
Signed letters in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence 20.

General Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, July 23. New York. — Has nominated John Smith to succeed Mr. Mackenzie as Paymaster-General to the Provincial Corps. Hopes it will meet with their Lordships' approbation.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 1 and 16. 1 page each.

Gov. Patrick Tonyn to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 25. St. Augustine. — Refers to the enclosures. "From the best Accounts the rebel forces appear to have been about eight hundred with their Gallies and armed Vessels, and between two and three thousand land forces, of which one half were Carolinians, under the command of the rebel Generals Howe and Williamson; the other regulars and Militia from Georgia immediately under the command of their rebel Governor Houstone, mostly forced into the Service, and many were enticed by the prospect of plunder thrown out as a bait by their Governor Houstone's Proclamation.
"In twelve days after our provincial naval forces were stationed in St. Johns river so as effectually to secure it, Captain Elphinstone of the 'Perseus,' and with the 'Otter' arrived off this Coast, and soon after nigh five hundred Seminoly Indians advanced within a days march of the Enemy and a short distance from the King's forces."
The rebels have relinquished their designs and retreated. The Seminoly Indians have ever shown their attachment to his Majesty. They are ready to return in the fall to attack the
Page 276
Georgians should I require it. Report that a French fleet has arrived in the "Chesapeak" from Toulon.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 122. 3 pages.
Enclosing Lt.-Col. Brown to Gov. Tonyn, 30 June 1778.
                   Capt. Shaw to Gov. Tonyn, 1 July 1778.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 26. St. Augustine. — "The Rebel Army has repassed St. Mary's River. They effected it with great expedition and tho' every step was taken by Major Prevost to harrass and attack their Rear, only few of his advanced parties were able to exchange a few shots with a large body of horse which they had pushed forwards to cover their Retreat; these after having two Men killed retreated also with all possible hurry and were over the River before the parties that were in pursuit could come up with them, owing to the difficulties of the roads that had been destroy'd, the heavy rains and the intense heat of the weather ; the conveniency of putting their artillery and heavy baggage on board of their Galleys greatly facilitated their Retreat, and that of their horses is seldom retarded by Rivers as they don't hesitate to plunge into the Water and swim across.
"Measures had been taken to enable Captain Elphinston of the 'Perseus' to attempt the destruction of the Naval force of the Rebels or to make a diversion on the Coast of Georgia, the retreat of the Rebels in part prevented this last plan, the former may prove difficult on account of the difficulty of adventuring our Galleys and the Sloop of War into the inland navigation without a possibility of the 'Perseus' affording them the necessary protection, however a Number of Men are embarked and in readiness to proceed if Capn Elphinstone thinks it of the least utility in the execution of his project, he will at least have it in his power with the assistance of Capt. Moncrieffe the Engineer to ascertain the properest place for establishing a Post at or near the mouth of St. Mary's River."
Requests bat and forage money for the Regulars. Sends list of the Carolina officers. Capt. Shaw of his battalion appointed Assistant Deputy Quarter-Master-General. As there are two troops of Light Horse among the Carolina Royalists submits what extraordinary allowance ought to be made to them as hitherto the property of their horses, saddles and arms have been their own.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 125. 3 pages.
Enclosing Formation of the Corps of Carolina Royalists, with Commission List, 20 July 1778.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Lord George Germain.

1778, July 27. New York. — No. 11.
Draft. Vol. 8. No. 127. 4 pages.
Signed letters in Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 123; and 589, fo. 21; copy 306, fo. 243; and in the Sackville MSS,

Page 277

John Robinson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 27. Treasury Chambers. — That he had wrote fully to Mr. Wier about supplies of provisions, therefore thought it unnecessary to trouble his Excellency with a detail of matters.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 120. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
John Robinson to Daniel Wier.
1778, July 27. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. —     .     .     .     .     The great increase of the numbers victualled at Philadelphia added to the large and unexpected demand for the support of General Burgoyne's army     .     .     .     .     has decided their Lordships to dispatch the remainder of the provisions of the last year's contract, 6 sail of ships with part of the new contract and 12 sail more which had waited some time for the dry provisions detained by contrary winds in the British Channel. Only 8 ships will then remain to be further dispatched till the return of some victuallers which are earnestly desired. Begs to be constantly advised of the rations drawn and the stock in hand. Messrs. Mure and Atkinson are directed to send out oats. The deficiency reported in the cargoes does not seem to exceed the natural waste and shrinkage in measure of grain so long on board in such a voyage, but an enquiry will be made. The vinegar so long detained for want of conveyance was shipped last November. Mr. Burfoot is exempted from duties on rum contracted for.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 119. 7 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, July 28. New York. — Transmits state of cash for extraordinaries to the 27th inst., also the following requisition. Would desire a sum in specie nearly equal to the balance due on Gen. Howe's requisitions.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 2 and 17. 1 page each.
Enclosure:—
1778, July 28. — Requisition, addressed to Messrs. Gordon and Crowder, contractors for supplying money for his Majesty's Forces in North America, for £400,000.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 3 and 18. 1 page each.

Major Jacob Van Braam to the Commander-in-Chief [Clinton].

1778, July 28. Camp at Cowford. — Recommending a succession to vacancies in battalion. Inconvenience of the small number of officers present.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 128. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
Recommendations to vacancies in the 3rd Battalion 60th Regt. Signed by Major Van Braam.
Vol. 8. No. 129. 1 page.

Page 278

Major Mark Prevost to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, July 31. St. Augustine. — Enclosing a memorial praying for the rank of lieut.-colonel, he being left out of promotion.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 131. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
1778, July 31. — Memorial as above.
Original. Vol. 8. No. 132. 1 page.

Row. Swann to Lord Barrington.

1778, August 2. London. — That through illness he felt obliged to sell his commission and received bills to the amount of £1,100, one of which for £250, drawn by Capt.-Lt. Feltham, is now protested. Asks his Lordship to condescend to regulate this affair.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 53. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to [Sir H. Clinton] , 5 Aug. 1778.

Gen. Haldimand to the Commander at Rhode Island [Pigot].

1778, August 3. Quebec. — How to ensure safety for the clothing for the Troops of Convention.
Signed letter. Vol. 11. No. 7. 1 page.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21722, fo. 16.

General Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, August 4. New York. — Acknowledges letters. Sends enclosed calculation. The Barrack-Master-General has in store 80,000 lbs. weight remaining of last year's, which, with ¼ of the quantity mentioned in his estimate that can be purchased here on reasonable terms, may serve till the remainder can be sent out.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 4 and 19. 1 page each.
Enclosing — Estimate of the number of candles required for 40,000 men for the winter months, 20 April 1778.

General Haldimand to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, August 4. Quebec. — Defensive operations only. Has allowed the Indians with Butler's Rangers to make expeditions into the rebel provinces. Desirability of communication.
Signed letter. Vol. 11. No. 8. 2 pp.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21722, fo. 19.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, August 5. War Office. — The promotions approved. Major Craig of the 57th Regt. promoted to a lieut.-colonelcy vice Duff, and majority to be sold for Col. Duff's benefit. The proceedings of the Board of General Officers appointed to examine into the conduct of Major-General Prescott who was made prisoner at Rhode Island, have been approved by the King.
Copy. Vol. 6. No, 49. 2 pages.
Page 279
Enclosures:—
Lord Barrington to Capt. St. George, see 2 July 1778.
Row. Swann to Lord Barrington, see 2 August 1778.
List of Promotions.
Vol. 6. No. 51. 2 pages.
List of Vacancies.
Vol. 6. No. 52. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, August 5. Whitehall. — No. 10.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 25. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 49; copy 431, fo. 265; and in the Sackville MSS.

Halifax.

1778, August 5. Halifax. — List of the Refugees, receiving rations of provisions; alphabetically arranged. Marked — "Received January 12th, 1779."
Original. Vol. 53. No. 15. 4 pages.

Lieutenant Mertz.

1778, August 5. Kingsbridge. — Designation of loss of Lt. Mertz, on the "Brilliant" lost going to Philadelphia, March 1778. One regimental uniform, 48 dollars. Sworn before Richard Porter, assistant deputy Judge Advocate, 25 January 1782, New York, with note on the back by a Board of Field Officers, that Lt. Mertz is allowed that sum.
Translation. Vol. 32. No. 179. 1 p.

John Robinson to [Gen. Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, August 6. Whitehall. — To examine and settle the charge of Gov. Martin, and give such orders in respect to the provisions and support of the Provincial Officers of North Carolina as thought fit, charging the same to the contingencies.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 177. 1 page.
Enclosing Gov. Martin to the Treasury, 16 May.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, August 7. Whitehall. — Private. Introducing Mr.Diemar.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 26. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 431, fo. 267; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord George Germain].

1778, August 12. New York.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 163. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 165; copy 306, fo. 249.

Page 280

Loud Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, August 15. War Office. — Death of the Duke of Ancaster. Signifies his Majesty's pleasure that the present Duke be allowed to return home.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 54. 1 page.

General Washington to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, August 16. White Plains, Head Quarters. — Encloses a packet sent by Sir H. Clinton. Is unable to grant the request as all matters respecting Convention Troops are under the control of Congress.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 26. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 27 Aug.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, August 17. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 58. Copy. Vol. 6. No. 55. 1 page each.
Enclosure:—
List of Regiments in North America for which clothing has been shipped on the "Tortoise" and "Margery" transports.
Original. Vol. 6. No. 57. Copy. Vol. 6. No. 56. 1 page each.

Andrew Bruce and Henrietta Overing.

1778, August 18. Newport. — Marriage certificate. Marked 1st. Signed, George Bissett.
Copy. Vol. 30. No. 84. 1 page.
Enclosed by Henrietta Bruce to Sir G. Carleton, 19 July 1783.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to [Gen. Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, August 20. Halifax. — Received last letter 12th June. Sent 8 vessels for a supply of coals for this place. Arrival of Capt. Maclane with 3 regiments. The engineer has set about barracks for the new corps. Has fortified this place. Waits to hear if he approves of Lt.-Col. Hierlyhey's detention at Spanish River. Arrival of staff of a surgeon, apothecary and four mates. "Mr. Marshall produced the King's Commission, but told me Mr. Adair said he only was sent here in case of being wanted. I answered him, no Man that produced the King's Commission to me, should remain Idle for he must do his Duty; but as Doctor Jeffries with two Mates has done all this Duty, I have put him in orders as Purveyor and Surgeon untill your Excellency's Pleasure is known, this Gentleman was left with 200 Sick and wounded when the Grand Army left this the 10th June; I sent them to join their different Regiments, as fast as I could: after that, he has had the Care of all the Rebel Prisoners, besides all the different detachments that have come in here since I commanded, which Duty he discharged with Chearfulness, and I declare it by
Page 281
my word, I never have had a Complaint. One of His Mates a worthy good Lad, I have sent to Spanish River to take care of all the Working Men at the Colliery, and to be Surgeon to Lieut.-Col. Hierlihey's Corps, as he asked for him before I sent him off, for which I have given him a Warrant untill your Excellency's pleasure is known. His name is Clarke. I could not turn off good Loyal Men who had done their duty in the King's Service, by any Mistakes at home." Col. Maclane appointed as brigadier. Forwards letter from Haldimand. P.S. — Had a letter from Lord G. Germain; "it contains no orders but desires I may supply the inhabitants of Halifax with coals, a measure I ever pursued since I commanded this province."
Signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 20. 4 pages.

Maj.-Gen. W. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.
1778, August 21. Cambridge. — Sends this letter by Brig-Gen. Wilkinson of the Americans. Has received no letters from him. The Troops are remarkably healthy, the British at this place and Rutland, the Germans entire at Cambridge. By some unknown means the clothing from Canada is not arrived. Has requested leave from Washington to send an officer to know what is to be expected. Will be forced to apply to New York, as the soldiers are naked. Impatiently waiting answer from Gt. Britain relative to ratification of the Treaty of Convention. The intention of a general exchange of prisoners being reported over leaves no hopes of serving. Will send returns for July and August the first opportunity. Will be glad to receive answers to such public matters as he has written upon. Concerning succession to vacancies.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 28. 2 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord ? Barrington].

1778, August 23. New York. — Cannot examine minutely the charges contained in the half yearly contingent bills of the regiments. If any be thought improper has no objection to their being disallowed.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 151. 1 page.

Loyalists.

1778, to August 24. — List of a party of Royalists under the command of Peter Van Alstine going to New York on board the Mary, with allowance to each person for their subsistence from 25 June to 24 August 1778.
Vol. 11. No. 5. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Haldimand to [Sir Henry Clinton] 5 July 1778.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Gen. Haldimand.

1778, August 25. New York. — Has received letters announcing his arrival. Although no reinforcement is asked for, will send
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2,000 men if the presence of the French fleet does not compel him to defer it. Colonel Johnson goes to Canada to arrange the Indian Department. Sends copy of the letter addressed to Lord George Germain. Colonel Johnson will give other details.
2 copies. Vol. 11. Nos. 9 and 55. 2 pages and 1 page.
Signed letter in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21807, fo. 15.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1778, August 25. Head Quarters, New York. — Will allow 200 days bat and forage money to the officers as desired. P.S. — Though he cannot continue the Carolina Loyalists on the establishment they are at present is willing to allow them rations of provisions.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 142. 1 page.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1778, August 25. Head Quarters, New York. — Is surprised to hear that Governor Tonyn and Colonel Stuart have put the Provincial Corps embodied by them on a different footing to that adopted in every other part of the country. The South Carolina Royalists and the Florida Rangers (unless Tonyn acts by particular powers from home) to be acquainted that if they do not choose to serve on the same terms as the other Provincial forces he cannot employ them.
Draft. Vol, 15. No. 143. 2 pages.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to Col. Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

1778, August 25. New York. — Has only time to enclose copy of letter of this date to Prevost as to pay of the Provincial troops in the Floridas.
Draft. Vol. 15. No. 141. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, August 27. Cambridge. — Yesterday received a packet from General Washington dated the 16th and containing a letter from him (Sir Henry) of 18th July. Appreciation of the favour of the request made for passport to pay a visit to New York. Gen. Washington's answer. Cannot judge how far it may be proper for an application to Congress. Believes there must have been a prior letter which he has not received. Would like a duplicate of that letter, as it may contain answers to several passages particularly relating to vacancies. Sends paper for succession to Capt. Montgomery. The troops are beginning to suffer for want of clothing. Congress has given no answer yet to his request for an officer to go to Canada about the matter.
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From an impossibility of supplying the troops with necessaries in this country they have occasionally sent to Rhode Island. Lt. Campbell, Ass.-Q.M.G. embarked for this purpose on a vessel which ran aground, has proceeded to New York, begs a flag of truce to carry him and necessaries back. Should the ratification of the Convention so eagerly awaited be prevented precautions should be taken for the convenience and safety of the men. Withdraws request as to vacant ensigncy on the 21st.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 25. 3 pages.
Enclosing — Gen. Washington to Maj.-Gen. Phillips, 16 August.

John Robinson to Samuel Martin.

1778, August 29. Treasury Chambers. — Accepting the tender for supplying coal to North America at £4 10s. per chaldron. Directing 1,000 chaldrons to be sent to New York.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 132. 2 pages.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 31 Oct. 1778.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, August 30. Boston. — "A considerable Sum of Money is now due for Supplies furnished the Troops of the Convention. I am to desire a settlement as soon as possible."
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 33. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, August 30. Cambridge. — "I will send you my remarks upon the publick accounts this week and will give it as my opinion that Mr. Commissary-General Clarke may again go to the British Head Quarters with the Accounts as the surest means of their being finally liquidated and settled. I request your answer upon this."
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 43. 1 page.

Major-General William Phillips.

1778, August 31. Cambridge. — List of Promotions.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 29. 1 page.

Ja. Richardson, Account to Major-General Phillips.

For the months of March, April, May, June, July and August, 1778. — To the United States of America for supplying the Troops of Convention with provisions at Boston, Cambridge and Rutland £114,104 6s. 2¾d. or £85,578 4s. 8d. sterling. Certified by Ja. Richardson, A.D.C.G. Issues. Endorsed as from 1 March to 1 September 1778.
Original. Vol. 53. No. 25. 1 page.

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Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, September 1. War Office. — Concerning enclosures which relate to a debt incurred at Chatham by Lieut. Munro of the 28th Kegiment.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 59. 1 page.
Enclosing Lord Barrington to Maj.-Gen. Grey, 9 April 1777.
                   Lord Barrington to Gen. Howe, 9 April 1777.
                   Rebecca Howell. Petition to Lord Barrington.
                   (qy. about 9 April 1777).

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 1. Boston. — "I have wrote His Excellency General Washington on the expediency of Mr. Clarke's passing his Head Quarters, with the Accounts, to New York — hope soon to have his Answer."
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 34. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 1. — Sends returns of the troops of Convention for July, August and September, in which are included the civil and military lists.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 30. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Major-General William Phillips.

1778, September 1. Cambridge. — List of the Civil Department of the British troops of the Convention of Saratoga.
Signed. Vol. 9. No. 31. 1 page.
Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, September 2. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 63. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Promotions.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 64. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 2. Whitehall. — No. 11. Provision to be made for loyalists by erecting a province between the Penobscot and St. Croix rivers. Post to be taken on Penobscot River.
Triplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 27. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 81; copy 431, fo. 267; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 2. Whitehall. — No. 12.
Triplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 28. 3 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 89; copy 431, fo. 271; and in the Sackville MSS.

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John Smith to Major-General Eyre Massey or Officer Commanding His Majesty's Forces at Halifax.

1778, September 3. New York. — Transmits blank warrants for holding general courts martial. The letter of 13th June to Sir Henry Clinton with its enclosures has been received. His absence in Rhode Island prevents an answer.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 5. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 4. Halifax. — Waited for orders from Major General Robertson, but as the season was advancing he sent off eight vessels for the colliery. Concerning his return home, — will not leave till every part is put into a posture of defence. Has reviewed all the troops. Lt.-Col. Goreham prayed his letter might be enclosed and his surgeon recommended, as he has been a prisoner some months. Ensign Davies much distressed. Capt. Campbell's services merit his Excellency's attention.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 21. 1 page.

Lieut.-Gov. Richard Hughes to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 6. Halifax. — Has been appointed Lt.-Governor of Nova Scotia. The Council of this province has requested that the departure of the Marine Battalion for England might be delayed. Communicated this to Major-General Massey, who has thought proper to stop them until further intelligence of the French fleet is received. Hopes this measure will be approved.
Signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 23. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, September 6. Halifax. — The corps of Marines had been embarked for some days. Adl. Byron, Capt. Fielding and himself had resolved they should sail this day, but Lord Howe has ordered them to be detained. Had given up the command to Brig. Maclane, but will resume it to-day. Thinks troops already in Halifax . are sufficient to defend it. 600 rebel and French prisoners are here.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 22. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 7. Cambridge. — Is still of opinion Mr. Clarke should go to New York to accelerate the settlement of accounts, but if it is not thought proper to send him, Mr. Geddes will be sent.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 44. 1 page. Also Vol. 8. No. 133.

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[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey, or Officer Commanding His Majesty's Forces at Halifax.

1778, September 8. New York, Head Quarters. — "Having long since directed Major Hierlyhy with his Corps to proceed to the Island of St. John's, where they were to be Stationed for the defence and security of that Post, I could have wished they had not been detained at Spanish River; as I took it for granted you would have been able to spare a sufficient Number of Men from Halifax for the Protection of the Coal Mines at that Place, and I am therefore to desire that you will order Major Hierlyhy to proceed forthwith with his Corps to St. John's, agreeable to the Orders he received before his Departure from hence.
"As I understood by your Letter of the 13th of June, that upon Colonel McLean's Arrival at Halifax you meant to join me here, it is probable I may see you soon,     .     .     .     .     but if your affairs require your Presence in Europe, I can have no objection to your returning thither by the first Opportunity.
"I am just now returned from Rhode Island, for the Relief of which Place besieged by a considerable Body of Rebels I embarked about 14 days ago, but found on my arrival that the Enemy had Evacuated it the Evening before.
"Colonel Butler with a Body of Indians and others, assembled under his Command, has destroyed a Number of Settlements upon the Frontiers of Pennsylvania, and repulsed what Force the Rebels had collected to oppose him.
"The French Fleet, which has been for a considerable while upon this Coast, and for a time assisted the Rebels in their attempts to reduce Rhode Island, has, I am afraid, got into Boston."
Will consider the recommendations for successions. Lt.-Col. Gunning to be allowed to go to Europe.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 7. 2 pages,

Lieut.-Col. John Campbell, Lieut.-Col. James Bruce and Major James Henry Craig to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1778, September 9. Camp near Halifax. — As the officers have been at great expense, not only in coming over, but in providing camp equipage, &c, beg he will grant allowance of bat and forage money. At foot is copy of Maj.-Gen. Massey's orders of 12 September, to the deputy Quarter Master General to pay 100 days bat, &c, to the three corps lately landed.
Duplicate copy. Vol. 21. No. 15. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lt.-Cols. Campbell and Bruce to Sir H. Clinton, 21 September 1778.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord Barrington].

1778, September 9. New York. — Acknowledging letters and enclosing a list of promotions.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 130. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, Vol. 20.

Page 287

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Gen. Haldimand.

1778, September 9. New York. — Will send 2,000 men if the presence of the French fleet does not compel him to defer it. Col. Johnson goes to Canada to arrange the Indian Department.
2 copies. Vol. 11. Nos. 10 and 15. 4 and 3 pages respectively.
Signed letters in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21807, fos. 17 and 19.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to Colonel Maclean.

1778, September 9. New York. — Acknowledges letter. Major- General Massey has leave to go to Europe or join the army here, and will, before leaving, put him in possession of all orders and instructions.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 8. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey, or Officer Commanding His Majesty's Forces at Halifax.

1778, September 9. New York. — To forward dispatches for Gen. Haldimand.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 6. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Gen. Prevost and Gov. Tonyn.

1778, September 9. Circular. — Has just returned from Rhode Island. Found that the enemy had evacuated the Island. Proposes to send a regiment of 1,500 or 2,000 shortly. Fears the French fleet have got into Boston. Col. Br. with a body of Indians and others assembled has destroyed a number of settlements on the frontiers of Pennsylvania, and created much consternation in that quarter. Has not time to send promotions.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 145. 2 pages.

John Smith to General Prevost.

1778, September 9. New York. — Sends warrants for holding courts martial.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 144. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 10. Head Quarters, Boston. — Extract. That he wrote to Washington on the subject of Mr. Geddes and Mr. Clarke going to New York with the accounts to obtain money, &c. As soon as an answer is received he shall hear further. Followed by copy of another of same day, 4 o'clock, that he has received an answer and will not object to their going.
Vol. 9. No. 35. 1 folio each.

Page 288

Gen. Halpimand to Lord George Germain.

1778, September 11. Camp at Sorel.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 40. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton, 10 Nov.
Copy in Vol. 11. No. 88. Signed letter in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, Quebec 15, No. 68; copy America and W. Indies 377, fo. 92; copies in the British Museum, Additional MSB. 21714, fo. 7; 21717, fo. 5; and 21722, fo. 54.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 11. Boston. — Would prefer Mr. Clarke going by Rhode Island. Will duly consider and report any remarks he may think necessary to make on the accounts.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 36. 1 page. Extract. Vol. 8. No.l33o.

.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 11. Cambridge. — By Washington's permission proposes Mr. Clarke to set out with the accounts for New York this day fortnight. Would wish him to go by land. Will send the accounts for inspection with remarks.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 45. 1 page. Also Extract Vol. 8. No. 133.

Jonathan Clarke to Major-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, September 12. Cambridge. — He has examined the Continental accounts of provisions for July and finds an overcharge of 22,240 lbs. of flour, 209 of pork and 4 of candles. Thinks an interview with the Continental Commissary necessary in order to settle the articles in which they disagree.
Signed copy. Vol. 9. No. 42. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Major Timothy Hierlyhy
.
1778, September 12. New York, Head Quarters.
Copy. Vol. 29. No. 225. 1 page.
Copy in the Public Record Office, Colonial Correspondence, St. John (Prince Edward Island) 4.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 12. Cambridge. — Recapitulates the points of Mr. Commissary Clarke's report [20 July]. As to the rations delivered to prisoners of war:— "It cannot fail to strike your imagination immediately, that I have nothing to do with Prisoners of War — I received a number of them into my care at the request of the Commissary of Prisoners and with your consent. I did this as a relief to your Prisons and Prison Ships and as an act of humanitv to the Prisoners of War, but I never
Page 289
stipulated for the delivery or Payment of Provisions for them, and so clear was I in the impropriety of my interfering in matter of provisions for these Men, that at their arrival on Prospect Hill, I gave orders for all accounts of Provisions, &c, &c. to be kept separate, as having nothing to do with those issued to the Troops of the Convention." As to the form of the accounts "Maj.-Gen. Phillips Dr. to the United States" has no objection to become the nominal debtor for provisions issued by the commissaries, but requests that they be charged against him by Maj.-Gen. Heath or by the American Commissaries, as he cannot acknowledge any such power as the United States of America. Desires at any rate that he will sign the accounts for which purpose he returns the originals.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 41. 3 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, September 12. Cambridge. — Sending report of the Assistant Quarter Master General and remarks on some of the items therein. Makes some objections to form. (Similar to the above.)
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 48. 4 pages.
Enclosing Lt. Yallancev's Report to Maj.-Gen. Phillips, 21 July.

David Geddes.

1778, September 13. Cambridge. — Estimate of cash wanted for four months' subsistence for the army under the command of Major-General W. Phillips from 25th June to 24th October 1778.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 76. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 2 October 1778.

Brig.-Gen. Hamilton and the commanding officers of 8 regiments to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, September 14. Cambridge. — Report, according to request [see below] that one blanket, one woollen cap, a thick double breasted flannel waistcoat with sleeves and a blanket coat should be supplied to each man. Had the clothing from Canada arrived the men would have had these which they have already paid for and which were left behind by order of the Commander in chief. A return will be sent of the woollen cloth for leggings, stockings, &c, required which will be charged to the men.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 75. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 2 Oct.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 14. Cambridge. — Returns the accounts with the reports and remarks. As they must be settled between Sir Henry Clinton and the American Congress they may properly be sent with all the reports, &c.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 50. 1 page. Extract. Vol. 8. No. 133.

Page 290

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. de Riedesel.

1778, September 14. Cambridge. — Sends the enclosed. Requests him to adopt such parts as he thinks proper and necessary for the German troops, and report as soon as convenient. Apprehends all he requires must be bought at the expense of the Duke of Brunswick, and adjusted later, unless otherwise directed by Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 77. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Major-General William Phillips to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, September 14. Cambridge. — That the season for cold weather advances. That in consequence of General Heath's seeming resolution not to suffer an officer to go over the Lakes, all idea of receiving the baggage or clothing from Canada must be given up. Mr. Commissary Gen. Clarke is going to New York and he (Phillips) proposes to send the Commander in Chief a report of the state of the troops. Desires him to consult with the several commanding officers of corps. What sort of clothing may be cheapest and easiest provided. What necessaries will be absolutely required.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 78. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, September 15. New York. — Nos. 14, 15, 16. Three letters.
Copies. Vol. 8. Nos. 134, 135, 136. 2 pages, 3 pages, 1 page.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134 and 589; copies in Vol. 306.

Edgar Town, Martha's Vineyard.

Account of horned cattle, sheep and hay delivered to the British fleet and army by the inhabitants between the 10th and 15th September 1778. With certificates.
Original. Vol. 28. No. 73. 4 pages.

Lt.-Col. John Lind to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 15. Cambridge. — "I am exceedingly sorry to be under the necessity of troubling you on this occasion, but Major-General Phillips's proceedings with Respect to my Behaviour and authority founded on my letter of the 8th Inst, makes it absolutely necessary for me to apply to your Exy for a Genl Court Martial to clear up my Conduct on this occasion, more espetialy(sic) as by the Major-General's orders I am Debar'd seeing him but through the Brigadier-General, when the late Deputy Chaplain is paid every attention too, his reasons and report heard on the Strength of which I am so severely Censured in public orders without being heard, which I can't help thinking
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is a very extraordinary proceeding towards a Lieut-Col. Commg a Kegiment ? which I flatter myself you will easily perceive by the anex't Copy of The Orders of the Major-General and Letters pass'd between the late Deputy Chaplain and me, which I beg leave to referr to for my present Justification. With respect to Mr. Brown he never was put in orders by me or any report made, tho intended at the particular request of three field officers. The moment I was made Sensible of the impropriety of appointing him, I made my excuse, and have the honor to be, Sir, Your most Humble and most obedient Servant.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 90; with papers annexed 81 to 89.
Annexed:—

Lt.-Col. Lind to the Reverend Mr. Brudenell.

1778, September 8. Cambridge. — 1st letter. — "It being necessary the 20th Regiment should have a Chaplain or Deputy to do the Duty at Rutland, I have desired Captain Rollinson to appoint Mr. Brown to act as such till further orders, and given the Paymaster directions to pay you for the time you have acted, and am, Sir, Your most Obedient Humble Servant."

Rev. Ed. Brudenell to Lt.-Col. Lind.

N.D. — 2nd letter.Has read with great surprise his letter. If it is merely residence which is thought necessary remembers Mr. Mungan while deputy chaplain resided chiefly at Quebec. Must report his dismissal to Maj.-Gen. Phillips. Desires answer.

Lt.-Col. Lind to the Rev. E. Brudenell.

1778, September 13th. Cambridge. — Answer to letter of yesterday     .     .     .     .     "on the Regiment's going from hence and your remaining behind without saying anything to me or taking any Steps towards geting somebody to do the duty     .     .     .     .     I look't upon it as my Duty to provide another, after waiting upwards of a Month, without seeing or hearing from you."     .     .     .     .     " Mr. Mungan looked on me as Commanding Officer of the 20th Regt. and had my leave and Sir Guy Carleton's through me for what he did."     .     .     .     .    

Rev. E. Brudenell to Lt.-Col. Lind.

1778, September 13. Cambridge. — That his servant on delivering the letter attended to know if there was any answer but was told he need not wait. Concluded no answer was meant and laid his letter before Maj.-Gen. Phillips. Readily allows he failed in attention, politeness, and even duty, on the regiment moving but from no want of respect. Acknowledges himself liable to censure,

Page 292

Thomas Bibby, Dep. Adj.-Gen. to Lt.-Col. Lind.

1778, September 13. Cambridge. — 3rd letter. — Sends copy of the General Orders and of letter to Capt. Rollinson.

Major-General Phillips. General Orders.

Marked No. 1. — His disapproval of Lt.-Col. Lind's letter — that it marks a want of respect due to the commanding officer who should have been consulted — that Mr. Brown, nominated, being a minister of the Church of Scotland, cannot properly serve as chaplain to a regiment which is of the English Church — that two chaplains are actually resident at Rutland, and Divine service celebrated, under a General Parade — that Mr. Brudenell's character is called in question and report must be made from the regiment.

Thomas Bibby, Dep. Adj.-Gen., to Capt. Rollinson, commanding the 20th Regiment at Rutland.

1778, September 13. Cambridge. — Maj.-Gen. Phillips desires a report whether Mr. Brudcnell has failed in duty or incurred censure, also whether the Regiment does not attend Divine service regularly, and if they reported the necessity of the deputy chaplain residing there.

Lt.-Col. John Lind to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, September 14. Cambridge. — "In obedience to the orders of the 13th wherein I am so severely Censured, without being heard, I must refer the Major-General to my letter of the above date to the Revd Mr. Brudenell, a copy of which I here inclose, beging in Consequence of the above orders and reasons given which I had not the smallest Idea off, or that any expressions I had made use of in my letter of the 8th Inst. could be so strained, I may be allowed a Genl Court Martial to Justify, my Conduct, at the same time you may acquaint the Major-General I never had any intention to fail in my respect to him, or to attack in the smallest degree Mr. Brudenell's Character as a Clergyman."

Lt.-Col. John Lind to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, September 19. Cambridge. — "In consequence of my letter of the 14th Inst I beg to know the Major-General's Answer as soon as possible, as Mr. Clarke informed me he was to go the latter end of the week for N. York."

Brig. -Gen. James Hamilton to Lt.-Col. John Lind.

1778, September 19. Cambridge. — "I this moment received your note of this Day's date and was so far in my way to shew you Major-General's Phillips' Letter of the 17th Inst which I received yesterday at dinner-time in as far as related
Page 293
to your application for a Genl Court Martial. But on reflection have sent you the whole to peruse, hoping by it to put a stop to any public hearing, a subject I wish was done away, at the same time beg leave to acquaint you that Major- General Phillips has no objection to Transmitt to the Commander-in-Chief whatever you have to say on the Subject."

Lt.-Col. John Lind to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, September 19. Cambridge. — "I this moment received yours of the 19th and should have been happy at Complying with the Majr.-General's Intentions had I known them; or been made Sensible of them before the orders were given out. It is now too late. I shall therefore     .     .     .     .     appeal to a Genl Court Martial     .     .     .     .     and shall send the Commr-in-Chief a Copy of the orders, with the letters that passed between the late Deputy Chaplain, yourself, and me, without saying anything further in my Justification." (See also p. 306. Proceedings of Court Martial with papers annexed.)

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 16. St. Augustine. — Transmits duplicates of last letters. Affairs of this Province with respect to rebels nearly in the same situation, excepting some depredations committed at Smyrna by a privateer and the loss of the "Otter" sloop, who being sent to intercept her was stranded in a gale of wind on Cape Canaveral. The loss is serious, as a naval force is absolutely necessary for the defence of this Province and to prevent the Southern Colonies receiving supplies from the French, Dutch, and Spanish settlements. Requests men-of-war and a supply of field pieces, muskets and ammunition. Provisions needed. Insufficiency of the supplies sent by the contractors. The flour though lately arrived is bad. "The propriety of having a Post at the mouth of St. Mary's river for the protection of his Majesty's Ships of war and the vessels armed by the Province being strongly urged by Captain Elphinstone — I have ordered the Engineer Captain Moncrief to take a Survey of the fittest place for the purpose, the want of Provisions which never can be sent over the different Bars and removed without great risk of loss and certain waste does not permit at present the execution of the plan, he has proposed its expediency however being very obvious, I would proceed to it as soon as the present objection is removed some heavy Guns and a couple of eight inches howitzeers will be requisite, will be much wanted the Governor having already taken six twenty four pounders for the Provincial Naval Armament, if more were to be taken, it might be of great prejudice. The presents for the Indians being nearly exhausted, I could wish that some might be sent, their friendship to us in great part depends upon it, our Superiority would fix them — in the late invasion of this Province, when the numbers of the Enemy were reported to be so considerable they did not appear to be very
Page 294
forward to assist as probably they conceived that this Province would only be the prelude to their destruction of course they remained as it were neuter 'till the retreat of the Enemy having relieved them from their fears, they then came very readily to offer their Services and to receive the presents which their good will and friendship merited in their opinion." Begs warrants for holding General Courts Martial and for Judge Advocate. Has not received any orders or instructions relative to his conduct in this Province except for disciplining the two new battalions. Has acted on the defensive. This would be a favourable time for an attack on Georgia if he could keep it.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 140. 4 pages.

Brig.-Gen. W. B. de Gall to Major-General Riedesel.

1778, September 17. Cambridge. — Has received his letter and the orders of Major-General Phillips relative to winter clothing. Sends returns of the regiment and artillery of Hesse Hanau upon same plan as those of the Brunswick troops.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 66. 2 pages.
Qy. Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Riedesel to Maj.-Gen. Phillips, 18 Sept.
Enclosures:—
List of articles wanted for officers and men.
Return of men (exclusive of officers) requiring mattrasses and bolsters.
        Ditto         requiring different articles of winter clothing.
        Ditto         who require blankets and caps.
        Ditto         who have had no clothing for four years whom Brig.-Gen. de Gall is obliged to provide with a blanket coat, &c.
       Ditto         who are obliged to provide long breeches at their own expense, though they have already paid for those left with the baggage in Canada.
Vol. 9. Nos. 61-65 and 67. All signed by Brig.-Gen. W. R. de Gall. 1 page each.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 17. Head Quarters, Boston. — "Yours of the 14th (sic) enclosing the Accounts, Mr. Commissary Clarke's report and your own Remarks came duly to hand, and would have been sooner answered had not more important concerns prevented.
"As to any accidental mistake in the Accounts I apprehend that Messrs. Clarke and Richardson fully investigated the matter at their late interviews and corrected whatever they found wrong in that respect.
"As to the charge of wastage I think it must appear just: the Provisions are purchased by our Commissaries for the Troops of the Convention with as much care as for our own, and you are charged at the same rate; if therefore a wastage happens by the shrinking or drying of the several Species of Provisions, or in
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weighing them in small quantities, which I think you will allow, will always happen, it is consonant both will reason and justice that you should pay for such wastage. If in a judgment of Equity the charge for Wastage is greater than can be reasonably supposed, it deserves consideration, and not otherwise, and of this those acquainted with the issuing of Provisions are the most competent Judges.
"The Charges of Rations for our Commissaries and Clerks who are employed for the sole purpose of serving the Troops of the Convention, is not higher than the Rations charged to the Troops, neither are there more Rations charged to you for those Officers than they are respectively entitled to in the American Army, and I know of no Rule or Reason why they ought to be more or less; if there are more of those Officers employed than are necessary for the regular delivery of the Provisions, on your representation they shall be reduced, and this I have several times mentioned to the Commissary.
"The Rations delivered to the Hospital in Watertown in November last were omitted in the first Account, and are as much due as any other part of the Accounts yet unsettled, and for ought I can conceive, are now inserted with equal propriety, as their validity cannot admit of a doubt.
"In regard to the Rations supplied the Prisoners of War, I was informed by Major Merserau that you assured him that if the Prisoners of War were permitted to remove from the Guard Ship to Prospect Hill you would be accountable for the Provisions which they received and upon no other consideration should I have consented to their removal; I have however ordered those Supplies to be transferred to a separate account.
"The Title of the Accounts was not inserted by mistake or to ensnare you, and although you may affect not to know or acknowledge any such power as the United States yet surely your present situation, and the recognition of these Independant States by some of the first Powers in Europe, must be such demonstrative evidence as not to leave a doubt on your mind, although you may decline an acknowledgement of it.
"The appelations being the established Stile and Title of these States, there dignity is not to be waved to gratify the feelings of any Man, or Power whatever. The former Accounts bore the same Title, and I never heard that either Lieutenant General Burgoyne or Sir Wm. Howe conceived them to be indecent.
"As our Commissaries always Contract for Provisions and settle their Accounts in their own Names, I can see no Necessity for my signing their Accounts, and as I never have heretofore in any instance done it, you will excuse my not beginning to do it in the present instance."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 38. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 17. Boston. — "Yours of the 14th (sic) respecting the Deputy Quarter Master General's Accounts is before me.
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"That there are very considerable charges for the transporting of Provisions is certain and they are also equally just. Whenever it is necessary to remove Provisions from any of the Magazines for the purpose of supplying the Troops of the Convention, they most certainty ought to he at the expence of it. The Provisions being nigh the Troops of the Convention on their first arrival at Cambridge was fortunate for the Government of Britain in avoiding the expence of transportation; but this is by no means to be plead as a president(sic) , when transportation is unavoidable."     .     .     .     .    
"With respect to any Charges for Wood in the Month of December which were omitted in the former Accounts, I refer you to my observations respecting the Provisions furnished to the Hospital in November last which are applicable in this present Case.
"As to the Charges for Teaming and carting Wood, they are not greater than necessity has required, and with all their exertions you are fully sensible that the necessity of the Troops for Fuel have scarcely been supplied.
"As the Troops of the Convention were removed back for the Conveniences of the Country rather than themselves I ordered the Asst. Q. M. Genl. to furnish the number of Waggons allowed to our own Troops, free of expence, and that whatever Waggons over and above that number were wanted for the Officers or Troops were to be charged at the usual Rates and they were charged accordingly.
"I do not know that more persons are employed in the Q. M. General's Department than are necessary for the procurement and delivery of Fuel, if it is your Opinion that there are, any which you suppose unnecessary shall be discharged, but I apprehend upon enquiry you will find that the several Persons who are employed are necessary in the several Spheres in which they act.
"The Persons who attended Officers of the Convention to Philadelphia did it at the request of General Burgoyne with his assurance that all expences should be paid, and whenever any of our Officers were sent no charge of Wages has been made for them — a Charge is made for the time for a Mr. Peck, who is not an Officer, and was engaged specially to attend an Officer of the Convention to Philadelphia, I know of no Reason why the United States should pay for his time while on that Service.
"Upon the whole having paid attention to the several objections and remarks that you have made and replied thereto, I think you must be satisfied that the Accounts are just; I have therefore returned them and desire that immediate Measures may be taken for the settlement of them."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 37. 2 pages.

Major-Gen. Riedesel to Major-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, September 18. Cambridge. — Received letter of yesterday, and also order relative to requirements of German troops. Communicated a copy of orders to Brig.-Gen. de Gall. Will
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send his answer soon as received. Called a Council respecting requirements of Brunswick troops. Gives his opinion that extraordinary expenses should fall on the Sovereign in whose service the troops are employed. If Clinton will not provide the winter clothing he must purchase it himself at the cost of the Duke of Brunswick and await representations made at home. Sends two returns specifying the number of blankets he would wish to have in order to make coats for one part of the corps, and the number of yards of blue or other coloured cloth necessary to make long breeches for the whole. The articles mentioned under No. 1 in the annexed memorial cannot be purchased at the expense of the Duke.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 69. 4 pages.
Annexed,
1778, September 18. Cambridge. — Memorial, end wanting. That in consequence of his letter, he summoned the commanding officers ofthe Brunswick troops. They return their sincere thanks and offer four particulars for consideration. 1st. That as the troops passed through. England in 1776 they received a blanket and a cap to each man as an extraordinary gift. That the blankets have been constantly used or carried on the soldiers' backs and are now almost useless. It cannot be expected that the Duke of Brunswick will allow now what was at first a gift; they therefore send return of the number requisite for the men on Winter Hill. 2nd. That Sir Guy Carleton ordered each man, on account of the severe cold in Canada, a long blanket coat, a pair of long breeches, a cap covering the shoulders, and a pair of gloves. These are in a serviceable condition, but are in Canada. 3. That the men have slept on the boards without straw and many without a blanket. Though the Americans issue out straw it is spoiled in a very short time. Would like them to have mattrasses stuffed with straw, and a return is sent specifying the quantity of coarse linen desired. 4th. A return is sent of necessaries desired by captains of companies for their men, which he begs Mr. Commissary Clarke may procure from Xew York.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 72. 6 pages.
List of different articles required for the repair of the clothing small mountings.
Return of men (exclusive of officers) who require blankets and caps.
        Ditto         requiring winter clothing left with the baggage in Canada and which the soldiers have already purchased, &c., &c.
        Ditto         now at Winter Hill who require mattrasses and bolsters, &c., &c.
       Ditto         who are provided with long breeches at their own expencc though they have already paid for those left with the baggage in Canada.
Return of men who have received no cloathing in four and a half years and who must have blanket coats, &c.
Vol. 9. No. 57-60, 70 and 71. All signed by Riedesel. 1 page each.

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Maj.-Gen. Riedesel to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, September 18. Cambridge. — Sends the returns of the regiment of Hesse Hanau and copy of Brig.-Gen. de Gall's letter to him. (See above on 17th September.)
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 73. 2 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

1778, September 19. New York. — "Nothing but His Majesty's positive Instructions, of which I send you an Extract, could have induced me to trouble you or the American Congress again on the Subject of the Troops detained in New England in direct Contravention of the Treaty entered into at Saratoga. The Neglect of the Requisitions already made on this Subject is altogether unprecedented among Parties at War. I now however repeat the Demand that the Convention of Saratoga be fulfilled ; and offer by express and recent Authority from the King received since the Date of the late Requisition made by His Majesty's Commissioners to renew in his Majesty's Name all the Conditions stipulated by Lieut. General Burgoyne in Respect to the Troops serving under his Command.
"In this I mean to discharge my duty not only to the King whose Orders I obey; But to the unhappy People likewise whose Affairs are committed to you, and who I hope will have the Candour to acquit me of the Consequences that must follow from the new System of War you are pleased to introduce. I have the Honor to be, Sir, your most obedient and most humble Servant."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 137. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton, 12 June 1778.
Copy also in Vol. 8. No. 151. 1 page.

Samuel Remington, Lt. and Qr.-Mr. Royal Regiment Artillery.

1778, September 19. Rutland. — Return of necessaries wanted by the detachment of the Royal Regiment of Artillery, three companies and two detachments. Consists of Irish linen, cambric, lawn, checked linen for shirts, black ribbon for hair, green camblet, black callemanco, stockings, pen-knives, thread and tea, velvet stocks, etc.
Signed copy. Vol. 9. No. 55. 5 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord Barrington].

1778, September 20. New York. — Transmits lists of promotions.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 124. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, Vol. 20.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 20. Cambridge. — "I find by your observations on my remarks that these accounts, must, as I have
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imagined, go to our Superiors to be finally settled — the sooner they are sent the better — I shall not create any delay. As you decline signing the Accounts as the Military Officer in Command in the Massachusets Bay, I will propose to you that my name, also, be omitted. Let the Accounts be headed for Provisions issued to the British Commissaries, and for Fuel, &c, &c, delivered the British Assistant Quarter Master General for use of the Troops of the Convention of Saratoga.
"Under this discription the Accounts may go in, which I most heartily desire."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 51. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Riedesel to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, September 20. Cambridge. — Forwards the representation and the lists, corrected and altered in the way found necessary yesterday. The lists of the Hanau Regiment will follow as soon as Brig.-Gen. Gall sends them.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 68. 1 page.

Lieut.-Colonel John Campbell and Lieut.-Colonel James Bruce to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 21. Halifax. — That as the regiments under their command have been at great expense in providing camp equipage and in coming over to America, as well as unexpectedly being ordered to encamp, they beg the usual allowance of bat and forage money.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 16. 2 pages.
Enclosing Lt.-Cols. Campbell and Bruce and Maj. Craig to Maj.-Gen. Massey, 9 September.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, September 21. New York. — No. 17.
Draft. Vol. 8. No. 139. 2 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 235; 589, fos. 45, 50; copy 306, fo. 256.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 21. Head Quarters, Boston. —     .     .     .     .     "Although there is not the least necessity of my signing the Accounts yet I think there is a strict propriety that you, as Senior Officer of the Troops of the Convention of Saratoga, should be made chargeable with the supplies furnished to those Troops."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 39. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 22. Halifax. — Transmits proceedings of a General Court Martial. Promotions in the Emigrants corps. The Dep. Q.M.G. has pushed on the coal business. Halifax strong
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enough to resist any force. 100 days bat and forage money offered to the reinforcement has been rejected. "Sixty-nine Rebel Prisoners sent here from Newfoundland, amongst them is William Taylor, Secretary to Handcock, by whom I learn Thos. Boilston, a Merct, who was at Boston, a very rich Man, who had many Notes from Genl. Officers with your Army, and wanted to go home to pass these Notes, as well as to get his Money out of the English Fund, which I hear is above £80,000, and Mr. Bethume is just in the same way, I think it my Duty to inform You of this; I now wait with great Impatience to hear, from your Excellency or my Lord Howe, as indeed my Health would not allow me to delay longer in America."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 24. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 23. Cambridge. — A long letter. Arguments maintaining his ground as to the accounts.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 52. 3 pages. Extract. Vol. 8. No. 133.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 24. War Office. — Major-Generals Charles Grey and Jas. Grant having requested leave to return to Great Britain the matter is referred to him.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 65. 1 page.

Jonathan Clarke, Assistant Commissary General, to Major-General William Phillips.

1778, September 24. Cambridge. — The quantity of provisions charged in the Continental accounts for August agrees with the quantity delivered. Overcharges of provisions on former accounts are in some measure corrected and in part accounted for by rations for their commissaries and labourers, part of it deducted from the foot of the account and part of it remains unanswered which will probably be accounted for by wastage. Wastage is regulated in a very uncertain manner. Whatever is found wanting in the public stores at the expiration of each month is supposed to be wasted and therefore charged to the Troops of Convention.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 46. 1 page.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to Richard Hughes, Lieut.-Gov. of Nova Scotia.

1778, September 24. New York. — Acknowledges letter of 6th. Intends sending two battalions to replace the marines. These may leave for England on the arrival of the former at Halifax.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 11. 1 page.

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General Sir Henry Clinton to [Brig.-Gen. Maclean].

1778, September 24. New York. — Appointing him, on his arrival in Nova Scotia and taking the command in place of Maj.- Gen. Massey, to the local rank of brigadier in that province only. Submits advisability of a battery and close work near Point Pleasant, to command that landing, an abbatis to join the works — from the 10 gun battery to Citadel Hill, etc., to secure against attempts by land. As the marines are wanted in Europe he will request the Admiral for an opportunity to send two battalions to relieve them: on there arrival he can have no objection to the departure of the marines for England.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 10. 2 pages.

[General Sir Henry Clinton] to Maj.-Gen. Eyre Massey.

1778, September 24. New York, Head Quarters. — With letter of 13th June, he received the Engineer's report of the defences of Halifax. Submits to him and Brigadier Maclean the suggestions as given above.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 9. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. W. Phillips to Major Mercereau.

1778, September 24. Cambridge. — Receipt to the American Commissary of prisoners for six officers of the Brunswick troops exchanged, but it being thought improper for the soldiers to be left without some officers they are kept for that purpose. Followed by certificate from Joshua Mercereau, dated 27 September, promising a discharge for the same.
Signed copy. Vol. 9. No. 74. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 2 Oct.

Provisions.

1778, September 24. — Account of provisions issued, in store, and dispatched to St. Augustine.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 43. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 19 Jan. 1779.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 25. Whitehall. — No. 13.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 29. 4 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 137.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, September 25. Cambridge. — Sends report upon the provision accounts, including those for the month of August.
"You will receive, also, a letter I have thought it my Duty to write upon the Subject.
" As I am still desirous that every Attention to publick faith on
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my part should be observed, I now propose to you that Mr. Clarke be allowed to go to New York where the present subject regarding these accounts may be submitted from me to Sir Henry Clinton, and if His Excellency shall see proper to direct me to receive your accounts under the Title of United States of America, I shall obey his Orders with the respect and attention due to His Majestys Commander in Chief in America.
"I have no objection to Mr. Clarke taking Copies of these Accounts, which may lead to explanation and serve perhaps to shorten the time of settling. But I can neither certify to any examination of them or sign them."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 53. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 25. St. Augustine. — Transmits duplicate of last letter and accounts of expenditures and monthly returns of this District, wherein the Rangers are not included, as he cannot procure a proper return. These Rangers under Lt.-Col. Brown "receive no pay     .     .     .     .     without being of service they subsist upon the King's provisions     .     .     .     .     the few who have horses keep them to go plundering into Georgia whenever they can form a party     .     .     .     .     the rank of Lt.-Col. given to Mr. Brown by the Governor prevents me from the means of reducing them to some order and regulation. Lt.-Col. Fuser is often sick, and the other officers being all majors could not take the command from him     .     .     .     .     in the late invasion of the rebels, for want of his not complying with Major Prevost's orders     .     .     .     .     the corps of Rangers had been very nearly cut off by a party of the Rebel Horse, who past in a manner pell-mell with them all the advanced parties of the Major's posts and might have surprised the camp but for a check by some of the regulars. Lt.-Col. Brown tenacious of his rank, the legality of which I am not acquainted with, had been repeatedly desired to join the Major, large parties had been sent to cover and protect his retreat, he never chose to comply till the moment that he might have occasioned the loss of the advanced Corps of the Army if they had been less alert than they were. As it appears rather hard that old officers should be commanded by a young man entirely unacquainted with military matters, though otherwise zealous and deserving, I beg to be informed by your Excellency whether he is entitled to his rank, in which case I would request that the Majors of this Garrison, who are all old officers, might be ordered to serve as lieutenant-colonels"     .     .     .     .     Ensign Schodde abandoned by the Indians had joined a party of Rangers under Captain Moore, who had been betrayed to the enemy, wounded and murdered. Ensign Schodde having escaped has come hither with a party of Creeks. Provisions needed. Money required for the Carolina Royalists. The want of Col. Innes or a proper person to command that corps. Sends memorial from Major Allaz. Repeats the solicitations of 26th July.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 141. 4 pages,
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Enclosure:—
Maj. James Allaz, 4th Battalion 60th, to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 25. St. Augustine. — Petition. Having been replaced from half-pay to full-pay, asks leave to sell his present company for the regulated price. Is fifty-nine years old, was wounded at Ticonderoga, and his services in Martinico and Havana have broken his constitution.
Signed. Vol. 8. No. 142. 1 page.

Major Prevost to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 25. St. Augustine. — Recommends Ensign Davies to succeed Lt. Gordon, promoted 10th August 1777, by Sir W. Howe, but who was otherwise provided for previous thereto in some of the Companies in the West Indies.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No, 143. 1 page.

George Vallancey (Asst. Qr.-Mr.-General).

1778, September 25. Cambridge. — General return of necessaries wanted by the British troops of the Convention at Cambridge. Consists of pieces Irish (sic), check linen, Bussia sheeting, cotton check, thread, shirts, leggings, stockings, buttons and soap.
Original. Vol. 53. No. 24. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, September 26. Boston. — To the effect that the accounts must be settled as they stand.
Copy. Vol, 9. No. 40. 2 pages. Extract Vol. 8. No. 133o.

Lieut.-Gen. James Robertson to Oliver Templeton.

1778, September 26. — Recommendation. That he has acted the part of a good citizen and is entitled to the protection and favour of his Majesty's servants.
Copy. Vol. 32. No. 61. 1 page.
Enclosed by Oliver Templeton to Sir G. Carleton, 8 Sep. 1783.

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 26. St. Augustine. — The naval force has returned to St. John's River and Prevost sends Captain Moncrief's plan for a post to secure St. Mary's harbour. Has requested of Lord Howe an establishment for the protection of rivers and coast. Invasion of this province said to be concerting by Congress. It is also in contemplation to attack the Creek Nation, and Col. Williamson is collecting troops in Carolina for that expedition in case it takes place in preference. The rebel generals Howe and Elbert are gone to the north to receive instructions,
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etc Genl. Mackintosh is appointed to lead an army to reduce West Florida; his reported check by the Indians wants confirmation. The Indians have made incursions into rebel provinces; they do not molest women and children, but attack men in arms. Has begged gunpowder of Lord Howe. Capt. Moncrief desired to give assistance in forwarding some boats building for protection. P.S. — As the Brigadier sends state of the provisions for the garrison, mentions that the inhabitants are in a still lower condition.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 144. 3 pages.

Charles Thomson (Secretary to Congress) to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 28. Philadelphia. — That they make no answer to insolent letters. (No. 1,168 of Stevens's Facsimiles.)
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 116. ¾ page.
Copy in Vol. 8, No. 152; copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 184, fo. 313; and 589, fo. 57; printed 300, fo. 290.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, September 29. Cambridge. — In answer to letter of 26th. Denying any intention to "infract" the Treaty at Saratoga. Can neither pay the accounts nor order them to be paid.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 54. 2 pages. Extract Vol. 8. No. 133.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Maj.-Gen. Riedesel.

1778, September 30. New York. — Every attention which circumstances will allow he will cheerfully pay to the troops of the Duke of Brunswick.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 148. 1 page.

Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost to Gen. Clinton.

1778, September 30. St. Augustine. — Letters received; "the directions relative to the Carolina Royalists shall be duly observed, those with respect to the Rangers I shall communicate to the Governor, to whom they look for pay, &c.
. . . "The extraordinary pay of the Refugees has been given in consequence of a letter from General Howe to Colonel Stuart, the paragraph relative to which I herewith send; the extraordinary Services expected of them, the extraordinary price of all necessaries rendered it necessary to allow them a higher pay. The Rangers in this Province had one shilling promised them per day. Colonel Stuart gave the same to those he had raised and requested me to take care of these people that came here, the Memorial of the Carolina Royalists, mention'd their desire of coming into the Service on the terms offered them by Lord William Campbell, but were willing untill that could be settled, to be on the same footing with the troops raised by Colonel
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Stuart. I submitted the same to General Howe in my letter of 27th April last, and gave my reasons for thinking it right to shew a particular mark of attention and favour to people who had abandoned everything dear to them to evince their zeal for the King's Service; your Excellency was pleased to approve of what I had done without any particular restrictions; unless that of the Stoppage for Provisions, to which they with some reluctance have submitted; I shall endeavour to make them sensible of the propriety of your reasons for reducing their pay still more and soothe them if possible with the indulgence intended not to make them pay for provisions in future; — the extraordinary expences attending the supplying of them, the horses, saddles &c. absolutely necessary will of course swell my public Accounts considerably, which will make it requisite to have more money by the first convenient opportunity."
With regard to articles wanted, has sent some memoranda by Capt. Shaw, whom he recommends. Recommends Ensign McKenzie to succeed Lt. Keppel, and his son George M. Prevost to succeed Ensign McKenzie.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 145. 3 pages.
Enclosing General Howe to John Stuart, see 13 Jan. 1777.

Governor Patrick Tonyn to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, September 30. St. Augustine. — "Last night I had the honour of receiving your Excellency's letter of 25th August enclosing a copy of a letter to Brigadier-General Prevost relative to the pay of the Provincial Troops in this province: the contents of which I shall consider and endeavour some time hence to convince your Excellency that they are not so expensive to Government as Dragoons, as they act in that capacity.
"I beg leave only at present to observe that the state of the province when the rangers were raised absolutely required their assistance for the defence of our frontiers, that I communicated the measure to Sir William Howe, who refused to pay them, although he approved of the establishment, that Lord George Germain approved of their being raised and since of their being augmented, that they receive no enlisting money, have no Barracks or Quarters, are encamped always on the frontiers, are on perpetual service, they furnish and maintain their horses, and horse accoutrements, each at their own expence, and receive only one shilling by the Day.
"They have, Sir, been very useful in this province, and I am humbly of opinion in the present situation of Affairs that without great prejudice to the King's Service and endangering the security of the Plantations, I cannot discharge them; but I shall endeavour to establish them on any footing that will correspond with your Excellency's sentiments, and if the Horse be taken into the scale, your Excellency will find they are on terms more reasonable than was imagined.
"I beg leave, Sir, further to surmise that should the rebels attack the Indian Nations that it will be expedient in order to
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preserve their attachment, that an attack be made upon Georgia."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 147. 2 pages.

Martha's Vineyard.

1778, September. — "An Account of the Number of Neat Cattle Delivered Major-General Gray (sic) by the Scelect(sic) men of the Town of Tisbury for the use of the Brittish Garrisons at Newport & New York in September 1778. Also a Quantity of Forrage for said Stock." Shows names of persons and number of cattle from each — 93 in all and 13 tons of forage. Signed James Athearn, Shubael Cottle and Abijah Athearn, Select men for 1778.
Copy. Vol. 28. No. 141. 3 pages.

1778, September. — "List of the number of Sheep Delivered Major-General Gray Comander of a party of Brittish Troops at the Island of Martha's Vineyard in the month of September A.D. 1778. And by whome Owned, Delivered by the Subscribers Scelect men for the Town of Tisbury being Their Proportion of The Stock then Demanded. Total, 2,752." Signed by the same as above.
Original signed. Vol. 28. No. 142. 2 pages.

Rev. Edward Brudenell.

1778, October 1. Cambridge. — Proceedings of a Court of Enquiry upon his dismissal. Papers read. Lt.-Col. Lind appeared and stated his willingness to give information, but begs to be excused entering into the whole matter or making a defence, as he has appealed to a Court Martial.
Vol. 29. Nos. (with annexed papers) 42-44.
Annexed:—
No. 1. Lt.-Col. Lind to Rev.E. Brudenell, 8 September (same as that annexed to Brudenell's letter to Sir H. Clinton, 15 September).
No. 2. Rev. E. Brudenell. Answer. (Ditto.)
No. 3. Lt.Bibby, D.A.G., to Lt.-Col. Lind, 13 Sept. (Ditto.)
No. 4. General Orders by Maj.-Gen. Phillips. (Ditto.)
No. 5. Lt. Bibby to Capt. Rollinson, 13 Sept. (Ditto.)
No. 6. Lt.-Col. Lind to Rev. E. Brudenell, 13 Sept. (Ditto.)
No. 7. Rev. E. Brudenell to Lt.-Col. Lind, 13 Sept. (Ditto.)
No. 9. Lt.-Col. Lind to Brig.-Gen. Hamilton, 14 Sept. (Ditto.)
No. 8. Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, September 16. Cambridge. — "In consequence of your General Orders, Lt.-Col. Lind     .     .     .     .     looks upon himself as severely censured     .     .     .     .     and begs leave to apply to Sir Henry Clinton for a General Court Martial to clear up his conduct."
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No. 10. Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, September 17. Cambridge. — Acknowledges letter. Comments on the Lt.-Col.'s letter to the Brigadier on the words "without being heard," that he does not know what the Lt.-Col. understood by the copy of the General Orders sent him previous to being made publick. It was intended as a civility, a means for his speaking — the only way of being heard. Recapitulates order of the letters. Had Lt.- CoL Lind reported the conduct of the Deputy Chaplain it should not have passed without reprehension. The Deputy Chaplain's letter of apology and the copy of orders remained for near two days with Lt.-CoL Lind previous to the orders becoming public. If he (Phillips) has a right to have offered to his consideration the dismissing of a deputy chaplain, Lt.-CoL Lind has failed in respect and duty.

No. 11. Capt. Rollinson to Lt. Bibby, D.A.G.

1778, September 20. Rutland. — Has assembled the officers ; they have nothing to say against the Rev. Mr, Brudenell. The regiment has not attended Divine service regularly, as Mr. Money (the only chaplain here) has been indisposed. Did not report to Lt.-Col. Lind, being certain he was well acquainted with the fact.

Schedule.

List of the papers relating to the above case.

Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, October 1, Cambridge. — Declaration.

Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

N.D. [1778, October 1.] — Message by Dep.-Adj. Bibby. That not being able to attend he has directed the Deputy Adjutant to lay before the Court the several papers relating to the above subject. That he desires the Deputy Adjutant to read his Declaration and the copies of the various letters, and that he desires the liberty of making a reply to any parts of Lt.-Col. Lind's declaration which may seem to require explanation or answer.
Vol. 29. No. 29. 1 page.

Prisoners.

1778, October 1. Corunna. — Declaration by Herman Katencamp, H.M. Consul, touching prisoners taken by Wingate Newman, commanding the "Vengeance" privateer, of Newberry Port, Mass. Followed by similar declaration or certificate from Capt. Newman as to his agreement with the Consul for their exchange
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and calling on all commanders of French and American vessels to allow them to pass unmolested to England. Includes a list of the prisoners.
2 copies. Vol. 7. Nos. 36 and 37. 3 pp. and 5 pp.
Enclosed by Lord Germain to Sir H. Clinton, 4 Nov.
Also in the Public Record Office, State Papers, Domestic, Geo. III. 16; Foreign Office, Spain 206.

William Spry to Captain Philip (sic) Callbeck.

1778, October 1. Halifax. — Certified true copy, Halifax, 27 January, 1780, by W. Spry, commanding engineer. The island of St. John being included in Maj.-Gen. Massey's command, has received orders to take charge, as commanding engineer, of the fortifications and military buildings. Directs him as assistant engineer to report present state of the works and what he proposes to be done this fall and next spring. To send also a demand of such materials as he may want. Imagines the lumber may be got cheapest on the Island or from Pictow. Sends by the ship that takes Capt. Hierlihy's company to St. John's, two 12-pounders, some intrenching tools and two puncheons of rum. To take Capt. Hierlihy to his assistance as overseer.
Vol. 29. No. 299. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 2. New York. — No. 18.
Draft. Vol. 8. No. 149. 1 page.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 301; and 589, fo. 54; copy 306, fo. 261.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 2. Cambridge. — That Captain Willoe had been sent to Canada for clothing and baggage for the troops, but nothing further is known. Has tried in vain for permission for an officer to go over the Lakes to Canada, but the season has advanced towards winter without any hope of success either of intelligence or clothing. Sends for his inspection and orders reports, returns, letters and papers as to clothing and blankets. However the expense may be arranged it is positively necessary the demand should be complied with. Relies on his Excellency's goodness that a flag of truce may be directed to carry these stores to Boston. Has understood that a number of articles of clothing purchased from subscriptions in Great Britain are frequently sent to New York; hopes these troops may share. Hopes to send an officer to explain this matter, but should he be refused this by Maj.-Gen. Heath must trust to Mr. Clarke's intelligence. Has received notice of exchange of officers of 53rd Regiment, also German officers; all these have gone to Rhode Island except those German officers thought necessary to be left in charge of the soldiers; sends the certificates. Sends
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estimate of cash required. From 25th June to the 24th December there will be due from forty to fifty thousand pounds. Begs answers to letters. Submits a copy of his letter to the Secretary at War and memorial on behalf of officers.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 79. 6 pages.
Enclosures:—
Brig.-Gen. Hamilton and Commanding Officers of corps to Maj.-Gen. Phillips. See 14 Sept.
Maj.-General Phillips, receipt to Major Mercereau. See 24 Sept.
David Geddes. Estimate of cash, &c. See 13 Sept.
List of Officers not included in the distribution of lodging money as sent by Sir Wm.Howe. Signed by Geo. Vallancey.
Vol. 9. No. 80. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Phillips and Maj.-Gen. Heath.

1778, June 21 to 2 October. — Paper of extracts of correspondence between Maj.-Gens. Phillips and Heath dated as follows:— From Phillips 21 June; from Heath 1 August; from Phillips 7 September; from Heath 11 September, from Phillips 11, 14, 23 September; from Heath 26th, from Phillips 29th September and 2 October. For copies of most of these see the respective dates.
Vol. 8. No. 133. 6 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Riedesel to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 2. Cambridge. — Recommending to his protection the exchanged officers of the Brunswick troops to be employed or sent to Canada to take charge of men there. Would esteem it a favour if he would please to exchange the 600 soldiers.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 115. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 3. New York. — No. 19.
Draft. Vol. 8. No. 153. 2 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 589, fo. 58 and 134, fo. 317; copy 306, fo. 262.

Lieutenant Edward Thornhill to Lord Barrington.

1778, October 3. Kinsale. — Memorial. Is entitled to the money arising from sale of the first vacant ensigncy in the 57th Regt. Entreats enquiry and interposition on his behalf.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 71. 1 page.
Enclosed by Lord Barrington to Sir H. Clinton, 27 Oct. 1778.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 4. Cambridge. — Recommends Mr. Commissary Clarke, who will present this letter.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 91. 1 page.

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Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 4. Cambridge. — Some reason has prevented the exchange of Col. Webb (American). Requests that permission be given to him to go from New York on his parole for a short time.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 92. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 4. Cambridge. — Has imagined himself "under a necessity of acting as will appear in these papers submitted." Refers him to Lt.-Col. Hill's report and shall not make any partial application. Has signified so to Lt.-Col. Lind, who it is presumed intends to observe the same conduct. (See proceedings under 1 October.)
Signed letter. Vol. 29. No. 30. 2 pages,

[Col. David Rogers] to Gov. Patrick Henry.

1778, October 4. New Orleans.
Copy. Vol. 11. No. 105. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 284, fo. 289; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21844, fo. 99.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 6. War Office. — His Majesty approves the promotions enclosed in his letter of 23rd July past, except that the Company in the Fuziliers should be filled by Lt. Layard, not Lt. Shuttleworth. Letter of 26th of same month likewise received.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 66. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 6. War Office. — Sir William Erskine to be allowed to return to Great Britain.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 67. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 7. War Office. — Captains Hamilton, Maxwell, and Norman McLeod of the 71st approved as Majors for an additional Battalion to Lord McLeod's regiment, to be allowed to return home.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 68. 1 page.

John Robinson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 7. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — That the Treasury has consented to advance £8,000 to Messrs. Nesbit, Drummond and Franks on their account of £9,892 2s. 3½d. for provisions supplied by them to English prisoners in America.
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To take care that credit be taken for this amount as well as for other sums issued. Transmits minutes of the Board directing that such services be settled for out of the contingencies in America where the services can best be controlled.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 128. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 8. War Office. — Rev. Mr. Burch, chaplain of the 4th, granted leave of absence on account of a fracture in his knee. Lt. Leland of the 44th regt. dead at Burlington in Yorkshire.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 69. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 8. New York. — No. 20.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 154. 3 pp.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 589, fo. 59; 134, fo. 321; copy, 306, fo. 263.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Major-General Eyre Massey, or Officer Commanding H.M. Forces at Halifax.

1778, October 8. New York. — The Hessian regiment of Seitz and the provincial one of Bayard sent to replace marines. To issue what monies the former require for subsistence, and direct Col. Bayard's regiment to be paid as other provincial corps are according to Howe's orders of 4th April.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 12. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson, Treasury.

1778, October 8. New York. — Sends the enclosed. Materials have been procured here to make up the clothing in store to 5,000 suits.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 7 and 22. 1 page each.
Enclosure:—
1778, October 8. — Return of clothing and camp equipage for the Provincial Forces, received, issued and remaining in the Inspector General's Stores at New York on this date. Signed, Alexander Innes, Inspector General.
Copy. Vol. 56. No. 11. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 8. Whitehall. — No. 14.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 30. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 115; copy 431. fo. 273; and in the Sackville MSS.

Page 312

Anthony Knecht to the Lords of the Treasury.

1778, October 8. Memorial. — With certificate by Daniel Wier, New York, 8 August 1778.
Copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 53 and 54. 2 pages and 1 page respectively.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 8 March 1779.

John Robinson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 8. Treasury Chambers, Whitehall. — Receipt of letters. "The Remitters Agents have drawn Bills to a very large Amount for your Supplies of money which have been duly honoured by the Board, and by the money which they obtain for their Bills it is hoped that they will be able to provide amply for your Requisitions without their Lordships being under the necessity of sending out much Specie; which can't fail to have the best Effects, and will be a Considerable saving to the Public." Appointment approved of Mr. Smith to be Paymaster of provincial forces. Refers him to the dispatch to Mr. Wier respecting the supply of provisions. "All Ranks of people here are most anxious to hear again from your Excellency and Lord Howe, and they flatter themselves that by his and your Conduct and abilities they shall be made happy with very good and pleasing Accounts."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 33. No. 24. 2 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Major-General Eyre Massey, or Officer Commanding H.M. Forces at Halifax.

1778, October 9. Head Quarters, New York. — To send by the return of the transports which carry the two regiments to Halifax, or such other conveyance as the commander of the King's ships may be pleased to order for that service, as much coal from Spanish River as can be had.
Copy. Vol. 21. No. 13. 1 page.

Lieut.-Gov. Richard Hughes to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, Oct. 10. Government House, Halifax. — Received letter of the 24th Sept. As the Marine battalion left on the 5th, is glad to learn reinforcements are to be sent. Does not think an attack on this post by sea impracticable. Renews request made to Lord Howe for gunpowder.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 26. 2 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Fras. McLean to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 10. Halifax. — Major-Gen. Massey with the battalion of marines sailed for England the 5th inst. Letter of 24th Sept. did not arrive until the 6th, or they should have been detained for the arrival of the reinforcements mentioned.
Autograph signed letter. Vol, 21. No, 25. 2 pages.

Page 313

Resolves of Congress.

1778, October 15. In Congress. — Relative to removing the Troops of the Convention of Saratoga to Charlottesville in Virginia. Transmitted to Major-General Heath.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 95. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Heath to Brig.-Gen. Hamilton, 25 Oct.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Comte d'Estaing
.
1778, October 16. Cambridge. — By the Treaty of the Convention of Saratoga clothing and necessaries were to have entrance into the port of Boston. Asks that passports and protection may be given for that purpose to vessels from Rhode Island.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 124. 8 pages.
Signed letter in Paris, Arch, de la Marine B.4 Campagnes, 146, fo. 348.

Comte d'Estaing to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, October 18. Boston. — That General Heath's passports for vessels carrying provisions for Phillips's troops will be respected by the French.
Copy (French). Vol. 9. No. 139. 2 pages.

Gov. Bernardo de Galvez to Gov. Patrick Henry.

N.D. [1778, Oct. 19] received 24 Nov. 1779. New Orleans.
Copy (French). Vol. 11. No. 101. 3 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, Cornwallis MSS. 4, fo. 175; and America and W. Indies 284, fo. 285; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21844, fo. 121.

William Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, October 19. Head Quarters, Boston. — Has received "the enclosed" (not here) from D'Estaing. The sentiments of humanity and politeness exhibit the most amiable disposition. Will order passports for four vessels addressed to Maj.-Gen. Prescott and desire Maj.-Gen. Sullivan to forward them by a flag.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 125. 1 page.

Troops.

1778, October 19. Halifax. — Return of the party going to Quebec by land. Signed, Guy Johnson, colonel. The first name is Ensign Wm. Johnson of the 29th. This and the following appear to be two of the papers alluded to by Brigadier Maclean on 24 October.
Vol, 21. No. 38. 1 page.
Also in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21809, fo. 29.
1778, October 19. Halifax. — Return of party of British and Brunswick Troops ordered to Lunenburg under command of Lieut.-Col. Speth.
Duplicate. Vol. 21. No. 37. 1 page.

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[Gen. Sir H. Clinton] to Brig.-Gen. Augustine Prevost.

1778, October 20. New York. — Reinforcement for St. Augustine and Pensacola to sail immediately. To march troops from Augustine and take post on St. Mary's River, in order to cooperate with the officer commanding that reinforcement who has orders to make an impression on Savannah. All armed craft to be sent to St. Mary's. Capt. Elphinstone to cruize off Tybee for the fleet.
Draft. Vol. 15. No. 147. 1 page.

[Gen. Sir Henry Clinton] to Gov. Patrick Tonyn.

1778, October 20. New York. — Sends copy of letter to Prevost of this date. To give every assistance by collecting all armed crafts and detaining all private ships of war.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 146. 1 page.

General Sir William Howe to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 20. Philadelphia. — [This date, it will be seen, is erroneous. The extract is found to be from letter of 21 Oct. 1777.] The casualties of this campaign require a supply of 1,500 drafts early in the spring independent of recruits raised by the additional companies. Requests additional clothing for 5,000 Provincials.
Extract. Vol. 4:. No. 110. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 20. Cambridge. — "Since I had the honour of addressing Your Excellency by Mr. Clarke an Account is received of the Cloathing Ships from Canada being arrived at Rhode Island.
"The necessary Passports are gone for the security of the Vessels entering Boston Harbour, and I shall expect them in a few days.
"I must request, Sir, that the Commissions for Cloathing, &c, with which Mr. Clark was charged may still go on, as it will be quicker made up, and better adapted for the present instant than the regular Cloathing which may by this means be fitted to the Soldiers by degrees and regularly.
"The system of the Germans differs from ours, and I have, therefore, desired Major-General Reidesel to write to Mr. Clark upon the Subject of his Cloathing Commissions. But we hope in general that Donation Cloathing may be given to the whole. And this leads me to observe that the Officers live in anxious hope of forage Money or some equal allowance, for I do assure you, Sir, their necessary Expences are so great that it will be impossible for them to support without some assistance.
"I hear that Lieutenant Campbell is arrived at Rhode Island and I shall soon see him at Cambridge.
"Mr. Hayes the Surgeon informs me that he has your Excellency's Permission to go for England, he being not included
Page 315
in the Convention but an Exchanged Officer. I take for granted he has reported justly in saying he has your Excellency's leave and I shall, therefore, allow him to go when he has settled the Hospital Accounts: Indeed one Surgeon General is sufficient and Mr. Wier will remain.
"Of the variety of matter with which I have been obliged to trouble Your Excellency by Mr. Clark, I will hope to receive orders upon soon, and that with that Gentleman's return I may know your Excellency's sentiments of those Publick Transactions referred to in my letters."
Signed letter. Vol. 53. No. 32. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott.

1778, October 20. Cambridge. — "Immediately on the Receipt of your Letter of the 12th instant, I writ a Letter to the Count d'Estaing, respecting Passports for Flags of Truce Vessels. I send you Copies of the Letter from me to Count d'Estaing, and the Counts Answer you have, also, a Copy of a Letter from Major-General Heath, with a Draught of the Passports he means, as I suppose, to send to you. By these you will perceive that the Vessels bearing Cloathing may proceed in Safety; and I shall lose no Time in discharging of them.
"I am very sorry to hear by my Secretary, that we shall not immediately receive the whole of the Money expected, but as you were in Want for your own Garrison, it was natural you should use the Cash you had, as the Communication with New York will soon reimburse you and serve us. I beg, however, that you will send round as much as possible, and whenever the next arrives (I hope it may be already arrived), that it may be forwarded directly.
"We are in so much Want of Money here, that the Officers find Difficulty to Subsist; I shall, therefore, be much obliged to you, to send by Land three or four thousand Pounds; this may be done by Mr. Geddes, or by Lieutenant Campbell, as the one may bring the present Sum I request for immediate Use, and the other may go round by Sea, charged with the greater Sum.     .     .     .     .    
"Mr. Clark writ to me in Consequence of the Arrival of the Canada Vessels, to have my Orders whether the Commission he was charged with for Soldiers Cloathing, and Necessaries should be executed. It is agreed upon that they should be, and I must request you will have the Goodness to forward the Letters for Sir Henry Clinton and Mr. Clark, with all Expedition.
"Ensign Savory, who is in Charge of the British Cloathing, and the German Officer, also, will in Course, proceed with the Vessels, in which, when their Commission is ended, they may return to Rhode Island."
P.S. — "I have recollected that it may be possible for you to have received Accounts from New York of the Intention of sending Cash from thence, as I have demanded near £50,000, but I request, in that Case, it may not retard the Vessels, as we want the Cloathing at present more than money, and when the latter
Page 316
arrives at your Island, it may be conveyed to us by Land; I therefore request that, Money or not Money, the Cloathing Vessels may be sent to us.
"I shall take it as a great Favor if you will transmit to Sir Henry Clinton Copies of the Letters I send to you."
Copy. Vol. 9. Nos. 120 and 121. 8 pages.

Resolves of Congress.

1778, October 21. — That David Franks, Commissary of British Prisoners, had abused the trust reposed in him by Congress, by a letter written to Moses Franks in London, which he had endeavoured to convey through the British line. Gen. Arnold to arrest and convey him to jail.
Vol. 8. No. 161. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Washington to Sir H. Clinton, 26 October.

General Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, October 22. New York. — Requests that, in the impossibility the contractors' agents experience here in procuring a sufficient supply of money by bills on their constituents, he will urge the Treasury to send a considerable sum in specie. Begs to refer them to Mr. Crowder — one of the agents, for information.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 8 and 23. 1 page each.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott.

1778, October 22. Boston. — Acknowledges letter of 12th inst.; sends the enclosures to Maj.-Gen. Phillips. Forwards a packet from him and four passports for vessels with flags to come round with the baggage, clothing, etc., for the Convention troops. The flag just arrived with clothing had a passport from a British commander only. Count D'Estaing points out this as improper.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 127. 1 page.

Colonel Guy Johnson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 22. Halifax. — "After being forced by contrary Winds to the Capes of Virginia, we enter'd the Gulph of St. Lawrence the 4th of this Month, and on the 6th being near the Isle of Anticosti, we were forced out by a storm at North West, in which we split our fore Top Sail, Sprung the Top Mast and main Top Sail Yard; The Gale abating when we got off Louisbourgh, we again stood into the Gulph, and had reached the Bird Rocks on the 11th when we were forced away a Second time, having suffer'd much in our Rigging; from the reported State of which, of the Water, the Insufficiency of the Seamen that remained fit for duty, and the condition of the German, and other Troops worn with fatigue, and almost naked, in a Northern Latitude at this advanced Season, we found it necessary to put in here last Week, where the General obligingly offer'd to procure additional Sailors, and give us all the aid in his power, if it should
Page 317
be deemed practicable to prosecute the Voyage; but after making the necessary enquiry's the Owners of the Ship cou'd not be prevail'd on to undertake it, neither can the General obtain any other conveyance for us this Season.
"Lt.-Col. Speht is order'd with his Corps to Lunenburgh, and some of the Officers, Canadians, &c, are gone for St. John's River, being permitted to try for Canada by Land, accompanied with one of my Indians and two others of my People, and (with the Generals approbation) I have sent the Dispatches by the Officer who marches them, and the General has given me every Assurance of being forwarded as early as the Season will permit, notwithstanding which, the delay is a Sensible disappointment and mortification to me, that can only be alleviated by the prospect of some occurring Services here, and of arriving in Canada before the lesser Rivers are open, or the Commencement of Operations."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 21. No. 27. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 23. New York.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 155. 5 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 337; and 589, fo. 62; copy 306, fo. 268.

Halifax.

1778, October 23. Halifax. — Return of engineers and overseers of Nova Scotia. Signed, W. Spry, Comdg. Engineer.
Vol. 21. No. 88. 1 page.
1778, October 23. Halifax. — Return of gunpowder in store. Signed, James Morden, Ordnance Store Keeper.
Vol. 21. No. 34. 1 page,

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Lord Barrington].

1778, October 24. New York. — Lieut. Chapman appointed captain lieutenant in the 52nd, and goes to England by this opportunity.
Copy. Vol. 14. No. 95. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, Vol. 20.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 24. Whitehall. — No. 15.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 31. 8 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 173; copy 431, fo. 274; and in the Sackville MSS.

Halifax.

1778, October 24. Halifax. — Establishment of the General Hospital. Signed, J. Jeffries, purveyor.
Copy. Vol, 21. No. 32. 1 page.

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Brig.-Gen. McLean to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 24. Halifax. — Extreme difficulty in procuring a sufficiency of fuel. The quantity at present in store not sufficient for the troops till the middle of January. Wood extremely scarce and risen to the enormous price of 40s. the cord. Maj.-Gen. Massey's vessels not returned from Spanish River. Sent a small vessel to experiment on cutting and procuring wood about 7 leagues to the eastward of this. Regiments still in camp. "The Nancy armed Ship, which sailed from New York on the 10th of September with a Detachment of British, and German Troops on board for Quebec, put in here the 14th Instant, by the inclosed Memorial, No. 1. The Officers on board represent the Impossibility of going up the River St. Lawrence at this advanced Season of the year, in which they are supported by the unanimous Opinion of everybody here conversant in the Navigation of that River, the more so as the Ship wants some repairs; I have therefore ordered the Troops on board her as Pr return No. 2, to winter Quarters at Lunenburg, where they will be well Accomodated. Some Officers and several Canadians who were on board the Nancy, presented me a Memorial to obtain leave to go to Quebec by land. Having on enquiry found that their Scheme was very practicable; I gave them all the Assistance in my Power. No. 3, will inform your Excellency of the Number of Persons." Has continued the intrenchment round Citadel Hill. Gen. Massey had erected two batteries at Point Pleasant. Chief Engineer Capt. Spry is now drawing plans of all the works around this place. Will send these as soon as finished. Captain Spry has no money. Has granted a temporary warrant for £4,000. Sends a return of the assistant engineers and overseers employed in that department. Whatever his sentiments on so great a number will not make any alteration till he receives directions. Want of powder; sends return and requests a supply. Sends also a return of the artillery mounted with quantity of ammunition at each post as also a return of the troops in the Province. Has found here a number of refugees, besides what is called a Charity List, who have and do receive provisions from the King's stores. Desires directions whether to continue them or not. Incloses return of the establishment of the General Hospital. Has received letter from Lt.-Col. Campbell as to allowing Capt. McDonald of his regiment to dispose of his commission, his health being much impaired. The Lt.-Col. also asks leave for Lt. Campbell to go to Head Quarters concerning affairs of his regiment. The Province tranquil. Harmony between the Lieutenant-Governor Hughes, Sir George Collier and himself.
P.S. — "Of 500 French and Rebel Prisoners who were here, there now only remain 35 the others having been sent in Flags of Truce by Sir George Collier — the French in those that were sent to Newfound Land, in order to carry off the Inhabitants of St. Piers — the Rebels to Boston."
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 53. No. 21. 6 pages.

Page 319

[Navy Board] to John Robinson.

1778, October 24. London. — Report on the application of midshipmen, sent out in command of the small armed vessels to the River St. Lawrence, for the same pay during their service on the Lake as lieutenants commanding armed ships are allowed in the navy.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 156. 3 pages.
Copy in the British Museum, Additional MSS. 21706, fo. 102.

Jonathan Clarke to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

[1778, October 25.] — Report, as Deputy Commissary of the Troops of Convention, on presenting the American accounts for supplies to these troops.
Vol. 8. No. 159. 5 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 365; 589, fo. 65; and 155, fo. 169.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 25. New York. — No. 24.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 157. 3 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 347; and 589, fo. 66; copy 306, fo. 272.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 25. New York. — Separate. Sends report of Commissary Clarke above.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 158. 1 page.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 361; and 589, fo. 64; copy 306, fo. 274.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, October 25. Head Quarters, Boston. — "I have this moment received the enclosed Resolve of the Honourable Congress and a letter from His Excellency General Washington to have it carried into effect without delay.
"The orders for this movement came as unexpected to me as they will to you, but I must desire that you will immediately give notice of it to the Officers and Troops that they may be ready to move as soon as possible.
"It seems by the resolve of Congress, that the sole reason for the removing the Troops of the Convention is founded on Sir Henry Clinton's not furnishing passports for American vessels to bring provisions to Boston for the use of those Troops, or supplying them with provisions himself, as appears by a letter received since I have been writing, brought by another express from his Excellency General Washington, in which he is pleased to observe, 'The first request we know has never been granted, and I imagine no steps have been taken to supply the Troops from New York or elsewhere; if there have, agreeable to the
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'letter and Spirit of the resolution, they are to remain where they now are, if not they are to be sent forward in the manner pointed out in mine of Yesterday.'
"As nothing of the latter has been done of any Consequence the orders by the first express must be complied with.
"I do not know exactly where Charlotteville is situated, but am certain the distance must be very considerable, you will please to determine whether it will not be best for the Vessels which came from Canada with the baggage to proceed to Virginia, which will save you a very considerable expense.
"The necessary Provisions, Waggons, &c, will be provided at different Stages on the rout, and you may depend upon every assistance in my power."
P.S. — "I will inform you to-morrow in what Divisions the Troops are to march."
Copy. Vol. 9. No, 96. 2 pages.
Enclosing Resolves of Congress, 15. Oct.

Major-General Riedesel and Brigadier-General James Hamilton to Major-General William Heath.

1778, October 26. Cambridge. — Answer. "It becomes necessary for us to make only one observation upon your letter, and to do it properly it is necessary to transcribe what you have quoted from General Washington's letter to you, He is, as you write pleased to observe
'The first request we know has never been granted, and I imagine no steps have been taken to supply the Troops from New York or elsewhere; if there have, agreeable to the letter and spirit of the Resolution, they are to remain where they now are, if not they are to be sent forward in the manner pointed out in mine of yesterday.'
"Upon this passage of General Washington's letter you are pleas'd to make the following remark:
'As nothing of the latter has been done of any consequence, the Orders by the first express must be complied with.'
"We profess, Sir, not clearly to understand your remark, and as the consequences upon it are of a very serious nature, we wish you would be so good to reconsider General Washington's letter. What you mention of not having been done 'of any consequence' we apprehend may have reference to the Provisions brought here in the Summer, and surely, Sir, cannot be considered as belonging in any part to the late resolutions of the American Congress of September and October.
"It may therefore be presumed that provisions are ordered from New York to Boston for the use of the Troops of Convention but that there has not been sufficient time for the arrival there of the Victualler Ships.
"While, therefore, there remains any doubt upon this matter, and that General Washington's Orders are conditional, and have
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a reference to what Sir Henry Clinton may do on this subject, we submit to you whether it might be not reasonable that an explicit answer should be had from Sir Henry Clinton before the Troops of Convention are positively put upon a march for so many hundred miles in the severe season of Winter and in the unlucky situation you well know they are in respecting their want of Cloathing." But if the march is to take place they trust he will render each day's march as moderate a distance as the nature of the Country will admit — that he will allow the troops to halt as often as may be convenient — that they may be marched in such divisions as to be furnished with quarters in barns or otherwise as may be necessary for them, and that provisions may be so ordered to be issued upon the march that there may be no apprehension of want. Ask that the flag of truce lately arrived may be unloaded and the blankets, cloth for breeches and leggings, shoes and stockings be delivered to the troops particularly at Rutland prior to the order of march. They would certainly prefer the Canada vessels going to Virginia and desire that an officer be permitted to go to Rhode Island to detain the vessels and to forward Mr. Geddes to Cambridge. Propose Lt. Collier for this as his baggage is all on board, but to prevent any delay beg that the accompanying letter might be forwarded by express to Maj.-Gen. Prescott at Rhode Island. In a matter of such moment, they earnestly request passport for an officer (Capt. Masters) to go to New York to report to Sir Hy. Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 38. 3 pages.

Major-General William Heath to Major-General Riedesel and Brigadier-General James Hamilton.

1778, October 20. — Head Quarters, Boston. — "Gentlemen, Your joint favor of this date inclosing a letter from Major General Phillips to Major General Prescott, is before me; my great indisposition of Body forbids my answering of it so particularly as I otherwise should do.
"The letter to Major General Prescott I have sent by express, and copy of your letter to me, to His Excellency General Washington.
"I shall have no objection to Mr. Collier's going to Rhode Island, if it should appear necessary, and any part, or all, the Cloathing (as you may choose) on board the Flag shall be landed. I cannot see any necessity of, or advantage that can accrue from an Officer's going to New York. If you wish to write to Sir Henry Clinton I will forward it to General Washington without delay and request him to send it in by a flag.
"As the resolve of Congress and His Excellency's orders are express, that the Troops should move, if no steps have been taken before a time therein mentioned to supply them, and I do not know that there have been any, and your letter only observes that it may be presumed that provisions are ordered, I dare not delay the removal of the Troops, but have given your letter at
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large to General Washington who will, if he chooses perhaps have time to express himself further by the time the Troops are ready to march."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 94. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Maj-Gen. Richard Prescott.

1778, October 26. Cambridge. — That an order is arrived for the Convention troops to march into Virginia. Desires him to give notice to the Commander-in-Chief by the first opportunity. Major.-Gen. Heath has been requested to allow an officer to go to New York as also for Lt. Collier to return to Rhode Island. Will send all particulars by latter. Requests that the two Canada ships be detained at Rhode Island till he sends directions for them to go to Virginia. Necessity for Mr. Geddes coming here with money "without which we cannot possibly proceed, as we have not one shilling among us."
2 copies. Vol. 9. Nos. 110 and 123. 2 and 3 pages respectively.

Treasury.

1778, October 26. London. — Papers marked 1 to 7, viz.:—
(1) Abstract of the advices received from Daniel Wier of the number of rations daily consumed October 1777, to August 1778.
(2) Comparison between the stock of provisions on 10 October 1777 and 26 April 1778 (from Daniel Wier's Returns).
(3) Ditto, 26 April 1778 and 30 August.
(4) Ditto, 30 August and 14 September.
(5) List of ships lately taken up — 22 ships — 7,965 tons and 1,356 seamen.
(6) State of the provisions at New York and Rhode Island grounded on Daniel Wier's return, dated 14 September.
(7) List of ships which will remain in America after the departure of those mentioned in Daniel Wier's letter of 14 September, as meant to be sent to Cork directly.
Vol. 2. No. 130.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Daniel Wier 31 October and further enclosed to Sir Hy. Clinton on the same date.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 26. Head Quarters. — "By direction of Congress I transmit you the inclosed copy of their Resolutions on the 21st instant respecting David Franks, Esq., by which you will perceive he will not be permitted to act as Commissary to the British prisoners after the 10th of next month; and that it is their desire that your Excellency will nominate a proper person, who, having received their approbation, may succeed Mr. Franks in the Office."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 160. 1 page.
Enclosing Congress Resolutions, 21 Oct. 1778.

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Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 27. War Office. — Sends the enclosed to make such enquiry on as may be thought proper.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 70. 1 page.
Enclosing:— Lt. Thornhill. Memorial to Lord Barrington, 3 Oct.

General Sir Henry Clinton to [Brig.-Gen. John Campbell].

1778, October 27. Head Quarters, New York. — Directing him to proceed with his troops to Pensacola and to take command of H.M. forces in West Florida. Tho commanding officer has been instructed to erect a fort on the Mississippi at or near where Fort Bute stood, to command entrance of the Ibberville, with a garrison of 300, also to provide 2 or more gallies to protect the navigation of the river and prevent any craft of the rebels descending to New Orleans. To communicate with Col. Stuart. Blank warrants for general courts martial and deputations for Judge Advocates will be given him and he is hereby authorized to approve sentences of such Courts excepting reduction of Commissioned Officers and those that are capital. Waldeck Regiment going under his command to receive their subsistence subject to the same stoppages as the British troops. Copy of their last settlement will be given him. The Provincial troops are paid up to 23rd Feb. 1779 inclusive. Lt. Hugh Mackay Gordon of the 16th regt. of Foot to be invested with money to pay them when next subsistence becomes due.
Copy. Vol. 13. No. 51. 2 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Colonel John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

1778, October 27. New York. — Has dispatched 1,000 under Brigadier General Campbell to Pensacola. Three thousand detached also under Lt.-Col. Campbell of 71st Regiment to take possession of Savannah. Encloses copies of their instructions. With regard to employing the Indians refers him to Gen. Howe's letter of 12 July 1777. Has sent orders to Prevost to march to St. Mary's river to co-operate with Lt.-Col. Campbell.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 148. 2 pages.

Major-General Baron de Riedesel and Brigadier-General James Hamilton to Major-General William Heath.

1778, October 27. Cambridge. — Receipt of his letter of yesterday's date. Major-General Phillips is totally unacquainted with whatever may have passed between Gen. Washington and Sir Henry Clinton and they themselves can know nothing of the subject but what is described in his (Heath's) letter, and as the inserted paragraph of Gen. Washington's letter gave cause for making the observation they did in their letter of yesterday they leave it there. Thanks for permission to Lt. Collier to go to
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Rhode Island. Consider the refusal to permit Capt. Masters going to New York as a hardship, since it is necessary Gen. Clinton should he fully acquainted with the situation of the troops. They renew their request. Are anxious that on the march daily distances be not more than 10 or 12 miles and the divisions in small hodies. Sends a few particulars upon the subject of the march of last year which they hope will prevent all complaint on this. Desire the march be delayed until the British troops at Rutland have received shoes, stockings and other necessaries.
Copy. Vol. 53. No, 37. 3 pages.

Major-General Baron de Riedesel and Brigadier-General James Hamilton to Major-General William Heath.

1778, October 27. Cambridge. — Enclose two orders of march, one for the British, the other for the German Troops of Convention. Observations on the desirability of marching in several small divisions as the barns of the inhabitants will not be able to hold many men. Are convinced that in this winter season he means to put the men under cover. Hope that quarters will be provided for officers and horses for such as require them. Provisions will be more easily obtained for smaller divisions. Arrangements which could be made about escort. Maj.-Gen. Riedesel will incline to stay 24 hours in the rear of the march to regulate anything necessary. Should the enclosed order of march be adopted, request that the first division of the Germans move from Winter Hill the same day as the 2nd or 3rd division of the British move from Rutland. But should his sentiments be contrary to the enclosed order they still hope he will not direct large divisions, also that they may be allowed to regulate the distribution of them.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 36. 3 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, October 28. New York. — Presents copy of a memorial from the Major Commandant and other officers of the Provincial corps of Queen's Rangers to the late Commander in Chief praying his intercession with the King to establish them in the rank of the army. Their signal services induce him to recommend it and request that it be laid before his Majesty.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 162. 1 page.

Major-General Heath to Major-General Riedesel and Brigadier-General Hamilton.

1778, October 28. Head Quarters, Boston. — Acknowledges their favours of the previous day. The distribution, although exceedingly convenient for the troops, will be very tedious for the inhabitants. The divisions must be larger than they propose. Has formed a plan of march dividing the British into three and the German into two divisions agreeable to the enclosed schedule; in such divisions thinks they will be made tolerably comfortable
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on the march. Alteration of corps from one division to another may be made. List of officers and men must be given in before the troops march. Gov. Trumbull will direct their movements after they reach Enfield. They are to start next Wednesday. Does not see any advantage of Capt. Masters going to New York. However, as they appear anxious for it, consents that he may go to Gen. Washington with Capt. Bliss on condition that he pays Capt. Bliss's expenses and thence to Clinton if Washington thinks proper, otherwise he is to join the troops. Distances cannot exactly be determined, as convenience of covering must be consulted. Riedesel's request to stay behind for the time proposed is agreeable.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 35. 2 pages.
Enclosure:—
[Query about 1778, October 28.] — Distribution of the Troops of Convention on their march to Connecticut on their way to the State of Virginia.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 93. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 29. Cambridge. — "An order has been given very sudden and very unexpected for the Troops of the Convention of Saratoga to march from Masachusetts Bay to Charlotteville in the County of Albermarle in the Province of Virginia.
"It is needless for me to make any Remarks upon this March as Your Excellency will perfectly judge upon the matter respecting the distance, the season of the Year, the ill condition of the Troops for such an Operation, but in a particular manner as the Order stands connected with, or opposed to, the treaty of Convention made at Saratoga between Major General Gates and Lieutenant General Burgoyne.
"I leave the whole to Your Excellency's wisdom and judgement, observing only that the Troops, both Officers and Men, have received this order as becomes them, and are preparing for this March of seven hundred Miles with the utmost chearfullness, Alacrity, and a most determined perseverance in their Zeal and duty in His Majesty's service.
"I inclose for Your Excellency's perusal Copys of all the Papers that have passed upon this subject between Major General Heath and Brigadier General Hamilton and Major General Reidesel.
"The reason for the two latter corresponding with Major General Heath is owing to that American Officer having ceased of some time writing to me, of which I have not informed Your Excellency before, nor do I recollect whether 1 verbally mentioned it to Mr. Clarke.
"It has happened most fortunately that Lieutenant Campbell is just arrived with the donation from Your Excellency to the Troops which, with other Necessaries, will prove of essential service on this occasion — but the two Clothing Vessels from Canada I have stopped at Rhode Island meaning with Your
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Excellency's Permission to order them round to Virginia to meet the troops there at their Arrival; and I shall detain the Vessel in which Lieutenant Campbell came untill after the March is begun, as I propose to put into her all superfluous Stores and Baggage.
"This letter goes by Captain Masters of the 24th Regiment who has permission from Major General Heath to attend General Washingtons Commands at His Head Quarters for his going on to New York. I have been desirous of sending an Officer of this Rank as he will be able to answer a number of Questions which Your Excellency may chuse to make, and to give such clear reports of the State of the Troops as cannot well be crowded into a letter.
"This Officer as well as Captain England, who went into New York some little time ago on parole will receive Your Excellency's orders upon the necessary applications to General Washington for the manner in which they are to join the Troops of Convention upon their March, unless Your Excellency and General Washington shall settle that they go round by sea or otherwise as may be thought proper. Captain Masters has a request to make relating to himself and his private affairs, which he has my liberty of submitting to your Excellency's consideration.
"The return of Mr. Commissary Clarke by the most expeditious method seems absolutely necessary as the Publick Papers in his Department as Commissary General are all at Cambridge, and he will probably have Publick Accounts to settle with the American Commissaries. I will, therefore, hope you may obtain permission, Sir, for Mr. Clarke going by land from New York, and he may return to Cambridge with the Officer who conducts Captain Masters to General Washington's Head Quarters.
"Your Excellency will perceive that the Orders of Major General Heath respecting the March of the Troops of Convention are special and Positive in every respect, but as it relates to me, and as I am in close confinement under a Guard in my Quarters I apprehend Your Excellency will approve of my silently attending on whatever may be further directed on my Subject — I mean as it relates to Major General Heath; for I have taken the liberty of writing to General Washington requesting to know what directions he may have given relating to my future situation — that General being, as Yrour Excellency will observe, empowered by the American Congress to govern the March of the Troops of Convention from Masachusetts Bay to Virginia.
"Mr. Hayes, the Surgeon, being an exchanged Officer, will go from hence to Rhode Island, as will also Lieutenant Collier, my Secretary, by permission of Major General Heath. I shall keep one of these Gentlemen till the last moment that I may finally Report upon the Marching of the Troops."
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 53. No. 34. 4 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to General Washington.

1778, October 29. Cambridge. — Capt. Masters who delivers this letter has a pacquet for Sir Henry Clinton. Requests
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permission for him to carry it to New York. It is fortunate that the direction of the march has been given to His Excellency.
"In the present situation of things respecting the Troops of Convention I am led to trouble you, Sir, on a Subject which, otherwise, I should be silent upon — I mean my own Situation, and I will request to be informed whether it is intended that I should remain in my present confinement at Cambridge, or whether I am to move with the Troops of Convention. These are questions it would be improper in me to make to Major General Heath, but your Excellency having the direct and positive power over the future destination of the Troops of Convention opens to me an intercourse with you, Sir, whose Character stands admired, even by those whom Publick Calamity and the unhappy disputes between America and Great Britain have compelled to be Your Enemies, and who view your private virtues in the fairest light.
"I by no means, solicit to know how far the American Congress have entered into Major General Heath's reasons for his Conduct towards me, nor whether at my arrival at Virginia, if I am to be sent thither, I am to be continued or not in close confinement. I only wish to know if it is intended I should leave Cambridge and, if so, when and how. I have necessarily a great deal of Baggage and a numerous Suite, and the Situation of the Aides de Camp and Staff Officers who compose my family will depend on a great measure upon what shall be done with me.
" Under this description allow me to request your orders upon this Subject.
"I will not plead inconveniences upon so long a Journey nor the want of good health; for I possess the latter so entirely as would render the journey of no Account, but I will honestly own a strong desire to visit my friends before I take my residence in Virginia which I acknowledge to view as a state of Exile that will necessarily continue for a long duration. I have, also, connections in Great Britian from whom I have never been able to hear of fourteen Months which, with a total ignorance of my private affairs, makes me desirous of settling the latter, and of communicating once more freely with my friends and relations before I am fixed in my Retirement in Virginia.
"If these reasons appear to a Gentleman of your nice feelings of any force I will hope to receive passports for myself and Family agreeable to my request. If I do not I shall still be in the opinion that a Refusal will be Painfull to you as a Private Gentleman, however, in Your Publick Character such refusal may have become necessary; and I can, then, only lament that this unhappy War will not always allow the Principles of Generosity to Operate.
"By the resolution of the American Congress, by which is given to you, Sir, an entire power over the troops of Convention, I apprehend, this application goes properly to Your Excellency ; but, should I mistake, I will relie on Your goodness to refer my request to the President of the American Congress, and that you
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will do it so as to render my having written to you on the Subject free of any intention of disrespect for Mr. Laurens."
Copy, Vol. 53. No. 33. 4 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 30 Oct.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, October 30. Head Quarters, Boston. — His letter of this date enclosing report of the Assistant Quarter Master General just received. Two warrants are issued to impress waggons for the Convention troops. The Capt. of Provost shall have passport to Rutland. Maj.-Gen. Phillips is to go with the other officers and troops. No concessions have yet been made by Gen. Phillips for the expressions for which he was restricted; when he chooses to proceed to Rutland an escort shall attend him.
Copy. Vol. 9. No, 122. 2 pages.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 30. Cambridge. — Sends the enclosed. Desires him to negative his request to go to New York if he thinks it improper.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 97. 1 page.
Enclosing:— Maj. Phillips to Gen. Washington, 29 Oct. 1778.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 30. Cambridge. — Sends return of the state of troops under his command. Begs this year's bat and forage money for the officers; also that usual daily stoppages be taken off from soldiers during this march to Virginia.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 99. 1 page.

Jonathan Clarke to [                 ].

1778, October 31. New York. — List of articles for Brunswick and Hessian troops.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 50. 3 pages.

Brig.-Gen. Jas. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

1778, October 31. Cambridge. — Some sick and some married officers desire to go by sea to Virginia. Requests the sick men be permitted to remain in hospital at Cambridge until further directions are received. Their number not yet ascertained. Officers sick and married amount to about five or six. Requests hospital stores be shipped on board the cartel and go under care of a hospital mate, with a conductor and the matron.
Copy. Vol. 9. No, 136. 2 pages.

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Brig.-Gen. Jas. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, October 31. Cambridge. — Nothing has been heard of Mr. Geddes and the total want of money renders the situation very critical. The Major-Generals Phillips and Riedesel mean to become responsible for the debts of the officers at their marching, but this must be very inconvenient to them. Seriously requests that Lt. Campbell may go express to Rhode Island and if possible meet Mr. Geddes. A variety of business necessitates the request that Major-General Riedesel be allowed to remain three days after the German troops leave Cambridge and Major- General Phillips set forward three days after Riedesel. Requests an answer and hopes to receive passports with parole for Lt. Campbell.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 138. 3 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, October 31. Cambridge. — "On Lt.-Col. Lind's Memorial. Cannot consent to his going to New York or Rhode Island on parole but will submit his memorial to the Commander-in- Chief. He shall be included amongst those officers for whom Maj.-Gen. Heath's permission will be requested for the liberty of staying behind. Should that mode fail Lt.-Col. Lind may apply himself to Maj.-Gen. Heath. Might make very severe strictures on that gentleman's conduct."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 98. 5 pages.
Extracts of the same. Vol. 9. No. 103. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Lieut.-Colonel John Lind to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, October 31. Cambridge. — Memorial. That having reason to believe his Commission is by this time disposed of to Major Ackland, in consequence of an agreement and resignation given in to Sir Guy Carleton before the troops left Canada, therefore considering Major Ackland's influence makes no doubt but he has obtained His Majesty's approbation, begs leave to go to New York or Rhode Island on parole, or if that cannot be granted to remain behind the regiment, till he is certain of his fate, which is humbly submitted.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 104. 1 page.

John Robinson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 31. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — The Lords of the Treasury have agreed with Mr. Samuel Martin to deliver 1,000 chaldrons of coal at Head Quarters for the use of the army. The enclosure contains the terms and conditions of the agreement.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 131. 1 page.
Enclosing John Robinson to Saml. Martin, 29 Aug. 1778.

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John Robinson to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, October 31. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — Acknowledges letter of 4 August with triplicate of a requisition made 26th April for candles, neither original nor duplicate of which had before come to hand. 100,000 lb. weight of candles immediately ordered to be shipt at Cork. From previous correspondence with Mr. Wier he will have seen the constant attention paid by the Board to the state of his provisions. Refers to the enclosed. The true causes of the stock being reduced so low were that a very great consumption or loss of provisions took place last year beyond what their Lordships had information of and the detention of the Mersey's fleet in America, when promises had been repeatedly made to send all the victuallers back immediately necessitated additional expence to the public in taking up fresh ships. Their Lordships rely on him to prevent such detention, as it is for this reason victuallers are not under the direction of the admiral. Directs enquiry to be made to account for the deficiency or loss beyond the established consumption and the result communicated.
Triplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 116. 3 pages.
Enclosures:—
John Robinson to Daniel Wier.

1778, October 31. Whitehall, Treasury Chambers. — A long letter pointing out the defects and distressing uncertainties in his returns of the provisions and supplies for America. Observations on the enclosed papers. Supplies on the way or preparing to be sent out.
Triplicate signed letter. Vol. 2. No. 129. 11 pages. Enclosing 7 papers. See under Treasury, 26 October.

Brig.-Gen. Jas. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, November 1. Cambridge. — Was much surprised at Maj. Hopkins informing him that no orders had been given to provide waggons for the Troops as no application had been made to him (Heath). In every European service the great line of orders is given and received by general officers and details settled by subordinate departments. Makes requisition according to the 2nd distribution and has lowered demand as far as possible. Officers in Rutland in great distress for money and cannot discharge their debts. If Lt. Campbell be allowed to go without delay to Rhode Island he may return in about six days and Major-General Phillips proposes to write for a sum of money to be sent by him as it is possible Mr. Geddes may have sailed in the Canada vessels. They have no wish to delay the march, but it is requisite the officers be enabled to leave this province with an honourable name by discharging their debts and with the means of subsisting upon the march.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 137. 4 pages.

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Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, November 1. Head Quarters, Boston. — Acknowledges two letters of yesterday. The one respecting sick and married officers shall be transmitted to Washington. They may remain at Cambridge until his answer is received. Lt. Campbell may proceed to Rhode Island unless he meets Mr. Geddes on the way. An American officer must attend him. Encloses parole and passport; the former to be sent to him (Heath) after it is signed. Has no objections to the requests of Major-Generals Phillips and Riedesel.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 126. 1 page.

Captain Maclean, 9th Regt., to Captain Alex. Baillie.

1778, November 1. Rutland. — "Tho' the Rebel General has ordered us to March its a doubt with me whether the Inhabitants will let us go, as we are all drowned in debt to them.
"Its Tyranny with their former transgressions. We are not now under any Parole, at least, when we leave this."
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 132. 1 page.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. Heath to Brig.-Gen. Hamilton, 4 Nov.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott.

1778, November 1. Cambridge. — "I writ to you on the 20th of October,     .     .     .     .     I cannot but be greatly alarmed at not hearing from you; for supposing Mr. Geddes being sailed with the two Canada Vessels for Boston, my letter was of such serious Import as to require an Answer, with the real State respecting Money for the Supply of the Troops of Convention upon this unexpected Order of March from this Province to Virginia.
"All the Regulations are settled, and the Day of March both for German and British Troops from Cambridge and Rutland is fixed, for Wednesday the 4th of November,     .     .     .     .     You may naturally judge, Sir, of the very painful Situation I must be in, when I declare to you that there is not Fifty Pounds among all the Troops under my Command, and that the Officers are entirely unable, not only to discharge their Debts before they go, but both Officers and Men will have no means of Subsistence upon the March, unless Mr. Geddes fortunately arrives in the Canada vessels; or that I shall succeed in obtaining Money from Rhode Island through the Liberty that has been obtained from Major General Heath, of sending Lieutenant Campbell express for that purpose.
"I am, therefore, to supplicate you, Sir, that should Mr. Geddes be still at Rhode Island, he may be ordered to proceed to Cambridge with the utmost Dispatch and with as much Money as he can procure.
"Should Mr. Geddes be sailed in the Canada vessels, I must then most seriously request that you will send with Lieutenant Campbell, one of your Paymasters, with ten Thousand Pounds, or as near that Sum as you are able.
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"If Mr. Geddes be at Sea, the Uncertainty of winds may keep him from Boston for some Time, and though Major General Heath may be prevailed upon to postpone the March for a day or two, it cannot be expected he will longer; and therefore, our only hope is in the Return of Lieutenant Campbell, who has my Orders for travelling Night and Day.
"I enclose you a Duplicate of the Letter I wrote to you on the 20th of October, and I also send you a Duplicate of my Dispatch to Sir Henry Clinton, containing Copies of various Papers relating to this March of the Troops of Convention. You will be so good to read them and send the Dispatch to Sir Henry Clinton.
"I must of Necessity stay some days, after the Troops at Cambridge, and you shall hear from me by Lieut. Collier, my Secretary, who Major General Heath has granted Permission to go in the Canada Vessels to Virginia, where I shall direct them to meet the Troops, at their Arrival there, should it be agreeable to the Commander in Chief.
"I will most earnestly request that Lieutenant Campbell may return to me without an Instant's Delay."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 145. 9 folios. Extract same Vol. No. 109.

Brig.-Gen. Jas. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath.

1778, November 2. Cambridge. — "Not having received an answer to my letter of yesterday, in the present painfull and critical situation of the Officers and Troops of Convention obliges me to give you this second trouble.
"Major General Phillips has received representations from all the different Corps, British and German, upon their present distress — Major General Riedesel has already written to you, as will Brigadier Gall — not that there needs any explanation upon this matter to you, who are so thoroughly acquainted with our situation.
"If the Troops begin their march on Wednesday what is to become of the situation of the Officers? how are they to be received into houses? how are they to be fed? when they are entirely without money to defray any such Expences. While they remained at Rutland, Cambridge, Winter Hill and Medford they had a running Credit, as it was known the Pay Master General would be soon here with Money to enable them to discharge their debts, but upon the route, where they are entirely unknown and where they change place every day, it is impossible they can subsist.
"Lieut. Campbell set off the Instant your Passport arrived and went on to Jamaica Plains to wait for Major Rice, and I am informed that he continued his route last night at Eleven o'Clock. It is possible he may be at Rhode Island to-night, but with Certainty to-morrow. It will require one entire day to compleat his business there. Two days after that will bring him to Cambridge, and I apprehend there can be no doubt of his arriving on next Friday night. On Saturday, therefore, Money can be distributed to the Troops here and sent to Rutland. As this
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seems to be the real state of the Case it must be referred to your Consideration whether the March should not be ordered for next Monday, as in that time, without all doubt, these so essential matters will be settled.
"At any rate, Sir, supposing you to keep the March suspended upon the Idea that Mr. Geddes or Lieutenant Campbell may arrive sooner, it will be certainly necessary to send directions thereon to Rutland, as the Troops there are actually under orders of March and we understand that Colonel Garnish is gone forward to take upon him the Command.
"This unlucky delay is certainly more painfull to us than it can possibly be troublesome to you, for at this Season of the Year Six days must necessarily make a very great difference in such a March, and you may be assured, Sir, that tedious and distressing as this long March must be, it will be undertaken very cheerfully and without any desire of procrastination or Stop.
"I shall take it as a particular favor if you will be so good to answer this, and will give your directions upon the request contained in this letter."
Copy. Vol, 9. No. 128. 4 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, November 2. Head Quarters, Boston. — "Yours of yesterday came to hand the last evening. The number of Waggons applied for by the Assistant Quarter Master Genl of the Troops of the Convention is greater than can be allowed, and considering that the heavy baggage is on board the Transports at Rhode Island lately arrived from Canada, I cannot conceive that a greater number than what Major Hopkins has orders to take up can be necessary. If any of the Officers have Liquors or other small Stores which they wish to take on with them, the Quarter Master will assist them in procuring Teams at the usual rates, the respective Officers paying for them, but no such Stores are to be loaded on the other Waggons.
"Your representation of the present situation of the Officers I have duly considered; in every view it is embarrassing. My orders from His Excellency General Washington are to put the Troops in motion immediately. The advanced Season, if we consider the Comfort of the Troops, requires that not a moment be lost. It must, also, be exceedingly disagreeable to the Officers to think of going away without discharging their debts, and without money to supply their necessities on the road.
"Under a view of the whole I have given orders that the march of the first division be deferred untill Saturday morning next, and so successively, when they must at any rate march."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 129. 2 pages.

[Chief Justice] W[illiam] S[mith] to William Eden.

1778, November 2. New York.
Autograph copy signed W.S. Vol, 8. No. 163. 4 pages.
Autograph signed letter in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 300, fo. 435.

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Lord Barrington to General Sir. Henry Clinton.

1778, November 3. War Office. — That the heavy expense of the hospitals appearing to arise from the principal members not agreeing on the duties they were severally to exercise, it was intended to send out Sir James Napier with ample powers to set every branch on a proper footing. That the order has been countermanded, but regulations contained in the instructions to him and in the letter to Sir W. Howe of the 2d March, however, are to be adopted as far as may be practicable. Some immediate regulation should be made as to the usual stoppage of 4d. a day to be made or not made for sailors, women, children and refugees who pass through, or at least that the purveyors be indemnified by authority against any demand against them. That the number of mates be reduced. Proper economy be observed with regard to servants of the hospitals. Surgeons of detached hospitals should have orders to observe the same regulations as to the purveying business as established in the General Hospitals or to leave that part to the clerks and stewards appointed and instructed by the purveyors.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 72. 3 pages.

Major George Forster to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, November 3. Eutland. — "If we are to march on Wednesday I do not see how it will be possible for the greater part of the Officers to leave this, as the Inhabitants here are thoroughly determined to detain them if they have not Money to pay their Lodgings, &c.
"It is an universal complaint here, and, as I mentioned to you in my letter of Sunday last, I do not think there are Forty Guineas in this Army. Some Method must be fallen on, or a Number of us must be thrown into Jail. This will not be the case with me and a few others, but the greater number will be detained. I sincerely wish it was in my power to assist those Gentlemen, but that is out of my power, as I have only Five Guineas left, and in course if money does not arrive we shall be obliged to live on our Rations, and fare as our Fellow Soldiers, but this we shall not repine at."
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 130o. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Brig.-Gen. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. Heath, 4. Nov.

Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, November 3. Newport. — "Dear Sir: Your letter of the 26th October did not come to my hand 'till the 28th, and that of the 1st instant this day.
"The former from feeling much your very disagreeable situation I should have answered more immediately, had I not been detained by the hope of doing to your satisfaction, which, for many reasons, has not been in my power 'till now.
"Agreeable to your wish Lieutenant Campbell and Mr. Geddes are sent, without delay, with 10,000l. sterling. Should any further sum be necessary Mr. Geddes may return.
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"Several European Goods for the use of your Troops having been contracted for by Mr. Geddes and others, I must beg to know your wish in that respect by Mr. Collier, when he comes here.
"No time shall be lost in forwarding your letter to Sir Henry Clinton, but the wind will not permit it at present.
"With the warmest wish for your health and, if possible, happiness in so long a march and at this disagreeable Season, I have the honor, &c."
P.S. — "Some unavoidable official delays having hindered Mr. Geddes proceeding with the Money this day, I have forwarded Lieutenant Campbell to give you notice thereof, and to assure you the other Gentleman shall follow him early to-morrow morning, at farthest, with the sum I have mentioned above, which should have been more considerable had it been in my power to make it so."
Copy, Vol. 9. No. 108. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 4. War Office. — Acknowledges letters. List of promotions laid before the King and approved. Must defer answering dispatch of 17th Sept. as he has not yet been able to take the pleasure of the King on the questions therein stated, especially allowance to be made to foreign troops in case of losses by fire or other accidents, and extending to wounded officers of provincials the same bounties as are given to regulars.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 73. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 4. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 75. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Promotions.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 76. 1 page.

Lord George Germain to Mr. President Callbeck.

1778, November 4. Whitehall. No. 4. — Acknowledges letters. "If Mr. Mellish, the Acting Provost Marshall, from feelings of false Delicacy chose rather to resign his Office than do his duty by putting the Laws into Execution, you did very right to Accept his Resignation.     .     .     .     .     As you Mention Mr. Bobert Stewart, whom you have Nominated to the Intermediate Exercise of that Office, to have been one of the first Adventurers, and to have Expended a Large Sum of Money on the Island, I have the pleasure to Acquaint you that His Majesty has been pleased to Approve that Appointment.
"I shall Enquire into the Cause of Mr. Allanby's long Absence, and if it should Appear that no proper Permission shall have been Obtain'd or Reason Assigned, he will be under the Necessity of Relinquishing his Office or of Returning to his Duty.
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"You have Done well in Advising the lords of the Treasury of the Sums you have Drawn for in Consequence of Sir William Howe's Letter of the 6th February 1776, and the Services to which those Sums have been Applied     .     .     .     .     I have only to Recommend to you that in finishing such Barracks and in Accomplishing such Works as are to be undertaken for the Defence of the Town, you do take Care that no Works shall he undertaken that are not Essentially Necessary, and that in the Execution of them the Publick may not be put to any Expence that can be Avoided."
Certified true copy by W. Spry, Commanding Engineer, Halifax, 27 January 1780. Vol. 29. No. 295. 2 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 4. Whitehall. — Nos. 16, 17, 18. Three letters.
Duplicate signed letters. Vol. 7. Nos. 32, 33, 34. 4, 6, 2 pages.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, 431, 589, &c.; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 4. Whitehall. — No. 19.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 35. 3 pages.
Enclosing Declarations of Consul Katencamp and Capt. Newman. See 1 October.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 273; copy 431, fo. 280; and in the Sackville MSS.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 4. Whitehall. — Separate. Recommends John Cristall surgeon to 1st Battalion Pennsylvania Loyalists.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 38. 1 page.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 277.

Brig.-Gen. Jas. Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. W. Heath.

1778, November 4. Cambridge. — His directions for deferring the march it is sincerely hoped will have their effect, and that Mr. Geddes or Lt. Campbell will be returned in time. The inhabitants require attention as well as the officers, and they will take it themselves unless it is given. It is certain writs are prepared here and at Rutland to arrest the officers unless the debts are discharged before the march is commenced. The enclosure confirms this. Disabled and sick soldiers will be left at Cambridge as directed and with a surgeon's mate and two officers. Requests Lt.-Col. Lind and Capt. Pilman may stay behind at Cambridge. Major Riedesel will write concerning the German troops. List of officers and men to be left behind shall be given, and he doubts not Washington will grant them leave to go by sea and probably the invalids to be exchanged. Lists of officers and men desired
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are in the Adjutant General's office; he shall have them immediately. "The Number of Waggons you have directed is inadequate to the Service."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 130. 4 pages.
Enclosing Maj. Foster to Maj.-Gen. Phillips, 3 Nov.

Brig.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, November 4. Head Quarters, Boston. — Lt. Maxwell shall remain at Cambridge till an answer is received from Gen. Washington. "The first division of the Troops of Convention must absolutely begin their march on Saturday morning and so successively. If Mr. Geddes or Lieutenant Campbell should not be returned, measures must be devised for paying off the Accounts of the Officers who march first; I think there can be no doubt of Mr. Geddes or Lieutenant Campbell returning before the last division are gone.
"Inclosed is copy of a letter which is just sent me, at which, I must confess, I am not a little surprized. I shall take proper notice of it.
"From this hint in Capt. McLean's letter, that the former parole would be void on leaving this place, I have enclosed a new Parole for the route, the signing of which will promote the ease and convenience of the Officers on their journey; if any refuse to sign it they must expect to march under close restriction."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 131. 2 pages.
Enclosing Capt. McLean to Capt. Baillie, 1 Nov.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Heath to Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, November 5. Head Quarters, Boston. — "Yours of yesterday enclosing an Extract of a Letter from Major Forster was handed to me this morning.
"I have this day put off the march of the first division of the Troops of the Convention untill Monday morning next."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 133. 1 page.

Richard Masters, Captain 27th Regt., to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 5. Head Quarters. — That he is not permitted to proceed to New York with the dispatches. That Gen. Washington has forwarded these and has also signified to him that in consequence of a resolve of Congress no officer can be permitted to go to Europe on parole. Takes the liberty to represent that a living of 500l. p. an. on his brother's estate and in his gift, and for which he himself has been educated, was always intended for him, and he promised his family to accept it when vacant. The living is now reserved for him, and he is desired particularly to return to England at once. Gen. Washington has given him leave to remain here till His Excellency's consent is obtained for his exchange, and would allow of Capt. Bliss being given for him if approved.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 2. 3 pages.

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Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, November 5. Newport. — "In consequence of arrivals from New York I have been obliged to detain the 10,000l. I had before granted a warrant to Mr. Geddes for, for the use of your Army, so that I am afraid it will not hereafter be in my power to obey your commands in this way so much as I could wish."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 107. 1 page.

General Washington to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, November 6. Fredericksburgh, Head Quarters. — He will endeavour to confine to such as are unavoidable the inconveniences of the march of the troops. Has appointed an officer of rank to attend them and commissaries and quarter-masters to meet them. The resolution of Congress for the removal to Charlotteville includes, in his opinion, the officers of every description. The proposal made for desiring leave to visit friends first must come directly and in the first instance before Congress. Printed in Sparks's Washington, VI., p. 105.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 105. 3 pages.

Memorandum.

1778, November 7. — By the different letters received this day from Gen. Phillips it appears that Wednesday was fixed for the march of the troops. That Lt. Collier was sent to Rhode Island. That Capt. Masters detained in Washington's camp is probably charged with messages from Phillips, and if exchanged might be of service. That Phillips has no correspondence with Heath; wishes bat and forage money and stoppage from soldiers to be taken off during the march, and has applied for leave to come to New York.
2 copies. Vol. 9. Nos. 4 and 5. 1 and 2 pages respectively.

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel and Brig. -Gen. James Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

1778, November 7. Cambridge. — Their surprise and concern at his letter of Nov. 4th relating to the new parole to be given by officers of Convention troops. Maj.-Gen. Phillips has ordered Capt. Maclean to explain what he meant, and he is to repair to Cambridge to await his (Heath's) decision. They disclaim the dishonourable suspicions under which the new parole is demanded and claim the liberty of appealing to Washington, and from him to be referred to Congress if he shall see necessary     .     .     .     .     "Be assured that your threat of making the situation disagreeable and the restriction upon the march severe and inconvenient will have no effect; the Officers of the Troops of Convention will not be guided by accidental motives, but upon positive principles of honour. However, Sir, to mark to you how desirous we, that are at the head of these Troops, are to reconcile everything to the situation of the times, we wish to refer this matter to Maj.-Gen,
Page 339
Gates, who we understand to be at Boston. That Gentleman made and signed the Convention with Lieutenant-General Burgoyne. That General Officer did not see any necessity for a Parole upon the March under the Faith of that Treaty, to which we have upon all occasions invariably adhered." Should Maj.- Gen. Gates think a parole, not springing from reasons reflecting on the officers' honour, to be necessary, there will be no difficulty in getting it signed. Declares for himself and the other officers that the Convention has been "preserved in full force."
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 140. 6 pages.

John Robinson to [qy. R. Gordon].

1778, November 7. Treasury Chambers. — Various contracts for provisions have been made. Transmits copies of the letters of requisition, and directs him to forward such supplies from time to time and dispatch the first fleet on or before 1st February next.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 57. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Sir H. Clinton], 6 April 1779.

John Robinson to Messrs. Nesbitt, Drummond and Franks.

1778, November 7. Treasury Chambers. — To deliver to Mr. Gordon at Corke on or before 1st day of January four months' provisions in complete rations for 13,700 men. Gives quantity to be allowed each person seven days. Same amounts to be delivered on or before 1st April and 1st July. A like letter to Messrs. Wombwell, Henricks and Devaynes for 13,700 men, Anthony Bacon for 4,900 men, John Durand and Robert Mayne each for 4,850 men.
Copy. Vol. 33. No. 56. 1 page.
Enclosed by John Robinson to [Sir H. Clinton] , 6 April 1779.

Sir Henry Clinton to Lt.-Col. Archibald Campbell.

1778, November 8. New York. — To take possession of Savannah. Brigadier-General Prevost has orders to co-operate, and to him he is to deliver the residue of the 5,000l.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 152. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain.

1778, November 8. New York. — No. 25.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 164. 2 pages.
Signed letters in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 389; 589, fo. 70; copy 306, fo. 275.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, November 8. New York. — No. 2. It is impossible for him to liquidate the demand for payment for provisions and fuel
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furnished to the Convention troops. It is submitted to Government, and he awaits their determination. Has made one more effort to save the troops the march from Cambridge. Shall direct 165 days' forage money be given the officers if the journey takes place, and that no stoppage from the men be made during its continuance.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 165. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, November 8. New York. — Lt.-Col. Campbell has permission to return to Europe whenever he thinks proper after his junction. Colonel Innes, who accompanies him, has orders to proceed to England in the "Lord Hyde" packet.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 149. 1 page.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, November 8. New York. — Cannot supply him with provisions and will represent the matter at home. Lieutenant- Colonel Campbell takes 5,000l., which he will deliver over and account for what has been expended. The 71st is to return as soon as it can be spared. Field pieces and arms sent. Blank warrants for courts martial were also sent. The Hessian Begiment of Woellwarth-Wissenbach are paid to 31 December, the Provincial Corps to 24th December.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 150. 2 pages.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Brig.-Gen. Prevost.

1778, November 8. New York. — No other senior officer except himself is to interfere with Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 153. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Heath to Maj.-Gen. Riedesel and Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton.

1778, November 8. 11 o'clock a.m. Roxbury. — Their joint letter of yesterday is just received. It shall be laid immediately before Maj.-Gen. Gates, who now commands the district. The requisition was not intended to cast any slur on the officers collectively; whenever officers have been removed to other quarters a new parole is usual. None in the present case can think the measure unreasonable after what has been wrote by Capt. Maclean. Proposed the new parole for the comfort of the officers that they might enjoy more comfort and be less restrained. Will be perfectly easy with Gates' decision on what he has done.
2 copies. Vol. 9. Nos. 142 and 134. 3 pages and 1 page respectively.

Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Gates.

1778, November 8. 3 o'clock p.m. Cambridge. — It is announced that he (Gates) has taken command of the Eastern
Page 341
Department. He has probably been informed that Heath and himself (Phillips) have not "of some time corresponded." Does not intend to trouble himself about the General's public conduct to himself, in which the Congress have participated. But never having had any misunderstandings with Maj.-Gen. Gates, requests his good offices to troops on the march: that he will peruse correspondence which has passed on account of it: and that he will give such directions as his good sense will dictate. Expects his final orders concerning the march and recommends to his consideration a letter of this day's date to Heath respecting the distress of the officers for want of money.
Copy. Vol. 9. No, 141. 3 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel and Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton to Maj.-Gen. William Heath.

1778, November 8. Cambridge. — Have just had a conversation with Maj.-Gen. Phillips on the subject of the return of Lt. Campbell and Mr. Geddes from Rhode Island without money, and it appears that Gen. Prescott had granted 10,000l., but it was stopped by an express from New York directing it to other uses. This is the purport of Lt. Campbell's report, and Phillips declares this is all he knows of the matter. Must allow that full time has been granted. Requests that it may be signified at Rutland and Cambridge that the officers' creditors may take drafts for the debts owing to them upon Riedesel and Phillips, who are willing to remain here until such sums as they have signed to shall be paid. Certainly Sir Henry Clinton did not know of this march, or he would have sent that and larger sums. Earnestly requests that Lt. Campbell may go to New York to obtain money to release Phillips and Riedesel from their obligations, and if possible some may be sent to reach the troops on the Hudson River. Report that waggons cannot be procured to allow of the officers quitting Cambridge to join their troops at Rutland nor for the divisions to march to-morrow. This of course he will know and give the necessary directions.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 143. 5 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Horatio Gates to Maj.-Gen. Phillips.

1778, November 8. Head Quarters, Boston. — The orders given by Maj.-Gen. Heath in respect to the march of the troops must take place accordingly. Is at all times willing to give every reasonable indulgence to officers in the situation his are in; but if they are neglected by the Commander-in-Chief for the King of Great Britain in America, it is not the generals of the United States who are to blame. Will try to persuade the officers' creditors to accept their bills upon Phillips and Riedesel as requested. The parole demauded is strictly military, as the one already given is limited and local, and not meant to insult the honour of the officers. Baggage may go by water as requested.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 135. 2 pages.

Page 342

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 9. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 85. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Promotions in the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 86. 1 page.

Lords of Admiralty to Rear-Admiral James Gambier.

1778, November 10. — Relative to Capt. Gayton of the "Romulus" and his convoy of store ships.
Extract. Vol. 12. No. 78. 2 pages.
Enclosed by Lord G. Germain to Sir H. Clinton, 25 June 1779.
Copy in the Public Record Office, Admiralty, Secretary, Out Letters, vol. 104, No. 498; extract America and W. Indies 135, fo. 703.

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

1778, November 10. New York. — Considers it different from practice of nations or parties at war to refuse granting an equivalent of privates for officers. "You have ordered the Troops of the Convention to be removed from Massachusetts Bay to Virginia and I have ordered all the Officers of your Army out on Parole, to return here." These movements may in part be prevented should he agree to exchange the officers of his army now on parole or here for officers and men of the Convention Troops in customary proportions or such as may be determined by Commissioners appointed on both sides. Colonels O'Hara and Hyde should be sent on his part for this purpose. Mr. Clarke, Assistant Commissary General, will deliver this letter; requests a passport for him to return to Cambridge by land.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 166. 2 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 41; and 589, fo. 76.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 10. Whitehall. — No. 20.
Duplicate copy. Vol. 1. No. 39. 2 pages.
Enclosing Gen. Haldimand to Lord G. Germain. See 11 September.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 281; copy 431, fo. 282; and in the Sackville MSS.

Gen. Haldimand to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 10. Quebec.
Signed letter. Vol. 11. No. 16. In French. 3 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 437; British Museum, Additional MSS. 21807, fo. 21.

Page 343

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 11. Cambridge. — Respecting enclosures. Submits whether it might not be well for his Paymaster-General to keep an account current of monies he issues by order to the Brunswick officers and soldiers, which may be settled by receipt from the Assistant Paymaster-General of the Convention troops as part of monies advanced. Removal of the Convention troops to Virginia "will occasion our Assistant Paymaster-General going to New York, and he can then settle these matters" on this or any other plan.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 100. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Maj.-Gen. Riedesel to Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips.

1778, November 11. Cambridge. — Mr. Lorentz at New York having advanced 590l. on account of subsistence to Col. Specht and other Brunswick officers requests him to order Mr. Geddes to furnish him with bills of exchange for that sum to reimburse Mr. Lorentz.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 102. 1 page

Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Riedesel.

1778, November 11. Cambridge. — Has no objection to ordering the bills of exchange desired, though they are liable to a course of exchange that may prove to his prejudice. Recommends him to write to Clinton requesting him to direct his Paymaster-General to reimburse whatever sums Generals Kniphausen or Losberg may have lent for use of the Brunswick Troops, and these sums with whatever more may be expended can be liquidated between Clinton's Paymaster- General and Mr. Geddes, the Assistant Paymaster-General, to the Troops of Convention.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 101. 2 pages. Another copy in the same Vol. No. 116 is enclosed by Major-General Riedesel, 12 November.

John Smith to [                     ].

1778, November 11. — Sends copy of order relative to the rank between the regular and the provincial forces.
Draft. Vol. 15. No. 151. 1 page.

General Sir Henry Clinton to Captain Jno. Grant, Commanding Two Companies of the Garrison Battalion to be stationed at the Island of Providence.

1778, November 12. Head Quarters, New York. — To proceed to the Island, where he is to be stationed for its defence as well as the rest of the Bahama Islands. To wait on the Governor. To pay particular attention to the defence of the fortresses and report every occurrence. P.S. — The commanding officer of
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artillery has orders to deliver him twenty barrels of gunpowder, which is only to be used in defence of the fortresses before mentioned.
Copy. Vol. 47. No. 219. 2 pages.

Resolution of Congress.

1778, November 12. — Long paper bound in, folded so that it cannot be properly read, but mostly to the effect that Connolly's representations of bad treatment are groundless.
Vol. 8. No. 171. 5 pages.
Enclosed by Gen. Washington to Sir H. Clinton, 20 Nov.

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 12. Cambridge. — Letter delivered by Dr. Hayes. Sincerest acknowledgments for marks of their former friendship. The men ill-clothed and almost barefooted, have undertaken their march with great resolution, convinced his Excellency will procure their liberty. Acknowledges his goodness to Lt.-Col. Speth and other officers and soldiers belonging to the Brunswick troops now gone to Canada. Recommends Major Meibom and other officers lately exchanged, who are still at Rhode Island. Finds by a bill of 40l. some men have got safely to New York. Major Meibom might take charge of them on his arrival at that place. The American system separated the officers and men. The officers were kept at Westminster and non-commissioned officers and men scattered throughout the province, where they have been obliged to work for their bread. Captains Bartling and Fricke not sent with others to New York, but detained to collect their men at Westminster and convey them to New York. Prisoners of war still amount to five hundred and fourteen. Has directed their captains to apply at Newport when in want of money. Commends Dr. Hayes, who delivers this letter.
Autograph signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 113. 4 pages.

Maj.-Gen. Baron de Riedesel to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 12. Cambridge. — Lt.-Gen. Knyphausen has advanced 550l. to Lt.-Col. Speth for subsistence for the officers and soldiers who have gone to Canada, also the 40l. for men arrived at New York since Speth's departure. Applied to Maj.- Gen. Phillips for bills of exchange for 590l. to repay Mr. Lorentz. The Major-General has proposed another mode. Requests him to order the Paymaster-General to reimburse the Hessian military fund with 590l. sterling and has requested Knyphausen at New Yrork, and Lossberg at Rhode Island, to supply officers and soldiers who are exchanged, and any deserters who may get in, with necessary sums of money upon proper demands by their officers. Has begged the same favour for Captains Bartling and Fricke, exchanged and left at Westminster to collect their men, whenever they send an officer for money. Will therefore
Page 345
acknowledge any sum granted by Knyphausen and Lossberg for use of Brunswick troops. Requests him to direct the Paymaster- General to supply either of these officers with such sums as they demand, to be afterwards settled by the Paymaster-General and Mr. Geddes. If not, they may be liquidated by a deduction from the money due from the British Treasury to the Duke of Brunswick.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 118. 3 pages.
Enclosing Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Riedesel, 11 Nov.

Myndert Vielie, farmer, to Sir Henry Clinton.

Memorial. On account of his allegiance to His Majesty, he has been sent to this city, as appears by the annexed. Is upwards of 72 and his wife 62, unable to do anything for subsistence; begs rations for himself, wife and servant. Wafered to the foot of this is copy of notice dated at Poughkeepsie, 12 Nov. Signed by three "Commissioners for conspiracies, &c." that he having refused to take the Test Oath is to appear at Fishkill landing on the 26th in order to his removal by water within the enemies' lines.
Signed original. Vol. 29. No. 159.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 13. Whitehall. — No. 21. Secret. Surrender of Dominica.
Copy. Vol. 7. No. 41. 2 pp.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 589, fo. 72; 685, fo. 45; and in the Sackville MSS.

General Washington to Jonathan Clarke.

1778, November 14. Head Quarters. — "Sir: I recd your favor of the 13th inst.
"Gl, Scott has my Instructions that you may proceed by the most convt route to Cambe or the T. of Conn.
"And that nothing may be wanting which can add to their ease and comfort, You may (if you choose it) signify to S. H. C. that I will receive at K. Ferry the Necessaries and Money you mention, and take immediate measures to have them conveyed to the Troops."
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 168. 1 page.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 14. Head Quarters. — "I received your Excellency's letter of the 10th instant thro' Mr. Clarke.
"I have transmitted Congress a copy of your proposition relative to an exchange of the troops of Convention; and shall do myself the honor to communicate their decision the moment it is made known.
"Mr. Clarke has my permission to proceed by the most convenient route to the Troops of Convention."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 167. 1 page.

Page 346

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 15. Cambridge. — Enclosing copies of the correspondence which passed between him and General Gates and between Major-General Riedesel, Brigadier-General Hamilton and General Heath relative to the march of the Troops of the Convention to Virginia.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 119. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 15. Cambridge. — Narrative of what was unsuccessfully done on receipt of the order for the march of the Troops of Convention as to obtaining money for their use. Imagines His Excellency could not have known. The distress very great, numbers of the officers have been arrested for hire of their lodgings and other expenses; it "has ended however with Major General Riedesel becoming answerable for the debts of the Germans, as I have for those of the British, but ultimately the whole will rest on me, and I shall be obliged to remain here in pawn, until 10,000l. is sent to me to discharge the Bills for which I have and shall become answerable." Major General Gates has given leave for Mr. Geddes, Assistant Paymaster-General, to go a second time to Rhode Island and 10,000l. is requested of Maj.-Gen. Prescott, who, if he cannot comply, is also to send forward Mr. Geddes to New York. "The Troops began their March on Monday last the 9th Instant in Six Divisions, three British and three German; the Stages will be short, and by General Washington's Letter to me, a copy of which I enclose, there is reason to suppose the March will be conducted with conveniency to the Troops." Some officers and soldiers allowed to go round to Virginia by sea. Encloses memorial from Lt.-Col. Lind and answer. Awaits his Excellency's pleasure. Sends copies of correspondence.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 146. 7 pages. Also extract. Vol. 9. No. 153. 2 pages.
Enclosures:—
Lieut.-Col. John Lind to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, November 15. Cambridge. — Requests permission to go to New York to get medical advice. If this cannot be granted, begs this letter may be sent to Sir Henry Clinton, together with the memorial proposed to be submitted. Will embrace the first opportunity of submitting his conduct to the General Court Martial, not only on his own account but on that of every commanding officer of a regiment in his Majesty's service.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 151. 2 pages.

Lieut. Thos. Bibby, D.A. Genl., to Lieut.-Col. John Lind.

1778, November 15. Cambridge. — Is directed by Phillips to inform him some officers may have permission to go by sea to
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New York and thence to Virginia. Such liberty cannot be granted him, as his demand for a general court martial obliges him to await orders from Clinton, therefore he must remain at Cambridge until some answer is received. He may write on his own behalf to Clinton, and Maj.-Gen. Phillips proposes to submit his memorial to his Excellency.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 152. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Richard Prescott.

1778, November 15. Cambridge. — Inconvenience and distress to both officers and men, but the troops have marched leaving Maj.-Gen. Riedesel and himself answerable for money borrowed for their use. Sends abstract of letter from himself to Sir H. Clinton, and requests him to send Mr. Geddes back with 10,000l. If it is not in his power to send this money from Rhode Island, requests him to forward Mr. Geddes to New York and send a letter through Major-General Sullivan of his being set out for Sir Henry.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 106. 3 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, November 16. New York. — That the first quarter's provisions only for the year 1778 are as yet arrived. Requesting him to represent to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury the distress they will be in should the victuallers be delayed, that in future the supplies may be more regular. During the short time he has had command they have been reduced three(sic) several times to little more than three weeks' provisions. Brigadier- General Prevost at St. Augustine has also given notice of scarcity. Acknowledges letters.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 9 and 25. 2 pages each.

W. Collier, Secretary, to Mr. Weir, Chief Surgeon to the General Hospital.

1778, November 16. Cambridge. — It is the Major-General's orders that he pay a professional visit to Lt.-Col. Lind, enquire into the nature of his case, and report if it be necessary to delay his march at present or in what time he might journey without injury to his health.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 150. 2 pages.

Governor William Franklin to the Earl of Carlisle, Sir Henry Clinton and Wm. Eden (His Majesty's Commissioners).

1778, November 16. New York. — That in 1776 he was seized by an armed force and sent into Connecticut, where he was detained as a prisoner till last month. That he has been compelled to bear all his own expenses, his salary stopped, his landed estate in the hands of the rebels and his personal estate largely
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destroyed by fire in New York. That friends in Connecticut had assisted him, otherwise he must have starved. That he had frequently been applied to by the King's soldiers and loyalists and had endeavoured to relieve them. That all the other Governors had been previously rendered independent of the support of their Assemblies, but as such regulation in his case did not actually take place has not ventured to draw on the Treasury. Is not only in want of money for present subsistence but desirous of discharging the debts contracted in Connecticut, and requests that if they would, they can consistently with the powers vested in them advance him one year of his salary.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 11 and 26. 3 pages each.
Enclosed by Sir H. Clinton to John Robinson, 24 Nov.

Deputy Adjutant-General Thos. Bibby to Lt.-Col. John Lind.

1778, November 17. Cambridge. — Pointing out the reasons of his not obtaining permission to go to New York. That if the public application to Major-Gen. Heath for him to remain at Cambridge failed he had liberty to make use of private intercession. As Mr. Hayes, the surgeon, was goiug to New York it was an opportunity of stating his case direct. In his letter of the 15th there is a direct insinuation of partiality. This the Major- General cannot but consider as indecent, and proposes representing his conduct to Sir H. Clinton.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 149. 4 pages.

John Wier [Weir], Surgeon, to Maj.-Gen. William Phillips.

1778, November 17. Cambridge. — Has visited Lt.-Col. Lind. It will not be safe for him to march while the present symptoms remain. Should he have no relapse he may set out in a week or ten days under the description of easy journeys and that the exercise and removing to a milder climate will be of advantage to his health.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 148. 1 page.

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Lieut.-Col. John Lind.

1778, November 18. Cambridge. — The words of his letter of the 15th bring the affair betwreen them to a different point of view, in which every commanding officer as he says is concerned. Cannot therefore allow him to remain absent from the 20th Regt., and directs him to repair to it and there wait Clinton's orders. From Mr. Weir's report short journeys and change of air may be of use, therefore he is on his honour to make no unnecessary delay.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 147. 3 pages.

General Sir Henry Clinton to General Washington.

1778, November 19. — Acknowledges letter of 14th inst. In consequence of his letter to Mr. Clarke has sent Major Bruen,
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Deputy Quarter Master General, to King's Ferry with money and necessaries for the use of the troops under Maj.-Gen. Phillips. Desires the Major may be permitted to send information if more is required.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 169. 1 page.

Sir Grey Cooper to [Gen. Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, November 19. Whitehall. — The Lords of the Treasury have entered into contracts with Messrs. Nesbitt, &c. for supplying his Majesty's forces in North America with provisions. Transmits copy. A note enumerates the contracts as given already above 7 November.
Copy, Vol. 2. No. 115. 2 pages.

Greenwood and Higginson and others to Lord George Germain.

1778, November 19. London. — Memorial on behalf of themselves and others interested in the provinces of Georgia and S. Carolina.
Copy. Vol. 15. No. 187. 3 folio pages.
Copy in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 300, fo. 69; and in the Carlisle MSS.

Charles and Robert Cooke to His Majesty's Commissioners.

1778, Nov. 20. New York. — Copy of a memorial; annexed to their original memorial to the Treasury, 8 April 1782, which see.

General Washington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 20. Head Quarters. — "I am charged by Congress to transmit the inclosed resolution on the case of Lieut.-Col. Conolly. I have the honour to be, with due respect, your Excellency's most hble. Servt."
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No, 170. 1 page.
Enclosing Congress Resolution, 12 Nov.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 21. War Office. — Notifying exchange of commission between Capt. Fraser of the 1st regiment of Foot Guards and Capt. Cockran of the 4th regt. of Foot.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 88. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, November 21. War Office. — Sends particular invoices of the clothing for various regiments shipped with the rest of the clothing on board the Tortoise and Margery. Should the regiments be drafted, the clothing to be sent back.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 87. 1 page.

Page 350

Maj.-Gen. William Phillips to Maj.-Gen. Horatio Gates.

1778, November 21. Cambridge. — Requesting his opinion upon the enclosure and whether he would advise Canada clothing vessels to go to Fredericksburg upon the Rappahannock River or to Richmond upon James River.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 160. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Report from Brig.-Gen. James Hamilton got from Colonel Bland. — Vessels of near 200 tons can go up the Rappahannock River to Fredericksburg. The distance by land to Charlotteville sixty-five miles. At Fredericksburg waggons that carry tobacco can easily be obtained. Vessels of any tonnage can go up James River to Richmond, thence by land about one hundred miles.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 161. 1 page.
The above two enclosed by Major-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 9 Dec. 1778.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 23. War Office. — That if he thinks proper leave may be given to Col. Stephens, of the Foot Guards, to return to Great Britain at the end of this campaign on account of private affairs.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 74. 1 page.

Major-Gen. Horatio Gates to Major-Gen. Phillips.

1778, November 23. Boston. — Is of opinion the baggage should be sent to Fredericksburg.
Extract. Vol. 9. No. 159. 1 page.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 9 Dec. 1778.

General Sir Henry Clinton to John Robinson.

1778, November 24. New York. — It being the opinion of his Majesty's Commissioners that Governor Franklin should be supplied with the year's salary he asks for, has in consequence granted him a warrant on the Deputy Paymaster-General, which it is hoped will meet with their Lordships' approbation.
2 copies. Vol. 33. Nos. 10 and 27. 1 page each.
Enclosing Gov. Franklin to the Commissioners, 16 Nov. 1778.

Gen. Washington to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 27. Head Quarters, Fredericksburg. — Commissioners appointed for exchange of prisoners.
Signed letter. Vol. 8. No. 172. 3 pages.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 45; and 589, fo. 77.

Page 351

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, November 30. War Office. — Since the letter of the 3rd it has again been proposed to send out Sir James Napier as Superintendent General of Hospitals in North America, and upon his declining the office it was offered to Mr. John Adair, who, however, is not able to quit England. Dr. Nooth, Physician Extraordinary now in America and one of the Purveyors to the Hospitals, has been represented as competent. Should he (Clinton) see the necessity of the appointment and approve Dr. Nooth it is his Majesty's pleasure he should enter at once upon the duties of the office without waiting for a commission. Two Purveyors not being needed at New York Dr. Nooth may return to Great Britain should he not be approved as Superintendent of Hospitals. P.S. — Lord George Germain approves Dr. Nooth: encloses copy of his letter.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 77. 3 pages.
Enclosure:—
Lord George Germain to Robert Adair.

1778, November 30. Pall Mall. — Sorry to hear Mr. Adair declines going to America. It is fortunate that such a man as Dr. Nooth is on the spot. Feels obliged at his being pointed out, as there is no doubt he is equal to the undertaking.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 78. 1 page.
Signed letter in the Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, Vol. 25.

N.D. [about 1778, November.] — Schedule of correspondence between Maj.-Gen. Riedesel, Brig.-Gen. Hamilton, Maj.-Gen. Heath, Maj.-Gen. Gates, and Maj.-Gen. Phillips.
Vol, 9. No, 144. 2 pages.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 1. War Office. — Sends the enclosed.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No, 80. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
List of Promotions.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 81. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 1. War Office. — Acknowledges letter of 12th October, containing bill for 2,200l. and a blank commission of ensign, as purchase money for the late Major Saxton's majority. Also other letters with returns and list of promotions. Thanks for attention paid to his recommendation of Lt. Chapman.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 79. 1 page.
Extract in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 155, fo. 1,

Page 352

Messrs. Harley and Drummond.

1771 January 1 - 1778 December 1. — List of sums issued to Messrs. Harley and Drummond, contractors for remitting money for the pay of H.M. Forces in North America.
Another paper of sums issued to the same between the same dates.
Vol. 33. Nos. 34 and 35. 2 pp.
Enclosed by John Robinson to Sir H. Clinton, 19 Jan. 1779.

Lord Barrington to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, December 2. War Office. — Sends the invoice of military articles shipped on the "Margery" transport for the use of the 10th regiment of Foot.
Copy. Vol. 6. No. 82. 1 page.
Enclosure:—
Invoice marked at foot "The above shipd on board the Margery, Capt. Dickson, for No. America 10th and 21st August 1778. Receipts taken from Wm. Hope."
Copy, Vol. 6. No. 83. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to General Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 2. War Office. — A new commission bearing date 25th November, 1775, has been made out for Lt. Robt. Duncanson of the 2d Battalion of the 71st regiment. There is a lieutenancy vacant in the 40th regiment by the appointment of Lt. De Courcy to the Lt.-Government of Gravesend and Tilbury.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 6. No. 84. 1 page.

Lord Barrington to Major-General William Phillips to the care of Sir Henry Clinton, &c, &c, &c, New York.

1778, December 2. War Office. — Assuring him by the King's command that whenever proper occasions occur the officers now in New England under him shall be considered in an equal degree with the rest of the army.
Copy. Vol. 12. No. 46. 2 pages.
Copy in Public Record Office, War Office, In Letters, Original Correspondence, Vol. 21.
Enclosed by Maj.-Gen. Phillips to Sir H. Clinton, 29 May 1779.

Gen. Sir Henry Clinton to Gen. Washington.

1778, December 2. New York. — Arrangements for the meeting of Commissioners for exchange of prisoners.
Copy. Vol. 8. No. 173. 1 p.
Copies in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 135, fo. 53; 589, fo. 79.

Page 353

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 2. Whitehall. — Separate. Two letters.
Copies. Vol. 1. Nos. 42 and 43. 1 p. 2 pp.
Also in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fos. 273, 369; 431, fo. 285; and in the Sackville MSS.

Maj.-Gen. Wm. Phillips to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 2. Cambridge. — Capt. Barrington going to New York to procure his exchange will deliver this. The troops marched from Cambridge and Rutland 9th November. His aid-de- camp saw the several divisions pass the Connecticut and reports that about 50 British and 30 Germans deserted, the rest behaved well. Major.-Gen. Gates complied with every request. Col. Bland sent by Washington superintends the march from Enfield to Virginia. The last requisition for money on Rhode Island succeeded so far as to release Riedesel and himself. Riedesel set out four days ago, and he begins on Monday or Tuesday. Will report as to the troops after his arrival at Charlotteville. Wounded, disabled and sick officers and men are permitted to go to New York to be exchanged or sent by sea to Virginia. The cartel ship is found too small for the whole, and Maj.-Gen. Gates grants permission for some to march to New York. Lt. Matthews of 62nd British and Capt. Schlagenteuffell, German, to go to Rhode Island. Fears they will die before reaching it. Requests him to waive punctillio relating to partial parole exchanges so far as concerns officers and men sent into New York, and that the whole may be exchanged for an equal number of American prisoners. Encloses lists, all of whom he desires to be included in the exchange. Requests notice of such exchange be sent to Major Harnage, who will remain here sick. Will send further news by Lt. Collier.
Signed letter. Vol. 9. No. 154. 6 pages.
Enclosures:—
Troops of Convention.

1778, December 2. — Return of six British officers who remain behind the march.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 156. 2 pages.
1778, December. Cambridge. — Return offour German officers who remain behind the march.
Original. Vol. 9. No. 157. 1 page.

Major-General William Phillips to Major-General Horatio Gates.

1778, December 2. Cambridge. — Concern at troubling him so often on account of those who could not prosecute the march to Virginia. The number is no more than six or eight officers and about 200 men. It is found impossible to put so many on board the cartel ship and there is but one alternative, that of suffering a part of the men under proper officers to go by land to Rhode Island or New York. Makes no doubt of their being exchanged.
Page 354
Exact returns will be sent. Should they not be exchanged they shall join the troops in Virginia. Appeals on behalf of two officers, one British, one German, for liberty to go to Rhode Island attended by a surgeon's mate. They are ill, or dying, and the hope of change of air will alleviate their distresses. Should these requests be complied with, the Deputy Quarter Master General may meet Maj. Hopkins and regulate matters.
Copy. Vol. 9. No. 155. 4 pages.

Lord George Germain to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 3. Whitehall. — No. 22.
Duplicate signed letter. Vol. 7. No. 44. 5 pages.
Draft in the Public Record Office, America and W. Indies 134, fo. 377; copy 431, fo. 294; and in the Sackville MSS.

John Robinson to [General Sir Henry Clinton].

1778, December 5. Whitehall. — Is commanded to acknowledge receipt of letters of 8th, 14th, and 22nd October last. They will be taken into consideration.
Copy. Vol. 2. No. 133. 1 page.

Timothy Hierlihy, Major Commandant of the Independent Cos., to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton.

1778, December 6. Island of St. John, Charlotte Town. No. 1. — Recounting that on 7th April he arrived at Halifax with the Independent Companies and put himself under the command of Major General Massey, who ordered him and the corps to repair to Spanish river to protect colliery there. That he dug and prepared coals, fortified a post, suppressed the piratical attempts of the rebels and recovered some property and two vessels. On 27th October he received Major-General Massey's approbation and orders to repair hither with transports not laden with coal in order to load hence with fire-wood, that on the 11th November he sailed with the Independent Companies and twenty-seven men belonging to Captain Commandant Callbeck's Saint John's Volunteers. That the vessels were separated in a storm, but he arrived 30th November with the ship and two brigs. Despairs of the rest reaching here this year. Immediately after his arrival he showed Mr. Callbeck, who is President of the Council and Commander-in-chief on this island, His Excellency's orders of 12th September, directing the discharge of the company. Recounts the surprise of Mr. Callbeck and the Council and their pressing instances to delay carrying out the orders. His difficult position and the apparent utility, even necessity, of keeping the few men together till the spring induced him to accede, and he is emboldened to submit his conduct to his benign deliberation.
Signed letter. Vol. 52. No. 67. 4 pages.
Enclosures:—
President Phillips Callbeck to Maj. Hierlihy.

1778, December 3. Charlotte Town. — Immediately after the communication of Sir Henry Clinton's orders he convened
Page 355
the Council, the result of which is that they have resolved to apply for the postponement of the discharging of his company. Forwards at their request letter and extract from Minutes of Council, to which he adds his own; requests that it be delayed until application is made to Sir Henry Clinton. Encloses instrument of indemnification, pledging himself to pay all subsistence, clothing, &c, accounts also for rations supplied in consequence of Hierlihy's orders until his Excellency's pleasure is known.
Copy, Vol. 52. No, 77. 2 pages.
Thomas Wright, Peter Stewart, and Wm. Nesbitt to Major Hierlihy.

1778, December 3. Council Chamber, Charlotte Town. — That the order to disband President Callbeck's Company has been laid before them for opinion. They hope, if it can be done with propriety, he will delay what they apprehend will expose the Island to danger until Sir Henry Clinton's resolution is received in answer to their application. Likewise that he will join them in their request and in consequence order his Quartermaster to issue rations for that Company with his own corps.
Copy. Vol. 52. No. 74. 2 pages.
1778, December 2 and 3. — Minutes of the Council Board, Island of St. John.
Extract, signed Wm. Nisbett. Vol. 53. No. 65. 10 pages. 1778, December 3. — Instrument of Indemnification concerning the disbanding the volunteers of St. John's Island.
Copy. Vol. 53. No. 75. 2 pages.

Maj.-Commandant Timothy Hierlihy to Brig.-Gen. McLean.

1778, December 6. Charlotte Town. — On 27 October he received letter from Gen. Massey containing orders to repair hither with such transports as should not be able to load with coal, that they might be sent