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Fort Havoc (Wallace Hale)

Info The language of the text is the original used by Wallace Hale. Records acquired by the Provincial Archives are not translated from the language in which they originate.

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MINUTES

OF THE

PROVINCIAL CONGRESS

AND THE

COUNCIL OF SAFETY

OF THE

STATE OF NEW JERSEY.

 

TRENTON:
PRINTED BY NAAR, DAY & NAAR.
1879.

 

In compliance with "An Act for the better preservation of the early records of the State of New Jersey," approved April 6, 1871, the Minutes of the Council of Safety, commencing with the session at Haddonfield, March 18, 1777, were printed during the year 1872. The Minutes of the Provincial Congress and of the Council of Safety of 1775 and 1776 are as important as those of 1777. To complete this part of the history of the State, this volume has been prepared. In addition to the Minutes referred to, the Proceedings of the Committees of Correspondence, the Committees of Observation, the various Town Meetings, Township and County Committees, relating to the state of the Colonies, have been collated. A meeting of the Council and General Assembly of the Colony, just prior to the first meeting of the Provincial Congress, has also been added.

Trenton, February 22, 1879.

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RESOLUTIONS, CORRESPONDENCE, &c.,

Preliminary to the Provincial Congress and
Council of Safety.

Extract from Minutes of House of Assembly

.
Burlington, Tuesday, February 8, 1774
.

The House resumed the consideration of the several Letters and Resolutions of the other Houses of Assembly, on the subject matter of the common Rights and Liberties of the Colonies; and the House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Matters aforesaid; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Crane, Chairman of the Committee, (by order of the House) reported the Resolutions of the Committee as follows, viz.

1. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that the House should heartily accept of the Invitation to a mutual Correspondence and Intercourse with our Sister Colonies ; to which the House agreed, Nemine Contradicente.

2. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that a Standing Committee of Correspondence and Inquiry be appointed, to consist of the following Persons, to wit, James Kinsey, Stephen Crane, Hendrick Fisher, Samuel Tucker, John Wetherill, Robert Friend Price, John Hinchman, John Mehelm and Edward Taylor, Esquires, or any five of them, whose business it shall be to obtain the most early and authentick Intelligence of all Acts and Resolutions of the Parliament of Great Britain, or the Proceedings of Administration that may have any Relation to, or may affect the Liberties and Privileges of His Majesty's Subjects in the British Colonies in America, and to keep up and maintain a Correspondence and Communication with our Sister Colonies, respecting these important Considerations; and that they do occasionally lay their Proceedings before the House; to which the House agreed, Neinine Contradicente.

3. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that the said Committee of Correspondence do write Letters to the several Speakers of the Assemblies on the Continent of America, inclosing these Resolutions, and requesting them to lay the same before their respective Assemblies; and that they do return the Thanks of the House to the Burgesses of Virginia, for their early Attention to the Liberties of America ; to which the House agreed, Nemine Contradicente.

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Governour Franklin to the Earl of Dartmouth,
(Extract.)

Burlington, 31st May, 1774.

Since my last I have received two circular despatches from Mr. Pownall, dated March 10th and April 6th, enclosing copies of his Majesty's Message to both Houses of Parliament, relative to the late disturbances in America, their Resolutions thereupon, and the Act of Parliament respecting the port of Boston. The latter has been published in the usual manner, though the people in this Colony are not concerned in carrying on any commerce with the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

It is difficult as yet to foresee what will be the consequence of the Boston Port Act. It seems as if the merchants of Philadelphia and New York, at their late meetings, were inclined to assist or co-operate with those of Boston in some degree, but not to carry matters so far as to enter into a general non-importation and exportation agreement, as was proposed to them by the town of Boston. However, I believe it may be depended upon, that many of the merchants, on a supposition that a non-importation agreement (so far as respects from Great Brittain) will be certainly entered into by next autumn, have ordered a much greater quantity of goods than common to be sent out by the next fall ships from England.

A Congress of Members of the several Houses of Assembly has been proposed in order to agree upon some measures on the present occasion, but whether this expedient will take place it is as yet uncertain. The Virginia Assembly, some time ago, appointed a Committee of Correspondence to correspond with all the other Assemblies on the Continent, which example has been followed by every other House of Representatives. I was in hopes that the Assembly of this Province would not have gone into the measure; for though they met on the 10th of November, yet they avoided taking the matter into consideration, though frequently urged by some of the members, until the 8th of February, and then. I believe they would not have gone into it, but that the Assembly of New York had just before resolved to appoint such a committeee, and they did not choose to appear singular.

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Extract of a letter from one of the Members of the House of Assembly of New Jersey, and one of the Committee of Correspondence, which consists of nine members.

Dated June 2, 1774.

"I returned yesterday from New Brunswick, where six of our Committee met. We answered the Boston letters, informing them that we look on New Jersey as eventually in the same predicament with Boston, and that we will do everything which may be generally agreed on. We have signed a request to the Governor to call the General Assembly, to meet at such time as his Excellency may think proper, before the first of August next. Our Committee is well disposed in the cause of American freedom"

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Lower Freehold, Monmouth County, Resolutions.

At a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Lower Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, in New Jersey, on Monday, the 6th day of June, 1774, after notice given of the time, place, and occasion of this meeting;

Resolved, That it is the unanimous opinion of this meeting, that the cause in which the inhabitants of the town of Boston are now suffering is the common cause of the whole continent of North America, and that unless some general spirited measures, for the public safety, be speedily entered into, there is just reason to fear that every Province may in turn share the same fate with them; and that, therefore, it is highly incumbent on them all to unite in some effectual means to obtain a repeal of the Boston Port Bill, and any other that may follow it, which shall be deemed subversive of the rights and privileges of free born Americans.

And that it is also the opinion of this meeting, that, in case it shall appear hereafter to be consistent with the general opinion of the trading towns, and the commercial part of our countrymen, that an entire stoppage of importation and exportation from and to Great Britain and the West Indies, until the said Port Bill and other Acts be repealed, will be really conducive to the safety and preservation of North America and her liberties, they will yield a cheerful acquiescence in the measure, and earnestly recommend the same to all their brethren in this Province.

Resolved, moreover, That the inhabitants of this township will join in an Association with the several towns in the count}', and in conjunction with them, with the several counties in the Province, (if, as we doubt not, they see fit to accede to the proposal,) in any measures that may appear best adapted to the weal and safety of North America and all her loyal sons.

Ordered, That John Anderson, Esq., Messrs. Peter Forman, Hendrick Smock, John Forman, and Asher Holmes, Captain John Covenhoven and Doctor Nathaniel Scudder, be a committee for the township, to join with those who may be elected for the neighbouring townships or counties, to constitute a General Committee, for any purposes similar to those above mentioned ; and that the gentlemen so appointed do immediately solicit a correspondence with the adjacent towns.

——————————

Call for Essex County Meeting.

Essex County, N. J., 7th June, 1774.

All the Inhabitants of the County of Essex, in New Jersey, friends to the Constitution, the liberties and properties of America, are hereby notified and desired to meet at the Court House, in Newark, on Saturday, the 11th of June, instant, at two of the clock in the afternoon, to consult and deliberate, and firmly resolve upon the most prudent and salutary measures to secure and maintain the constitutional rights of his Majesty's subjects in America. It is, therefore, hoped, that from the importance of the subject, the meeting will be general. Signed, by order, at a meeting of a number of the Freeholders of the County of Essex, the 7th day of June, 1774.

  John De Hart,
Isaac Ogden.

——————————

Essex County Resolutions
.

At a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Essex, in the Province of New Jersey, at Newark, in the said County, on Saturday, the 11th day of June, 1774.

This meeting, taking into serious consideration some late alarming measures adopted by the British Parliament for depriving his Majesty's American subjects of their undoubted and constitutional rights and principles, and particularly the Act for blockading the port of Boston, which appears to them pregnant with the most dangerous consequences to all his Majesty's Dominions in America, do unanimously resolve and agree:

: 1. That under the enjoyment of our constitutional privileges and immunities we will ever cheerfully render all due obedience to the Crown of Great Brittain, as well as full faith and allegiance to his most gracious Majesty King George the Third ; and do esteem a firm dependence on the Mother Country essential to our political security and happiness.

2. That the late Act of Parliament relative to Boston, which so absolutely destroys every idea of safety and confidence, appears to us big with the most dangerous and alarming consequences, especially as subversive of that very dependence which we should earnestly wish to continue, as our best safeguard and protection ; And that we conceive every well-wisher to Great Brittain and her Colonies is now loudly called upon to exert his utmost abilities in promoting every legal and prudential measure towards obtaining a repeal of the said Act of Parliament, and all others subversive of the undoubted rights and liberties of his Majesty's American subjects.

3. That it is our unanimous opinion, that it would conduce to the restoration of the liberties of America should the Colonies enter into a joint agreement not to purchase or use any articles of British Manufacture, and especially any commodities imported from the East Indies, under such restrictions as may be agreed upon by a general Congress of the said Colonies hereafter to be appointed.

4. That this county will most readily and cheerfully join their brethren of the other counties in this Province, in promoting such Congress of Deputies, to be sent from each of the Colonies, in order to form a general plan of union, so that the measures to be pursued for the important ends in view may be uniform and firm; to which plan, when concluded upon, we do agree faithfully to adhere, and do now declare ourselves ready to send a Committee to meet with those from the other counties, at' such time and place, as by them may be agreed upon, in order to elect proper persons to represent this Province in the said general Congress.

5. That the freeholders and inhabitants of the other counties in this Province be requested speedily to convene themselves together, to consider the present distressing state of our public affairs; and to correspond and consult with such other Committees as may be appointed as well as with our Committee, who are hereby directed to correspond and consult with such other Committees, as also with those of any other Province; and particularly to meet with the said County Committees, in order to nominate and appoint Deputies to represent this Province in General Congress.

6. We do hereby unanimously request the following gentlemen to accept of that trust, and accordingly do appoint them our Committee for the purposes aforesaid, viz.; Stephen Crane, Henry Garritse, Joseph Riggs, William Livingston, William P. Smith, John De Hart, John Chetwood, Isaac Ogden and Elias Boudinot, Esquires.

——————————

Extract of a Letter from Governour Franklin to the
Earl of Dartmouth.

Burlington, June 18, 1774.

My Lord:— I have just received a copy of some resolves entered into at a meeting of a number of freeholders and inhabitants of the county of Essex, in this Province, on Saturday last, which I think it my duty to transmit to your Lordship. The meeting was occasioned it seems by an advertisement, requesting the attendance of the inhabitants on that day, and published in one of the New York papers, and signed by two gentlemen of the law, who reside in that county. I have likewise had an application made to me by some of the members of the House of Representatives, to call a meeting of the General Assembly in August next, with which I have not, nor shall not comply, as there is no public business of the Province which can make such a meeting necessary. It seems now determined by several of the leading men, in most, if not all the counties in this Province, to endeavor to follow the example of the freeholders in Essex. Meetings of this nature, there are no means of preventing, where the chief part of the inhabitants incline to attend them. I as yet doubt however, whether they will agree to the general non-importation from Great Britain, which has been recommended. Their principal aim seems to be to bring about a Congress of Deputies from all the Colonies, as proposed by Virginia; and that that Congress should not only apply to his Majesty for the repeal of the Boston Port Act, but endeavour to fall upon measures for accommodating the present differences between the two countries and preventing the like in future.

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Bergen County Resolutions.

At a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Bergen, in the Province of New Jersey, convened agreeable to advertisement, at the Court House of said County, on Saturday, the 25th of June, 1774.

Peter Zabriskie, Esquire, Chairman.

This meeting being deeply affected with the calamitous condition of the inhabitants of Boston, in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, in consequence of the late Act of Parliament for blocking up the port of Boston; and considering the alarming tendency of the Act of the British Parliament for the purpose of raising a revenue in America:—

Do Resolve. 1st, That they think it their greatest happiness to live under the Government of the illustrious House of Hanover, and that they will stedfastly and uniformly bear true and faithful allegiance to his Majesty King George the Third, under the enjoyment of their constitutional rights and privileges.

2d. That we conceive it to be our indubitable privilege to be taxed only by our own consent, given by ourselves, or by our Representatives; and that we consider the late Acts of Parliament, declarative of their right to impose internal taxes on the subjects of America, as manifest encroachments on our national rights and privileges as British subjects, and as inconsistent with the idea of an American Assembly or House of Representatives,

3d. That we will heartily unite with this Colony in choosing Delegates to attend at a general Congress from the several Provinces of America, in order to consult on and determine some effectual method to be pursued for obtaining a repeal of the said Acts of Parliament, which appears to us evidently calculated to destroy that mutual harmony and dependence between Great Britain and her Colonies, which are the basis and support of both.

And we do appoint Theunis Dey, John Demarest, Peter Zabriskie. Cornelius Van Voorst and John Zabriskie, junior. Esquires, to be a Committee for corresponding with the Committees of the other counties in this Province, and particularly to meet with the other County Committees at New Brunswick, or such other place as shall be agreed on, in order to elect Delegates to attend the general Congress of Delegates of the American Colonies for the purposes aforesaid.

Morris County Resolutions.

At a meeting of a respectable body of the Freeholders and inhabitants of the County of Morris, in the Province of East New Jersey, at the Court House in Morristown, in the said County, on Monday, the 27th June, 1774.

Jacob Ford, Esquire, Chairman.

1st. Resolved, That George the Third is lawful and rightful King of Great Britain and all other his Dominions and countries, and that as part of his Dominions it is our duty not only to render unto him true faith and obedience, but also with our lives and fortunes to support and maintain the just dependence of these his Colonies upon the Crown of Great Britain.

2d. That it is our wish and desire, and we esteem it our greatest happiness and security to be governed by the laws of Great Britain, and that we will always cheerfully submit to them as far as can be done, consistently with the constitutional liberties and privileges of free born Englishmen.

3d. That the late Acts of Parliament for imposing taxes for the purpose of raising a revenue in America, are oppressive and Arbitrary, calculated to disturb the minds and alienate the affections of the Colonists from the mother country, are replete with ruin to both, and consequently that the authors and promoters of said Acts, or of such doctrines of the right of taxing America being in the Parliament of Great Britain, are, and should be deemed enemies to our King and happy Constitution.

4th. That it is the opinion of this meeting, that the Act of Parliament for shutting up the Port of Boston, is unconstitutional, injurious in its principles to the general cause of American freedom, particularly oppressive to the inhabitants of that town, and that, therefore, the people of Boston are considered by us as suffering in the general cause of America.

5th. That unanimity and firmness in the Colonies are the most effectual means to relieve our suffering brethren at Boston, to avert the dangers justly to be apprehended from that alarming Act, commonly styled the Boston Port Bill, and to secure the invaded rights and privileges of America.

6th. That it is our opinion, that an agreement between the Colonies not to purchase or use any articles imported from Great Britain or from the East Indies, under such restrictions as may be agreed upon by the general Congress hereafter to be appointed by the Colonies, would be of service in procuring a repeal of those Acts.

7th. That we will most cheerfully join our brethren of the other counties in this Province in promoting an union of the Colonies, by forming a general Congress of Deputies to be sent from each of the Colonies, and do now declare ourselves ready to send a Committee to meet with those from the other counties at such time and place as by them may be agreed upon, in order to elect proper persons to represent this Province in the said Congress.

8th. That it is the request of this meeting that the County Committees, when met for the purposes aforesaid, do take into their serious consideration the propriety of setting on foot a subscription for the benefit of the sufferers at Boston, under the Boston Port Bill, above mentioned, and the money arising from such subscription to be laid out as the Committees so met shall think will best answer the ends proposed.

9th. That we will faithfully adhere to such regulations and restrictions as shall by the members of said Congress be agreed upon, and judged most expedient for avoiding the calamities, and procuring the benefits intended in the foregoing resolves.

10. It is our request that the Committee hereafter named, do correspond and consult with such other Committees as shall be appointed by the other counties in this Province, and particularly that they meet with the said County Committee, in order to elect and appoint Deputies to represent this Province in a general Congress.

11th. We do hereby desire the following gentlemen to accept of that important trust, and accordingly do appoint them our Committee for the purposes aforesaid : Jacob Ford, William Windes, Abraham Ogden, William De Hart, Samuel Tuthill, Jonathan Stiles, John Carle, Philip V. Cortland and Samuel Ogden, esquires.

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Hunterdon County Resolutions.

The Freeholders and Inhabitants of Hunterdon County, in the Province of New Jersey, convened by advertisement, at the house of John Ringo, in Amwell in said County, on Friday, the 8th July, 1774, Samuel Tucker, Esq., in the chair, came into the following Resolutions, without a dissenting voice, viz.:

: 1. We do most expressly declare, recognize and acknowledge his Majesty King George the Third to be the lawful and rightful King of Great Britain, and of all other his Dominions, and that it is the indispensable duty of this Colony, under the enjoyment of our constitutional privileges and immunities, as being a part of his Majesty's Dominions, always to bear faithful and true allegiance to his Majesty, and him to defend to the utmost of our power, against all attempts upon his person, crown, and dignity.

2. That it is the undoubted hereditary right of an English subject to give and grant what is absolutely his own, either by himself or his Representatives; and that the only lawful Representatives of the freemen of this Colony are the persons they elect to serve as members of the General Assembly thereof.

3. That any Act of Parliament for the apprehending and carrying persons into another Colony, or to Great Britain, to be tried for any crime, alleged to be committed within this Colony, or subjecting them to be tried by Commissioners or any Court constituted by Act of Parliament or otherwise, within this Colony, in a summary way, without a jury of this vicinage, is unconstitutional and subversive of the rights and liberties of the free subjects of this Colony.

4. That it is our indispensable duty, which we owe to our King, our country, ourselves and our posterity, by all lawful ways and means in our power, to maintain, defend and preserve our loyalty, rights and liberties, and to transmit them inviolate to the latest generations; and that it is our fixed, determined and unalterable resolution faithfully to discharge this our bounden duty.

5. That it is our unanimous opinion, that it would conduce to the restoration of the liberties of America should the Colonies enter into a joint agreement not to purchase or use any articles of British manufacture, nor any commodities imported from the East Indies, under such restrictions as may be agreed on by a general Congress of Delegates from all the Colonies, hereafter to be appointed.

6. That as the town of Boston is now suffering in the common cause of American freedom, it is the opinion of this meeting, that subscriptions be hereafter opened in every town in this county, and the money subscribed to be applied towards the relief of the suffering poor in said town of Boston, until they may be relieved by being restored to their just rights and privileges.

7. That this county will appoint a Committee to meet the Committees of the several counties of this Colony, at such time and place as may be agreed on, in order to elect and appoint Delegates to represent this Colony at the general Congress, whose resolutions and determinations we will most strictly adhere to, and abide by. And we do hereby unanimously request the following gentlemen to accept of that trust, and do accordingly appoint them our Committee for the purpose aforesaid, viz.: Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Isaac Smith, Charles Coxe, Joachim Griggs, Benjamin Brearly, Abraham Hunt and John Emley.

As we apprehend New Brunswick is not so convenient to the members of the lower counties, and that all the counties will hardly have sufficient time to appoint their Committees, by the 21st of July, with submission, we would propose Princeton, as most central, to be the place, and Thursday, the 11th of August, the time of meeting of the several Committees.

Thomas Shelton,                   
Committee Clerk.          

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Middlesex County Resolutions.

According to notice, which had been given to the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Middlesex, New Jersey, a great number from every quarter of the county met at the Court House in New Brunswick, on Friday, the 15th day of July, 1774, at 2 o'clock, and chose John Moores, Esq., to the Chair; but as the Court House could not contain half the number, the meeting adjourned to the Presbyterian Meeting House, where, after some deliberation upon the dangerous situation of the publick affairs in America, the meeting unanimously Resolved as follows, viz.:

Resolve 1st, That the members of this meeting, their fellow-subjects in this Province, and they are persuaded the inhabitants of America in general, are firm and unshaken in their allegiance to his Majesty King George the Third. That they have ever demonstrated their readiness to support his Majesty's Government over them, and also to grant aids to his Majesty, on any emergency, by their own Representatives, to the utmost of their power.

2d. That all other modes of taxation in the Colonies, by a British Parliament, under whatever name or form attempted to be introduced, is not only arbitrary and oppressive, but has a direct tendency to alienate the affections of the Colonies from the parent country, to widen the breach already made by Ministerial influence, which it is earnestly wished may speedily be healed, and a permanent union re-established, on a solid constitutional foundation.

3d, That the unexampled distresses brought on the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, particularly that of blocking up the Port of Boston, and depriving them of all trade and commerce, in virtue of an Act or Acts of Parliament, is a cruel oppression, in which all the Colonies are intimately concerned, tending by a numerous train of consequences, to fasten on them the chains of vassalage and slavery, or lay prostrate at the feet of an unjustly incensed Ministry the inhabitants of this wide extended country, who would triumph over their liberties, sport with their lives, and claim their properties at will.

4th. We concur in the general opinion of our brethren, that the Congress of Deputies from the several Colonies, should present a dutiful Address to his Majesty, praying for a general redress of the grievances complained of.

5th. We are of opinion (which we submit to be considered in the general Congress), that a general stop of all imports and exports of merchandises, especially to Great Britain, by all the Colonies, is the only probable, if not the only possible measure, to preserve the liberties of this country, at present in such imminent danger of being annihilated.

6th. That an immediate subscription be set on foot, throughout this country, towards the relief of the suffering families in the town of Boston. For which purpose sundry gentlemen in the different townships and precincts of the county, are named and appointed to take in the same, and to make return of such subscriptions and collections to James Wilson, Esq., by the 1st day of September next, in order that such collections may be sent to Boston as early as possible.

7th. We agree with our brethren of all the counties in this Province, in the method of choosing Committees of Correspondence, and also that such Committees from the several counties do meet, at a place convenient, by them to be agreed on, and when so met to elect proper persons to represent this Colony in the proposed Congress, for which purpose the following gentlemen, viz.: John Moores, John Wetherill, John Johnson, Michael Field, William Pecke, James Wilson, John Combs, Jun., Jonathan Balding, William Smith, John Dennis, and Rune Runyon, Esqs., are requested to be, and are hereby appointed a Standing Committee of Correspondence, and that any five of them are a sufficient number to act.

Signed by order of the meeting.
John Moores,                   
Chairman.             

Immediately after the meeting the members of the County Committee present met, and agreed to meet the Committees from the other counties, at New Brunswick, on Thursday, the 21st of July, instant.

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Sussex County Resolutions.

At a meeting of a number of Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Sussex, in the Province of New Jersey, at the Court House in Newtown, in the said county, on Saturday, the 16th of July, A. D. 1774. Hugh Hughes, esquire, Chairman.

1st. Resolved, That it is our duty to render true and faithful allegiance to George the Third, King of Great Britain, and to support and maintain the just dependence of his Colonies upon the Crown of Great Britain, under the enjoyment of our constitutional rights and privileges.

2d. Resolved, That it is undoubtedly our right to be taxed only by our own consent, given by ourselves or our Representatives; and that the late Acts of Parliament for imposing taxes for the purpose of raising a revenue in America, and the Act of Parliament for shutting up the port of Boston, are oppressive, unconstitutional, and injurious in their principles to American freedom, and that the Bostonians are considered by us as suffering in the general cause of America.

3d. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this meeting, that firmness and unanimity in the Colonies, and an agreement not to use any articles imported from Great Britain or the East Indies (under such restrictions as may be agreed upon by the general Congress hereafter to be appointed by the Colonies) may be the most effectual means of averting the dangers that are justly apprehended, and securing the invaded rights and privileges of America.

4th. Resolved, That we will join, with the greatest cheerfulness, the other counties of this Province, in sending a Committee to meet with those from the other counties, at such time and place as they shall appoint, in order to choose proper persons to represent this Province in a general Congress of Deputies sent from each of the Colonies.

5th. Resolved, That we will faithfully and strictly adhere to such regulations and restrictions as shall be agreed upon by the Members of said Congress, and that shall by them be judged expedient and beneficial to the good of the Colonies.

6th. Resolved, That the Committee hereafter named do correspond and consult with the Committees of the other counties in this Province and meet with them in order to appoint Deputies to represent this Province in general Congress.

7th. Resolved, We do appoint the following gentlemen our Committee for the purpose above mentioned: Hugh Hughes, Nathaniel Pettit, Thomas Van Home, Thomas Anderson, Archibald Stewart, Abia Brown, John B. Scott, Esquires, Messrs. E. Dunlap, Mark Thompson, W. Maxwell.

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Monmouth County Resolutions.

On Tuesday, July 19, 1774, a majority of the Committees from the several Townships in the County of Monmouth, of the Colony of New Jersey, met according to appointment, at the Court House at Freehold, in said county; and appearing to have been regularly chosen and constituted by their respective Townships, they unanimously agreed upon the propriety and expediency of electing a Committee to represent the whole county at the approaching Provincial Convention, to be held at the City of New Brunswick, for the necessary purpose of constituting a Delegation from this Province, to the general Congress of the Colonies, and for all such other important purposes as shall hereafter be found necessary.

They, at the same time, also recorded the following Resolutions, Determinations, and Opinions, which they wish to be transmitted to posterity, as an ample testimony of their loyalty to his British Majesty, of their firm attachment to the principles of the glorious Revolution, and their fixed and unalterable purpose, by every lawful means in their power, to maintain and defend themselves in the possession and enjoyment of those inestimable, civil and religious privileges which their forefathers, at the expense of so much blood and treasure, have established and handed down to them:

1. In the names and behalf of their constituents, the good and loyal inhabitants of the County of Monmouth, in the Colony of New Jersey, they do cheerfully and publickly proclaim their unshaken allegiance to the person and Government of his most gracious Majesty King George the Third, now on the British Throne, and do acknowledge themselves bound at all times, and to the utmost exertion of their power, to maintain his dignity and lawful sovereignty in and over all his Colonies in America; and that it is their most fervent desire and constant prayer that, in a Protestant succession, the descendants of the illustrious House of Hanover, may continue to sway the British sceptre to the latest posterity.

2. They do highly esteem and prize the happiness of being governed, and having their liberty and property secured to them, by so excellent a system of laws as that of Great Britain, the best doubtless in the universe; and they will, at all times, cheerfully obey and render every degree of assistance in their power to the full and just execution of them. But at the same time will, with the greatest alacrity and resolution, oppose any unwarrantable innovation in them, or any addition to, or alterations in the grand system which may appear unconstitutional, and consequently, inconsistent with the liberties and privileges of the descendants of free born American Britons.

3. As there has been for ages past a most happy union and uninterrupted connection between Great Britain and her Colonies in America, they conceive their interests are now become so intimately blended together, and their mutual dependence upon each other to be at this time so delicately great, that they esteem everything which has a tendency to alienate affection or disunite them in any degree, highly injurious to their common happiness, and directly calculated to produce a Revolution likely to prove in the end destructive to both; they do, therefore, heartily disclaim every idea of that spirit of independence which has of late, by some of our mistaken brethren on each side of the Atlantic, been so groundlessly and injuriously held up to the attention of the Nation, as having, through ambition, possessed the breasts of the Americans. And, moreover, they devoutly beseech the Supreme Disposer of all events, graciously to incline the heart of our Sovereign, and all his Ministers, to a kind and impartial investigation of the real sentiments and disposition of his truly loyal American subjects.

4. Notwithstanding many great men and able writers have employed their talents and pens in favour of the newly adopted mode of taxation in America, they are yet sensible of no convictive light being thrown upon the subject; and, therefore, although so august a body as that of the British Parliament is now actually endeavoring to enforce, in a military way, the execution of some distressing edicts upon the capital of the Massachusetts Colony, they do freely and solemnly declare, that in conscience they deem them, and all others that are, or even may be, framed upon the same principles, altogether unprecedented and unconstitutional, utterly inconsistent with the true original intention of Magna Charta, subversive of the just rights of free born Englishmen, agreeable and satisfactory only to the domestick and foreign enemies of our Nation, and consequently pregnant with complicated ruin, and tending directly to the dissolution and destruction of the British Empire.

5. As they, on the one hand, firmly believe that the inhabitants of the Massachusetts Colony in general, and those of the town of Boston in particular, are, to all intents and purposes, as loyal subjects as any in all his Majesty's widely extended Dominions, and on the other that (although the present coercive and oppressive measures against them may have taken their rise in some part from the grossest and most cruel misrepresentation both of their disposition and conduct) the blockade of that town is principally designed to lead the way in an attempt to execute a dreadful, deep-laid plan for enslaving all America. They are, therefore, clearly of opinion, that the Bostonians are now eminently suffering in the common cause of American freedom, and that their fate may probably prove decisive to this very extensive Continent, and even to the whole British Nation; and they do verily expect that unless some generous spirited measures for the publick safety be speedily entered into, and steadily prosecuted, every other Colony will soon, in turn, feel the pernicious effects of the same detestable restrictions. Whence they earnestly entreat every rank, denomination, society and profession of their brethren, that, laying aside all bigotry and every party disposition, they do now universally concur in one generous and vigorous effort for the encouragement and support of their suffering friends, and in a resolute assertion of their birthright, liberties, and privileges. In consequence of which they may reasonably expect a speedy repeal of all the arbitrary edicts respecting the Massachusetts Government, and at the same time an effectual preclusion of any future attempts of the kind from the enemies of our happy Constitution, either upon them or any of their American brethren.

6. In case it shall hereafter appear to be consistent with the result of the deliberations of the general Congress, that an interruption, or entire cessation, of commercial intercourse with Great Britain, and even (painful as it may be) with the West Indies, until said oppressive Acts be repealed, and the liberties of America fully restored, stated, and asserted, will on this deplorable emergency be really necessary and conducive to the publick good, they promise a ready acquiescence in the measure, and will recommend the same as far as their influence shall extend.

7. As a general Congress of Deputies from the several American Colonies is proposed to be held at Philadelphia, some time in September next, they declare their entire approbation of the design, and think it the only rational method of evading those aggravated evils which threaten to involve the whole Continent in one general calamitous catastrophe. They are therefore met this day, vested with due authority from their respective constituents, to elect a Committee representing this County of Monmouth in any future necessary transactions respecting the cause of liberty, and especially to join the Provincial Convention soon to be held at New Brunswick, for the purpose of nominating and constituting a number of Delegates, who, in behalf of this Colony, may steadily attend said general Congress, and faithfully serve the labouring cause of freedom, and they have consequently chosen and deputed the following gentlemen to that important trust, viz.: Edward Taylor, John Anderson, John Taylor, James Grover, and John Lawrence, Esquires, Doctor Nathaniel Scudder, and Messrs. John Burrowes, John Covenhoven, Joseph Holmes, Josiah Holmes, and Edward Williams; Edward Taylor, Esq., being constituted Chairman, and any five of them a sufficient number to transact business. And they do beseech and entreat, instruct and enjoin them, to give their voice at said Provincial Convention, for no persons but such as they in good conscience and from the best information shall verily believe to be amply qualified for so interesting a department, particularly that they be men highly approved for integrity, honesty and uprightness, faithfully attached to his Majesty's person and lawful Government, well skilled in the principles of our excellent Constitution, and steady assertors of all our civil and religious liberties.

8. As, under the present operations of the Boston Port Bill, thousands of our respected brethren in that town must necessarily be reduced to great distress, they feel themselves affected with the sincerest sympathy and most cordial commisseration; and that they expect, under God, that the final deliverance of America will be owing, in a great degree, to a continuance of their virtuous struggle, they esteem themselves bound in duty and interest, to afford them every assistance and alleviation in their power, and they do now, in behalf of their constituents, declare their readiness to contribute to the relief of the suffering poor in that town ; therefore, they request the several Committees of the counties, when met, to take into their serious consideration the necessity and expediency of forwarding, under a sanction from them, subscriptions through every part of this Colony, for that truly humane and laudable purpose; and that a proper plan be concerted for laying out the product of such subscriptions to the best advantage, and afterwards transmitting it to Boston in the safest and least expensive way.

9. As we are now, by our Committees in this, in conjunction with those of the other Colonies, about to delegate to a number of our countrymen, a power equal to any wherewith human nature alone was ever invested ; and as we firmly resolve to acquiese in the issue of their deliberations, we do therefore earnestly entreat them, seriously and conscientiously to weigh the inexpressible importance of their arduous department, and fervently to solicit that direction and assistance in the discharge of their trust, which all the powers of humanity cannot afford them; and we do humbly and devoutly beseech that God, in whose hand are the hearts of all flesh, and who ruleth them at His pleasure, graciously to infuse into the whole Congress a spirit of true wisdom, prudence, and just moderation; and to direct them to such unanimous and happy conclusions, as shall terminate in His own honour and glory; the establishment of the Protestant succession of the illustrious House of Hanover; the mutual weal and advantage of Great Britain and all her Dominions, and a just and permanent confirmation of the civil and religious liberties of America. And now lastly, under the consideration of a bare possibility, that the enemies of our Constitution may yet succeed in a despotick triumph over us in this age, we do earnestly (should that prove the case) call upon all future generations to renew the glorious struggle for liberty, as oft as Heaven shall afford them any probable means of success.

May this notification, by some faithful record, be handed down to the yet unborn descendants of Americans, that nothing but the most fatal necessity could have wrested the present inestimable enjoyments from their ancestors. Let them universally inculcate upon their beloved offspring an investigation of those truths, respecting both civil and religious liberty, which have been so clearly and fully stated in this generation. May they be carefully taught in all their schools ; and may they never rest, until, through a Devine(sic) blessing upon their efforts, true freedom and liberty shall reign triumphant over the whole Globe.

Signed by order of the Committee,

Edward Taylor,                   
County Chairman.          

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Convention to Nominate Delegates to the
Continental Congress, &c.

At a general meeting of the Committees of the several Counties in the Province of New Jersey, at New Brunswick, on Thursday, the 21st July, and continued to the Saturday following. Present, seventy-two Members. Stephen Crane, Esquire, in the Chair. The Committees taking into their serious consideration the dangerous and destructive nature of sundry Acts of the British Parliament, with respect to the fundamental liberties of the American Colonies, conceive it their indispensable duty to bear their open testimony against them, and to concur with the other Colonies in prosecuting all legal and necessary measures, for obtaining their speedy repeal. Therefore, we unanimously agree in the following sentiments and Resolutions:

1st. We think it necessary to declare, that the inhabitants of this Province, (and we are confident the people of America in general) are, and ever have been, firm and unshaken in their loyalty to his Majesty King George the Third; fast friends to the Revolution settlement; and that they detest all thoughts of an independence on the Crown of Great Britain; Accordingly we do, in the most sincere and solemn manner, recognize and acknowledge his Majesty King George the Third to be our lawful and rightful Sovereign, to whom under his royal protection in our fundamental rights and privileges, we owe, and will render all due faith and allegiance.

2d. We think ourselves warranted from the principles of our excellent Constitution, to affirm that the claim of the British Parliament, (in which we neither are, nor can be represented) to make laws, which shall be binding on the King's American subjects, "in all cases whatsoever," and particularly for imposing taxes for the purpose of raising a revenue in America is unconstitutional and oppressive, and which we think ourselves bound in duty to ourselves and our posterity, by all constitutional means in our power, to oppose.

3d. We think the several late Acts of Parliament for shutting up the port of Boston, invading the Charter rights of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and subjecting supposed offenders to be sent for trial to other Colonies, or to Great Britain; the sending over an armed force to carry the same into effect, and thereby reducing many thousands of innocent and loyal inhabitants to poverty and distress; are not only subversive of the undoubted rights of his Majesty's American subjects, but also repugnant to the common principles of humanity and justice. Thee proceedings, so violent in themselves, and so truly alarming to the other Colonies, (many of which are equally exposed to Ministerial vengeance.) render it the indispensable duty of all, heartily to unite in the most proper measures, to procure redress for their oppressed countrymen, now suffering in the common cause; and for the re-establishment of the constitutional rights of America on a solid and permanent foundation.

4th. To effect this important purpose, we conceive the most eligible method is, to appoint a General Congress of Commissioners of the respective Colonies; who shall be empowered mutually to pledge, each to the rest, the publick honour and faith of their constituent Colonies, firmly and inviolably to adhere to the determinations of the said Congress.

5th. Resolved, That we do earnestly recommend a general non-importation and a non-consumption agreement to be entered into at such time, and regulated in such manner, as to the Congress shall appear most advisable.

6th. Resolved, That it appears to us, to be a duty incumbent on the good people of this Province, to afford some immediate relief to the many suffering inhabitants of the town of Boston.

Therefore, the several County Committees do now engage to set on foot, and promote collections, without delay, either by subscriptions or otherwise, throughout their respective counties; and that they will remit the moneys arising from the said subscriptions, or any other benefactions, that may be voluntarily made by the inhabitants, either to Boston, or into the hands of James Neilson, John Dennis, William Oake, Abraham Hunt, Samuel Tucker, Dr. Isaac Smith, Grant Gibbon, Thomas Sinnicks, and John Carey, whom we do hereby appoint a Committee for forwarding the same to Boston, in such way and manner as they shall be advised will best answer the benevolent purpose designed.

7th. Resolved, That the grateful acknowledgements of this body are due to the noble and worthy patrons of constitutional liberty, in the British Senate, for their laudable efforts to avert the storm they behold impending over a much injured Colony, and in support of the just rights of the King's subjects in America.

8th. Resolved, That James Kinsey, William Livingston, John Dehart, Stephen Crane, and Richard Smith, Esquires, or such of them as shall attend, be the Delegates to represent this Province in the General Continental Congress, to be held at the City of Philadelphia, on or about the first of September next, to meet, consult, and advise with the Deputies from the other Colonies; and to determine upon all such prudent and lawful measures as may be judged most expedient for the Colonies immediately and unitedly to adopt, in order to obtain relief for an oppressed people, and the redress of our general grievances.

Signed by order
.
 
Jonathan D. Sergeant,   
Clerk.

Letter from the Committee of Correspondence of New
Jersey to the Committee of Correspondence of Boston.

Elizabethtown, New Jersey, July 28, 1774.

Gentlemen:— The arbitrary and cruel oppression under which your Metropolis now labours from the suspension of commerce, must inevitably reduce multitudes to inexpressible difficulty and distress.

Suffering in a glorious and common cause, sympathy and resentment, with peculiar energy, fill the breasts of your anxious countrymen. As the King of Kings and the Ruler of Princes seems, in a remarkable manner, to be inspiring these Colonies with a spirit of union, to confound the counsels of your unrighteous oppressors, and with a spirit of humanity and benevolence towards an innocent and oppressed people; so, we trust, he will also inspire your town with patience, resignation, and fortitude, until this great calamity shall be over-past.

We have the pleasure to acquaint you that, on the 21st instant, at the city of New Brunswick, the Province of New Jersey, with singular unanimity, seventy-two Delegates from the several counties and a majority of the House of Representatives present and approving, entered into similar resolutions with the other Colonies; elected five Deputies for the proposed Congress, and the County Committees then agreed to promote collections in their respective counties, for the relief of such of the unhappy inhabitants of the town of Boston as may now be reduced to extremity and want. To accomplish this purpose with the more acceptation to yourselves, we the Committee of Correspondence for the Eastern Division, request that, by the return of the post, you would be pleased to advise us in what way we can best answer your present necessities; whether cash remitted, or what articles of provision, or other necessaries, we can furnish from hence, would be most agreeable; and which we hope we shall be able to forward to Boston very soon after your advice shall be received. We doubt not gentlemen are devising every possible method for the employment of those who, by their deplorable situation, are cut off from all former means of subsistence.

We are, gentlemen, your very humble servants.

  By order,
          William Peartree Smith,
                              Chairman.

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Letter from the Committee of Correspondence of Boston,
to the Committee of Correspondence for New Jersey
.

Boston, August 22, 1774.

Sir:— The Committee of Correspondence for this town have handed to the Committee of Donations a letter from you of the 28th ult., which breathes such a spirit of union and hearty concern for the rights of America, as must enkindle in every breast the highest opinion of the virtue and firmness of the inhabitants of New Jersey. With hearts deeply impressed with gratitude, we note your kind intentions to contribute for the relief of the inhabitants of this town, suffering by means of the Boston Port Bill, and desire to know "in what way you can best answer our present necessities, whether cash remitted or articles of provision." For answer, if cash would be equally agreeable to our friends, it would be very acceptable at this time, but would leave that matter entirely to your convenience. The Christian sympathy and generosity of our friends through the Continent cannot fail to inspire the inhabitants of this town with patience, resignation and firmness, while we trust in the Supreme Ruler of the universe, that he will graciously hear our cries, and in his time free us from our present bondage, and make us rejoice in his great salvation.

Please to present our greatful(sic) acknowledgments to our friends of New Jersey, and be assured we are, with great esteem, sir, your friends and fellow-countrymen.

Nathaniel Appleton.         
per order.

——————————

Commission of Delegates for New Jersey to Continental Congress
at Philadelphia, September 5, 1774.

To James Kinney, William Livingston, John De Hart, Stephen Crane and Richard Smith, Esquires, each and every of you:

The Committees appointed by the several Counties of the Colony of New Jersey, to nominate Deputies to represent the same in the General Congress of Deputies from the other Colonies in America, convened at the City of New Brunswick, have nominated and appointed, and do hereby nominate and appoint you, and each of you, Deputies to represent the Colony of New Jersey, in the said General Congress.

In testimony whereof the Chairman of the said several Committees here met, have hereunto set their hands, this twenty-third day of July in the fourteenth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the Third and in the year of our Lord, 1774.

Signed,

William P. Smith,
John Moores,
Robert Field,
Peter Zabriskie,
Edward Taylor,
Archibald Stewart,
Abia Brown,
Jacob Ford,
Robert Johnson,
Robert Friend Price,
Samuel Tucker,
Hendrick Fisher,
Thomas Anderson,
Mark Thompson.

——————————

Address of the Grand Jury of Essex County.

To the Honourable Frederick Smyth, Esquire, Chief Justice of the Province of New Jersey : The address of the Grand Jury for the Body of the County of Essex, at a Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery, held at Newark, in the said County, the first Tuesday in November, 1774.

May it please your Honour:

As your Honour's charge from the Bench was not so properly directory to us with respect to our duty as the Grand Inquest of this County, as matter of instruction for the regulation of our own personal conduct amidst the present commotions of the Continent, we think ourselves obliged, from the singularity of the charge, and its paternal tenderness for our welfare, to express our gratitude for your Honour's friendly admonitions, (which doubtless derived great solemnity from the place in which they were delivered,) and at the same time inform you how far we have the misfortune to differ from you in sentiment, both as to the origin and tendency of the present uneasiness so generally diffused through all the Colonies. If we rightly understood a particular part of your Honour's charge, you were pleased to tell us, that while we were employed in guarding against "imaginary tyranny, three thousand miles distant," we ought not to expose ourselves to a "real tyranny at our own doors." As we neither know, sir, nor are under the least apprehension of any tyranny at our own doors, unless it should make its way hither from the distance you mention, and then, we hope, that all those whom the Constitution has entrusted with the guardianship of our liberties, will rather strive to obstruct than accelerate its progress, we are utterly at a loss for the idea thereby intended to be communicated. But, respecting the tyranny at the distance of three thousand miles, which your Honour is pleased to represent as imaginary, we have the unhappiness widely to differ from you in opinion. The effect, sir, of that tyranny is too severely felt to have it thought altogether visionary. We cannot think, sir, that taxes imposed upon us by our fellow subjects, in a Legislature in which we are not represented, is an imaginary, but that it is a real and actual tyranny; and of which no Nation whatsoever can furnish a single instance. We cannot think, sir, that depriving us of the inestimable right of trial by jury; seizing our persons and carrying us for trial to Great Britain is a tyranny merely imaginary.

Nor can we think with your Honour, that distroying Charters and changing our forms of Government, is a tyranny altogether ideal.— That an Act passed to protect, indemnify, and screen from punishment such as may be guilty even of murder is a bare idea.— That the establishment of French laws and Popish religion in Canada, the better to facilitate the arbitrary schemes of the British Ministry, by making the Canadians instruments in the hands of power to reduce us to slavery, has no other than a mental existence. In a word, sir, we cannot persuade ourselves that the Fleet now blocking up the Port of Boston, consisting of ships built of real English oak and solid iron, and armed with cannon of ponderous metal, with actual powder and ball; nor the Army lodged in the Town of Boston, and the Fortifications thrown about it, (substantial and formidable realities,) are all creatures of the imagination. These, sir, are but a few of the numerous grievances under which America now groans. These are some of the effects of that deliberate plan of tyranny concerted at "three thousand miles distance," and which, to your Honour, appears only like the "baseless fabrick of a vision." To procure redress of these grievances, which to others assume the form of odious and horrid realities, the Continent, as we learn, has very naturally been thrown into great commotions; and as far as this County in particular has taken part in the alarm, we have the happiness to represent to your Honour, that in the prosecution of measures for preserving American liberties, and obtaining the removal of oppressions, the people have acted in all their popular assemblies, (which it is the right of Englishmen to convene whenever they please,) with the spirit, temper and prudence becoming freemen and loyal subjects.

To trespass no longer on your Honour's patience, we conclude w4th our hearty wishes, that while the great cause of liberty is warmly, and at the same time so peaceably vindicated, by all honest Americans, as essentially necessary to publick happiness; no bias of self-interest; no fawning servility towards those in power; no hopes of future preferment, will induce any man to damp their laudable and patriotick ardour; nor lend his helping hand to the unnatural and diabolical work of riveting those chains which are forging for us by that same actual tyranny, at the distance of three thousand miles.

 

To the Freeholders of the County of Essex, in the Province of New Jersey,
qualified to vote for Representatives in the Legislature.

Gentlemen:— The zeal you have hitherto manifested in support of the constitutional liberties of your country will unquestionably prompt you to carry into execution, with firmness and unanimity, the wise and prudent Resolutions lately entered into by the Delegates of this Continent, in General Congress. In the eleventh Article of the Association, formed in behalf of themselves and their constituents, it was agreed "That a Committee be appointed in every County, City and Town, by those who are qualified to vote for Representatives in the Legislature, whose business it shall be to observe the conduct of all persons touching the said Association." We your Committee of Correspondence, cannot in the least doubt your ready and immediate compliance with the Article; for, as the salutary effects to arise from this Association, must, under God, depend upon the fidelity of individuals in carrying it precisely into execution; so, should any inhabitant of this Colony be found so lost to a sense of publick virtue, as to violate the same in any instance, such person, pursuant to the said Article, may by your Committees, "be held up to publick notice, as unfriendly to the liberties of his country, and all dealings with him or her be thenceforward broken off." We have therefore thought fit to recommend to you, that for the more extensive observation of the conduct of individuals, Committees be chosen for each of the three Precincts into which the County is divided, viz., Elizabethtown, Newark and Achquakanung; and we do hereby give notice to and request the Freeholders of the respective Precincts, to convene for that purpose, as follows: For the Borough of Elizabeth, at the Court House, in Elizabethtown, on Tuesday, the sixth day of December next, at 2 o'clock, P. M.; for Newark, at the Court House in Newark, on Wednesday, the seventh day of December; and for Achquakanung, on Monday, the twelfth day of December, at the Bridge, opposite the house of Timothy Day. And we do also recommend to you, that ten at least of the most reputable inhabitants for Achquakanung, fifteen for Newark, and twenty for Elizabethtown, be elected for the above purpose.

As Delegates for the several Colonies are again to be appointed, to meet at Philadelphia, on the tenth day of May next, it will be farther expedient that the inhabitants make choice of a new Committee of Correspondence, with power to instruct the Representatives for this County, when convened in General Assembly, to join in the appointment of Delegates for the Colony to meet in the said Congress. But if the said General Assembly shall not appoint Delegates for that purpose, by the first day of April next, then the said Committee of Correspondence do meet with the several County Committees of this Colony, and appoint the said Delegates at such time and place as shall be agreed upon by the said Committees.

Stephen Crane,
John De Hart,
William Livingston,
Isaac Ogden,
W. P. Smith.
Elias Boudinot,
Jo. Riggs, Jr.,
John Chetwood,
Henry Gerritse,
 

County of Essex, November 28, 1774.

——————————

Essex County Assembly
.

At a meeting of the Freeholders of Elizabethtown, in Essex County, in the Province of New Jersey, on Tuesday, the first day of December, 1774:.

Stephen Crane, Esquire, in the Chair.

The Committee of Correspondence for the County of Essex having produced the Association lately entered into by the Delegates of the American Colonies, met in General Congress, the same was read to and then unanimously approved and adopted by the whole Assembly, who were pleased at the same time to signify their thanks to the Delegates of this Colony for their faithful services. It was then proposed, that pursuant to the eleventh Article of the said Association, a large Committee should be now chosen for the purposes therein mentioned, which was also agreed to, and the following persons were accordingly appointed, viz.: Jonathan Hampton, Matthias Williamson, Elias Dayton, Isaac Woodruff, William Barnett, Wm. Herriman, Oliver Spencer, George Ross, Edward Thomas, Cornelius Hetfield, John Blanchard, Ephraim Tyrrel, Abraham Clarke, Robert Ogden, junior, Jeremiah Smith, Richard Townley, junior, Samuel Shotwell, David Miller, Thomas Woodruff, John Clawson, Jonathan Dayton, Ephraim Marsh, Recompence Stanbury, Jedediah Swan, William Parsons, Samuel Potter, William Bott, Jonathan Williams, Christopher Marsh, Isaac Wynants, Daniel Halsey.

After which the Committee of Correspondence informed the Assembly that, having executed the services for which they had been particularly appointed, they had thought proper to desolve themselves, in order that the inhabitants of the respective Precincts of the County might have the opportunity of a new choice. Whereupon Stephen Crane, John De Hart, William Livingston, William P. Smith, Elias Boudinot, and John Chetwood, Esquires, being of the late Committee, were unanimously re-elected for the Borough of Elizabeth, and at the same time authorized to instruct the Representatives of this County, when convened in General Assembly, to join in the appointment of Delegates for this Colony, to meet in the next General Congress, at Philadelphia. But if the said Assembly should not appoint Delegates for that purpose, by the first day of April next, then the said Committee of Correspondence to meet with the several County Committees of this Colony, and appoint the said Delegates, at such time and place as shall be agreed upon by the said Committees.

The above business being finished, the Assembly unanimously Voted, That two certain Pamphlets lately published, the one entitled A Friendly Address, &c., and the other under the signature of A Farmer, as containing many notorious falsehoods, evidently calculated to sow seeds of dissention among the good people of America, grossly misrepresenting the principles of the present opposition to Parliamentary Taxations, vilifying the late Congress, and intended to facilitate the scheme of the British Ministry for enslaving the Colonies, be publickly burnt, in detestation and abhorrence of such infamous publications.

And the same were accordingly committed to the flames, before the Court House, with the universal approbation of a numerous concourse of people.

——————————

Newark Committee.

Pursuant to the eleventh Article of the Association entered into by the late Continental Congress, held at Philadelphia, at a meeting of the Freeholders of the Township of Newark, in the County of Essex, at the Court House, on Wednesday, the 7th of December, 1774.

Joseph Briggs, Jun., Esq., in the Chair.

After a proper introduction to the business of the day, the following persons were unanimously chosen as a Committee of Observation for the Town aforesaid, viz.: Joseph Allen, Esq., Garrabrant Garrabrant, Esquire, Caleb Camp, Bethuel Pierson, John Range, Solomon Davis, Doctor Matthias Pierson, Samuel Pennington, Joseph Hedden, Jun., Daniel Condict, John Earle, John Spear, Moses Farrand, David Condict, Esq., John Peck, Joseph Lyon, Thomas Cadmus, Jun., Abraham Lyon, James Wheeler, Ichabod Harrison, Jonathan Sayer, Robert Johnston, Robert Neil, Junior.

At a meeting of a majority of the above Committee, held in Newark, January 5, 1775, Caleb Camp, Chairman, Robert Johnston, Clerk.

Voted, That the Thanks of this Committee be presented to the Honourable Delegates for this Province, members of the Continental Congress held at Philadelphia in September last, for the faithful discharge of the important trust reposed in them:

To the Delegates for New Jersey, in the Continental Congress:

Gentlemen:— While we feel an inviolable attachment to the person of the King, and the present reigning family, it is with the highest esteem of, and gratitude to you, the particular Delegates for this Province (in conjunction with the whole of that venerable body) that we view the many wise and prudent measures by you adopted to support, and hand down to posterity inviolate, those valuable and important privileges, both civil and sacred, so highly prized by our ancestors.

And 'tis with the greatest resentment that we so often behold your virtuous and patriotick endeavours wickedly traduced and made the subject of ridicule and slander by those Sons of Belial, whose attachedness to their master, will prompt them to commit violence to their own judgments, and even feed their wickedness with the very blood of their country. But you sirs, may be assured, that such authors (when known as their criminal production) shall ever be treated by us with the utmost contempt, as they merit.

And as a further mark of acquiescence in the Association, and demonstration of our sincerity, we think it our duty for ourselves, and we will with the utmost of our influence, recommend to our constituents, as the only probable means of securing our liberties, that the said Association be punctually adhered to, and strictly put in execution.

That the blessings of Heaven may succeed all our endeavours to vanquish our enemies, and effectually secure the liberties of British America, and finally establish a happy, constitutional, and lasting union between Great Britain and her Colonies, is the sincere wish of, gentlemen, your much obliged and very humble servants.

By order of the Committee,

Caleb Camp,               
Chairman.          

As the present critical situation of our Nation, and especially of British America, make it highly necessary, that every publick exhibition from the press should be stripped of all false disguises, and fairly hold up to view the only alternative, viz.: a tame submission to a tyrannical Ministry, and its consequence, abject slavery; or a brave, manly and constitutional resistance, as the only likely means of obtaining and enjoying liberty; Therefore the Committee of Observation, for the Township of Newark, beg leave to publish the following Queries and Resolves:

Query 1. Whether a Press, which weekly throws out pamphlets and other publick pieces, replete with the most bitter invectives, scandalous and criminal reflections upon that reputable body, the Continental Congress, and their constituents; and all, with a manifest design to blind the eyes of the less judicious; sow the seeds of faction and discord, and thus gratify the perfidious authors by prejudicing the honest, unthinking, against their real interest; whether such a press is not inimical to the country where it is, and does not forfeit its support?

Query 2. Whether such a Printer, and the authors of such pieces, when known, are not, according to the strict sense of the Grand Congress, those very persons who by them are considered such enemies to their country that every true friend of liberty ought to avoid them?

Query 3. Whether a Printer in New York in the space of three or four years, by the profits of his press, and a moderate per cent, on Keyser's Pills, with a few other insignificant perquisites, can from a low ebb of fortune, if not bankruptcy, acquire such independence, that he dare publickly, with an air of supercilious haughtiness, proclaim himself independent of the country, and that he could live without their custom.

Query 4 Whether such a man is not a Ministerial hireling, who is endeavouring to sacrifice his country to his own private interest.

AND WHEREAS, it is too evident to this Committee, that the above character is exactly fitted to J. Rivington; therefore

Resolved, That this Committee will henceforth take no more of his papers, pamphlets, or any other publick performance of his press, neither will we deal with him in any other way. And we would heartily recommend, that our constituents may take this matter into serious consideration; and as far as it shall carry conviction to them, treat him with a correspondent conduct.

By order of the Committee.

Caleb Camp,                   
Chairman.                

——————————

Elizabethtown Resolutions
.

Elizabethtown, New Jersey, December, 19, 1774.

The Committee of Observation for the free Borough and Town of Elizabeth, taking into consideration that James Rivington, Printer of one of the New York Gazettes, having published many pieces in his paper, and divers pamphlets, inimical to the liberties of America; by which we have reason to suspect that he is a vile Ministerial hireling, employed to disunite the Colonies, and calumniate all their measures entered into for the publick good; in order therefore, to discountenance the attempts of every person unfriendly to America liberty,

Resolved, unanimously, By this Committee, that they will take no more of said Rivington's Gazettes, nor send any advertisements to be inserted therein, or have any further dealings or commerce with him; And that we will recommend it to our constituents to observe the same conduct towards said Rivington, or any other Printer who shall publish or print any pieces or pamphlets tending to break the happy union now subsisting throughout the American Colonies.

By order of the Committee.

Jonathan Hampton,                
Chairman.          

Middlesex County Resolutions.

According to a notice of the 20th of December, sundry of the Freeholders of Middlesex County assembled at the Court House in New Brunswick, on the 3d day of January, 1775, but finding their number insufficient to pursue the business recommended by the Continental Congress: It was agreed that every City, Township and District, should have a meeting by themselves, and choose Committees of Observation and Inspection; and when chosen, meet at New Brunswick, the 16th day of this instant, and by majority of votes, choose a Committee of Correspondence for the County, to have existence for a limited time.

Accordingly the several Districts in the County have had meetings, and have chosen Committees of Observation, as follows, to wit:

For Woodbridge — Ebenezer Foster, Henry Freeman, Nathaniel Heard, Reuben Potter, William Smith, Jeremiah Manning, Matthias Baker, Charles Jackson, Samuel Force, John Pain, James Manning, John Heard, Daniel Moores, John Ross, Ellis Barron, William Cutter, Reuben Evans, James Randolph, Timothy Bloomfield, John Noe, and John Conway.

For Piscataway — John Gilman, Henry Sutton, John Langstaff, William Manning, Benjamin Manning, Jacob Martin, Charles Suydam, Jeremiah Field, Daniel Bray, Jacob Fitsworth, Micajah Dunn, Melancthon Freeman and John Dunn.

For South Amboy — Stephen Pangburn, John Layd, Luke Schenck, Matthew Rice, William Vance and Joseph Potter.

For New Brunswick — Azariah Dunham, J. Schureman, John Dennis, John Lyle, Jun., Abraham Schuyler, George Hame, Jacobus Van Huys, John Slight, John Voorhees, Barent Stryker, William Williamson, Peter Farmer, Ferdinand Schureman, Abraham Bucklew and Jonathan Roeff.

For South Brunswick — David Williamson, William Sender, Isaac Van Dyck, John Wetherill, Jun., Abraham Terheune, Jacob Van Dyck, and Charles Barclay.

For Windsor — James Hebron, Samuel Minor, Jonathan Combs, Andrew Davison, Isaac Rogers, Ezekiel Smith and Jonathan Baldwin.

By a meeting of the General Committee of Observation and Inspection for the County of Middlesex, in the Province of New Jersey, chosen in pursuance of the eleventh Article of the Association of the Continental Congress, and assembled at New Brunswick, in the said County, on Monday, the 16th day of January, 1775.

Azariah Dunham, Esquire, in the Chair.

1. Resolved, That this Conimittee have been duly empowered and authorized by the Freeholders and Freemen of the County of Middlesex, to meet this day at New Brunswick, and, in their names, to transact all such publick business as the Committee, or a majority of them, think of importance to the general interest of the County,

2. Resolved, That we heartily and entirely approve of the Proceedings of the late Continental Congress, as published in their journal, entitled "Journal of the Proceedings of the Congress, held at Philadelphia, September fifth, 1774;" and that we esteem ourselves bound by the ties of virtue, honour, and the love of our country, to contribute all in our power towards carrying into practice the measures which they have recommended.

3. Resolved, That we look upon ourselves as under particular obligations of gratitude to the worthy and publick spirited gentlemen who composed the late Congress, for the knowledge with which they have pointed out and defined our rights, the firmness with which they have asserted them, and the wisdom with which they have devised the most likely and peaceable means of recovering, establishing and perpetuating them.

4. Resolved, That James Neilson, William Oak, Azariah Dunham, John Wetherill, Jonathan Combs, Stephen Pangburn and Ebenezer Foster, Esquires, Messrs. Wm. Smith, Matthias Baker, Jacob Fitsworth, John Dunn, David Williamson, Jonathan Baldwin and Jacob Schenck, be and they are by this Committee appointed a Committee of Correspondence for the County of Middlesex, and that they do, as soon as possible, by their humble petition, address the General Assembly now sitting at Perth Amboy, to nominate Deputies from this Province to the General Congress, to be held at Philudelpliia in May next; and provided the Assembly do not undertake such nomination, that they then meet and join with the other Committees of Correspondence appointed by the several Counties in the Province, and at a proper time and place, and elect Deputies for the service aforesaid; and that this Committee be and continue the Committee of Correspondence for the County of Middlesex, till the rising of the next General Congress, and no longer.

5. Resolved, That we think it our duty publickly to declare our contempt and detestation of those insidious scribblers, who, with the vilest views, enlist themselves in the cause of the Ministry, and by the vilest means endeavor to effect a disunion among the good people of the Colonies, that they may become a prey to the oppression against which they are so laudably and unanimously struggling; who skulk behind prostituted printing presses, and with the assistance of the prostituted conductors of them, labour to circulate their pestilent compositions through the land, under the show of friendship and a regard to the publick good; who, with the most unexampled effrontery against the sense of every man of the least information and impartiality, will persist in retailing the rotten, exploded, and ten thousand times confuted doctrines of a passive acquiescence in the measures of Government, however distempered and tyrannical.

6. Resolved, That we will preserve on this trying occasion a resolute spirit, directed by loyalty to our King, prudence, temper, and dispassion, testifying that, as our cause is clearly just, we mean to support it by just exertions, and not by misrule and outrage.

Signed by order and on behalf of the meeting, by

John Dennis,                    
Clerk.                

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Woodbridge Committee.

At a General Meeting of the Inhabitants of the Township of Woodbridge, in the County of Middlesex, in New Jersey, on Saturday, the 7th day of January, 1775.

Captain Reuben Potter being chosen Moderator.

The Association entered into and recommended by the late General Congress at Philadelphia being read and approved of, it was

1st. Resolved unanimously, That the said Association be adopted by the Town, and carried into execution.

2d. Resolved unanimously, That a Committee of Observation, consisting of twenty-one members, be appointed by those "qualified to vote for Representatives in the Legislature." Accordingly, the following persons were chosen without a dissenting voice, viz: Ebenezer Foster, Henry Freeman, Nathaniel Heard, and Reuben Potter, Esquires, Messrs. William Smith, Jeremiah Manning, Matthias Baker, Charles Jackson, Samuel Force, John Pain, James Manning, John Heard, Daniel Moores, John Ross, Ellis Barron, William Cutter, Reuben Evans, James Randolph, Timothy Bloomfield, John Noe, and John Conway, to see the said Association be punctually observed and carried into execution; that any nine or more of them be authorized to act for the purpose specified in the eleventh Article of said Association.

3d. Resolved unanimously, That it is the desire of the people now met, that the said Committee do execute the trust reposed in them with firmness and fidelity, and in every respect follow the directions of the Association, as much as if it was a law of this Province; and they be upon oath for the conscientious discharge of their duty.

The Committee of this Town appointed to meet the Committees of the other Townships in County Committee and Provincial Congress, in July last, desiring to be dismissed, it was

4th. Resolved unanimously, That they be thanked for the faithful discharge of the trust reposed in them, and dismissed agreeable to their request.

5th. Resolved unanimously, That a Committee of this Town be chosen to meet the Committees of the other Townships in this County, to choose a Committee of Correspondence, agreeable to the directions of the said Association; accordingly, Ebenezer Foster, Esquire, Messrs. William Smith, and Matthias Baker, were chosen, and are hereby instructed, that in case the Assembly of New Jersey do not appoint Delegates to meet the Continental Congress in May next, they meet the Committees from the other Counties of this Province, in Provincial Congress, and choose them.

John Ross,                    
Clerk.          

At a meeting of the above Committee of Observation for the township of Woodbridge, the 10th day of January, 1775, pursuant to advertisement; present, sixteen members:

Ordered, That Ebenezer Foster, Esquire, Messrs. Jeremiah Manning, Matthias Baker, Ellis Barron, and John Conway, wait on Messrs. Joseph Shotwell and Sons, Merchants, immediately, and ask them if they are disposed to comply with the Association of the late Continental Congress, respecting the importation of Goods, it being represented that said Shotwells have imported sundry Goods since the first day of December last.

The Deputies aforesaid returned and reported to the body that they had waited on Messrs. Shotwells according to appointment, who assured them "that all Goods imported by their house since the first of December, remained unopened as they came to hand;" but observed, that as said Goods were imported into and entered at New York, and had been under the inspection of the Committee for said City, they did not come under the inspection of this Committee, and requested the favorable construction of this body, and the inhabitants in general, respecting their conduct and answer."

The Committee in consequence of said report, allow that the answer of Messrs. Shotwells is satisfactory; and are of opinion that any Goods or Merchandise imported into the City of New York, which may even escape the notice of their Committee, are not subject to our inspection.

This Committee earnestly recommend to all Merchants and Retailers in this Township, to adhere strictly to the ninth Article of the Association respecting the sale of Goods.

And we do farther recommend to all the inhabitants of this Township, a strict compliance with the eighth Article of the Association, respecting Frugality, Economy and Industry, and the prohibition of all kinds of Gaming.

This Committee also taking into consideration the many pieces and pamphlets published by James Rivington, tending to frustrate and defame the proceedings of the late Continental Congress, and disunite the Colonies, are of opinion that he is a person inimical to the liberties of this country, and as such ought to be discountenanced; we therefore do cordially recommend to all our constituents to drop his Paper and have no further dealings with him.

Voted, That these Proceedings be published in Messrs. Holts' and Gaines' Papers.

Signed by order of the Committee.

Reuben Potter,                  
Chairman.          

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Morris County Meeting.

At a Meeting of the Freeholders of the County of Morris, at Morristown, on Monday, the 9th day of January, 1775.

William Winds, Esquire, Chairman.

The Committee of Correspondence, for the County of Morris, having produced and read the Association of the Continental Congress, the same was deliberately considered by the whole assembly, and by them unanimously approved as a wise, prudent and constitutional mode of opposition to the late several tyrannical and oppressive Acts of the British Parliament. Whereupon they unanimously determined strictly to abide by the same, and gratefully expressed their acknowledgments and hearty thanks to the Delegates of this Colony for their great attention to the rights and liberties of their constituents, and for the faithful discharge of the important trust reposed in them.

The assembly then unanimously agreed that the inhabitants of each several Township in the County should meet at their respective places of holding Town Meetings, on Monday, the 23d day of January, instant, at one o'clock in the afternoon, then and there respecttively to choose (by those who are qualified to vote for Representatives in the Legislature) a Committee of Observation, pursuant to, and for the purposes expressed in the eleventh Article of the said Association. After which the Committee of Correspondence declared to the assembly that they had thought proper to dissolve themselves, in order that their constituents might have an opportunity of a new choice, and that they were dissolved accordingly: Whereupon Jacob Ford, William Winds, and Jonathan Stiles, Esquires, Messrs. Jacob Drake, Peter Dickerson, and Ellis Cook, together with Samuel Tuthill, Doctor William Hart, and Abraham Ogden, Esquires, were elected ; and at the same time authorized to instruct the Representatives of this County, when convened in General Assembly, to join in the appointment of Delegates for this Colony, to meet in General Congress, at Philadelphia; but if the said Assembly should not appoint Delegates for that purpose by the first day of April next, then the said Committee of Correspondence to meet with the several County Committees of this Colony, and appoint the said Delegates, at such time and place as shall be agreed upon by the said Committees.

The assembly afterwards taking into consideration the conduct of James Rivington, Printer in New York, in publishing two certain Pamphlets: the one entitled "A Friendly Address, &c., &c.; the other under the signature of "A. W. Farmer, and several others; all containing many falsehoods, wickedly calculated to divide the Colonies — to deceive the ignorant, and to cause a base submission to the unconstitutional measures of the British Parliament for enslaving the Colonies, do unanimously resolve, that they esteem the said James Rivington an enemy to his country; and therefore that they will, for the future, refrain from taking his Newspapers, and from all further commerce with him; and that, by all lawful means in their power, they will discourage the circulation of his Papers in this County.

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Hunterdon County Committee.

At a meeting of the several Township Committees in the County of Hunterdon, and Province of New Jersey, held at John Ringo's, the 18th day of January, 1775:

Present, sixty members.

John Hart, Esq., Chairman.

The Committee taking into consideration the Proceedings of the late Continental Congress, highly approve thereof, and the Association entered into do recommend and will abide by, and thank the Delegates for their firm and steady conduct.

The Committee then taking into their consideration the method of choosing Delegates for this Province, to attend at Philadelphia, the 10th day of May next, or sooner, if necessary, in Continental Congress, agreed to adopt the measure pursued by the several County Committees of this Province, the 21st day of July last, and do recommend that the several County Committees meet at Trenton, on Wednesday, the 29th day of March next, unless some other time and place should be agreed on by a majority of the Counties in this Province, to choose Delegates for the purpose aforesaid, and we do hereby appoint Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Daniel Hunt, Jasper Smith, Charles Coxe, Richard Stevens, Samuel Johnson, Esquires, Messrs. Thomas Jones and Thomas Stout, a County Committee for the purpose aforesaid, who, or any three of them, are also appointed a Committee of Correspondence, and a majority of the whole Committee to have power to call Committees of the several townships together, at such times and places as they may judge necessary.

This Committee to continue till the Proceedings of the next Continental Congress be published, or a new Committee chosen.

Samuel Corwine,        
Clerk.    

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Elizabethtown Resolutions.

February 13, 1775.

Whereas, the inhabitants of Staten Island have manifested an unfriendly disposition towards the liberties of America, and among other things have neglected to join in the General Association proposed by the Continental Congress, and entered into by most of the Townships in America, and in no instance have acceeded thereto. The Committee of Observation for this Town, taking the same into consideration, are of opinion that the inhabitants of their District ought, and by the aforesaid Association are bound, to break off all trade, commerce, dealings, and intercourse whatsoever with the inhabitants of said Island, until they shall join in the General Association aforesaid; and do Resolve that all trade, commerce, dealings and intercourse whatsoever be suspended accordingly, which suspension is hereby notified and recommended to the inhabitants of their District, to be by them universally observed and adopted.

G. Ross,        
Clerk.    

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Burlington Committee.

At a General Meeting of the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of the City and County of Burlington, in New Jersey, qualified to vote for Representatives in the Legislature, held at the Court House, on Tuesday, the 14th of February, 1775.

Peter Tallman, Esquire, in the Chair.

The Association entered into by the General American Congress, convened at Philadelphia on the 5th of September last, was read and approved.

Resolved, That in pursuance of the eleventh Article of the said Association, a Committee of Observation for this City and County be now appointed, for the purposes in that Article mentioned; and the following persons were accordingly chosen, viz.: James Sterling, Colin Campbell, William Smith and Jonathan Hough, Esquires, John Coates, Thomas Fennimore, Thomas Reynolds, Esquire, Joseph Budd, Jonathan Middleton, Joseph Borden, Esq., John Wood, William Newbold, Isaac Pearson, Esq., Randle Mitchell, William Lewis, Peter Tallman, Esq , William Potts, John Black, Joseph Read, Esq., Peter Shiras, Thomas Budd, Jun., Charles Read, Esq., John Evans, Josiah Foster, Joseph Stokes, Esquire, John Cox, Abraham Hewlings, Baldwin Wake, Esquire, Samuel Newton, Jacob Perkins, John Leek, Eli Matthis and William Pharo.

Resolved, That the said Committee shall be and continue for one year from this time, unless the measures of the next General Congress shall make an alteration necessary.

Signed by order of the Meeting.

Peter Tallman,           
Chairman.    
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Hanover, Morris County, Committee.

At a meeting of the Committee of Observation for the Township of Hanover, in the County of Morris, and Province of New Jersey, on the 15th day of February, Anno Domini, 1775. Present : Matthias Burnet, Chairman, Aaron Kitchel, Clerk; David Bruen, Captain Stephen Day, Stephen Munson, Benjamin Howel and Captain James Kien.

The following Resolutions were unanimously entered into:

1st. Resolved unanimously, That they will discourage all unlawful, tumultuous, and disorderly meetings of the people within their Districts, and upon all occasions exert themselves to the utmost of their power, and oppose and prevent any violence offered to the person or property of any one.

2d. Resolved unanimously. That they will take notice of all Horse-Racing, Cock-Fighting and every kind of Gaming whatsoever, and cause the offenders to be prosecuted according to law; and discourage every species of extravagant entertainments and amusements whatsoever, agreeable to the eighth article of the Association of the Continental Congress.

3d. Resolved unanimously, That this Committee will after the first day of March next, esteem it a violation of the seventh article of the said Association if any person or persons should kill any Sheep until it is four years old, or sell any such Sheep to any person whom he or they may have cause to suspect will kill them, or carry them to market; and further, that they will esteem it a breach of said article if any inhabitant of this Township should sell any Sheep of any kind whatsoever, to any person dwelling out of this County, or to any person who they may have cause to suspect will carry them out of this County, without leave first obtained of this Committee.

4th. Resolved unanimously, That we do recommend to the inhabitants of this Township the cultivation of Flax and Hemp, to the greatest extent that their lands and circumstances will admit of.

5th. Resolved unanimously, That from several Pamphlets and Publications printed by James Rivington, of New York, Printer, we esteem him as an incendiary employed by a wicked Ministry to disunite and divide us ; and therefore we will not, for ourselves, have any connection or dealings with him, and do recommend the same conduct towards him to every person of this Township; and we will discountenance any Post-Rider, Stage-Driver, or Carrier, who shall bring his Pamphlets or Papers into this County.

6th. Resolved unanimously, That if any Manufacturer of any article made for home consumption, or any Vender of Goods or Merchandises in this Township shall take advantage of the necessities of his country, by selling at an unusual price, such person shall be considered an enemy to his country; and do recommend it to the inhabitants of this Township to remember that after the 1st day of March next no East India Tea is to be used in any case whatsoever.

7th. Resolved unanimously, That we will in all cases whatsoever, and at all events, use our utmost endeavours to comply with, and enforce every article of the Association of the General Continental Congress.

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Woodbrldge, Middlesex County, Committee.

The Committee of Observation for the Township of Woodbridge taking into consideration the conduct of the inhabitants of Staten Island, in neglecting or refusing to adopt the Association of the General Congress, and as a number of said inhabitants daringly attempted by force to prevent a Ship's returning to Europe, which arrived with Goods after the first day of February, by which they have justly incurred the displeasure of all the friends of liberty, we think it a duty incumbent on us to publish our dislike of such hostile measures, and suspend all trade, dealings and intercourse with them till they join the Association aforesaid; Therefore,

Resolved unanimously That we will from this day break off and suspend all trade, dealings, and intercourse with them, and will use every lawful means in our power to prevent the inhabitants of said Island getting any Timber, Plank, Iron, &c., from this Town. But as we are unwilling to involve the innocent with the guilty, we except, under particular restrictions, such of them as have openly approved of the Association, and are willing to adopt it.

And we do earnestly recommend to all the inhabitants of this Township a strict observance of this suspension, by having no dealings or intercourse with the inhabitants of said Island till they retract their late conduct, and join in the measures recommended by the Congress; and Messrs. Matthias Baker, Samuel Force, William Smith, John Noe, William Cutler, John Conway, John Ross, and Jeremiah Manning, are appointed Inspectors of the several Publick Landings to see that this Resolve is strictly adhered to.

Signed by order of the Committee.

John Conway.           
Clerk.        

Woodbridge, February 20, 1775.

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Council of New Jersey.

Proceedings of his Majesty's Council for the Province of New Jersey, at a Session of the General Assembly of the said Province, begun and holden at the City of Perth Amboy, on Wednesday, the eleventh day of January, in the fifteenth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King George the Third, Anno Domini 1775.

Friday, January 13, 1775.

The House met. Present, David Ogden, James Parker, Esquires, the Chief Justice, Daniel Coxe, John Lawrence, and Francis Hopkinson, Esquires.

His Excellency came into the Council Chamber, and having, by the Deputy Secretary, commanded the attendance of the House of Assembly, the Speaker with the House attended, when his Excellency was pleased to make a Speech to both Houses. After which the Speaker, with the House of Assembly, withdrew.

Wednesday, January 18, 1775.

The House met. Present, David Ogden, Esquire, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, James Parker, Esquires, the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Daniel Coxe, John Lawrence, and Francis Hopkinson, Esquires.

His Excellency's Speech to both Houses, at the opening of this session, being read.

Ordered, That Mr. Parker, Mr. Stockton and Mr. Hopkinson, be a committee to prepare and bring in a draught of an Address to his Excellency, in answer to the said Speech.

Tuesday, January 24, 1775.

The House met. Present, David Ogden, John Stevens, James Parker, Esquires, the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Daniel Coxe, John Lawrence and Francis Hopkinson, Esquires.

Mr. Parker, from the Committee to whom it was referred to prepare and bring in a draught of an Address to his Excellency, in answer to his Speech at the opening of the session, reported that the said Committee had prepared the draught of an Address, which he was ready to report when the House would be pleased to receive the same.

Ordered, That the said Report be made immediately.

Mr. Parker then read the said draught in his place, and delivered it in at the table.

And the said draught having been again read, and some amendments made thereto,

Ordered, That the said Address be engrossed.

Wednesday, January 25, 1775.

The House met. Present, Peter Kemble, David Ogden, Esquires, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, James Parker, Esquires, the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Daniel Coxe, John Lawrence and Francis Hopkinson, Esquires.

The engrossed Address to his Excellency being read and compared, was approved by the House.

Ordered, That the Speaker do sign the same.

Ordered, That Mr. Coxe and Mr. Hopkinson wait upon his Excellency, and request to know when he will be pleased to receive the Address of the House.

Mr. Coxe reported that Mr. Hopkinson and himself had obeyed the order of the House, and that his Excellency was pleased to say the House should hear from him.

Thursday, January 26, 1775.

The House met. Present, Peter Kimble, David Ogden, Esquires, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, James Parker, the Chief Justice, Daniel Coxe, John Lawrence and Francis Hopkinson, Esquires.

His Excellency came into the Council Chamber, and having signified that he was ready to receive the Address of this House, the House attended, and by their Speaker presented the following Address, viz.:

To his Excellency William Franklin, Esquire, Captain- General, Governour and Commander-in-Chief in and over Jiis Majesty^s Province of New Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the same, &c.

The humble Address of His Majesty's Council of the said Province:

May it Please Your Excellency:— We his Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Council of the Province of New Jersey, beg leave to return your Excellency our thanks for your Speech at the opening of this session, and to express our obligations for having given us so early an opportunity of transacting the publick business ; and that you have been pleased therein to consult our convenience.

We agree with your Excellency that it would argue not only a great want of duty to his Majesty, but of regard to the good people of this Province, were we, on this occasion, to pass over in silence the present alarming transactions which are so much the object of publick attention; and therefore beg leave to assure you, that, feeling ourselves strongly influenced by zealous attachment to the interests of Great Britain and her Colonies, and deeply impressed with a sense of the important connection they have with each other, we shall, with all sincere loyalty to our most gracious Sovereign, and all due regard to the true welfare of the inhabitants of this Province, endeavour to prevent mischiefs which the present situation of affairs seems to threaten; and by our zeal for the authority of Government on the one hand, and for the constitutional rights of the people on the other, aim at restoring that health of the political body, which every good subject must earnestly desire.

Yonr Excellency may be assured that we will exert our utmost influence, both in our publick and private capacities, to restore that harmony between the parent state and his Majesty's American Dominions, which is so essential to the happiness and prosperity of the whole Empire; and earnestly looking for that happy event, we will endeavour to preserve peace and good order among the people, and a dutiful submission to the laws. To which his Excellency was pleased to reply in the words following, viz:

GENTLEMEN :— I heartily thank you for this Address. Your sentiments concerning the present alarming transactions; your expressions of zealous attachment to the interests of Great Britain and her Colonies; your promises to exert your utmost influence to restore harmony between them, and to preserve peace, good order, and a dutiful submission to the laws, are such as evince your loyalty to the most gracious of Sovereigns, and your regard for the true welfare of the people. Their constitutional rights will ever be found best supported by a strict obedience to the laws and authority of Government. Whenever that barrier is broken down, anarchy and confusion, with all their attendant evils, will most assuredly enter and destroy all the blessings of civil society.

Friday, February 10, 1775, 4 o'clock P. M.

The House met. Present — Peter Kemble, Esquire, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, Esquire, the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Stephen Skinner, and Daniel Coxe, Esquires.

Mr. Coxe in his place acquainted the House that he had received information that James Murdock, of the City of Perth Amboy,Surgeon, had presumed to send a challenge to one of the Members of this House, sitting as the General Assembly of this Colony, and moved the House that the said Member be called upon to produce the Letter containing the said challenge.

Whereupon, by order of the House, the said Letter was produced, and is in the words following, viz:

My Lord:— It is needless to repeat your Lordship's behaviour last night. Mr. Murdock now desires of your Lordship time and place to have the satisfaction of a gentleman,

I am your Lordship's most obedient servant.

Jas. Murdock.    
Friday morning.

Superscribed, "This to Lord Stirling."

Resolved unanimously. That the said Letter is a most audacious insult to Lord Stirling; and that sending the same to him during the sitting of General Assembly of this Colony, is a daring contempt of the authority, and a manifest violation of the rights and privileges of this House.

Ordered, therefore, That the Speaker do issue his Warrant, directed to the Sergeant-at-Arms, commanding him to apprehend and bring the said James Murdock forthwith before the House, to answer for the said contempt.

The House being informed that James Murdock was attending at the door in custody of the Sergeant-at-Arms,

Ordered, That he be brought in.

And on his appearance before the House, and the said Letter being shown to him, he acknowledged that he wrote and sent the same as directed, and that he meant it as a challenge; but said he had done it in the heat of passion, that he was sensible he had done exceedingly wrong, and was sorry for his indiscretion; and he was ready to make such farther acknowledgments as the House should be pleased to direct.

Ordered, That the Sergeant-at-Arms withdraw with the said James Murdock, and that he remain in his custody till farther orders.

Saturday, February 11, 1775.

The House met. Present, Peter Kemble, Esquire, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, Esquire, the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Stephen Skinner, and Daniel Coxe, Esquires.

The House resumed the consideration of the Insult and Breach of Privilege committed by James Murdock.

Resolved, That the said Murdock be brought up before this House by the Sergeant-at-Arms, and that he receive such reprimand and admonition from the Speaker, as the nature of his offence requires; and that he be also commanded to make such submission and acknowledgement of his offence, as may be satisfactory as well to the House as to Lord Stirling.

Whereupon, the said James Murdock was accordingly brought before the House, in the custody of the Sergeant-at- Arms, and being reprimanded and admonished did declare his unfeigned sorrow for the insult by him offered to the House, thanked the House for their lenity towards him, and with the fullest acknowledgments of his submission to the House, implored their pardon and forgiveness, as well for the publick insult offered to them, as for the affront to Lord Stirling.

Whereupon he was ordered to be discharged from custody, on paying the accustomed Fees to the Sergeant-at- Arms,

Monday, February 13, 1775.

The House met. Present, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, Esquire, the Chief Justice, Stephen Skinner, and Daniel Coxe, Esquires.

A Message from the House of Assembly, by Mr. Fisher and Mr. Eldridge, informing this House that the House of Assembly have no further business before this House, and that the House have no objection to such application being made for a dismission.

To which the Speaker answered that there was no further business before this House, and that the House have no objection to such application being made for a dismission.

Afternoon.

The House met. Present, the Earl of Stirling, John Stevens, Esquire, the Chief Justice, Stephen Skinner and Daniel Coxe, Esquires.

The Speaker, with the House of Assembly, came into the Council Chamber, when the Deputy Secretary read to both Houses his Majesty's Proclamation, proroguing the General Assembly to Tuesday, the fourteenth day of March next, then to meet at the City of Burlington.

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Assembly of New Jersey
.

Votes and Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Colony of New Jersey, at a session began at Perth Amboy, on Wednesday, January 11, 1775, and continued until the 13th day of February following, being the third session of the twenty-second Assembly of New Jersey.

NAMES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES.

  City of Perth Amboy — Cortland Skinner, Speaker, and John Combs.

County of Middlesex — John Wetherill.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor and Richard Lawrence.

Essex — Stephen Crane and Henry Garritse.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher and John Roy.

Bergen — Theunis Dey and John Demarest.

Morris — Jacob Ford and William Winds.

City of Burlington — James Kinsey and Thomas P. Hewlings.

County of Burlington — Henry Paxson and Anthony Sykes.

Gloucester — John Hinchman and Robert F. Price.

Salem — Grant Gibbon and Benjamin Holme.

Cape May — Jonathan Hand and Eli Eldridge.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker and John Mehelm,

Cumberland — John Sheppard and Theophilus Elmer.

Sussex — Nathaniel Pettit.

Perth Amboy, Wednesday, January 11, 1775.

Pursuant to his Excellency's several prorogations of the General Assembly from time to time till this day, the House met, and, for want of a sufficient number of Members to proceed upon business, adjourned till to-morrow morning, ten o'clock.

Thursday, January 12, 1775.

Tlie House met.

Ordered, That Mr. Kinsey and Mr. Combs do wait on his Excellency and acquaint him that a sufficient number of members to proceed upon business, are now met, and are ready to receive anything he may please to lay before them.

Mr. Kinsey reported that Mr, Combs and himself waited on the Governor, pursuant to the order of the House, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him.

Friday, January 13, 1775.

Mr. Kinsey laid before the House a duplicate of his Majesty's allowance of the Act entitled "An Act for establishing the Boundary or Partition Line between the Colonies of New York and Nova-Cæsarea or New Jersey, and for confirming the Titles and Possessions"

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and requires the immediate attendance of this House.

Whereupon Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and with the House went to wait upon his Excellency; and being returned Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and reported that the House had waited on his Excellency, who was pleased to make a Speech to the Council and House of Assembly, of which Mr. Speaker said he had, to prevent mistakes, obtained a copy, and the same, by order of the House, was read, and is as follows, viz:

Gentlemen of the Council and Gentlemen of the Assembly:

Although not more than ten months have elapsed since your last meeting in General Assembly; yet, as there are several matters of importance which require the particular attention of the Legislature, I have thought it proper to give you as early an opportunity of transacting the publick business, as was consistent with your conveniency.

Gentlemen of the Assembly:

The support of Government having been expired ever since the first of October, I must recommend that matter to your early consideration.

The Barrack-master's accounts for the expenditure of the money granted last year for the supply of the King's Troops, shall be laid before you as soon as they can be prepared.

Gentlemen of the Council and Gentlemen of the Assembly:

It would argue not only a great want of duty to his Majesty, but of regard to the good people of this Province, were I, on this occasion, to pass over in silence the late alarming transactions in this and the neighboring Colonies, or not endeavour to prevail on you to exert yourselves in preventing those mischiefs to this country, which, without your timely interposition, will in all probability, be the consequence.

It is not for me to decide on the particular merits of the dispute between Great Britain and her Colonies; nor do I mean to censure those who conceive themselves aggrieved, for aiming at a redress of their grievances; it is a duty they owe themselves, their country and their posterity. All that I wish to guard you against, is the giving any countenance or encouragement to that destructive mode of proceeding which has been unhappily adopted in part by some of the inhabitants of this Colony: and has been carried so far in others, as totally to subvert their former Constitution. It has already struck at the authority of one of the branches of the Legislature, in a particular manner. And if you, gentlemen of the Assembly, should give your approbation to transactions of this nature, you will do as much as lies in your power to destroy that form of Government of which you are an important part, and which it is your duty, by all lawful means, to preserve. To you your constituents have entrusted a peculiar guardianship of their rights and privileges. You are their legal Representatives, and you cannot, without a manifest breach of your trust, suffer any body of men, in this or any of the other Provinces, to usurp and exercise any of the powers vested in you by the Constitution. It behooves you particularly, who must be constitutionally supposed to speak the sense of the people at large, to be extremely cautious in consenting to any act whereby you may engage them as parties in, and make them answerable for measures which may have a tendency to involve them in difficulties far greater than those they aim to avoid.

Besides, there is not, gentlemen, the least necessity, consequently there will not be the least excuse for your running any such risks on the present occasion. If you are really disposed to represent to the King any inconveniences you conceive yourselvs to lie under, or to make any propositions on the present state of America, I can assure you from the best authority, that such representations or propositions will be properly attended to, and certainly have greater weight coming from each Colony in its separate capacity, than in a channel, of the propriety and legality of which there may be much doubt.

You have now pointed out to you, gentlemen, two roads, one evidently leading to peace, happiness and a restoration of the publick tranquility, and the other inevitably conducting you to anarchy, misery, and all the horrours of a civil war. Your wisdom, your prudence, your regard for the true interests of the people, will be best known when you have shown to which road you give the preference. If to the former, you will probably afford satisfaction to the moderate, the sober, and the discreet part of your constituents. If to the latter, you will, perhaps, for a time, give pleasure to the warm, the rash, and the inconsiderate among them, who, I would willingly hope, violent as is the temper of the present times, are not even now the majority. But it may be well for you to remember, should any calamity hereafter befall them from your compliance with their inclinations, instead of pursuing as you ought, the dictates of your own judgment, that the consequences of their returning to a proper sense of their conduct, may prove deservedly fatal to yourselves.

I shall say no more at present on this disagreeable subject, but only to repeat an observation I made to a former Assembly, on a similar occasion: "Every breach of the Constitution, whether it proceeds from the Crown or the People, is in its effects equally destructive to the rights of both." It is the duty, therefore, of those who are entrusted with Government, to be equally careful in guarding against encroachments from the one as the other. But it is, says one of the wisest of men, a most infallible symptom of the dangerous state of liberty, when the chief men of a free country show a greater regard to popularity than to their own judgment.

Wm. Franklin.

Council Chamber, January 13, 1775.

Ordered, That his Excellency's Speech be read a second time.

Saturday, January 14, 1775.

Ordered, That Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Crane, Mr. Fisher, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Ford, Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Price, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Sheppard and Mr. Hand be and they are hereby appointed a Committee of Grievances, and they or any three of them, may meet together at such times and places as they or any three of them shall think proper to appoint, either during the sitting of the Assembly, or at any other time, and make report of their proceedings to the House.

Monday, January 16, 1775.

His Excellency's Speech was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the Committee sit to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, January 17, 1775,

The House, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on his Excellency's Speech, and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee reported that the Committee had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again, to which the House agreed.

Friday, January 20, 1775.

The House again according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on his Excellency's Speech; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that they had made some farther progress in the matters to them referred, and had come to two Resolutions, which he was ready to report whenever the House would please to receive the same, and that the Committee desired leave to sit again.

Ordered, That the said Report be made immediately, and that the Committee have leave to sit again.

Whereupon, Mr. Fisher reported the Resolutions of the Committee as follows:

1. Resolved, That an humble Address be presented to his Excellency, in answer to his Speech.

To which the House agreed.

2. Resolved, That the Government of this Colony be honourably supported from the first day of October, 1774, to the first day of October, 1775.

To which the House agreed.

Saturday, January 21, 1775.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on his Excellency's Speech; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that they had made some further progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the House agreed.

Monday, January 23, 1775.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on his Excellency's Speech; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that they had made some further progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the House agreed.

Ordered, That Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Fisher, Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Crane, be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of an Address to his Excellency, in answer to his Speech.

Ordered, That Mr. Price, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Dey, Mr. Sheppard, Mr Roy, Mr. Sykes, and Mr. Elmer, be a Committee to bring in a Bill for support of Government.

Tuesday, January 24. 1775.

Mr. Crane and Mr. Kinsey laid before the House the following Memorial, which was read, and is as follows, to wit:

To the Honorable the House of Representatives of the Colony of New Jersey, in General Assembly met:

Gentlemen:— We the subscribers, having been appointed and requested by the Committees of the several Counties in this Colony, including a majority of the Members of your House, to represent the Colony of New Jersey in the Continental Congress of Delegates from the other American Colonies, at Philadelphia, in September last, beg leave to report to the House that we attended the said Congress, and did everything in our power to answer the intention of our appointment; and hope and trust that the Proceedings of the said Congress, which we now lay before you for your consideration, will receive your approbation, and have the desired effect in producing that peace, happiness, harmony, and confidence, between Great Britain and the Colonies, so ardently wished for by all good men.

We are, gentlemen, your most obedient servants.

James Kinsey,
Stephen Crane,
William Livingston,
John DeHart
January 11, 1775.

Mr. Crane and Mr. Kinsey also laid before the House the Proceedings of the Continental Congress, held at Philadelphia, in September last, which were read. On the question, whether the House approve of the said Proceedings? It passed in the affirmative.

Resolved, That this House do unanimously approve of the Proceedings of the Congress; such as are of the people called Quakers, excepting only to such parts as seem to wear an appearance, or may have a tendency to force, (if any such there be,) as inconsistent with their religious principles.

Resolved unanimously, That James Kinsey, Stephen Crane, William Livingston, John DeHart, and Richard Smith, Esquires, or any three of them, be and they are hereby appointed to attend the Continental Congress of the Colonies, intended to be held at the City of Philadelphia, in May next, or at any other time and place; and that they report their proceedings to the next session of the General Assembly; instructing the said Delegates to propose and agree to every reasonable and constitutional measure for the accommodation of the unhappy differences at present subsisting between our mother country and the Colonies, which the House most ardenly wish for.

The House also being informed, that at the Congress held at Philadelphia, the 6th of September last, a motion was made to give some of the Colonies a greater number of votes in the determination of questions to be agitated therein, than to others; and conceiving such motion to be of dangerous consequence, do also instruct their Delegates not to agree to a measure of that kind, unless it should be agreed at the same time that no vote to be taken on such principles shall, in future, be obligatory on any Colonies whose Delegates do not consent thereto.

Ordered, That Mr. Speaker do transmit a copy of the foregoing Resolutions to the Speakers of the Assemblies of New York and Pennsylvania.

Resolved unanimously, That the Thanks of this House be given to James Kinsey, Stephen Crane, William Livingston, John De Hart, and Richard Smith, Esquires, for their faithful and judicious discharge of the trust reposed in them at the late Continental Congress.

Wednesday, January 25, 1775.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on his Excellency's Speech; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that they have gone through the matters to them referred, and have came to one more Resolution, which he was ready to report whenever the House would please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately.

Whereupon Mr. Fisher reported the Resolution of the Committee, as follows:

Resolved, That an humble Petition be presented to his most gracious Majesty, praying a redress of Grievances under which this and the neighbouring Colonies now labour; to which the House agreed.

Ordered, That Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Fisher, Mr. Ford, Mr. Tucker, and Mr. Sheppard be a Committee to prepare and bring in a Petition accordingly.

Friday, January 27, 1775.

Mr. Tucker, from the Committee appointed for that purpose, brought in a Bill, entitled "An Act for Support of Government of his Majesty's Colony of New Jersey," &c., which was read and ordered to a second reading.

Monday, January 30, 1775.

Mr. Wetherill, from the Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an Address to his Excellency, brought in a draught, which was read and ordered a second reading.

Tuesday, January 31, 1775.

A Message from his Excellency, by the Deputy Secretary, which was read, and is as follows:

Gentlemen:— I send you the Barrack-master's Accounts of Expenses incurred for the repair of the Barracks and supply of the King's Troops, including furniture, bedding, &c., from June, 1773, to December, 1774, by which you will see in what manner the money has been expended, which I was authorized by law to draw out of the Treasury for that service. There is a balance remaining in my hands of about thirty-four Pounds, eight Shillings and six Pence, Proclamation Money.

As the House had some objections last session to the charge in Colonel Robertson's Account for Sheets furnished the King's Troops, I directed the Barrack-master not to pay that article of the Account, and to acquaint the Colonel with the occasion. I now lay before you a letter from the Colonel on that head, which appears to me to contain so many just reasons why the charge ought to be allowed by the Province, that I cannot but recommend it to your particular consideration.

Wm. Franklin.

January 30th, 1775.

The Secretary also laid before the House the Accounts mentioned in the Message.

Ordered, That his Excellency's Message have a second reading.

The draught of an Address to his Excellency was read the second time.

Ordered, That the same be referred to a Committee of the Whole House,

Whereupon, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Address to his Excellency; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr, Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had gone through the Address to his Excellency, and had made several amendments thereto, which he was ready to report whenever the House would please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately.

Whereupon, Mr, Fisher reported the Address with several amendments; and the same being read.

Ordered unanimously, That the said Address be engrossed.

Wednesday, February 1, 1775.

The engrossed Address to his Excellency was read and compared.

Ordered, That Mr. Speaker do sign the same.

Ordered, That Mr. Kinsey and Mr, Combs do wait on his Excellency, and desire to know when he will please to be waited on by the House with their Address,

Mr, Kinsey reported that Mr, Combs and himself waited on his Excellency with the Message of the House, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him.

Friday, February 3, 1775.

A Petition was presented from a number of Inhabitants of Nottingham, in the County of Burlington, praying the House will take some measures to settle the unhappy disputes between Great Britain and the Colonies, which was read and ordered a second reading.

On motion made, it is the opinion of, and this House do advise, that the present Committee of Correspondence may draw any part of the sum of one thousand Pounds, made subject to their order by an Act passed at the last session,not exceeding three hundred Pounds, to pay the expenses of the Delegates appointed by this House to attend the intended Congress and that this House will allow thereof.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and ready to receive the Address of the House.

Whereupon, Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and with the House went to wait upon his Excellency; and being returned, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and reported that the House had waited on his Excellency with their Address, in these words, viz:

To his Excellency William Franklin, Esquire, Captain General, Governour, and Commander-in-Chief in and over the Colony of New Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the same, &c:.

The Humble Address of the Representatives of said Colony, in General Assembly convened:

May it Please Your Excellency:— We his Majesty's loyal and dutiful subjects, the Representatives of this Colony of New Jersey, in General Assembly convened, have taken into our consideration your Excellency's Speech at the opening of the present session. We should have been glad that your Excellency's inclinations to have given us as early an opportunity of transacting the publick business, as was consistent with our "convenience," had determined in a manner more agreeable to your design, and more favourable to us, than it really has done on the present occasion. If the Petitions which we understand have been presented to you, had been granted, we should have had a meeting more convenient to us than the present, and that meeting, perhaps, would have prevented some of those "alarming transactions" which your Excellency's apprehension of your duty leads you to inform us as having happened in this Colony. We thank you for your intention to oblidge us; but that it may not be so entirely frustrated in future, permit us to inform you it would be much the most agreeable to us, that the meeting of the House to do publick business, should not be postponed to a time later than when the Bill for the support of Government expires.

We are sorry to hear that in your Excellency's opinion, there has been of late any "alarming transactions" in this and the neighbouring Colonies, our consent to, or approbation of which, may lead the good people we represent into "anarchy, misery, and all the horrours(sic) of a civil "war." It is true you are pleased to tell us that this destructive mode of proceeding has been adopted but "in part" by some of the inhabitants of this Colony. We assure you that we neither have nor do intend to give our approbation to measures destructive to the welfare of our constituents, and in which we shall be equally involved with them; their interests and our we look upon as inseperable. No arguments are necessary to prevail on us to endeavour to prevent such impending calamities; and if we should, at any time, mistake our duty so much, we hope your regard to the people will induce you to exert the prerogative, and thereby give them the choice of other Representatives, who may act with more prudence. The uncertainty, however, to what "alarming transactions" in particular you refer, renders it sutticient for us to assure you only, that we profess ourselves to be the loyal subjects of the King, from whose goodness we hope to be relieved from the present unhappy situation; that we will do all in our power to preserve that excellent form of Government under which we at present live; and that we neither intend to usurp the rights of others, nor suffer any vested in us by the Constitution, to be wrested out of our hands by any person or persons whatsoever.

We sincerely lament the unhappy differences which at present subsist between Great Britain and her Colonies. We shall heartily rejoice to see the time when they shall subside, on principles consistent with the rights and interests of both, which we ardently hope is not far off; and though we cannot perceive how the seperate Petition of one Colony is more likely to succeed than the united Petitions of all; yet in order to show our desire to promote so good a purpose by every proper means, we shall make use of the mode pointed out by your Excellency, in hopes it will meet with that attention which you are pleased to assure us will be paid to the Representatives of the people.

We have already resolved to support his Majesty's Government; and we beg leave to assure your Excellency, that though we are warmly attached to that liberty which, as subjects of our august Monarch, we apprehend ourselves to be justly entitled to, and firmly resolved to preserve it by every constitutional means in our power, yet we shall, with pleasure, lay hold of every proper occasion to manifest that loyalty to his person, and regard to the Constitution, which, as subjects and freemen, can be reasonably expected from us.

By order of the House.
Cortland Skinner,         
Speaker.    
House of Assembly, February 1, 1775.

To which his Excellency was pleased to make the following Answer:

Gentlemen:— Were I to give such an answer to your Address as the peculiar nature of it seems to require, I should be necessarily led into the explanation and discussion of several matters and transactions, which, from the regard I bear to you and the people of this Colony. I would far rather have buried in perpetual oblivion. It is, besides, in vain now to argue on the subject, as you have, with a most uncommon and unnecessary precipitation, given your entire approbation to that destructive mode of proceeding which I so earnestly warned you against.

Whether, after such a resolution, the Petition you mention can be reasonably expected to produce any good effect; and whether you or I have best consulted the true interests of the people on this important occasion, I shall leave others to determine. You may be assured, however, that the advice which I gave you was totally uninfluenced by any sinister motive whatever. It came from an heart sincerely devoted to my native country, whose welfare and happiness depend, as I conceive, upon a plan of conduct very different from what has been hitherto adopted.

Saturday, February 4, 1775.

The Bill for the support of Government was read the second time; whereupon, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said Bill for support of Government; and, after some time spent therein, Mr, Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Crane, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the House agreed.

Monday, February 6, 1775.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Bill for the support of Government; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr, Crane, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had gone through the matters to them referred, and had come to several Resolutions, which he was ready to report whenever the House would please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the said Report be made immediately.

Whereupon Mr. Crane reported the Resolutions of the Committee, as follows, viz:

1. Resolved, That in and by the said Bill when passed into a law, there be paid to his Excellency William Franklin, Esq., Governour of this Colony, at the rate of twelve hundred Pounds per annum. Proclamation Money, to commence the first day of October last.

And on the question, whether the House agreed to the said sum or not?

It passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Hewlings,
Garritse,
Hinchman,
Fisher,
Eldridge,
Roy,
Tucker,
Dey,
Mehelm,
Deraarest,
Sheppard,
Ford,
Elmer,
Winds,
Pettit,
Kinsey
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Sykes,
Hand.
who voted for £1000.

2. To David Ogden, Esquire, Second Justice of the Supreme Court of this Colony at the rate of One hundred and fifty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

Abd on the question,k whether the House agrees thereto or not?

It passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Fisher,
Roy,
Demarest,
Ford,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
 
Mehelm,
Sheppard,
Elmer,
Pettit
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Garritse,
Dey,
Wind,
 
Hand,
Eldridge,
Tucker.
 
who voted for £100.

3. To Richard Stockton, Esquire, Third Justice ofthe Supreme Court of this Colony, at the rate of One hundred and fifty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

And on the question, whether the House agrees thereto or not?

It passed in the affirmative as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Fisher,
Roy,
Demarest,
Ford,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
 
Mehelm,
Sheppard,
Elmer,
Pettit.
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Garritse,
Dey,
Winds,
Hand,
Eldridge,
Tucker,
who voted for £100.

4. To Cortland Skinner, Esq., Attorney General of this Colony, at the rate of forty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

And on the question, whether the House agrees thereto or not?

It passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
Mehelm,
Elmer,
Pettit.
 

Nays—

Mr. Combes,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Dey,
Hand,
Eldridge,
Tucker,
Sheppard,
who voted for £30.

5. To Samuel Smith, and John Smith, Esquires, Treasurers of this Colony, each at the rate of forty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

6. To the Clerk of Counmcil for the time being, at the rate of thirty ounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

7. To the Agent of this Colony for the time being, at the rate of one hundred Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To wliich the House agreed.

8. To the Clerk of the Circuits for the time being, residing in this Colony, the sum of twenty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

9. To the Doorkeeper of the Council of this Colony, at rate of ten Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

10. To his Excellency William Franklin, Esquire, at the rate of sixty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid, for house rent, provided he makes Perth Amboy or Burlington the place of his residence.

To which the House agreed.

11. To the Justice or Justices of the Supreme Court of this Colony for attending the Circuit Courts, and Courts of Oyer and Terminer in the manner prescribed by the said Act, the sum of ten Pounds for each time.

To which the House agreed.

12. To each of the Council for the time being, for the time they may attend at any sitting of the General Assembly within the time, eight Shillings per day.

On the question, whether the sum be eight Shillings or six Shillings? It was carried for eight Shillings, as follows, viz.:

For Eight Shillings per Diem—

Mr. Crane,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Dey,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Kinsey,
 
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Elmer,
Pettit.
 

For Six Shillings per Diem—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
Hand,
 
Eldridge,
Tucker,
Sheppard.
 

13. Jonathan Deare, one of the Clerks of the House of Representatives, or any other Clerk for his attendance, the sum of ten Shillings per day, for the time he hath or shall attend at any sitting of the General Assembly, during the continuance of this Act, and also the sum of four Pence per sheet, reckoning ninety words to the sheet, for entering the Minutes of any sitting during the continuance of this Act, fair in the Journals, and copying the Laws and Minutes for the Printer; and to the said Jonathan Deare, the sum of twelve Pounds, for Pen, Ink and Paper, and hiring Clerks to forward the business of this session.

To which the House agreed.

14. To Charles Pettit, Esq., Deputy Secretary, or to the Deputy Secretary for the time being, for copying publick Laws to send home to England, during the continuance of this Act, four Pence per sheet, reckoning ninety words to the sheet.

To which the House agreed.

15. To each of the Treasurers of this Colony, six Pence per Pound for exchanging ragged and torn Bills of Credit of this Colony.

To which the House agreed.

16. To Isaac Collins, or any other Printer hereafter to be appointed, for printing the Minutes of the House of Representatives, of any sitting during the continuance of this Act, and for printing the Laws passed at any sitting as aforesaid, or any other printing, such sums as Hendrick Fisher, Stephen Crane, James Kinsey, and Thomas Polgreen Hewlings, Esquires, or any two of them shall agree to be paid for the said service.

To which the House agreed.

17. To the Sergeant-at-Arms for the time being, who shall attend the Council, the sum of three Shillings per diem; and to the Sergeant-at-Arms who shall attend the House of Representatives, the sum of three Shillings per diem.

To which the House agreed,

18. To the Doorkeeper of the House of Representatives for the time being, who shall attend the House in manner aforesaid, the sum of three Shillings and six Pence per diem.

To which the House agreed.

19. To the Speaker and every of the Members of the House of Representatives for the time each of them shall attend at any sitting of the General Assembly, during the continuance of this Act, eight Shillings per diem.

On the question, whether the sum be eight Shillings or Six Shillings per diem? It was carried for eight shillings as follows, viz.:

For Eight Shillings per Diem—

Mr. Crane,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Dey,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Kinsey,
 
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Elmer,
Pettit.
 

For Six Shillings per Diem—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
Hand,
 
Eldridge,
Tucker,
Sheppard.
 

Ordered, That the Bill for support of Government, as reported and agreed to, be engrossed.

Tuesday, February 7, 1775.

On motion made.

It is ordered by the House, that the late Treasurer do appear before the House at ten o'clock to-morrow morning, in order that they may inquire of him concerning the deficiency reported due from him to the Province; and that a copy of this order be served on him immediately.

The House took into consideration his Excellency's Message, of the 30th day of January last, which was read, together with Colonel Robertson's Letter, and his Account, &c., whereupon, after some debate.

Resolved, That this House will not allow the charge for Sheets, as charged in Colonel Robertson's Account.

Ordered, That Mr. Mehelm, and Mr. Hewlings, do wait on his Excellency and inform him that the House have taken his Message of 30th day of January last, relating to the charge made by Colonel Robertson, of three hundred and fifty-four Pounds, seven Shillings and six Pence, for Sheets furnished the King's Troops in this Colony, and the balance in his hands of thirty-four Pounds, eight Shillings and six Pence, into their consideration.

That the House beg leave to acquaint his Excellency that they cannot allow of the charge so made, it being new, uncommon, and never allowed of by this Colony; and that the House requests his Excellency will be pleased to pay the balance in his hands to the Eastern Treasurer.

Wednesday, February 8, 1775.

A Letter was presented to the House from the Honourable Stephen Skinner, Esquire, which, by order of the House, was read, and is as follows, viz.:

Mr. Speaker:— The Message of the House, ordering the late Treasurer to attend this day at ten o'clock, to inquire of him the deficiency of the Treasury, I have received; but as I have the Honour to be one of his Majesty's Council, I can't possibly attend till such time as I have laid the order before the Council, which I shall immediately do upon their meeting.

As the order is to inquire concerning the deficiency of the Treasury, I can assure the House, had I been apprized of their wanting the publick money, I should have taken care that the whole should have been in the Treasury for their inspection; but as I have amply secured the Treasurer, I shall take care that he shall have the whole amount of the bond I have given him within the time appointed for cancelling the publick money.

I am., with great respect, yours and the House's most humble servant,

Stephen Skinner.      
February 8, 1775.

The Petition from a number of Inhabitants of Nottingham, in the County of Burlington, praying the House will take some measures to settle the unhappy differences between Great Britain and the Colonies, was read the second time; on the question.

Ordered, That the same be referred to the Committee appointed to prepare a Petition to his Majesty.

Thursday, February 9, 1775.

The House met.

It appearing to the House, from the Report of the Committees appointed to settle the Accounts of the Eastern Treasury, that there ought to be therein upward of twenty thousand Pounds, and the House being informed by the Eastern Treasurer that there is therein upward of fifteen thousand Pounds, great part of which is in Gold and Silver, and the Bills of Credit of this Colony, in order that the Colony may be secured from accidents, Mr. Kinsey moves that leave be given to bring in a Bill for that purpose, and that a Committee be appointed to consider of ways and means to effect it; and the previous question being put, whether the question be put on the said motion or not?

It passed in the negative.

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Wetherill,
Taylor,
Kinsey,
Tucker,
Melhelm.

Nays—

Mr. Lawrence,
Crane,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Dey,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Hewlings,
Sykes,
 
Hinchman,
Hand,
Eldridge,
Sheppard,
Pettit.
 

On motion, made by Mr. Tucker,

Resolved, nem. con., That there is a large deficiency in the Eastern Treasury of the moneys which either ought to be therein, or ought to have been cancelled and burned some time past; and that it is a manifest breach of duty for any Treasurer of this Colony to apply any such publick money to any private purposes whatsoever.

John Smyth, Esquire, desiring to attend the House, was called in, and informed the House that he had entered into a new Bond with securitites, for the true and faithful execution of his office as Treasurer of the Eastern Division, and desired to have the sentiments of the House as to the sufficiency of his securities, and that his former Bond may be cancelled:

Whereuponh he said Bond was read; and on the question,

Resolved, nem. con., That in the opinion of this House, his said securities are very sufficient, and that his former Bond may and ought to be cancelled.

The engrossed Bill, entitled An Act for suport of Government of his Majesty's Colony of New Jersey, to commence the 1st day of October, 1774, and to end the 1st day of October, 1775, and to discharge the Publick Debts and Contingent Charges thereof, was read and compared; on the question,

Resolved, That the same do pass.

Friday, February 10, 1775.

The House being informed that Dr. James Murdock did, this day, send a challenge to one of the Members of this House, which was delivered in the House, and an answer insolently demanded; the House taking the same into consideration,

Resolved unanimously, That the challenging a Member of this House is a contempt and breach of the privileges of this House:

Ordered, therefore, That Mr. Speaker do issue his Warrant to the Sergeant-at-Arms, immediately to take the said Doctor James Murdock, and bring him to the Bar of the House for the contempt aforesaid.

The Sergeant-at-Arms attended with Dr. James Murdock at the Bar of the House, who, being there examined, confessed his sending a challenge to a Member of this House; that he knew the gentleman to be a Member of the House, but did not apprehend it an insult to the House, and was extremely sorry for it, and declared his sorrow for writing the said letter, and his ignorance of the consequences, and hoped the favour of the House:

Whereupon, the Sergeant-at-Arms being ordered to withdraw with his prisoner, the House took the matter into consideration, and the Member injured moving that the said Doctor Murdock's acknowledgements might be accepted by the House; after some debate,

Ordered, That the said Doctor James Murdock do humbly ask pardon of this House, in general, and the Member in particular; that he be thereupon reprimanded by the Speaker, and that he then be discharged on payment of his Fees.

Whereupon the said Doctor Murdock did humbly ask pardon of the House, and the Member in particular; and being reprimanded by the Speaker,

Ordered, That he be discharged on payment of his Fees.

Saturday, February 11, 1775.

Mr. Wetherill, from the Committee appointed to prepare a draught of a Petition to his Majesty, brought in a draught, which, by order of the House, was read and ordered to a second reading.

The draught of the Petition to his Majesty was read the second time.

Ordered, That the same be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Whereupon the House accordingly resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Petition to his Majesty; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the House agreed.

Monday, February 13, 1775.

The House taking into consideration the state of the Debt due to this Colony from Lord Stirling, and it appearing that Mrs. Mary Verplank hath a mortgage upon the same Lands, prior to that given to the late Treasurer,

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Crane, and Mr. Lawrence, or any two of them, do wait on Lord Stirling, and endeavour to procure security for the Debt due to the Colony.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Petition to his Majesty; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee have gone through the said Petition, and made several amendments thereto, which he was ready to report whenever the House would be pleased to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately.

Whereupon Mr. Fisher reported the said Petition and amendments, which being read and agreed to by the House, on the question.

Ordered, That the same be engrossed.

Mr, Fisher and Mr. Lawrence reported that they had waited on Lord Stirling, pursuant to the order of the House, who informed them that he could not give the Province other security, unless a general mortgage, but that in four or five months the matter should be settled.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher and Mr. Eldridge do go to the Council and inquire whether they have any business before them; if not, that this House proposes to apply to his Excellency for a dismission.

Mr. Fisher reported that Mr. Eldridge and himself went to the Council according to order, who said they had no business before them.

The engrossed petition to his Majesty was read and compared, and is as follows:

To the King's most Excellent Majesty:

Most Gracious Sovereign:— We, your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Representatives of the Colony of New Jersey, in General Assembly convened, beg leave to approach your royal presence to express our unfeigned attachment to your Majesty's person, family, and Government, and to return you our most humble thanks for your gracious assurance, signified to us by our Governour, that "the representations or propositions of your Colonies will be attended to."

Firmly persuaded of your Majesty's solicitude for the happiness of your subjects in the remotest parts of your Dominions from the above gracious assurance, we cannot but encourage ourselves in the prospect of your royal interposition for our relief from the grievances under which your American subjects have been so long labouring. We do, with the greatest sincerity, assure your Majesty that our complaints do not arise from a want of loyalty to your royal person, or a disposition to withdraw ourselves from a constitutional dependence on the British Crown, but from well grounded apprehensions that our rights and liberties are intimately affected by the late measures, in their consequences pernicious to the welfare and happiness both of Great Britain and your Majesty's Colonies.

The Grievances of which we complain are:

A Standing Army has been kept in these Colonies ever since the conclusion of the late war, without the consent of our Assemblies; and this Army, with a considerable Naval Armament, has been employed to enforce the collection of Taxes.

The authority of the Commander-in-Chief, and, under him, of the Brigadiers General, has, in time of peace, been rendered supreme in all the Civil Governments of America.

The Commander-in-Chief of all your Majesty's Forces in North America has, in time of peace, been appointed Governour of a Colony.

The charges of usual Officers have been greatly increased, and new, expensive, and oppressive Offices have been multiplied.

The Judges of Admiralty and Vice Admiralty Courts are empowered to receive their salaries and fees from the effects condemned by themselves.

The Officers of the Customs are empowered to break open and enter houses without the authority of any Civil Magistrate, founded on legal information.

The Judges of Courts of Common Law have been made entirely dependent on one part of the Legislature for their salaries, as well as for the duration of their commissions.

Counsellors, holding their commissions during pleasure, exercise Legislative authority.

The Agents of the People have been discountenanced, and Governours have been instructed to prevent the payment of their salaries.

Assemblies have been frequently and injuriously dissolved, and Commerce burdened with many useless and oppressive restrictions.

By several Acts of Parliament, made in the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth years of your Majesty's reign. Duties are imposed on us for the purpose of raising a Revenue; and the powers of Admiralty and Vice Admiralty Courts are extended beyond their ancient limits, whereby our property is taken from us without our consent; the Trial by jury, in many civil cases, is abolished; enormous Forfeitures are incurred for slight offences; vexatious Informers are exempted from paying damages to which they are justly liable, and oppressive Security is required from owners, before they are allowed to defend their rights.

Both Houses of Parliament have resolved that the Colonies may be tried in England for offences alleged to have been committed in America, by virtue of a Statute passed in the thirty-fifth year of Henry the Eighth; and, in consequence thereof, attempts have been made to enforce that Statute.

A Statute was passed in the twelfth year of your Majesty's reign, directing that persons charged with committing any offence therein described, in any place out of the Realm, may be indicted and tried for the same in any Shire or County within the Realm, whereby inhabitants of these Colonies may, in sundry cases, by that Statute made capital, be deprived of a trial by their peers of the vicinage.

In the last session of Parliament an Act was passed for blocking up the Harbour of Boston; another empowering the Governour of Massachusetts Bay to send persons indicted for murder, in that Province, to another Colony, or even to Great Britain, for trial, whereby such offenders may escape legal punishment; a third, for altering the Chartered Constitution of Government in that Province; and. a fourth, for extending the Limits of Quebec, abolishing the English and restoring the French Laws, whereby great numbers of British freemen are subject to the latter, and establishing an absolute Government and the Roman Catholick Religion throughout those vast regions that border on the Westerly and Northerly boundaries of the free Protestant English settlements; and a fifth, for the better providing suitable quarters for Officers and Soldiers in his Majesty's service in North America.

To a Sovereign, who "glories in the name of Briton," the bare recital of these Acts must, we presume, justify the loyal subjects who fly to the foot of his Throne, and implore his clemency for protection against them.

Although all the grievances above enumerated do not immediately affect the people of this Colony, yet as, in their consequences, they will be deeply involved, we cannot remain silent and unconcerned.

Should our properties be liable to the disposal of those of our fellow-subjects in whose election we have no voice, we conceive it evident that we have no property but at their will and pleasure.

And should we be carried for trial to places where it is impossible for the accused to compel the appearance of his witnesses, innocence will be no security from punishment. Nor is the jurisdiction lately given to the Courts of Admiralty, which deprive your Majesty's American subjects of Trial by Juries of the vicinage, less repugnant to the fundamental principles of the Common law.

All which necessarily tend to reduce us to a state of servitude, from which our affection for the English Constitution, and duty to ourselves and our posterity, loudly call upon us to avert, by all lawful means in our power.

The Colony of New Jersey, during the late glorious war, though not immediately affected, because surrounded by your Majesty's other more extensive and opulent Colonies, complied with every royal requisition for aid, and cheerfully exerted itself, at a very considerable expense, whereby it incurred a heavy debt, under a great part of which it at present labours.

And as this Colony hath always, according to its ability, cordially defrayed the charge of the administration of justice, and the support of the Civil Government, your Majesty may be assured, that it will ever be ready, not only to defray the same charge, but also to contribute when constitutionally required, to every reasonable and necessary expense, for the defence, protection and security of the whole British Empire.

We do solemnly, and with great truth, assure your Majesty that we have no thoughts injurious to the allegiance which, as subjects, we owe to you as our Sovereign; that we abhor the idea of setting ourselves up in a state of independency, and that we know of no such design in others. We therefore most earnestly beseech your Majesty to interpose your royal authority for the redress of the above grievances, and to vouchsafe us a gracious answer to this our humble Petition.

That the Omnipotent Being, "by whom Kings reign and Princes decree justice," and who hath placed your Majesty on the throne of your ancestors, to which they were called by the suffrage of a free people, to protect them against Popery and arbitrary power, may bless you with every felicity, both temporal and eternal, and that the Colonies may vie with the most faithful of your subjects, in every dutiful and loyal attachment to your royal person, family and Government, is, and always will be, the sincere and fervent prayer of your Majesty's loyal and dutiful subjects, the Representatives of the Colony of New Jersey.

House of Assembly, February 13, 1775.

On the question, whether the Speaker do sign the same ?

It passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Roy,
Hand,
Wetherill,
Dey,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Demarest,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Ford,
Mehelm,
Crane,
Winds,
Elmer,
Garritse,
Sykes,
Pettit,
Fisher,
Hinchman.
 

Nays—

Mr. Kinsey, Hewlings.                  

Ordered, That the Speaker do sign the same.

Mr. Speaker dissenting from the Petition to the King, requested as a favour, that his dissent might be entered in the Journals of the House; and on the question whether the same to be entered or not?

It passed, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Lawrence,
Ford,
Garritse,
Kinsey,
Fisher,
Hewlings,
Roy,
Mehelm,
Dey,
Demarest,
Pettit.
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Hinchman,
Wetherill,
Hand,
Taylor,
Crane,
Eldridge,
Tucker,
Winds,
Sykes,
Elmer.
 

The votes being equal, Mr. Speaker gave his voice in the affirmative.

Ordered, That the same be entered accordingly.

Ordered, That the Committee of Correspondence do transmit the said Petition to the Agent, by the first opportunity.

Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit then, by Writ, prorogued the House to Tuesday, the fourteenth day of March next, then to meet at Burlington.

——————————

Cumberland County Committee.

Cumberland County, N. J., March 6, 1775.

The Committee of the County of Cumberland, in New Jersey, met at Bridgetown; and after reading the Association of the American Congress, it appeared by the voluntary declaration of Silas Newcomb, Esquire, a Member of the Committee, that he had contravened the same, and in open violation of the Third Article of the aforesaid Association had drank East India Tea in his family ever since the first day of March instant, and that he is determined to persist in the same practice. After much time spent in vain to convince Mr. Newcomb of his errour it was agreed that it is the duty of this Committee agreeable to the Eleventh Article of the above mentioned compact to break off all dealings with him and in this manner publish the truth of the case, that he may be distinguished from the friends of American liberty.

By order of the Committee.
Thomas Ewing,      
Clerk.   

Cumberland, New Jersey.

Whereas, Silas Newcomb, Esquire, was in March last advertised by the Committee of said County for a breach of the Association of the Continental Congress, and having since manifested a desire of making a public acknowledgement for his former misconduct, the Committee accepted of the following recantation, viz:

"I, the subscriber, do hereby publickly acknowledge my former errour, and voluntarily confess myself to blame for obstinately refusing to submit to a majority of the Committee; and I do hereby ask pardon of the Members of the Committee for the abuses offered them and promise for the future to regulate my conduct agreeable to the aforesaid Association and a majority of said Committee.

"Witness my hand the 11th day of May, 1775.

"Silas Newcomb"      

Published by order of the Committee.

Thomas Ewing,           
Clerk.      

——————————

Freehold, Monmouth County, Committee.

Freehold, March 6, 1775.

Although the Committee of Observation and Inspection for the Township of Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, New Jersey, was constituted early in December last and the members have statedly and assiduously attended to the business assigned them ever since, yet they have hitherto deferred the publication of their institution, in hopes of the general concurrence of the other Townships in the choice of a new County Committee, when one publication might have served for the whole; but finding some of them have hitherto declined to comply with the recommendation of the General Congress in that respect, and not knowing whether they intend it at all, they judge it highly expedient to transmit the following account to the Press, lest their brethren in distant parts of the Colony should think the County of Monmouth altogether inactive at the present important crisis.

"In pursuance of the recommendation of the Grand Continental Congress and for the preservation and support of American freedom, a respectable body of the Freeholders Inhabitants of the Township of Freehold, met at Monmouth Court House on Saturday, December 10th, 1774, and unanimously elected the following gentlemen to serve as a Committee of Observation and Inspection for the said Town, viz.: John Anderson, Esquire, Captain John Covenhoven, Messrs. Peter Forman, Hendrick Smock, Asher Holmes, David Forman and John Forman, Doctor Nathaniel Scudder, and Doctor Thomas Henderson, who were instructed by their constituents to endeavour to the utmost of their knowledge and power to carry into execution the several important and salutary measures pointed out to them by the American Congress; and without favour or affection to make all such diligent inquiry as shall be found conducive to the accomplishment of the great and necessary purposes held up by them to the attention of America"

At an early meeting of said Committee, a pamphlet entitled Free Thoughts on the Resolves of the Congress by A. W. Farmer, was handed in to them and their opinion of it asked by a number of their constituents then present. Said pamphlet was then read, and upon mature deliberation unanimously declared to be a performance of the most pernicious and malignant tendency; replete with the most specious sophistry but void of any solid or rational argument; calculated to deceive and mislead the unwary, the ignorant, and the credulous; and designed no doubt by the detestable author to damp that noble spirit of union, which he sees prevailing all over the Continent, and if possible to sap the foundations of America freedom. The pamphlet was afterwards handed back to the people, who immediately bestowed upon it a suit of tar and turkey-buzzard's feathers; one of the persons concerned in the operation justly observing that although the feathers were plucked from the most stinking fowl in the creation he thought they fell far short of. being a proper emblem of the author's odiousness to every advocate for true freedom. The same person wished, however, he had the pleasure of fitting him with a suit of the same materials. The pamphlet was then in its gorgeous attire, nailed up firmly to the pillory post, there to remain as a monument of the indignation of a free and loyal people against the author and vendor of a publication so evidently tending both to subvert the liberties of America and the Constitution of the British Empire.

At a subsequent meeting of said Committee it was resolved unanimously that on account of sundry publications in the pamphlet way by James Rivington, Printer, of New York, and also a variety of weekly productions in his paper blended, in general with the most glaring falsehoods, disgorged with the most daring effrontery, and all evidently calculated to disunite the Colonies and sow the seeds of discord and contention through the whole Continent, they do esteem him a base and malignant enemy to the liberties of this Country, and think he ought justly to be treated as such by all considerate and good men. And they do for themselves, now publickly declare (and recommend the same conduct to their constituents) that they will have no connection with him the said Rivington, while he continues to retail such dirty, scandalous, and traitorious performances; but hold him in the utmost contempt as a noxious exotick plant incapable either of cultivation or improvement in this soil of freedom and only fit to be transported.

This Committee did early make application to every other Township in the County, recommending the election of Committees; and they soon had information that those of Upper Freehold, Middletown and Dover had chosen theirs and were resolved to enforce the measures of the Congress.

N. B.— A very considerable number of the inhabitants of Freehold have formed themselves into Companies and chosen Military Instructors, under whose tuition they are making rapid improvement.

Signed by order of the Committee.
John Anderson,            
Chairman.     

——————————

Meeting of the Inhabitants of Hackensack, New Jersey.

At a Meeting of the Inhabitants of the Precinct of Hackensack, in the County of Bergen and Province of New Jersey, held pursuant to an Act of Assembly of the said Province, on Tuesday, the 14th of March, in the year of our Lord, 1775.

Thomas Moor, Esq., Chairman.

This meeting being heartily grieved at the unhappy disputes now existing between Great Britain and her American Colonies, and earnestly wishing that the present misunderstandings may be removed, and such a reconciliation take place as may be consistent with the dignity of Great Britain and the true interest of the Colonies; and being unanimously of opinion that it is the duty of every loyal subject to adopt and encourage the most lenient measures which may tend to heal and not inflame the present differences.

We therefore, in order to contribute what is in our power to this salutary purpose, and to show our loyalty to our King, and love to our Country, do Resolve,

1. That we are and will continue to be loyal subjects to his Majesty King George, and that we will venture our lives and fortunes to support the dignity of his Crown.

2. That we disavow all riotous mobs whatsoever.

3. That by humbly petitioning the Throne is the only salutary means we can think of to remove our present grievances.

4. That we have not, nor, (for the future) will not be concerned in any case whatever with any unconstitutional measures.

5. That we will support his Majesty's Civil Officers in all their lawful proceedings.

Signed by thirty-seven Inhabitants.

——————————

Committee of Freehold, Monmouth County.

March 14, 1775, P. M.

The Committee of Observation for the Township of Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, New Jersey, have made repeated applications to the inhabitants of the Township of Shrewsbury earnestly requesting and exorting them to comply with the instructions of the late American Congress in constituting for themselves a Committee of Observation, that they might conspire with their brethren in the other Towns belonging to the County in executing the Resolves of said Congress; but although they have entertained hopes, notwithstanding their former opposition, that they would do it at their stated annual town-meeting, they are at this late hour informed that the said annual meeting of Shrewsbury is broke up without a Committee being chosen, or any one step taken whereby the least disposition is discovered of their being inclined to adopt the Resolutions of said Congress. They think it therefore their duty, however painful, the declaration to bear publick testimony against them.

And we do unanimously enter into the following Resolve, viz.: That from and after this day, during our continuance as a Committee, (unless they shall turn from the evil of their ways, and testify their respentance by adopting the measures of the Congress) we will esteem and treat them, the said inhabitants of Shrewsbury, as enemies to their King and Country, and deserters from the common cause of true freedom; and we will hereafter break off all dealings and connection with them while they continue their opposition. We do furthermore recommend the same conduct towards them to our constituents and all others; earnestly hoping it may be a means of reclaiming those deluded people to their duty and interest, whom we shall always be pleased to receive and treat as returning prodigals.

Signed by order of the Committee.
Nathaniel Scudder,           
Clerk.        

Freehold, Monmouth County, Committee.

April 3, 1775.

Thomas Leonard, Esquire, having been duly notified to appear this day before the Committee of Inspection for the Township of Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, New Jersey, and answer to a number of complaints made against him, did not think proper to attend.

The Committee therefore proceeded, with care and impartiality, to consider the evidence laid before them, and were unanimously of opinion that the said Thomas Leonard, Esquire, has in a number of instances been guilty of a breach of the Continental Association, and that, pursuant to the tenour of said Association, every friend of true freedom ought immediately to break off all connexion and dealings with him, the said Leonard, and treat him as a foe to the rights of British America.

Ordered, That their Clerk transmit a copy of this judgment to the Press.

Signed accordingly by
Nath. Scudder,        
Clerk.    

——————————

Newark Committee
.

At a meeting of the Committee of Observation for the Township of Newark, April 24, 1775, present eighteen members.

Mr. Caleb Camp, Chairman.

The Chairman having opened the business of the meeting, and related the purport of the expresses lately received from Boston, the following motions were made and agreed to unanimously:

That the members of this Committee are willing at this alarming crisis to risk their lives and fortunes in support of American liberty; and that it be recommended to our constituents to give all necessary support in their power to our brethren in the Province of Massachusetts Bay in the present alarming exigency.

That it be also recommended to the Captains of the Militia in this Township to muster and exercise their respective Companies at least once in every week, and carefully to exact that each man be provided with arms and ammunition, as the Militia Law directs.

That it be requested of all heads of families and masters of apprentices to encourage all of proper age under their direction to learn the military exercise, and to allow them such portions of time as may be necessary to make them perfect therein.

Robert Johnston,        
Clerk.    

——————————

Proclamation by Governour Franklin, Perth Amboy.

By his Excellency William Franklin, Esq., Captain- General, Governour and Commander-in-Chief in and over the Province of New Jersey, and Territories thereon depending, in America, Chancellor and Vice-Admiral in the same, &c.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, I have lately received despatches from one of his Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, containing matters of great importance to the Colony in the present situation of publick affairs, and calculated to restore that harmony between Great Britain and her American Colonies so essential to the interest and happiness of both; and being desirous of communicating the same as early as possible to the General Assembly of this Colony in order to give them an opportunity of using their best endeavours towards effecting so desirable a purpose; I have, therefore, thought fit, and by and with the advice and consent of his Majesty's Council do hereby appoint the said General Assembly to meet at the City of Burlington, on Monday the 15th day of May next; of which, all His Majesty's subjects concerned therein, are required to take notice and govern themselves accordingly.

Given under my hand and seal at arms, at the city of Perth Amboy, the twenty-eighth day of April, in the fifteenth year of the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King George the Third, Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five.

William Franklin.      

By his Excellency's command,
Cpiarles Pettit,         
D. Secretary      
. God save the King.

Meeting of the Inhabitants of Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

At a meeting of the inhabitants of the North Ward of the City of Perth Amboy, on Friday, the 28th of April, 1775.

Resolved unanimously, That James Parker, Stephen Skinner, and Jonathan Deare, Esquires, or any two of them be a standing Committee of Correspondence for the North Ward of this City.

A copy of a Letter from the Committee of Correspondence of Princeton, signed by Jonathan D. Sergeant, Esquire, Clerk to the said Committee, transmitted by the Committee of Woodbridge, and by them directed to the inhabitants of this City was read, wherein after mentioning the very alarming intelligence lately received, a Provincial Congress for this Province is proposed to be held on the 5th day of May next; and a meeting of the inhabitants being now called that their sense might be taken on the necessity and propriety of choosing Deputies to attend the said Congress.

The question was thereupon put whether Deputies shall be sent or not, and carried in the affirmative unanimously.

James Parker, Stephen Skinner and Jonathan Deare, Esquires, were then nominated as Deputies to attend the said Congress to represent this City and were unanimously chosen, and it is requested that they or any one or more of them do attend the said Congress accordingly.

It is also agreed by the inhabitants now assembled that the expenses of the Deputies who shall attend the said Congress be defrayed by this City.

It is also requested that Mr. Deare acquaint the Committees of Princeton and Woodbridge of the proceedings of this meeting.

By order of the meeting.
John Thomson,       
Clerk.   

Meetings of Inhabitants of Morris County, New Jersey.

Pursuant to an apointment(sic) of a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Morris, agreeable to notice given by the former Committee of Correspondence, the said Freeholders and Inhabitants did meet accordingly on Monday, the first day of May, Anno Domini, 1775.

Jacob Ford, Esq., Chairman.

William De Hart, Esq., Clerk.

And came into the following Votes and Resolutions, to wit:

That Delegates be chosen to represent the County of Morris, and that the said Delegates be vested with the power of legislation, and that they raise Men, Money and Arms for the common defence, and point out the mode, method and means of raising, appointing and paying the said Men and Officers subject to the control and direction of the Provincial and Continental Congress; and that afterwards they meet in Provincial Congress with such Counties as shall send to the same jointly with them to levy taxes on the Province, with full power of legislative authority, if they think proper to exercise the same for the said Province, and the said Provincial Congress be subject to the control of the Grand Continental Congress.

And they proceeded to elect the following persons to be their Delegates as aforesaid, to wit:

William Winds, Esquire, William De Hart, Esquire, Silas Condit, Peter Dickerson, Jacob Drake, Ellis Cook, Jonathan Stiles, Esq., David Thompson, Esq., Abraham Kitchell.

By order,
William De Hart,        
Clerk.    

And pursuant to the above appointment the said Delegates met at the house of Captain Peter Dickerson, at Morristown, in the County of Morris, on the first day of May, 1775.

Present, William Winds, Esquire, William De Hart, Esq., Silas Condit, Peter Dickerson, Jacob Drake, Ellis Cook, Jonathan Stiles, Esq., David Thompson, Esquire, Abraham Kitchell.

William Winds, Esq., was unanimously chosen Chairman, Archibald Dallas was appointed Clerk.

Voted unanimously, That any five of the Delegates, when met, be a body of the whole, and do make a board, and that a majority of them so met should make a vote.

Voted unanimously, That Forces should be raised.

Then the delegates adjourned till to-morrow at nine o'clock in the forenoon, to meet at the house of Captain Peter Dickerson aforesaid.

Tuesday, Nine o'clock, May 2, 1775.

Pursuant to adjournment the Delegates met.

Present, William Winds, Esq., William De Hart, Esq., Silas Condit, Peter Dickerson, Ellis Cook, Jonathan Stiles, Esq., David Thompson, Esq., Abraham Kitchell.

Voted, That three hundred men should be raised exclusive of Commissioned Officers.

Voted, That the said three hundred men be Volunteers.

Voted, That the three hundred men so raised shall be divided in Five Companies, sixty men each.

Voted, That those Companies shall be commanded by three Commissioned Officers, viz.: a Captain and two Lieutenants.

Voted, That two Field Officers shall be appointed and that each of them shall supply the place of Captain in the two first Companies.

Voted, That William Winds shall be Colonel.

At twelve o'clock adjourned, to meet at half an hour after one o'clock in the afternoon.

Half-past one o'clock.

Met according to adjournment. All the Members present.

Voted, That William De Hart, Esquire, shall be Major.

Voted, That Samuel Ball, Joseph Morris and Daniel Budd shall be Captains.

Voted, That John Huntington be Captain-Lieutenant in the Colonel's Company and Silas Howell to be Captain- Lieutenant in the Major's Company.

Voted. That the Captain of each Company shall appoint his Lieutenants.

Ordered, That the Captains shall discipline their men at the rate of one day every week, and to continue the same till further orders; and the times be appointed and the places of training affixed by the Captains.

Voted, That in case of any invasion or alarm either in this or any of the neighbouring Provinces, the said Officers and men shall be called out to service by the Commanding Officer for the time being; and the said Officers and men shall be paid as follows, viz.: Captains, Seven Shillings, Proclamation money per day; First Lieutenants, Six Shillings per day; Second Lieutenants, Five Shillings per day; Sergeants, Three Shillings and Six Pence per day; Private men, Three Shillings per day and found with Provisions, Arms, and Ammunition; and when only in discipline at home the same wages and to find themselves and their wages to be paid every two months.

Voted, That the following be the form of the Enlisting paper to be signed by the recruits:

"We, the subscribers, do voluntarily enlist in the Company of Captain ————, to be and serve in the Regiment under the command of Colonel William Winds, in this or any of the neighbouring Provinces where we may be called agreeable to certain Resolves made and entered into by the Delegates for the County of Morris."

Ordered, That five hundred weight of Powder and a ton of Lead be purchased and kept in a Magazine for the use of the new Regiment now to be raised for the County of Morris.

Voted, That William DeHart, Esquire, be appointed to purchase the said Powder and Lead.

Voted, That the Votes and Resolves of this meeting shall be subject to the control of the Provincial and Continental Congresses, to take place after due notice being given to us by either of the said Congresses, of their disapprobation of all or any of our proceedings.

And the Delegates taking into consideration the unhappy circumstances of this Country do recommend to the inhabitants of this County capable of bearing arms, to provide themselves with Arms and Ammunition to defend their Country in case of any invasion.

Adjourned till the ninth day of this month at nine o'clock in the forenoon, to meet at the house of Captain Peter Dickerson, in Morristown.

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Woodbridge Committee to the several Committees of Massachusetts.

In Committee, Woodbridge, New Jersey,
May, 1, 1775.

Gentlemen:— We have received repeated intelligence by expresses of your engaging and defeating the Regulars under the command of General Gage, which is universally credited in this Colony; and we have the pleasure of assuring you your conduct and bravery on that occasion is greatly applauded and admired by all ranks of men. In consequence of the intelligence a Provincial Convention will be held as soon as the Members can possibly be convened; in the meantime the inhabitants are putting themselves in the best posture of defence, being determined to stand or fall with the liberties of America. We have for some time past feared the New-Yorkers would desert American liberty but are now fully convinced by their late spirited conduct that they are determined to support the grand cause. We also learn with pleasure that the inhabitants of Pennsylvania and the other Southern Provinces are firm, unanimous and spirited. We have only to add that you have our unfeigned and hearty thanks for the noble stand you have made, and our sincere and fervent prayers for a speedy deliverance from all your calamities.

We are very respectfully, gentlemen, your most obedient humble servants.

By order of the Committee.
Moses Bloomfield,        
Chairman.    

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New Jersey Committee of Correspondence.

At a meeting of the New Jersey Provincial Committee of Correspondence, (appointed by the Provincial Congress) at the City of New Brunswick, on Tuesday, the second day of May, Anno Domini, 1775, agreeable to summons of Hendrick Fisher, Esq., Chairman.

Present, Hendrick Fisher, Samuel Tucker, Joseph Borden, Joseph Riggs, Isaac Pearson, John Chetwood, Lewis Ogden, Isaac Ogden, Abraham Hunt and Elias Boudinot, Esquires.

The Committee having seriously taken into consideration, as well the present alarming and very extraordinary conduct of the British Ministry, for carrying into execution sundry Acts of Parliament for the express purpose of raising a revenue in America, and other unconstitutional measures therein mentioned; and also the several acts of hostility that they have actually commenced for this purpose by the Regular Forces under General Gage against our brethren of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, in New England, and not knowing how soon this Province may be in a state of confusion and disorder if there are not some effectual measures speedily taken to prevent the same; this Committee are unanimously of opinion and do hereby advise and direct that the Chairman do immediately call a Provincial Congress to meet at Trenton on Tuesday, the twenty-third day of this instant, in order to consider of and determine such matters as may then and there come before them; and the several Counties are hereby desired to nominate and appoint their respective Deputies for the same as speedily as may be, with full and ample powers for such purposes as may be thought necessary for the peculiar exigencies of this Province.

The Committee do also direct their Chairman to forward true copies of the above minute to the several County Committees of this Province without delay.

Hendrick Fisher,          
Chairman.     

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Meeting of the Inhabitants of Acquackanonk,
Essex County, New Jersey.

At a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Acquackanonk in said County, held at Mr. James Leslie's, near Acquackanonk Bridge, on Wednesday, the 3d day of May, Anno Domini, 1775, an Association was then and there entered into and subscribed by the Freeholders and Inhabitants of said Township, being verbatim the same as that entered into by the Freeholders and Inhabitants at Newark, in said County, the following gentlemen in number twenty-three were then chosen or elected a General Committee agreeable to said Association.

Michael Vreeland, Esq., in the Chair.

Henry Garritse, Peter Peterse, John Berry, Robert Drummond, Captain Francis Post, Thomas Post, Daniel Niel, Richard Ludlow, Captain Abraham Godwin, John Spier, Jacob Van Riper, Lucas Wessels, Francis Van Winkle, Cornelius Van Winkle, Henry Post, Junior, Doctor Walter Degraw, John Peer, Jacob Garritse, Jacob Vreeland, Abraham Van Riper, Stephen Ryder. Doctor Nicholas Roche, Committee Clerk.

Of the same number were chosen the following Delegates to attend the Provincial Convention to be held at Trenton, the 23d instant, agreeable to the aforesaid Association, to represent said Township: Henry Garritse, Robert Drummond, Michael Vreeland and John Berry, Esquires.

Peter Peterse, Esquire, Daniel Niel, Richard Ludlow, Thomas Post and Doctor Nicholas Roche, are appointed a Committee of Correspondence for said Township; Daniel Niel, Deputy Chairman to the General Committee, and Richard Ludlow, Deputy Clerk.

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Town-Meeting, Upper Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey.

Monmouth County, Upper Freehold, May 4, 1775.

This day agreeable to previous notice a very considerable number of the principal inhabitants of this Township met at Imlay's-Town:

John Lawrence, Esquire, in the chair.

When the following Resolves were unanimously agreed to:

Resolved, That it is our first wish to live in union with Great Britain agreeable to the principles of the Constitution; that we consider the unnatural civil war which we are about to be forced into, with anxiety and distress; but that we are determined to oppose the novel claim of the Parliament of Great Britain to raise a revenue in America and risk every possible consequence rather than submit to it.

Resolved, That it appears to this meeting that there are a sufficient number of Arms for the people.

Resolved, That a sum of money be now raised to purchase what further quantity of Powder and Ball may be necessary; and it is recommended that every man capable of bearing arms enter into Companies to train and be prepared to march at a minute's warning; and it is further recommended to the people that they do not waste their Powder in fowling or hunting.

A subscription was then opened, and One Hundred and Sixty Pounds instantly paid into the hands of a person appointed for that purpose. The Officers of four Companies were then chosen, and the meeting broke up in perfect unanimity.

Elisha Lawrence,     
Clerk.  

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Town-Meeting, Newark, New Jersey.

Newark, New Jersey, May 4, 1775.

At a meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Newark, in New Jersey, on Thursday, the 4th day of May, A. D. 1775.

Doctor William Burnett in the Chair.

An Association having been entered into and subscribed by the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of said Town, a motion was made and agreed to, that the same be read. The same was accordingly read, and is as follows:

"We, the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Newark, having deliberately considered the openly avowed design of the Ministry of Great Britain to raise a revenue in America; being affected with horrour at the bloody scene now acting in the Massachusetts Bay, for carrjang that arbitrary design into execution; firmly convinced that the very existence of the rights and liberties of America can, under God, subsist on no other basis than the most animated and perfect union of its inhabitants; and being sensible of the necessity in the present exigency of preserving good order and a due regulation in all public measures; with hearts perfectly abhorrent of slavery, do solemnly, under all the sacred ties of religion, honour and love to our Country, associate and resolve that we will personally, and as far as our influence can extend, endeavour to support and carry into execution whatever measures may be recommended by the Continental Congress or agreed upon by the proposed Convention of Deputies of this Province, for the purpose of preserving and fixing our Constitution on a permanent basis, and opposing the execution of the several despotick and oppressive Acts of British Parliament, until the wished for reconciliation between Great Britain and America on constitutional principles can be obtained.

"That a General Committee be chosen by this Town for the purposes aforesaid, and that we will be directed by, and support them in all things respecting the 'common cause, the preservation of peace, good order, the safety of individuals and private property.'"

Voted, That Isaac Ogden, Esquire, Captain Philip Van Cortlandt, Bethuel Pierson and Caleb Camp be the Deputies to represent said Township in the Provincial Congress referred to in the said Association.

The General Committee also mentioned in the said Association was then chosen, consisting of forty-four.

Agreed, That the powers delegated to the Deputies and General Committee continue until the expiration of five weeks after the rising of the next Continental Congress and no longer.

Agreed, That the General Committee have power to appoint one or more Sub-Committees, to act on any emergency.

Isaac Longworth,          
Town Clerk.      

The General Committee immediately convened and elected Lewis Ogden, Esquire, Chairman, Doctor William Burnett, Deputy Chairman, and Elisha Boudinot, Esq., Clerk of the said General Committee.

Agreed, That the above named Lewis Ogden. Esquire, Doctor William Burnett, Elisha Boudinot, Esquire, Isaac Ogden, Esquire, and Mr. Isaac Longworth be a Committee of Correspondence for said Town.

Elisha Boudinot,            
Clerk to Committee.    

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Somerset County Committee.

Pursuant to notice given by the Chairman of the Committee of Correspondence for the County of Somerset in New Jersey, the Freeholders of the County met at the Court-House, the 11th day of May, 1775.

Hendrick Fisher, Esq., chosen Chairman.

Frederick Frelinghuysen, Clerk.

1. Resolved, That the several steps taken by the British Ministry to enslave the American Colonies and especially the late alarming hostilities commenced by the Troops under General Gage against the inhabitants of Massachusetts Bay, loudly call on the people of this Province to determine what part they will act in this situation of affairs; and that we therefore readily consent to elect Deputies for a Provincial Congress to meet at Trenton, on Tuesday, the 23d instant, agreeable to the advice and direction of the Provincial Committee of Correspondencce.

2. Resolved, That the number of Deputies shall be nine and that they shall be chosen by ballot.

Adjourned for an hour.

Four o'clock the people re-assembled.

Hendiick Fisher, John Roy, Esquires, Mr. Frederick Frelinghuysen, Mr. Enos Kelsey, Peter Schenck, Jonathan D. Sergeant, Nathaniel Airs, William Patterson, and Abraham Van Nest, Esquires, are appointed Deputies for this County, who or any five of them are hereby empowered to meet the Deputies from the other Counties in Provincial Congress at Trenton, on Tuesday, the 23d instant, and to agree to all such measures as shall be judged necessary for the preservation of our constitutional rights and privileges.

Resolved, That the Deputies for this County be instructed, and they are hereby instructed to join with the Deputies from the other Counties in forming such plan for the Militia of this Province as to them shall seem proper; and we heartily agree to arm and support such a number of men as they shall order to be raised in this County.

Resolved, That this County will pay the expenses of their Deputies who shall attend the Congress.

Resolved, That Messrs Tobias Van Norden and Daniel Blackford be added to the Committee of Observation for the Township of Bridgewater.

By order.
Frederick Frelinghuysen,      
Clerk.    

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Bergen County Committee Chamber.

May 12, 1775.

Resolved, That John Fell, Esquire, Theunis Dey, Esquire, Thomas Brown, Esquire, Peter Zabriskie, Esq., John Demarest, Esquire, Mr. Samuel Berry, Mr. Cornelius Van Vorst, Mr. Isaac Noble, Mr. Aarent J. Schuyler, Mr. Jacob Terhune, Doctor Abraham Van Boskirk, John Van Boskirk, Esquire, Mr. Gabriel Ogden, Mr. Jost Zabriskie and Mr. Gabriel Van Orden be a Standing Committee of Correspondence for this County, and that any five of them of which the President or Vice President to be one have power to act.

Ordered, That a copy of the above Resolve be printed in the New York Newspapers.

By order of the Committee,
John Fell,          
Chairman.    

At a meeting of the Committee of Correspondence for Bergen County, New Jersey, May 12, 1775.

Present, John Fell, Theunis Dey, Thomas Brown, John Demarest, Esquires, Messrs. Cornelius Van Vorst, Isaac Noble, Jacob Terhune, Doctor Abraham Van Boskirk, John Van Boskirk, Esquire, Messrs. Gabriel Ogden, Jost Zabriskie and Gabriel Van Orden.

John Demarest, Esq., chosen President. Mr, Gabriel Van Orden chosen Vice President.

Ordered, That a copy of the above proceedings be published in the New York Newspapers.

By order of the Committee of Correspondence.
John Demarest,      
President.    

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Assembly of New Jersey.

Votes and Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Colony of New Jersey, at a sitting begun at Burlington, Monday, May 15, 1775, and continued until the twentieth day of the same month, being the first sitting of the Fourth Session of the Twenty-second Assembly of New Jersey.

NAMES OF THE KEPRESENTATIVES.

City of Perth Amboy — Cortland Skinner, Speaker; John Combs.

Middlesex — John Wetherill, Azariah Dunham.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, Richard Lawrence.

Essex — Stephen Crane, Henry Garritse.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, John Ray.

Bergen — Theunis Dey, John Demarest.

Morris — Jacob Ford, William Winds.

City of Burlington — James Kinsey, Thomas P Hewlings.

County of Burlington — Henry Paxson, Anthony Sykes.

Gloucester — John Hinchman, Robert F. Price.

Salem — Grant Gibbon, Benjamin Holme.

Cape May — Jonathan Hand, Eli Eldridge.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm.

Cumberland — John Sheppard, Theophilus Elmer.

Sussex — Nathaniel Pettit, Joseph Barton.

Burlington, Monday, May 15, 1775.

Pursuant to his Excellency's several prorogations of the General Assembly from time to time till this day, the House met.

Azariah Dunham, Esq., being duly returned a Representative to serve in the General Assembly for the County of Middlesex and now attending, was admitted into the House and took the usual oaths, and made and subscribed the declaration by law appointed, before Cortland Skinner, Esq, thereto authorized be dedimus potestatem.

Ordered, That Mr. Dunham do take his seat in the House.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher and Mr. Wetherill do wait upon his Excellency and acquaint him that a sufficient number of Members to constitute a House are met, and are ready to receive any thing he may please to lay before them.

Mr. Sneaker laid before the House a Letter to him from William Bollan, Benjamin Franklin and Arthur Lee, Esquires, dated London, December 24, 1774; which was read.

Mr. Speaker also laid before the House a Letter to him from the Honourable John Cruger, Esquire, Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Province of New York, enclosing their Petition to the King, the Memorial to the House of Lords, and a Representation to the House of Commons, a List of Grievances, and the Resolutions entered into by the General Assembly there on the eighth of March last; all of which were read.

Mr. Fisher reported that Mr. Wetherill and himself waited upon his Excellency with the message of the House according to order, and that his Excellency was pleased to say that the House should hear from him tomorrow morning.

The House adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, May 16, 1775.

The House met and adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

A Message from his Excellency by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber and requires the immediate attendance of the House,

Whereupon Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and with the House went to wait upon his Excellency; and being returned Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and reported that the House had waited on his Excellency, who was pleased to make a speech to the Council and House of Assembly, of which Mr. Speaker said he had to prevent mistakes obtained a copy. And the same by order of the House was read, and is as follows, viz.:

Gentlemen of the Council, and Gentlemen of the Assembly:

The sole occasion of my calling you together at this time is to lay before you a Resolution of the House of Commons, wisely and humanely calculated to open a door for the restoration of that harmony between Great Britain and her American Colonies, on which their mutual welfare and happiness so greatly depend.

This Resolution having already appeared in the publick papers and a great variety of interpretations put upon it mostly according to the different views and dispositions by which men are actuated, and scarcely any having seen it in its proper light, I think I cannot, at this critical juncture, better answer the gracious purposes of His Majesty nor do my Country more essential service than to lay before you as full an explanation of the occasion, purport and intent of it as is in my power. By this means you and the good people you represent will be enabled to judge for yourselves how far you ought or ought not to acquiesce with the plan it contains, and what steps it will be prudent for you to take on this very important occasion.

You will see in the King's answer to the joint Address of both Houses of Parliament on the seventh of February, how much attention His Majesty was graciously pleased to give to the assurance held out in that Address, of the readiness of Parliament to afford every just and reasonable indulgence to the Colonies, whenever they should make a proper application on the ground of any real grievance they might have to complain of. This Address was accordingly soon after followed by the Resolution of the House of Commons now laid before you, a circumstance which afforded His Majesty great satisfaction, as it gave room to hope for a happy effect, and would at all events ever remain an evidence of their justice and moderation, and manifest the temper which has accompanied their deliberations upon that question which has been the source of so much disquiet to the King's subjects in America.

His Majesty ardently wishing to see a reconciliation of the unhappy differences by eyery means through which it may be obtained, without prejudice to the just authority of Parliament, which His Majesty will never suffer to be violated, has approved the Resolution of his faithful Commons, and has commanded it to be transmitted to the Governours of his Colonies, not doubting that this happy disposition to comply with every just and reasonable wish of the King's subjects in America will meet with such a return of duty and affection on their part as will lead to a happy issue of the present dispute, and to a re-establishment of the publick tranquility on these grounds of equity, justice and moderation which this Resolution holds forth.

What has given the King the greater satisfaction in this Resolution, and the greater confidence in the good effects of it, is his having seen that amidst all the intemperance into which a people jealous of their liberties have been unfortunately misled, they have, nevertheless, avowed the justice, the equity and the propriety of subjects of the same State contributing according to their abilities and situation to the publick burdens; and this Resolution, it is thought, holds no proposition beyond that.

It would probably be deemed unjust to suppose that any of the King's subjects in the Colonies can so far forget the benefits they have received from the Parent State as not to acknowledge that it is to her support held forth at the expense of her blood and treasure, that they principally owe that security which hath raised them to their present state of opulence and importance. In this situation, therefore, justice requires that they should in return contribute according to their respective abilities to the common defence; and their own welfare and interest demand that civil establishment should be supported with becoming dignity.

It has been the care and it is the firm determination of Parliament to see that both these ends are answered and their wisdom and moderation have suggested the propriety of leaving to each Colony to judge of the ways and means of making due provision for these purposes reserving to themselves a discretionary power of approving or disapproving what shall be offered.

The Resolution neither points out what the civil establishment should be nor demands any specifick sum in aid of the publick burdens. In both these respects it leaves full scope for that justice and liberality which may be expected from Colonies that under all their prejudices have never been wanting in expressions of an affectionate attachment to the mother country and a zealous regard for the general welfare of the British Empire; and therefore the King trusts that the provision they will engage to make for the support of civil government will be adequate to the rank and station of every necessary officer and that the sum to be given in contribution to the common defence will be offered on such terms, and proposed in such a way as to increase or diminish according as the publick burdens of Great Britain are from time to time augmented or reduced in so far as these burdens consist of taxes and duties which are not a security for the National Debt.

By such a mode of contribution, the Colonies will have full security that they can never be required to tax themselves without Parliament's taxing the subjects in Great Britain in a far greater proportion; and it may be relied upon that any proposition of this nature made by any of the Colonies and accompanied with such a state of their faculties and ability as may evince the equity of the proposal will be received with every possible indulgence, provided it be at the same time unaccompanied with any declarations and unmixed with any claims which will make it impossible for the King consistently with his own dignity, or for Parliament consistently with their constitutional rights to receive it. But it is not supposed that any of the Colonies will after this example of the temper and moderation of Parliament adopt such a conduct. On the contrary the pleasing hope is cherished that the publick peace will be restored and that the Colonies will enter into the consideration of the Resolution of the House of Commons with that calmness and deliberation which the importance of it demands and with that good will and inclination to a reconciliation which are due to the candour and justice with which Parliament has taken up this business and at once declared to the Colonies what will be ultimately expected from them.

It has been already observed that the King entirely approves the Resolution of the House of Commons, and I have his Majesty's commands to say that a compliance therewith by the General Assembly will be most graciously considered by his Majesty not only as a testimony of their reverence for Parliament, but also as a mark of their duty and attachment to their Sovereign, who has no object nearer to his heart than the peace and prosperity of his subjects in every part of his Dominions. At the same time I must tell you his Majesty considers himself as bound, by every tie, to exert those means the Constitution has placed in his hands for preserving that Constitution entire, and to resist with firmness, every attempt to violate the rights of Parliament, to distress and obstruct the lawful commerce of his subjects or to encourage in the Colonies ideas of independence inconsistent with their connexion with Great Britain.

Here, gentlemen, you have a full and candid state of the disposition and expectations of his Majesty and the Parliament. They require nothing of America but what the Colonies have repeatedly professed themselves ready and willing to perform. A late Assembly of this Province, in their Petition to the King in 1766, express themselves thus: "As no danger can approach Britain without giving us the most sensible alarm, so your Majesty may be assured, that with filial duty we shall ever be ready to afford all the assistance in our power, and stand or fall with that Kingdom from which we boast our descent, and to which we are attached by the strongest ties of duty, gratitude and affection." And in a subsequent Petition they say: "Very far it is from our intentions to deny our subordination to that august body, (the Parliament,) or our dependance on the Kingdom of Great Britain. In these connexions and in the settlement of our liberties under the auspicious influence of your Royal House, we know our happiness consists; and, therefore, to confirm those connexions, and to strengthen this settlement, is at once our interest, duty, and delight.

Similar declarations have been repeatedly made in other Colonies.

The following vote was passed in the Assembly of Pennsylvania, to wit: "The House, taking into consideration the many taxes their fellow-subjects in Great Britain are oblidged to pay towards supporting the dignity of the Crown, and defraying the necessary and contingent charges of the Government, and willing to demonstrate the fidelity, loyalty, and affection of the inhabitants of this Province to our gracious Sovereign, by bearing a share of the burden of our fellow-subjects, proportionable to our circumstances, do, threfore, cheerfully and unanimously resolve that three thousand Pounds be paid for the use of the King, his heirs and successors, to be applied to such uses as he in his royal wisdom shall think fit to direct and appoint." And the said three thousand Pounds was afterwards paid into his Majesty's Exchequer by the Agent of the Province accordingly.

Nor can I avoid mentioning what was done in the Convention of Committees from every County of Pennsylvania, who met in July last for the express purpose of giving instructions to their Representatives in Assembly on this very subject. Several of these instructions manifest such a candour and liberality of sentiment, such just ideas of the importance of our connexion with Great Britain, and point out so rational a method to be pursued for obtaining a redress for the supposed grievances, (previous to any attempts to distress the trade of that Kingdom,) that it is greatly to be regretted that the conduct of America, in a matter of such vast importance to its future welfare, had not been regulated by the principles and advice they suggested. In those instructions, speaking of the powers Parliament had claimed and lately exercised, the Convention say: "We are thoroughly convinced they will prove unfailing and plentiful sources of dissensions to our Mother Country and these Colonies, unless some expedients can be adopted to render her secure of receiving from us every emolument that can, in justice and reason, be expected, and us secure in our lives, properties and an equitable share of commerce. Mournfully revolving in our minds the calamities that, arising from these dissensions, will most probably fall on us and our children, we will now lay before you the particular points we request of you to procure, if possible, to be finally decided, and the measures that appear to us most likely to produce such a desirable period of our distresses and dangers."

Then after enumerating the particular Acts of Parliament, which they consider as grievances, and desire to have repealed, they add: "In case of obtaining these terms, it is our opinion that it will be reasonable for the Colonies to engage their obedience to the Acts of Parliament, commonly called Acts of Navigation, and to every other Act of Parliament declared to have force at this time in these Colonies, other than those above mentioned, and to confirm such Statutes by Acts of the several Assemblies. It is also our opinion that, taking example from our mother Country in abolishing the Courts of Wards and Liveries, tenures in capite, and by Knights' service and purveyance, it will be reasonable for the Colonies, in case of obtaining the terms before mentioned, to settle a certain annual revenue on His Majesty, his heirs and successors, subject to the control of Parliament, and to satisfy all damages done to the East India Company. This our idea of settling a revenue, arises from a sense of duty to our Sovereign, and of esteem for our mother Country. We know and have felt the benefits of a subordinate connexion with her. We neither are so stupid as to be ignorant of them, nor so unjust as to deny them. We have also experienced the pleasures of gratitude and love, as well as advantages from that connexion. The impressions are not erased. We consider her circumstances with tender concern. We have not been wanting, when constitutionally called upon, to assist her to the utmost of our abilities, insomuch that she has judged it reasonable to make us recompenses for our over-strained exertions; and we now think we ought to contribute more than we do to the alleviation of her burdens. Whatever may be said of these proposals on either side of the Atlantick, this is not a time either for timidity or rashness. We perfectly know that the great cause now agitated is to be conducted to a happy conclusion only by that well-tempered composition of counsels which firmness, prudence, loyalty to our Sovereign, respect to our Parent State, and affection to our native Country, united must form."

"In case of war, or in any emergency of distress, we shall also be ready and willing to contribute all aids within our power. And we solemnly declare, that on such occasions, that if we, or our posterity, shall refuse, neglect, or decline thus to contribute, it will be a mean and manifest violation of a plain duty, and a weak and wicked desertion of the true interests of this Province, which ever have been, and must be, bound up in the prosperity of our Mother Country. Our union, founded on mutual compacts and mutual benefits, will be indissoluble; at least more firm than an union perpetually disturbed by disputed rights and retorted injuries." I could quote several more passages from these instructions, which are expressive of the same honest and generous sentiments with regard to Great Britain, but I shall only make one more extract, and that respecting the mode which they recommend to be pursued for the redress of grievances, viz: " But other considerations have weight with us. We wish every mark of respect to be paid to His Majesty's Administration. We have been taught, from our youth, to entertain tender and brotherly affections for our fellow-subjects at home. The interruption of our commerce must greatly distress great numbers of them. This we earnestly desire to avoid. We therefore request that the Deputies you shall appoint may be instructed to exert themselves at the Congress, to induce the Members of it to consent to make a full and precise state of grievances, and a decent, yet firm claim of redress, and to await the event before any other step is taken. It is our opinion that persons should be appointed and sent home to present this state and claim at the Court of Great Britain." After mentioning their confidence in the intended General Congress, and their resolution to abide their determinations for the sake of unanimity, they declare that it is "with a strong hope and trust that they will not draw this Province into any measure judged by us, who must be better acquainted with its state than strangers, highly inexpedient. Of this kind, we know any other stoppage of trade; but of that with Great Britain, will be. Even this step we should be extremely afflicted to see taken by the Congress, before the other mode, above pointed out, is tried."

Happy would it have been at this day, in all probability, if some such healing measure had been pursued. Some plan of union, or proposal of "a mutual compact" for "mutual benefit," was the grand object which every honest man in the Colonies had at heart. An imperfect one (if not too glaringly so) was better than none, as it would, if it had answered no other purpose, have laid a foundation for negotiation and treaty. It has been lately observed in Parliament, "That it does not appear the Colonies were seriously inclined to come into any reasonable terms of accommodation, as nobody was authorized to make any proposals to that effect."

However, it can be of little avail now to animadvert on past transacticns. Who has been most in the right or most in the wrong, can never be satisfactorily decided. Many things will ever happen in the course of a long continued dispute, which good men of both parties must reflect on with pain, and wish to have buried in oblivion. In the present situation of affairs we should only look forward, and endeavour to fall on some expedient that may avert the impending danger. To effect this desirable purpose, a plan is now formed and recommended to you by his Majesty, containing terms greatly corresponding with the avowed sentiments of many of the Colonies, and which, I think, can only want to be rightly understood in order to be generally adopted. It does not require from the people of this country any formal acknowledgment of the right of taxation in the Parliament. It waives all dispute on that head, and suspends the exercise of it forever, if so long the Colonies shall perform their part of the contract. It does not even require as a preliminary that the Non-Importation and Non-Exportation Agreements shall be abolished. It comes before you in the old accustomed manner, by way of requisition, being approved and adopted by the King, who has directed his several Governours to signify to the respective Assemblies his desire that they should grant such aids for the common defence, and the support of Government within the Colonies, as shall appear to them just and equitable, and proportionate to their abilities. His Majesty and the Parliament, 'tis true, are to judge whether the aids which each Colony may offer are worth acceptance, or adequate to their respective abilities, as they did during the course of the last war, very much to the satisfaction of those Colonies who exerted themselves; often making them a compensation "according as their active vigour and strenuous efforts respectively appeared to merit." The necessity of some such supreme judge is evident from the very nature of the case, as otherwise some Colonies might not contribute their due proportion. During the last war I well remember it was ardently wished by some of the Colonies that others who were thought to be delinquent might be compelled, by Act of Parliament, to bear an equal share of the publick burdens. It appears, by the minutes of Assembly, in March and April, 1758, that some of the neighbouring Colonies thought New Jersey, had not, at that time, contributed its due share towards the expenses of the war, and that President Reading (the then Commander-in-Chief of the Colony) was of the same opinion. And since my administration, when the Assembly, in 1764, was called upon to make provision for raising some Troops on account of the Indian war, they declined doing it for some time but "on condition a majority of the Eastern Colonies, as far as to include Massachusetts Bay should come into his Majesty's requisition on the occasion." But as none of the Assemblies of the New England Governments thought themselves nearly concerned, nothing was granted by them, and the whole burden of the expeditions then carried on fell upon Great Britain and three or four of the middle Colonies, with which this Colony was dissatisfied, and the Assembly complained of it in one of their Addresses to me on the occasion. But what fully evinces that there is no design of oppression or extortion in the proposed reservation in his Majesty and his Parliament of the right of approving the aids which may be offered by the Colonies, is his Majesty's gracious assurance that the propositions on this head will be received with every possible indulgence. The moneys raised by the several Colonies as their proportion to the common defence, is made subject to the disposal of Parliament, as in justice it ought, as they furnish the whole sum which may be wanted for that necessary purpose, according to the estimates annually laid before them by the Crown, besides making provision for the civil list and National Debt, towards which the Colonies are not asked to contribute. The Army and Navy establishment, it is well known, is necessarily increased since the extension of the British Dominions in America. The whole American civil and military establishment, as paid by Great Britain, after the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, was it is said, only £70,000 sterling; but since the last peace, it amounts to upwards of £350,000. At this great additional expense was chiefly incurred on an American account, it cannot but be reasonable that America should pay some part of it. To remove every objection that other taxes may be raised upon America, under the colour of regulations on commerce, the produce of all such duties is to be carried to the account of that Province where it is to be levied.

We have now, thank Heaven, a happy opportunity of getting entirely rid of this unnatural contest, by only complying with what I think has been fully proved and acknowledged to be our indispensable duty. Wherever a people enjoy protection, and the other common benefits of the State, nothing can be more reasonable than that they should bear their share of the common burden. It is much to be lamented that there is so much truth in the observation, that mankind generally act, not according to right, but according to the present interest, and most according to present passion. In the present case there are no difficulties but what may be easily surmounted, if men come together sincerely disposed to serve their Country, unbiased by any sinister views or improper resentments. This, gentlemen, I trust will be found to be your disposition in this most alarming situation of publick affairs. ' Let me conjure you, however, not to come to any precipitate resolution respecting the plan of accommodation now communicated to you. I have no objection to give you any time you may think necessary for the due consideration of it. It is, indeed a concern of a more interesting nature than ever before came under the consideration of an American Assembly. If it is adopted, all will yet be well. If it is totally rejected, or nothing similar to it proposed, or made the basis of a negotiation, it will necessarily induce a belief of what has been lately so often mentioned in publick, "That it is not a dispute about modes of taxation, but that the Americans have deeper views, and mean to throw off all dependance upon Great Britain, and to get rid of every control of their Legislature." Should such sentiments ever prevail, they cannot but have the most fatal effects to this Country. I am, however, fully convinced that the body of the people in the Colonies do not even entertain a wish of the kind. Rather than lose the protection of Great Britain, America, were it ever so constitutionally and allowedly independent, would find it for its advantage to purchase that protection at an expense far beyond what Great Britain would ever think of requiring while we show her that regard and obedience to which she is justly entitled, and which our own interest and safety should prompt us to show, if there were no other considerations.

Taxation being the principal source of the present disorders, when that important point is once settled, every other subject of complaint which has grown out of it will, no doubt, of course, be removed; for you may rely, gentlemen, that notwithstanding the many inimical and oppressive designs which the jealousies and suspicions of incensed people have attributed to Government, yet it is evident, from the whole tenour of the letters which I have had the honour to receive from the King's Ministers, that His Majesty and they have nothing more at heart than to have these unhappy differences accommodated on some just and honourable plan, which shall at the same time secure the liberties of the people, without lessening the necessary power and dignity of Parliament.

God grant that the Colonies may manifest the same laudable disposition, and that a hearty reconciliation and harmony may take place of the present confusion and dissension.

William Franklin.
Council Chamber, May 16, 1775.

Mr. Deputy Secretary laid before the House the copy of an Address to the King from the Lords and Commons of Great Britain, of the 7th of February, 1775, together with His Majesty's Answer; also, a copy of a Resolution of the Honourable House of Commons of Great Britain, of the 20th of February last; all which were read.

Ordered, That his Excellency's Speech and the said Papers be read a second time.

Mr. Tucker laid before the House a printed Pamphlet lately received from Great Britain, entitled "The Parliamentary Register, No. 5," containing, among other things, a Paper entitled "An extract of a Letter from Governour Franklin to the Earl of Dartmouth, dated Perth Amboy. February 1, 1775; received February 28," in these words, viz.:

"The General Assembly of this Province are now sitting, being convened on the 11th of last month, in order to transact the publick business.

"At the opening of the session I had some hopes of prevailing on the House of Representatives not to approve of the proceedings of the General Congress held at Philadelphia, for which purpose a paragraph of my speech was particularly calculated. But the Delegates from this Province took the alarm, and used their utmost endeavors with the members to persuade them to give their approbation to those proceedings, as otherwise one grand end the Congress had in view would be entirely frustrated, namely: the preserving an appearance of unanimity throughout the Colonies, without which they said their measures could not have that weight and efficacy with the Government and people of Great Britain as was intended.

"The scheme, however, met with some opposition in the House, every member proposing to defer the consideration of it to a future time, or to give their approbation to only some parts of the proceedings of the Congress; but by the artful management of those who espoused the measure, it was carried through precipitately the very morning it was proposed, as your Lordship will see by a copy of their Resolutions now enclosed, which were all previously prepared for the purpose."

Which Extract was read, and ordered to be read a second time.

Mr. Crane had leave of absence upon special occasion.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, May 17, 1775.

The House met.

His Excellency's Speech, together with the Papers accompanying the same, were read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. Speaker laid before the House a Letter to him from John Smith, Esquire, Treasurer of the Eastern Division, dated Perth Amboy, May 13, 1775, setting forth that he had attended the Justices and Freeholders of Middlesex, with the sum of Nine Thousand Five Hundred and Ninety-Eight Pounds and Three Shillings, to be sunk according to law on the Wednesday preceding; but that no sufficient number to constitute a Board had attended ; and praying that an act of Assembly may immediately pass to cancel and burn said Bills; which Letter was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

The House, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on His Excellency's Speech and the Papers accompanying the same, and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had gone through the matters to them referred, and had come to one Resolution, which he was ready to report whenever the House will please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately.

Whereupon Mr. Fisher reported the Resolution of the Committee as follows, viz.:

Resolved, That an Humble Address be presented to his Excellency in answer to his Speech; to which the House agreed.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Paxon and Mr. Lawrence be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of an Address to his Excellency, in answer to his Speech.

Joseph Barton, Esquire, being duly returned a Representative in Assembly for the County of Sussex, and now attending, was admitted into the House, and took the usual oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration by law appointed, before Cortland Skinner, Esquire, authorized by dedimus potestatem.

Ordered, That Mr. Barton do take his seat in the House.

The House adjourned till ten o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, May 18, 1775.

The House met.

The printed Paper, entitled "An Extract of a Letter from Governor Franklin to the Earl of Dartmouth, dated Perth Amboy, February 1, 1775; received February 28," was read the second time.

Ordered, That Mr. Hinchman, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Combs, Mr. Taylor, and Mr. Holme, be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of a Message to his Excellency, to request his Excellency would be pleased to inform this House whether the said Extract is authentick or not.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Hinchman, from the Committee appointed this morning, brought in the draught of a Message to his Excellency, according to order; which was read, amended, agreed to and ordered to be engrossed.

The engrossed Message to his Excellency was read and compared, and the same is as follows, viz:

Ordered, That Mr. Dey and Mr. Hewlings do wait upon his Excellency with the following Message:

May it please your Excellency:

A printed Pamphlet lately received from Great Britain, entitled "The Parliamentary Register, No. 5," has been laid before this House, containing among other things, a Paper entitled "An Extract of a Letter from Governour Franklin to the Earl of Dartmouth, dated Perth Amboy, February 1, 1775: received February 28," in these words:

"The General Assembly of this Province are. now sitting, being convened on the 11th of last month, in order to transact the publick business.

"At the opening of the session I had some hopes of prevailing on the House of Representatives not to approve of the proceedings of the General Congress held at Philadelphia, for which purpose a paragraph of my speech was particularly calculated. But the Delegates from this Province took the alarm, and used their utmost endeavours with the members to persuade them to give their approbation to those proceedings, as otherwise one grand end the Congress had in view would be entirely frustrated, namely: the preserving an appearance of unanimity throughout the Colonies, without which they said their measures would not have that weight and efficacy with the Government and people of Great Britain, as was intended.

"The scheme, however, met with some opposition in the House, every member proposing to defer the consideration of it to a future time, or to give their approbation to only some parts of the proceedings of Congress; but by the artful management of those who espoused the measure, it was carried through precipitately the very morning it was proposed, as your Lordship will see by a copy of their Resolutions now enclosed, which were all previously prepared for the purpose."

We request your Excellency will be pleased to inform this House whether the said Extract contains a true representation of the words or substance of the Letter, or any part of the Letter by your Excellency written relative to the proceedings of the last session of Assembly.

By order of the House.
Richard Smith,        
Clerk    
.

House of Assembly, May 18, 1775.

Mr. Fisher, from the Committee on the Address to his Excellency, brought in a draught; which was read, and ordered to a second reading.

Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit laid before the House his Majesty's royal approbation of two Acts of Assembly of this Province; and also his Majesty's royal disallowance of one other Act, in these words, viz:

"At the Court of St. James, the 20th day of February, 1775. Present, the King's Most Excellent Majesty, Lord President, Duke of Queensbury, Duke of Newcastle, Earl of Denbigh, Earl of Rochford, Earl of Dartmouth, Viscount Falmouth.

"Whereas, by commission under the great seal of Great Britain, the Governour, Council, and Assemblv of His Majesty's Colony of New Jersey are authorized and empowered to make, constitute, and ordain Laws, Statutes, and Ordinances for the publick peace, welfare, and good government of the said Colony, which Laws, Statutes, and Ordinances are to be as near as conveniently may be, agreeable to the Laws and Statutes of this Kingdom, and are to be transmitted to his Majesty for his royal approbation or disallowance; And whereas, in pursuance of the said powers, two Acts were passed in the said Colony in the last session of the General Assembly there, which have been transmitted, entitled as follows, viz:

"An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same.

"An Act for the relief of Abner Hatfield, an insolvent debtor.

"Which Acts, together with the representation from the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations thereupon, having been referred to the consideration of a Committee of the Lords of His Majesty's most Honourably Privy Council for Plantation Affairs, the said Lords of the Committee did this day report as their opinion to His Majesty, that the said Acts were proper to be approved. His Majesty taking the same into consideration, was pleased, with the advice of his Privy Council, to declare his approbaiion of the said Acts; and pursuant to His Majesty's royal pleasure thereupon expressed, the said Acts are hereby confirmed, finally enacted, and ratified accordingly; whereof the Governour or Commanderin- Chief of his Majesty's said Colony of New Jersey, for the time being, and all others whom it may concern, are to take notice and govern themselves accordingly.

"G. Chetwynd."      

"At the Court at St. James, the 20th day of February, 1775 Present, the King's Most Excellent Majesty, Lord President, Duke of Queensbury, Duke of Newcastle, Earl of Denbigh, Earl of Rochford, Earl of Dartmouth, Viscount Falmouth.

"Whereas, by commission under the great seal of Great Britain, the Governour, Council, and Assembly of His Majesty's Colony of New Jersey are authorized and empowered to make, constitute and ordain Laws, Statutes, and Ordinances for the publick peace, welfare and good government of the said Colony, which Laws, Statutes, and Ordinances are to be as near as conveniently may be, agreeable to the Laws and Statutes of this Kingdom, and are to be transmitted for His Majesty's royal approbation or disallowance; and whereas, in pursuance of the said powers, an Act was passed in the said Colony in the last session of General Assembly, and transmitted, entitled as follows viz.:

"An Act for lowering the interest of Money to Six per Cent. within this Colony.

"Which Act, together with a representation from the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations thereupon, having been referred to the consideration of a Committee of the Lords of His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, the said Lords of the Committee did this day report as their opinion to His Majesty, that the said Act ought to be disallowed. His Majesty, taking the same into consideration, was pleased, with the advice of his Privy Council, to declare his disallowance of the said Act; and pursuant to His Majesty's royal pleasure thereupon expressed, the said Act is hereby disallowed, declared void, and of none effect; whereof the Governour or Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's said Colony of New Jersey, for the time being, and all others whom it may concern, are to take notice and govern themselves accordingly.

"G. Chetwynd."      

The House adjourned till 9 o'clock to-raorrow morning.

Friday, May 19, 1775.

The House met.

The Address to his Excellency was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

The House accordingly resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Address, and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Comirittee, reported that the Committee had gone through the Address, and had made sundry amendments to the same; and by leave of the House Mr. Fisher reported the Address with the amendments, which were read; and the Address being further amended in the House, was agreed to.

Ordered, That the said Address as amended and agreed to, be engrossed.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

The engrossed Address to his Excellency was read and compared.

Ordered, nem. con.. That Mr. Speaker do sign the same.

Ordered, That Mr. Tucker and Mr. Hinchman do wait upon his Excellency and desire to be informed when his Excellency will be attended by the House with their Address.

Colonel Ford had leave of absence on urgent business,

Mr. Tucker reported that Mr. Hinchman and himself had waited on his Excellency according to order and that his Excellency was pleased to say the House should hear from him.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, May 20, 1775.

The House met.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit.

Gentlemen:— As the Honourable Samuel Smith, Esquire, has resigned his office of Treasurer of the Western Division, I now inform you that I have, with the advice of the Council, appointed Joseph Smith, Esquire, to that office; which appointment, I doubt not, will be to your satisfaction.

Wm. Franklin.      
Burlington, May 20, 1775.

Which was read; and thereupon a certified copy of the Bond entered into by the said Joseph Smith, Esq., being laid before the House, executed according to law,

Resolved, That this House is entirely satisfied with the security therein mentioned.

It also appearing that the late Treasurer hath paid into the hands of the said Joseph Smith Esquire, the sum of Six Thousand, One Hundred and Sixty-Six Pounds, Fourteen Shillings and Eight Pence, the balance of the said late Treasurer's accounts, as settled by the Committees of the Council and this House, together with all books, papers, &c., belonging to the Colony;

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this House that the late Treasurer's Bond be taken off the files, cancelled, and delivered to him.

It also appearing that the Chest heretofore used for keeping the publick money, &c., is private property.

Ordered, That the present Treasurer do procure a proper and strong Iron Chest for that purpose, and upon his exhibiting an account of the expense thereof.

Resolved, That this House will make provision to defray the said expense.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit.

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and requires the immediate attendance of the House.

Whereupon Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and with the House went to wait upon his Excellency in the Council Chamber, when he addressed the Governour in the words, or to the effect following:

"I am ordered by the House of Assembly to deliver to your Excellency their Address, which being different from my sentiments, I think it necessary thus publickly to declare it; a step I should not have taken, had I been permitted to enter my dissent on the Minutes of the House."

Having delivered the Address, and being returned, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and reported that the House had waited on his Excellency with their Address, in these words, viz.:

To his Excellency William Franklin, Esquire, Captain General, Governour, and Commander-in- Chief in and over his Majesty's Colony of Nova-Csesarea, or New Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in America, Chancellor and and Vice-Admiral in the same, &c.

The humble Address of the Representatives of the said Colony, in General Assembly convened:

May it please your Excellency:— We, his Majesty's loyal and dutiful subjects, the Representatives of the Colony of New Jersey, in General Assembly convened, have taken under our consideration your Excellency's Speech at the opening of the session, together with the Resolution of the House of Commons accompanying the same, containing a proposition for accommodating of the unhappy differences at present subsisting between our Parent Country and the Colonies.

As the Continental Congress is now sitting to consider of the present critical situation of American affairs; and as this House has already appointed Delegates for that purpose, we should have been glad that your Excellency had postponed the present meeting until their opinion could be had upon the Resolution now offered for our consideration, and to which we have no doubt that a proper attention will be paid; more especially as we cannot suppose you to entertain a suspicion that the present House has the least design to desert the common cause, in which all America appears to be both deeply interested and firmly united, so far as separately, and without the advice of a body in which are all represented, to adopt a measure of so much importance. Until this opinion is known, we can only give your Excellency our present sentiments, being fully of opinion that we shall pay all proper respect to, and abide by, the united voice of the Congress on the present occasion.

Your Excellency is pleased to tell us that this Resolution "has had a variety of interpretations put on it," "that scarcely any have seen it in its proper light;" and you proceed to give us that explanation of the design and occasion, which you apprehend will enable us and our constituents to judge how far the plan it contains ought to be acquiesced in, and what steps it may be prudent to take in the present situation. We confess that your Excellency has put a construction on the proposition, which appears to us to be new; and if we would be of the opinion that the Resolution "holds no proposition beyond the avowal of the justice, the equity, and the propriety of subjects of the same State contributing, according to their abilities and situation, to the pnblick burden," and did not convey to us the idea of submitting the disposal of all our property to others in whom we have no choice, it is more than probable that we should gladly embrace the opportunity of settling this unhappy dispute.

Most Assemblies on the Continent have, at various times, acknowledged and declared to the world their willingness not only to defray the charge of the administration of justice, and the support of the civil Government, but also to contribute, as they have hitherto done when constitutionally called upon, to every reasonable and necessary expense for the defence, protection and security of the whole British Empire; and this Colony in particular hath always complied with his Majesty's requisitions for those purposes. And we do now assure your Excellency that we shall always be ready, according to our abilities and to the utmost of our power, to maintain the interests of His Majesty and of our Parent State. If, then, your Excellency's construction be right, and if a proposal "of this nature" will, as you are pleased to inform us, be received by His Majesty with every possible indulgence, we have hopes that the declaration we now make will be looked on by his Majesty and his Ministers, not only to be similar to what is required from us, but also to be a basis of a negotiation "on which the present differences may be accommodated" — an event which we most ardently wish for.

We have considered the Resolution of the House of Commons. We would not wish to come to a determination that might be justly called precipitate, in the present alarming situation of affairs; but if we mistake not, this Resolution contains no new proposal. It appears to us to be the same with one made to the Colonies the year preceding the passing of the late Stamp Act; at least it is not materially different therefrom. America then did not comply with it; and though we are sincerely disposed to make use of all proper means to obtain the favour of His Majesty and the Parliament of Great Britain, yet we cannot, in our present opinion, comply with a proposition which we really apprehend to give up the privileges of freemen; nor do we want any time to consider whether we shall submit to that which, in our apprehension, will reduce us and our constitutents to a state little better than that of slavery.

By the Resolution now offered, if assented to, we think we shall be, to all intents and purposes, as fully and effectually taxed by our fellow-subjects in Great Britain, where we have not any representation, as by any of the late Acts of the British Parliament under which we have been aggrieved; of which we have complained; and from which we have prayed to be relieved; and that, too, in a much greater degree, perhaps, than by ail those Acts put together. We cannot consent to subject the property of our constituents to be taken away for services and uses, of the propriety of which we have no right to judge, while to us are only left the ways and means of raising the money. We have always thought and contended, that we had a right to dispose of our property ourselves; and we have always cheerfully yielded our assistance to His Majesty in that way, when the exigencies of affairs required us so to do, and he has condescended to ask it from us. It is the freedom of granting, as well as the mode of raising moneys, which this House cannot voluntarily part with, without betraying the just rights of the Constitution. The present Resolution seems to require us to raise a proportion which a Parliament of Great Britain may at any time think fit to grant. At this time we cannot form any judgment, either of the extent of the proposition, or of the consequences in which the good people of the Colony may be involved by our assent to a provision so indeterminate; for it appears to us to be impossible to judge what proportion or share the people can bear, until we know what situation they will be in when any sum is intended to be raised.

Upon the whole, though sincerely desirous to give every mark of duty and attachment to the King, and to show all due reverence to the Parliament of our Parent State, we cannot, consistent with our real sentiments, and the trust reposed in us, assent to a proposal big with consequences destructive to the publick welfare; and hope that the justice of our Parent Country will not permit us to be driven into a situation, the prospect of which fills us with anxiety and horrour.

There may be much truth in the observation, "that mankind generally act not according to right, but according to present interest, and most according to present passion." Yet we trust that our conduct on the present occasion is neither influenced by the one nor the other; and we persuade ourselves that your Excellency is so well acquainted with the people you govern, that it is quite unnecessary for us to make use of any means to convince you of the injustice of the charge, "that the Americans have deeper views, and mean to throw off all dependence on Great Britain, and to get rid of every control of their Legislatures."

We heartily pray that the Supreme Disposer of events, in whose hands are the hearts of all men, may avert the calamities impending over us, and influence our Sovereign, his Ministry, and the Parliament, so as to induce them to put a stop to the effusion of the blood of the Colonists, who wish always to look upon their fellow-subjects in Great Britain as their brethren, and are really desirous to promote their interests and happiness upon any reasonable terms; and it will give us great pleasure to find your Excellency amongst those who, by just and proper representations of the dispositions of the inhabitants of these Colonies, shall assist in settling of the present unhappy differences.

By order of the House.
Cortland Skinner,        
Speaker.    
House of Assembly, May 19, 1775.

To which his Excellency was pleased to make the following Answer:

Gentlemen:— I have done my duty, I lost no time in laying before you the propositions I had received for an amicable accommodation of the present unhappy differences. I gave you as full and candid an explanation of them as I was authorized or enabled to do. Whether those propositions or my explanation of them did or did not contain anything new, is but little to the purpose. The question is, whether they ought or ought not to be approved, either in whole or in part, or be made the ground of a negotiation; and whether, in the latter case, every Assembly on the Continent ought not to take some active measures to effect an end so desirable. In stating the matter to you, I could have no suspicion that you did not think yourselves competent to the business, and were necessarily to wait the determination of another body. It was but the last session you assured me that you would not "suffer any of the rights vested in you by the Constitution to be wrested out of your hands by any person or persons whatsoever." I shall forbear to point out the inconsistency of this Address with that declaration. Nor shall I aim to convince you of the wrong ideas you have formed of those propositions. Were they ever so rightly understood, or ever so well approved by you, yet, to judge by your own declaration, it would be of no avail. The times are indeed greatly altered. I shall be happy to see some proper attempts made to mend them. My representations and endeavours, from the first commencement of this unnatural dispute to this day, have not been, nor shall they ever be, wanting towards effecting a reconciliation. I am persuaded that if a disposition of this sort is manifested, and the proper steps are pursued by those who have it in their power to take the lead in this important affair on the part of America, it may be easily accomplished to mutual satisfaction. His Majesty, I am sure, would wish to avoid the shedding of the blood of his American as much as that of his British subjects. They must be all equally dear to him, if they are equally dutiful. The Americans, in general, have been, and I hope will ever prove as well disposed to his Majesty and Family, as the subjects of any other part of the Dominions.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

His Excellency having laid before the House a copy of the Resolution of the honourable the House of Commons of Great Britain, of the 20th of February, 1775, containing a plan formed for the accommodation of the unhappy differences between our Parent State and the Colonies; which plan, under the present circumstances, this House could not comply with and adopt; and yet this House being desirous of making use of all proper means to effect a reconciliation, do recommend it to their Delegates to lay the same plan before the Continental Congress for their consideration.

Ordered, That Mr. Mehelm and Mr. Elmer do go to the Council, and inquire whether they have any business before them; if not, that this House proposes to apply to his Excellency for a dismission.

Mr. Mehelm reported that Mr. Elmer and himself waited on the Council accordingly, who said they had nothing before them.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher and Mr. Lawrence do wait upon his Excellency, and acquaint him that the House having gone through the business, is desirous of a dismission.

Mr. Fisher reported that Mr. Lawrence and himself waited upon the Governour accordingly, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him presently.

A Message from his Excellency by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit.

A MESSAGE TO THE ASSEMBLY.

Gentlemen:— It has been my unhappiness almost every session during the existence of the present Assembly, that a majority of the members of the House have suffered themselves to be persuaded to seize on every opportunity of arraigning my conduct, or fomenting some dispute, let the occasion be ever so trifling, or let me be ever so careful to avoid giving any just cause or offence. This, too, has been done with such an eagerness in the promoters of it as can only be accounted for on a supposition that they are either actuated by unmanly private resentment, or by a conviction that their whole political consequence depends upon a contention with their Governour. Such effusions of ill-humour have never yet, however, nor is it likely they ever will, produce any benefit to the Province; on the contrary, they have occasioned great delays and obstructions to the publick business, and consequently been attended with very considerable expense to the people.

In this light, and in no other, can I look upon the proceedings of your House with respect to the matter mentioned in your Message of Thursday.

A member receives a pamphlet from England, containing, as is pretended, an extract of a letter from me to the Secretary of State. What does he do with it? Does he come to me, or does he write to me on the subject, or does he even request any other person to inquire of me whether the extract is genuine or not? No, he treasures it up, till the House meets; but either through motives of shame or fear, he does not choose to appear openly in the affair himself. He looks around for some person to take the odium of the intended business off his hands, and presently finds one exactly fitted to his purpose. The pamphlet is accordingly laid before the Assembly, the extract is read, inserted at large on the Minutes, ordered a second reading, and after it had been on record two days, the House at length thought proper to send me a message requesting I would be pleased to inform them, "whether the said extract contains a true representation of the words or substance of the letter, or any part of the letter by me written relative to the proceedings of the last session of Assembly."

If such a proceedure does not manifest a premeditated affront, and an intention to do me a personal injury, let any man judge, who considers the several steps which have been taken in this affair, the many falsehoods which have been industriously propagated respecting the contents of the letter, and the present turbulent state of the Province.

Some, if not all of you, must have known that the pamphlet though called the Parlimentary Register, was not a publication authorized by Parliament, or of any more authority than a common magazine or newspaper. Nor can I doubt but that some of you must have seen or heard that what was lately published in that work, as the Speech of the Earl of Chatham, was publickly denied by his Lordship.

It is well known to be as much the practice in England to write and publish speeches which were never spoke, as it is in America to publish extracts of letters which were never wrote by the persons to whom they are attributed.

Besides, gentlemen, as to the particular extract in question, I cannot but flatter myself that I am not so remarkable for writing nonsense and contradictions but that you might have at least doubted the genuineness of the extract when you saw on the very face of it so glaring an absurdity as could not be supposed to have come from the pen of any man of common sense. Would you not have thought me extremely deficient in the common marks of respect which is due from one gentleman to another, and much more from one branch of the Legislature to another, had I seen a pretended extract of a letter, said to be wrote by you to your Agent, or from him to you, containing evident nonsense and absurdity, and should order it to be read in Council, and entered on the minutes without making any inquiry as to the authenticity of it, until two days after? Would you not have construed such conduct into a designed affront, or suspected that it was calculated to expose you to ridicule, or to promote some intended injury, more especially in times so circumstanced as the present.

I cannot think that you have the least right to a sight of any part of my correspondence with the King's Ministers, and I am convinced that you would deem it a very improper request, were I to ask you to communicate to me your correspondence with the Agent of this Province, at the Court of Great Britain. I will, however, thus far comply with your request as to assure you that "the said extract does not contain a true representation of the words or substance of my letter;" but had you, before you suffered it to be entered on your Minutes, applied to me, either in a private or publick way, I should have had not the least scruple to have let you seen the whole of what I wrote "relative to the proceedings of the last session of Assembly." It has ever been my rule, as it is my duty, to represent matters exactly in the light as they appear to me from the best information I can obtain at the time of writing my dispatches. If I afterwards find that I have been mistaken in anything, I never fail to rectify the mistake as soon as discovered.

On the whole, gentlemen, I have very particular reasons to complain of the treatment I have received on account of this pretended extract. Great pains have been taken to propagate an idea that I wrote a letter to England inimical to the Province, or to America in general. After it is produced nothing of the kind appears, nor should I have the least objection to the publication of my whole correspondence with the King's Ministers. You have on your Minutes a copy of a letter from Lord Shelburne, which will show that the representations I made of the disposition and conduct of the people of this Province, at the time of the Stamp Act, a time somewhat similar to the present, were, to use his Lordship's words, "much to its honour." My sentiments respecting the present transactions I have no scruple to declare do not entirely coincide with those of either party. But I trust that those who know me best will do me the justice to allow that no office or honour in the power of the Crown to bestow, will ever influence me to forget or neglect the duty I owe my Country, nor the most furious rage of the most intemperate zealots induce me to swerve from the duty I owe his Majesty.

William Franklin.      

1. Resolved, That the laying of the Parliamentary Register before this House, containing a publication said to be an extract of a Letter from Governour Franklin to Lord Dartmouth, so far from doing or carrying an appearance of intending an injury to the character of his Excellency, or deserving of those personal reflections contained in his Message to the House of this day, had, in the opinion of this House, a tendency to do him real service, by giving him an opportunity of exculpating himself from the charge of writing the said Letter or extract, if the charge had been groundless.

2. Resolved, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Paxon and Mr. Hinchman be a Committee to consider of the said Message, and make a report to the next sitting of Assembly.

On the question. Whether the House agrees to the said Resolution or not?

It passed in the affirmative:

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Dey,
Holmes,
Wetherill,
Demarest,
Hand,
Dunham,
Winds,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Kinsey,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Garritse,
Paxon,
Sheppard,
Fisher,
Sykes,
Elmer,
Roy,
Hinchman,
Pettit.

Nays—

Mr. Barton    

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit.

Mr, Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and requires the immediate attendance of this House.

Whereupon Mr. Speaker, with the House, waited upon his Excellency, who was pleased to prorogue the General Assembly to the 20th day of June next, then to meet at Burlington.

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Newark Committee.

At a meeting of the General Committee of Association for the Township of Newark, in New Jersey, on Thursday, the 18th day of May, 1775.

The Committee taking into consideration the Resolutions of the Committees of New York and other Provinces, relative to the suspension of all exportation to Quebeck, Nova Scotia, Georgia, and Newfoundland, or any part of the Fishing Coasts and Fishing Islands; and highly approving the same, do resolve that it be recommended to the gentlemen Traders of this Town, that they stop all exportations to the said places; and also to our constituents in general, that they do not supply any person whatsoever with any kind of Exports, which they have reason to believe are designed for either of those places, nor any of the King's ships or boats with provisions clandestinely; nor in any manner whatsoever that may counteract any Resolutions that have been made by the Committee of New York.

By order of the Committee.

Lewis Ogden,        
Chairman.    

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Instructions to Delegates from Newark in Congress of New Jersey.

At a meeting of the General Committee of Association, held at Newark, the 18th day of May, 1775:

The following Instructions to Isaac Ogden and Philip Van Cortlandt, Esquires, Messrs. Bethuel Pierson and Caleb Camp, the Deputies elected to represent said Town in Provincial Congress, were unanimously agreed on:

Gentlemen:— The great, the important crisis which will determine the fate of America, seems hastily approaching; a crisis in which not only you, the fond wives of your bosoms, the infants of your tenderest solicitude, but millions of your posterity yet unborn, and everything that is near and dear to you, worthy your wish, or meriting your care, are deeply interested; a crisis which will decide whether this Continent shall be governed by the unlimited will of a Senate in which it has no voice; by a power without the right, over which it can have no influence or control; whether it shall be forever bound in wretched, relentless chains of slavery, or whether the glorious sun of constitutional liberty shall still enlighten this horizon, and permanently shine, unclouded with the tainted breath of despotism.

To you, gentlemen, is delegated by the inhabitants of this Town one of the most important trusts in their power, which nothing less than tyrant necessity could have urged them to grant, or you to accept; a necessity which, with hearts glowing with affection, overflowing with loyalty to our Sovereign, we unfeignedly lament. We need not, we mean not, gentlemen, to wish you additional firmness in the common cause; your being chosen to this trust sufficiently approves your principles and steady regard to the duties, the great interests of your delegation; nor need we advise that you carry with you that spirit of harmony, that firmness with moderation, which we are happy to say animate this part of the Province; and as we have the pleasure and reason to expect that the interests of the general weal, on constitutional ground, will be the constant line of your conduct; that you will keep this goal steadily in view; so we do not wish to bind you with an embarrassing chain of restrictions, much less do we presume to dictate measures to the Provincial Congress; but shall only lay before you some outlines of a plan which we desire you to propose to the wisdom of that Convention.

Money has been aptly called the sinews of war; so may it also the anima that enlivens, that braces and gives firmness to the nerves of our Constitution. In the alarming exigency rising before us, there will probably be occasion for a publick fund; and we could wish, as the whole Province is equally interested, that the burden should be also equal. We conceive, when the necessary sum is fixed by the Congress, that the present Quota Bill, by which the proportion of taxes in the several Counties for the support of Government, &c., has been ascertained, will be a just scale to regulate the present occasion; and perhaps the Assessors and Collectors in the several Townships may, in general, be proper persons to conduct the like business leaving it in the option of such Towns as may incline to make a special choice of new officers for this purpose.

We consider it advisable that a certain number of men be immediately raised, disciplined, well accoutred w4th arms and ammunition, and prepared in every respect for an instant service.

That as men who go volunteers will be most likely to be hearty in the service, and the disagreeable measure of draughting from the Militia may thereby be prevented, a roll be opened in every Town where it can be advantageously, for the enlistment of Volunteers, to be prepared as above mentioned, for every emergency; that the Congress appoint the commandant and all the field officers, and that the General Committees of those Towns where any company or companies shall be raised, have the appointment of the Captains and subalterns; that one or more proper persons be empowered by the Congress to sign and affix a proper seal to the commissions, agreeable to such appoiniraent; that the Volunteers, on their enlistment, subscribe certain articles, to oblige themselves, under certain penalties, (to be ascertained by the Congress, similar to the Mutiny Bill, if thought proper,) to be obedient to their officers, and to prevent desertion; that proper persons be appointed for a Treasurer of said fund, and for a Paymaster General, giving the necessary security, &c.; that the pay for the officers and men be fixed by the Congress; and that the said Volunteers, from the day of their enlistment, be in discipline at least so much time as may amount to one day in a week; and also such further time, not exceeding ——— days in the whole, per week, as shall be judged expedient by the said General Committees; that sufficient arms and ammunition for such Volunteers as are unable to furnish themselves therewith, and provisions for emergent occasions be provided; and that every Volunteer entrusted with arms, &c., belonging to the Province, be obligated to return them to the Commanding Officer, when called for, except such as may be lost in the service, &c.; that magazines of powder and other necessary military stores be formed in such parts of the Province as shall be judged most advantageous for emergencies; that Commmissioners be appointed to direct and regulate any contingent business which cannot be ascertained with precision by the Congress; that Muster-Masters be appointed to review the companies, and to take care that none but able-bodied men be continued on the rolls; nor any apprentice or servant enlisted, without his master's consent in writing; that a proper number of field-pieces be provided, and one or more Artillery Companies raised and disciplined. As exigencies may happen which may require a greater force than the number of Volunteers to be raised as aforesaid, that the Congress recommend it to the Militia Captains throughout the Province to procure such persons as are capable of teaching military discipline, to be paid out of the publick fund; and that their men be exercised at least ——— times per week; that it be recommended by the Congress to the several Towns or Counties throughout the Province, who have not already done it, to appoint General Committees to enter into and subscribe an Association of similar import to that adopted by this County.

We are gentlemen, your humble servants.

By order of the Committee.

Lewis Ogden,        
Chairman.    

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To the Delegates of New Jersey in the Continental Congress.

(Read before Congress May, 27, 1775.)

House of Assembly, New Jersey,   }    
May 20, 1775.}    

His Excellency having laid before the House a copy of the Resolution of the honourable House of Commons of Great Britain, of the twentieth of February, 1775, containing a plan formed for the accommodation of the unhappy differences between our Parent State and the Colonies, which plan, under the present circumstances, this House could not comply with and adopt; and yet this House, being desirous of making use of all proper means to effect a reconciliation, do recommend it to their Delegates to lay the same plan before the Continental Congress for their consideration. A true copy from the Journals.

Richard Smith,          
Clerk of Assembly    
.

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Congress of New Jersey to New York Congress.

In Provincial Congress, New Jersey,   }    
Trenton, May 26, 1775, }    

Gentlemen:— We, the Deputies appointed by the inhabitants of this Province, to meet in Provincial Congress, are now convened here for the purpose of pursuing such measures as may be thought expedient in the present unhappv situation to which the Colonies are reduced, and which the peculiar exigencies of the times may require. As nothing can tend more to ensure success to the steps that may at this critical juncture be adopted by the several Provinces, than a uniform plan of conduct, we conceived it necessary to look up to the Continental Congress for their advice and direction which we have accordingly applied for, and hope soon to receive. We also think of consequence, that a correspondence should be established with you, and our other sister Colonies, and a free communication be had from time to time of such measures as may be judged most conducive to the interest of the common cause; and request that we may be favoured with such intelligence as may occur to you worthy of attention, and of which our situation may probably deprive us.

We are gentlemen, your humble servants.

Hendrick Fisher,          
President.    
To the Provincial Congress of New York.

The following reply was received:

In Provincial Congress,         }    
New York, May 29, 1775. }    

Gentlemen:— We have received your letter of the 26th instant, informing us that your body is formed. We agree with you in opinion that nothing can tend more to ensure success to the steps that may be taken by the several Colonies, at this critical juncture than a uniform plan of conduct; and we are equally convinced, that to this end we ought to look up to the Continental Congress for advice and direction. We are ready to establish a correspondence with you and our other sister Colonies, and a free communication of such measures as may, from time to time, be judged most conducive to the common cause. Every intelligence to this end we shall most readily communicate. At the same time permit us to observe, that either the directions of the Continental Congress or the nature of a particular measure may render its secrecy absolutely necessary.

We are, gentlemen, your humble servants.

To the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, at Trenton.

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Burlington County Committee.

At a meeting of the General Committee of Observation for the County of Burlington, in the Province of New Jersey, at the house of John Imlay, in the Township of Mansfield, June 24, 1775.

The Deputies appointed for the County of Burlington, to attend a Provincial Congress at Trenton, in May last, laid before the Committee an Association, recommended by that body to the good people of this Province; as also certain Rules for regulating the new-raised Militia, and a recommendation to raise the sum of Ten Thousand Pounds for the use of the Province at this very critical, situation of publick affairs.

The Committee taking the said Papers into consideration, after some time spent therein, it was, on motion.

Resolved, 1st, That this Committee do heartily approve of said Association, conceiving it to be of the utmost importance towards the future well-being of this County, that the Magistrates, and other civil officers of Government, should be supported in the due execution of their respective offices, agreeable to the laws of this Colony ; and that the good people of this County do make use of every means in their power to guard against those disorders and confusions, to which the peculiar circumstances of the times may expose us.

Resolved, 2d, That as unanimity amongst all ranks of people, in a virtuous opposition to the oppressive measures of the British Ministry and Parliament is the alone foundation whereon we can hope, under Providence, for a deliverance from our present grievances, it is most earnestly recommended and enjoined by this Committee to the good people of the County of Burlington, that no person or persons, on any pretence whatsoever, do attempt in the least degree to injure or molest his or their neighbour, for any supposed imposition or misconduct that they may have been guilty of on acccount of the present calamitous times, that is not cognizable by the laws of the Province; but that he or they do exhibit their complaint against such person or persons before some member of this Committee, who is hereby required to lay the same before the Chairman, and desire a general meeting of the Committee, in order that each party may have a fair hearing.

Resolved, 3d, That any person or persons in this County, who shall act contrary to the above mode of proceeding, ought to be deemed a violator of the eleventh article of the Continental Association, inimical to the British Constitution, and unfriendly to the liberties of America.

Resolved, 4th That this Committee do approve of the Rules recommended by the Provincial Congress, for the good Government of the new-raised Militia, and desire that the respective Military officers in this County will conduct themselves consistent therewith.

Resolved, 5th, That this Committee do approve of the recommendation of the Provincial Congress to raise the sum of Ten Thousand Pounds for the use of the Province at this most critical and important moment, recommending it to the good people of this County cheerfully to contribute their apportionment of the same; and as the Provincial Congress have ordered the said money to be disposed of by the respective County Committees, in such manner as they in their discretion shall think most proper, this Committee doth, in consequence thereof, most solemnly assure their constituents that whatever money may be lodged in their hands, or in the hands of the collector, shall be faithfully disposed of according as they may think most beneficial lor the service of the County, and purposes intended by the Provincial Congress; and that, whenever the publick shall desire it, they will cheerfully render a true and proper account of their proceedings and disbursements, that every member of the community may know that his contribution has not been embezzled or wasted.

Signed by order of the Committee.

Peter Tallman,      
Chairman.    

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Elizabethtown Committee To Committee of New York.

Committee Chamber,       }      
Elizabethtown, July 6, 1775. }      

Sir:— We have just received information that one William McLeod, son of Captain McLeod, of this place, lately appointed an Ensign in the Fifty-Second Regiment at Boston, left this Town early this morning and went to New York, in order to take passsage from thence to join his Regiment. We have thought fit to give you this intelligence that you may do what you think proper on the occasion. As soon as we got notice of his departure for such a purpose, his baggage was detained.

By order of the Committee,
Jona. Hampton,      
Chairman.    
To the General Committee of New York.

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Mendham, Morris County, Committee
.

July 8, 1775.

Whereas, the Committee of Observation for the Township of Mendham, in the County of Morris, having legally notified Ezekial Beach to appear before us, to answer sundry charges exhibited against him touching his unfriendly conversation and conduct towards the Continental Association; said Beach not appearing, we do agree for ourselves, and recommend it to all others, to break off all dealings or connection with him, agreeable to the Eleventh Article of the Continental Association.

Signed by order of the Committee.
David Thompson,        
Chairman.    

Elizabethtown Committee to New York Committee.

Elizabethtown, Monday July 17, 1775.

Gentlemen:— We have this moment received from the Committee of Philadelphia four hogsheads, said to contain fifty-two quarter-casks of powder, which they direct to be conveyed to Dobbs' Ferry, there to be delivered to the order of your Committee. We are sorry to say, that this powder has been coming from Philadelphia since the first instant; this accidental delay makes the utmost despatch necessary, which we doubt not you will promote as far as is in your power.

We are, Gentlemen, your most humble servants.

Jona. Hampton,        
Chairman.    
To the Chairman of the Committee of the City of New York.

P. S. — The powder will be at Dobbs' Ferry by nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

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Elizabethtown Committee.

Committee Chamber, Elizabethtown, }      
July 17, 1775.       }      

Resolved, That this Committee, for every hundred weight of Saltpetre made within this Town for the first three months after this day, will pay the sum of twenty Pounds, proclamation money of New Jersey, on the delivery thereof to this Committee, and fifteen Pounds, of same currency, for the like quantity of Saltpetre, made and delivered as aforesaid, within the next three months thereafter.

The Chairman of this Committee having received a letter from Mr. Richard Lawrence, a Delegate of Richmond County for the Provincial Congress of the Colony of New York, informing that the inhabitants of said County had, in general, signed the Association recommended by the Committee of New York, this Committee are therefore of opinion that the inhabitants of said County be restored to their commercial privileges with the inhabitants of this Town.

By order of the Committee.
Jonathan Hampton,        
Chairman.    

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Ellzabethtown Committee to New York Congress.

Elizabethtown, July 25, 1775.

Sir:— Under the conduct of Sergeant Faulker, with a file of men, I have, by an order of our Committee, sent three persons as prisoners, who were apprehended here on this day on suspicion of being deserters from Gen. Wooster's camp. We have not been able to draw any confession out of them to the purpose; they differ widely in their stories, which renders them so suspicious that we have thought proper to send them to your Committee for further examination and inquiry.

By order of the Sub-Committee.
Jona. Hampton,        
Chairman.    

P. S. — The prisoners all agree that they came from New Haven together, but differ as to the time; and one of them was lately seen by one of our members in the camp, which gives us strong suspicion of their being deserters from Waterbury's Regiment, now under marching orders.

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New Brunswick Committee to New York Committee of Safety.

City of New Brunswick, July 27, 1775.

Gentlemen:— Your favour of the 21st instant came safe to hand, the contents of which was duly observed.

Application was immediately made to Mr. Merrill, who says, about three weeks past a person coming from Egg Harbour, when within the Hook, saw a boat standing down our bay, that he thought was loaded with flour, which boat, he believes, went along side the man-of-war. This is all he ever heard or knows of the matter. Every other inquiry in our power has been made, but can make no further discovery.

All intelligences and discoveries of every action inimical to American liberty, and every matter of instruction for our better preservation and protection, will be paid due regard to and cheerfully received from you by the Committee of this City.

Assure yourselves, gentlemen, that this Committee has and ever will be ready to render to their country every service in their power, and will continue to give a strict attention to, and duly observe all resolutions formed by the Continental Congress.

We are, with esteem, gentlemen, your obedient humble servants.

John Dennis,            
Chairman.    
To Mr. Henry Williams, Chairman of the Committee of Safety, New York.

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Meeting of the Freeholders of Somerset County, New Jersey.

At a meeting of the Freeholders of the County of Somerset, in the Province of New Jersey, assembled at the Court House in said County, on Friday the 28th day of July, 1775, pursuant to advertisements of the late Committee of Correspondence, Hendrick Fisher, Esq., Chairman, John Leferty, Secretary.

The said Freeholders being informed that the late Committee of Correspondence for this County expired the 15th day of July instant, and being convinced of the necessity of choosing a new Committee of Correspondence for the County, do Resolve, That a new Committee of Correspondence, to consist of seventeen persons, be chosen for this County by ballot.

Adjourned for one hour.

Met according to adjournment; when the following gentlemen were elected a Committee of Correspondence for this County, viz: The Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon, Jacob Bogart, John Gaston, Gisbart Bogart, Gabriel Ogden, Garret Voorhees, Cornelius Van Muliner, Thomas Berry, Stephen Hunt, Rowland Chambers, Matthew Ten Eyck, William Annin, Ruloff Van Dicke, Jacob Bergen, Hendrick Van Middlesworth, Lucas Voorhees, and Ebenezer Tingley.

Resolved, That it be recommended, and it is hereby recommended to every township in this County, to assemble as soon as possible, and choose for their respective Townships nine persons, to be a Committee of Inspection to take cognizance of all violations of the measures recommended by the Representatives of the people in their District. And this County do further recommend that every Township Committee do choose from among themselves three persons, who shall meet when called upon, with an equal number of persons from every Township Committee, and form a General Committee of Inspection for the County, in case of an appeal, or when matters of importance require the sense of the County, or when a Township Committee choose not to decide on a case by themselves.

Resolved, That the Chairman of the late Committee of Inspection for each Township do notify a meeting of the inhabitants of their Township, for the purpose of choosing the aforesaid Committee of Inspection.

Resolved, That the County do earnestly recommend to, and they do hereby instruct their Committee of Inspection, to be vigilant and active in the discharge of their duty in taking cognizance of every person of whatsoever rank or condition, who shall, either by word or deed, endeavour to destroy our unanimity in opposing the arbitrary and cruel measures of the British Ministry; and so deal with him or them as to the particular Committee of Inspection where the offender resides, or to the General Committee of Inspection, (if an appeal or other reason require the same to be called,) shall seem most conducive to prevent any injury to the glorious cause of American freedom.

Resolved, That the Committee of Correspondence above chosen, and the Committees of Inspection to be chosen for the different Townships of this County, do continue until the first Monday in May next; after which, the Chairman of the Committee of Correspondence shall within three weeks call a meeting of the County. And in all cases when it shall be thought necessary to have the County assembled, the Secretary is hereby authorized and directed to give as publick notice thereof as possible ; and this County do agree to defray the expenses thence arising.

Ordered, That the foregoing Resolves and Proceedings be published in one of tiie New York newspapers.

A true copy from the Minutes.

John Leferty,          
Secretary.    

A draught of a Letter to the Committee at Brunswick, in New Jersey, was read and approved, and is in the words following, to wit:

Committee of Safety,       }
For the Colony of New York, }
July 21, 1775.     }

Gentlemen:— We have had intelligence that boats have sundry times loaded flour at or about your City, and have run down to the west bank, and there met boats to take it from them for the use of the men-of-war and the Army at Boston. As this is contrary to the resolution of the Continental Congress, it is a matter that requires your strictest inspection to prevent such traders from pursuing a business inimical to the cause of liberty in the United Colonies.

We have been informed that Mr. Merrill, opposite to or near Brunswick, can give you farther information on the subject. We are, respectfully, gentlemen, your very humble servants. Per order of the Committee. To the Committee at New Brunswick,

Ordered, That a copy thereof be engrossed, and signed by the President, and transmitted.

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Bergen County Committee.

Bergen County Committee Chamber     }
August 29, 1775. }

Resolved, That Peter Zabriskie, Jacob Terhune, John Demarest and Joost Zabriskie, be a Committee of Safety, to act for the County during the recess of the County Committee.

Resolved, That all male persons, above sixteen and under fifty years old, who have removed or shall hereafter remove from other Provinces or other Counties into this County, during the present unhappy contest between Great Britain and the American Colonies, shall be enrolled in the Militia Company of the District within which such Companies shall respectively reside; and that all such as neglect or refuse to come under the Militia Regulations of the Provincial Congress of this Province shall be immediately desired to leave the County.

By order of the Committee.
John Fell,        
Chairman.    

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To the Honourable the Delegfates of the Thirteen United Colonies in General Congress Assembled.

The Committee for the County of Cumberland, in the Province of New Jersey, beg leave to represent:

That the good people of this County have ever showed themselves forward in the cause of liberty, being the first in (at least this part of it) the Province that took up arms in support of the common cause, ever since which they have been diligently engaged in learning the military art, and furnishing themselves with the implements of war; notwithstanding which, they have not been able to provide themselves with a sufficient quantity of ammunition, particularly powder, of which article they assure us they have not a suiticient quantity to enable them to defend their property, in case of any emergency, until a supply could be procured from Philadelphia. We cannot but think this circumstance truly alarming, when we consider that we lie open, defenceless, and exposed to the depredations of Ministerial robbers, should they think proper to enter our Bay.

These considerations, joined to the probability we conceive there is that General Gage will, before the beginning of the winter, try every method, and ransack every place that may be in his power, to furnish his Troops with fresh provisions, will, we apprehend, fully appologize for this our application to your honourable Board for relief, especially when we assure you that we have taken every method in our power to furnish ourselves. We therefore earnestly beg you would take such measures for our relief in the premises as to you shall seem meet, assuring you that you may with the greatest safety rely on our taking every precaution necessary for securing any powder you may be pleased to order for our relief, and that none of it shall be used but in support of the rights and privileges of our countrymen.

Signed by order of the Committee.
Thomas Harris,      
Chairman.  
September 30, 1775.

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Hendrick Fisher to New York Committee of Safety.

New Jersey, September 30, 1775.

Sir:— As our Committee of Safety is at present not sitting, on receiving your favour of the 27th instant, by order of your Committee, I immediately advised with some of our Committee members, who were of opinion, with me, that as our Provincial Congress is to meet on Tuesday, the 3d of October next, which is as early as our Committee possibly can be convened, to lay your request before them, which I shall do accordingly, as soon as they have formed a board, and doubt not but they will do therein what is most proper.

I have the honour to subscribe myself your (and the other gentlemen of your Committee) very obedient and most humble servant.

Hendrick Fisher.      
To John Haring, Esq., Chairman of the Committee of Safety for the Province of New York.

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Sussex County Committee.

In Committee, Sussex County, New Jersey, }    
October 5, 1775.           }    

George McMurtrie, of Hardwick, being brought before this Committee, and charged with having spoke very contemptously and disrespectfully of the Continental and Provincial Congresses; which being fully proved, it is resolved that the said George McMurtrie be advertised in the publick prints as an enemy to his Country, and that no person or persons have any dealings or connection with him until he shall cause an acknowledgment of his fault to be published in one of the New York or Philadelphia newspapers, on pain of being deemed inimical to the liberties of America.

By order of the Committee.
Jacob McCollom,        
Chairman pro tem.    

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Extracts

From the Journal of Proceedings of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, held at Trenton, IN the Months of May, June and August, 1775.

—————

Provincial Congress.

LIST OF THE DEPUTIES WHO ATTENDED IN MAY AND JUNE.

Bergen — John Fell, John Demarest, Hendrick Kuyper, Abraham Van Boskirk, Edo Merselius.

Essex — Henry Garritse, Michael Vreeland, Robert Drummond, John Berry, William P. Smith, John Stites, John Chetwood, Abraham Clark, Elias Boudinot, Isaac Ogden, Philip Van Cortlandt, Bethuel Pierson, Caleb Camp.

Middlesex — Nathaniel Heard, Willian Smith, John Dunn, John Lloyd, Azariah Dunham, John Schurman, John Wetherill, David Williamson, Jonathan Sergeant, Jonathan Baldwin, Jonathan Deare.

Morris — William Winds, William De Hart, Jonathan Stiles, Peter Dickerson, Jacob Drake, Ellis Cook, Silas Condit.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, John Roy, Peter Schenck, Abraham Van Neste, Enos Kelsey, Jonathan D. Sergeant, Frederick Frelinghuysen, William Paterson.

Sussex — Archibald Stewart, Edward Dumont, William Maxwell, Ephraim Martin.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, Joseph Saltar, Robert Montgomery, John Holmes, John Covenhoven, Daniel Hendrickson, Nicholas Van Brunt.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, John Stout, Jasper Smith, Thomas Lowry, Charles Stewart, Daniel Hunt, Ralph Hart, Jacob Jennings, Richard Stevens, John Stevens, Jr., Thomas Stout, Thomas Jones, John Basset.

Burlington — Joseph Borden, Isaac Pearson, Colin Campbell, Joseph Read, John Pope.

Gloucester — John Cooper, Elijah Clark, John Sparks.

Cumberland — Samuel Fithian, Jonathan Elmer, Thomas Ewing.

Salem — Andrew Sinnickson, Robert Johnson, Samuel Dick, Jacob Scoggin, James James.

Cape May — Jesse Hand.

Tuesday, May 23, 1775.

The Provincial Congress having been appointed to convene this day at Trenton, a large number of the Deputies accordingly assembled; and the day was spent in examining and comparing the certificates of election of the several members present.

Wednesday, May 24, 1775.

The Congress proceeded to the choice of a President, when Hendrick Fisher, Esq., was duly elected; Jonathan D. Sergeant, Esq., was chosen Secretary, and William Paterson, Esq., and Mr. Frederick Frelinghuysen his assistants.

Inasmuch as the business on which this Congress are now assembled, and is likely to engage their deliberations, appears to be of the highest moment, and may in the event affect the lives and properties, the religion and liberties of their constituents, and of their remotest posterity, it unquestionably becomes the representative body of a christian community to look up to that all-powerful Being, by whose providence all human events are guided, humbly imploring His divine favor, in presiding over and directing their present councils towards the re-establishment of order and harmony between Great Britain and her distressed Colonies; and that He would be graciously pleased to succeed the measures that may be devised as most conducive to these desirable ends. It is therefore ordered, that the President do wait upon the ministers of the gospel in this town, and, in behalf of this Congress, request their alternate attendance and service every morning at eight o'clock, during the session, in order that the business of the day may be opened with prayer for the above purposes.

The President opened to the Congress the important occassion of their meeting — recommended the utmost deliberation in determining on the measures to be pursued in defending those inestimable rights and privileges to which, by our happy constitution, the inhabitants of this Province are justly entitled — and that due care might be taken to support the established civil authority (so far as might consist with the preservation of their fundamental liberties) for the maintenance of good order and the undisturbed administration of justice.

The Congress then took into consideration the present unhappy contest between Great Britain and these Colonies, which they determined to be of such a nature, and had arrived to such a crisis, that this convention had become absolutely necessary, in order to provide such ways and means for the security of the Province, as the exigencies of the times require; and, at the same time, declared, that they had assembled with the profoundest veneration for the person and family of his sacred Majesty George III, firmly professing all due allegiance to his rightful authority and government.

Whereas a majority of the several legislative representatives of this Colony, in General Assembly convened at Perth Amboy, in January last, was instructed and authorized by their constituents to elect and appoint Deputies to represent this Province in the Continental Congress now sitting in the city of Philadelphia; and whereas the said General Assembly did accordingly elect and appoint Stephen Crane, James Kinsey, William Livingston, John De Hart and Richard Smith, Esquires, for that purpose; and whereas some of the Counties of this Colony omitted so to instruct and authorize their said legislative representatives, who, notwithstanding, cordially joined in the said election and appointment. This Congress do therefore heartily approve of the said Stephen Crane, James Kinsey, William Livingston, John De Hart and Richard Smith, as Representatives of this Province in the said Continental Congress; and do also sincerely thank the House of Assembly for the laudible regard they have shewn for the rights and liberties of the good people of this Province, in timely adopting the Continental Association, and resolving in favour of the resolutions and proceedings of the late Continental Congress. And it is unanimously agreed and resolved, that it will be most eligible for the inhabitants of each respective County in this Colony, whenever a Continental Congress shall be again necessary, to appoint and empower Deputies to meet in Provincial Congress, for the purpose of electing Delegates to represent this Province in such Continental Congress.

Ordered, That all votes be taken from the Counties respectively, so that the vote of each County be taken as one.

The Congress having considered the application of about two hundred of the inhabitants of the Township of Shrewsbury, in the County of Monmouth, calling themselves Associators of the said Township, do unanimously advise, that the persons appointed by the said present Associators, as their Committee, do immediately advertise a meeting of the inhabitants of the said Township of Shrewsbury, in order to choose a Committee of Observation for the said Township, and adopt the Association recommended by the Continental Congress; and, after such choice and adoption, to elect Deputies, one or more, to represent them in this Congress. And that the persons who shall be so elected, by a majority of the inhabitants attending the said meeting of the Township, be received as members of this Congress. And in case of the refusal or neglect of the Township so to do, then this Congress do advise the said Committee of the present Associators to send a Deputy or Deputies for themselves to this Congress; and do direct the said Committee to make and certify their report to this Congress of what shall have been done in this behalf.

Thursday, May 25.

Samuel Tucker, Esquire, was elected Vice President by plurality of votes.

The Congress resumed the consideration of a written message to the Continental Congress, which, after certain amendments, was approved and ordered to be entered, and a copy to be made and signed by the President; which message is in the words following, viz.:

Gentlemen:— In the present alarming crisis, we have been appointed by the several Counties of this Province as their Deputies to meet in Provincial Congress. We are accordingly now convened in this place, with dispositions most heartily to concur to the utmost of our abilities, in the common cause of America. Yet we think it not advisable to enter into any measures of consequence, until some general plan may be agreed to and recommended by you. In this first instance of such assembly in the Colony, without any precedent among ourselves to direct us, and, at the same time, anxiously concerned to make our Provincial measures consistent with that plan which may be devised and recommended by the Continental Congress, we have judged it necessary to address ourselves to you for such advice and assistance as you in your wisdom may think proper to favour us with. For this purpose we have deputed William P. Smith and Elias Boudinot, Esquires, the bearers hereof, whom we recommend, requesting that you will be pleased to furnish us by them with such directions concerning the line of conduct in which we ought to act, as may prevent any measures we shall adopt from marring or obstructing the general views of the Congress, or disappointing your expectations.

We are.                            
Gentlemen, &c.    

Friday, May 26.

The Continental Congress having resolved unanimously, "That all exportations to Quebec, Nova Scotia, the Island of St. John's, Newfoundland, Georgia, (except the parish of St. John's) and to East and West Florida, immediately cease; and that no provisions of any kind, or other necessaries, be furnished to the British fisheries on the American coasts, until it be otherwise determined by the Congress.

Resolved unanimously, That this Congress do earnestly recommend to the good people of this Province, that they do most religiously adhere to the said Resolution; and that the Secretary do publish this Resolve in one or more of the public newspapers.

The Committee appointed for opening a correspondence with the Provincial Congress of New York, reported a draught of a letter for that purpose; which was read, approved, and ordered to be entered; and a copy to be made out and signed by the President; which letter was in the words following, viz:

Gentlemen:— We, the Deputies appointed by the inhabitants of New Jersey to meet in Provincial Congress, are now convened here, for the purpose of pursuing such measures as may be thought most expedient in the present unhappy situation to which the Colonies are reduced, and which the peculiar exigencies of the times may require. As nothing can tend more to ensure success to the steps which may, at this critical juncture, be adopted by the several Provinces, than a uniform plan of conduct; we conceived it necessary to look up to the Continental Congress for their advice and direction; which we have accordingly applied for, and hope soon to receive. We also think it of consequence that a correspondence should be established with you and our other sister Colonies, and a free communication be had, from time to time, of such measures as may be judged most conducive to the interest of the common cause; and we request to be favoured with such intelligence as may occur to you, worthy of attention, and of which our situation may probably deprive us. We are, &c.

Monday, May 29.

Pierpoint Edwards, Esq., one of a Committee from the Assembly of Connecticut to this Congress, attended with certain propositions and instructions, which were received and read, and ordered to be referred for further consideration.

Messrs, Daniel Hendrickson and Nicholas Van Brunt, from the Township of Shrewsbury, in the County of Monmouth, produced a certificate that the said Township had chosen a Committee of Observation pursuant to the directions of the Continental Congress, and that they had elected these gentlemen as Deputies to represent the said Township in this Congress. The said certificate was allowed and filed.

Tuesday, May 30.

William P. Smith and Elias Boudinot, Esqrs., the Committee sent by this Congress with a message to the Continental Congress, returned with a written answer, importing, that the Congress were not as yet prepared to give any advice on the state of this Province, and promising the same as soon as they should be prepared.

Jonathan D. Sergeant, Esq., having resigned his office of Secretary to this Congress, William Paterson, Esq., was chosen Secretary and Mr. Frederick Frelinghuysen Deputy Secretary.

The Congress received a letter from the Provincial Congress of New York, in answer to theirs of the 26th instant, importing their readiness to establish a correspondence with us, and a free communication of such measures as may from time to time be judged conducive to promote the common cause.

Wednesday, May 31.

The petition of Robert Murray and John Murray, setting forth their sincere contrition for violating the Continental Association, and their determined resolution for the future strictly to observe the same, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition of Robert and John Murray was read a second time; and, being now considered, it was unanimously resolved, that the petitioners, having made the best satisfaction in their power for their former breach of the general Continental agreement, and expressed their resolution strictly to adhere to the same in future, ought to be restored to the favourable regard of their Country; and the said Robert and John Murray are accordingly restored to all the civil and commercial privileges which they heretofore enjoyed in this Province.

P. M.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the form of an Association, which was reported in the morning; and, after certain amendments, approved the same, and ordered it to be entered, which is in the words following:

We, the subscribers, freeholders and inhabitants of the Township of                   in the County of                   and Province of New Jersey, having long viewed with concern the avowed design of the Ministry of Great Britain to raise a revenue in America; being deeply affected with the cruel hostilities already commenced in the Massachusetts Bay for carrying that arbitrary design into execution; convinced that the preservation of the rights and privileges of America depends, under God, on the firm union of its inhabitants; do, with hearts abhorring slavery, and ardently wishing for a reconciliation with our parent state on constitutional principles, solemnly associate and resolve, under the sacred ties of virtue, honor and love to our Country, that we will personally, and as far as our influence extends, endeavour to support and carry into execution whatever measures may be recommended by the Continental and our Provincial Congress, for defending our Constitution, and preserving the same inviolate.

We do also further associate and agree, as far as shall be consistent with the measures adopted for the preservation of American freedom, to support the magistrates and other civil officers in the execution of their duty, agreeable to the laws of this Colony; and to observe the directions of our Committee, acting according to the Resolutions of the aforesaid Continental and Provincial Congresses; firmly determined, by all means in our power, to guard against those disorders and confusions to which the peculiar circumstances of the times may expose us.

Resolved, That copies of the above Association be immediately sent to the Committees of Observation or Correspondence in the several Counties of this Province, which have not already associated in a similar manner, in order that the same may be signed by the several inhabitants, accompanied with the following letter, to be signed by the President:

Gentlemen:— Anxiously desirous to promote as far possible an union among the inhabitants of this Colony, we have thought proper to recommend to them the enclosed Association, which we desire may be immediately signed by the good people of your Township, that at a time when our most valuable privileges are invaded, we may in a uniform manner make our defence, and prevent the evils to which our unhappy situation exposes us.

Thursday, June 1.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an answer to Pierpoint Edwards, Esq., reported the same; which was read, approved, and ordered to be entered; and a copy thereof to be delivered, signed by the President; which is in the words following:

In Provincial Congress,     }
New Jersey, June 1, 1775.}

Pierpoint Edwards, Esq., from the Colony of Connecticut, having laid before this Congress sundry papers containing, among other things, the appointment of a Committee by the House of Representatives of said Colony, for the purpose of procuring intelligence of the true state of this Province, giving information of the state of the said Colony of Connecticut, and for cultivating harmony and good correspondence with this Province; and this Congress having read and considered the same, take this method of expressing their highest satisfaction with the spirited conduct and proceedings of the said Colony of Connecticut; and do hereby request the said Mr. Edwards to assure the Honourable House of Representatives of that Colony, that the Province of New Jersey will most heartily co-operate with them in the general measures now pursuing for the common defence of the rights of America; and will with great pleasure cultivate that harmony and good correspondence with our brethren of Connecticut, which they so earnestly desire — that this Congress are now engaged in settling a plan for putting the Province in the best state of defence in their power; and are ready to pursue such other methods and directions as shall be recommended to them by the Continental Congress, from whom they are daily expecting advice for this purpose; and whenever any particular measure shall be finally settled and concluded upon by this Province, the House of Representatives of Connecticut shall have the earliest intelligence.

Friday, June 2.

A letter from Pierpoint Edwards, Esq., requesting copies of such of the Resolves and Proceedings of this Congress as respected the regulation of the Militia, the raising of men and money, &c., for the common defence of America, was received and read; to which the following answer was returned, viz.:

Sir: — The Congress received your polite letter of this morning; and are sorry that the Militia Bill and other matters now before them are not so far completed that they can comply with your request, in giving you extracts from them to take with you to the Honourable House of Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut. You may, however, be assured, that when the Congress rise, a copy of such proceedings as shall be necessary to be communicated, will be transmitted to the Speaker of your Honourable House.

We are, &c.      

 

Saturday, June 3, P. M.

The draught of a plan for regulating the Militia of this Colony, which was reported in the morning, was read a second time; and, after sundry amendments, was approved, and ordered to be entered; which is in the words following:

The Congress taking into consideration the cruel and arbitrary measures adopted and pursued by the British Parliament and present Ministry, for the purpose of subjucating the American Colonies to the most abject servitude; and, being apprehensive that all pacific measures for the redress of our grievances will prove ineffectual, do think it highly necessary that the inhabitants of this Province be forthwith properly armed and disciplined, for defending the cause of American freedom. And further considering that, to answer this desirable end, it is requisite that such persons be entrusted with the command of the Militia, as can be confided in by the people, and are truly zealous in support of our just rights and privileges, do recommend and advise that the good people of this Province henceforward strictly observe the following rules and regulations, until this Congress shall make further order therein:

1st That one or more companies, as the case may require, be immediately formed in each Township or Corporation; and, to this end, that the several Committees in this Province do, as soon as may be, acquaint themselves with the number of male inhabitants in their respective districts, from the age of sixteen to fifty, who are capable of bearing arms; and thereupon form them into companies, consisting as near as may be of eighty men each; which companies so formed shall, each by itself, assemble and choose, by plurality of voices, four persons from among themselves of sufficient substance and capacity for its officers, namely, one captain, two lieutenants and an ensign.

2d. That the officers so chosen appoint for their respective companies fit persons to be sergeants, corporals and drummers.

3d. That as soon as the companies are so formed, the officers of such a number of companies as shall by them be judged proper to form a regiment, do assemble and choose one colonel, one lieutenant-colonel, a major and an adjutant, for each regiment.

4th. That each captain, as soon as elected, furnish himself with a muster-roll, after the form following, to be signed by every person under his command, viz:

We, the subscribers, do voluntarily enlist ourselves in the company of in the township of                 in the county of                 under the command of colonel               (if a colonel shall be chosen at the time of subscribing) and do promise to obey our officers in such service as they shall appoint us, agreeable to the rules and orders of the Provincial Congress. Witness our hands, &c.

5th. That the persons so enlisted meet under the direction of their officers in such manner, and at such times and places, as shall by them be judged necessary for their improvement in military discipline; and that each whole company do assemble at least once a month for the same purpose; and that a general muster or review of the whole regiment be had as often, and at such times, as the field officers shall appoint.

6th. That each person enlisted be equipped as soon as possible with arms and ammunition, in such manner as by the field officers of such regiment shall be directed.

7th. That due obedience be paid to the officers, and strict attention observed in learning the military exercise.

8th. That where companies and regiments are already formed, and officers chosen and appointed, the same be continued; provided, that they do adopt such further rules and orders respecting the signing of a muster-roll, days of meeting and reviews, as are hereinbefore contained; and that where part only of the officers are already appointed and chosen, they do proceed to elect such other officers as remain yet to be chosen, in conformity to the rules herein contained.

The Congress taking into consideration the spirited exertions of the Counties of Morris, Sussex and Somerset, in raising of minute-men, do approve of, and thank them for their zeal in the common cause; and will take the same into further consideration at their next meeting.

The draught of an ordinance for raising a sum of money for the purpose therein mentioned, after sundry amendments was approved, and ordered to be entered, in the words following:

Whereas, it has become absolutely necessary in the present dangerous and extraordinary state of public affairs, in which the usual resources of government appear to be insufficient for the safety of the people, and in which the good people of this Province have therefore thought proper to choose Deputies in this present Congress, that a fund be provided for the use of the Province; We, the said Deputies, being persuaded that every inhabitant is willing and desirous to contribute his proportion of money for so important a purpose, do, pursuant to the powers entrusted to us by the people, resolve and direct, that the sum of Ten Thousand Pounds, Proclamation Money, be immediately apportioned and raised for the use aforesaid; the same to be apportioned, laid out and disposed of, in such manner as herinafter is directed.

2. And it is Resolved and Directed, That the part and proportion of the said sum to be raised in the County of Bergen be six hundred and sixty-four Pounds eight Shillings; and that the part and proportion of Essex be seven hundred and forty-two Pounds eighteen Shillings; and that the part and proportion of Middlesex be eight hundred and seventy-two Pounds six Shillings and eight-pence; and that the part or proportion of Somerset be nine hundred and four Pounds two Shillings; and that the part or proportion of Monmouth be one thousand and sixty-nine Pounds two Shillings and eight-pence; and that the part or proportion of Morris be seven hundred and twenty-three Pounds eight Shillings; and that the part or proportion of Sussex be five hundred and nine-three(sic) Pounds five Shillings and four-pence; and that the part or proportion of Hunterdon be one thousand three hundred and sixty-three Pounds sixteen Shillings and eightpence; and that the part or proportion of Burlington be one thousand and seventy-one Pounds thirteen Shillings and four pence; and that the part or proportion of Gloucester be seven hundred and sixty-three Pounds two Shillings and eight-pence; and that the part or proportion of Salem be six hundred and seventy-nine Pounds twelve Shillings; and that the part or proportion of Cumberland be three hundred and eighty-five Pounds six Shillings and eight-pence; and that the part or proportion of Cape May be one hundred and sixty-six Pounds eighteen Shillings.

3. And, in order that the said sum may be duly raised,

It is further Resolved and Directed, That the same be apportioned by persons hereafter to be appointed by the Committees of the several Townships in this Colony; in which apportionment all certainties shall be rated one-fifth less than the sums they are respectively directed to be rated at by the fourth section of an Act of General Assembly of this Colony, made and passed in the tenth year of the reign of his present Majesty, entitled, An Act to settle the quotas of the several Counties in this Colony for the levying taxes; and that all lands, horses, cattle and otiier taxables be valued as in the above-mentioned Act is directed. Which said appointment shall be made and delivered to the persons to be appointed by the several Committees in each Township, at or before the first day of August next ensuing.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the persons who shall be appointed for apportioning the same as aforesaid, in the several Townships of each County, to that end, do meet together on the first Monday in July next, at such place as by the laws of this Colony have been appointed for the Assessors to meet in for the like purpose; and then and there settle and divide to each Township within their County its quota of the sum hereinbefore directed to be raised in the County.

4. And it is farther Resolved and Directed, That the several Committees in each Township of the Colony shall appoint fit persons to collect the same, who upon receiving the said apportionment, shall immediately collect and pay the same to such person or persons as the several Committees in each County may hereafter appoint; or, where there is no County Committee, to such person or persons as the several Township Committees shall jointly appoint.

5. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That, after the part or proportion of each County shall have been apportioned and received by the County Collector, he shall and do pay the same, or any part or parts thereof, to the County Committee, or to their order, signed by their Chairman, by their vote, the same to be disposed of by them in such manner as they in their discretion shall think most proper to answer the said exigencies.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr Tucker, Mr. Daniel Hunt, Mr. Frelinghuysen, Mr. I. Pearson, Mr. Dunham, Mr. Schurman, Mr. John Hart, Mr. Borden, Mr. Deare, Mr. Baldwin, Mr. Schenck, Mr. Ralph Hart and Mr. Heard, or any three of them, in conjunction with the President or Vice President, be a Committee of Correspondence, with power to convene this Congress.

LIST OF THE DEPUTIES WHO ATTENDED THE SESSION IN THE MONTH OP AUGUST
.

Bergen — John Fell, John Deraarest, Hendrick Kuyper, Abraham Van Buskirk, Edo Merselius.

Essex — Henry Garritse, Michael Vreeland, Robert Drummond, John Chetwood, Elias Boudinot, Isaac Ogden, Philip Van Cortlandt, Bethuel Peirson, Caleb Camp,

Middlesex — Nathaniel Heard, William Smith, John Dunn, John Lloyd, Azariah Dunham, John Schurman, John Wetherill, Lucas Schenck, Jonathan Sergeant, Jonathan Baldwin, Jonathan Deare.

Morris — William Winds, William De Hart, Jonathan Stiles, David Thompson, Jacob Drake, Ellis Cook, Silas Condit.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, Peter Schenck, Abraham Van Neste, Enos Kelsey, Jonathan D. Sergeant, Frederick Frelinghuysen, William Paterson, Nathaniel Eyers.

Sussex — Edward Dumont, William Maxwell, John B, Scott, Hugh Hughs, Mark Thomson, William Norcross.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, Robert Montgomery, John Holmes, John Covenhoven, Daniel Hendrickson.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Ralph Hart, John Stout, Jasper Smith, Thomas Lowry, Charles Stewart, Daniel Hunt, Richard Stevens, John Stevens, junior, Thomas Stout, Thomas Jones, Abraham Bonnell, Joseph Beavers.

Burlington — Joseph Borden, Isaac Pearson, Colin Campbell, John Pope.

Gloucester — John Sparks, Joseph Hugg, Joseph Ellis, Elijah Clark.

Cumberland — Samuel Fithian, Jonathan Elmer, Thomas Ewing.

Salem — Jacob Scoggin, James James, John Holmes, Benjamin Holmes, Ephraim Lloyd.

Cape May — Elijah Hughs.

In Congress, August 5, 1775.

1. Besolved, That the several persons appointed in pursuance of the ordinance of this Congress in their last session, to collect the quotas of the several Townships, do pay the money by them collected to the County Collector on or before the tenth day of September next; and if any persons within their respective districts shall have refused payment, that, in such case, they do make and deliver in a list of the names of the delinquents to their several Committees, together with their receipts and vouchers for the money, which they shall have paid to the aforesaid County Collectors.

2. Resolved, That the several Committees do furnish the Provincial Congress at their next session with the names of all such persons within their districts as shall have refused to sign the Association recommended in the last Congress, or one of a similar nature; and of all such as shall have refused to pay their respective apportionments.

3. Resolved, That the respective Committees in this Colony do return to the Provincial Congress at their next session copies of the several Associations signed in their districts, agreeable to the former order of this Congress, together with the names of those who have signed the same.

4. Resolved, That the Assessors and Collectors, appointed to apportion and collect the said money, do receive such reward for their labour and trouble therein, as the Assessors and Collectors are by law entitled to, for assessing and collecting the provincial taxes.

5. Resolved, That in case any part of the sum of ten thousand Pounds, by the said ordinance directed to be raised, shall, from the event of public affairs, be found to be unnecessary for the purposes thereby intended; in such case the surplus be paid by the several County Committees into the hands of the County Collectors appointed by act of Assembly, to be by them applied towards discharging the quotas of such Counties in the public taxes of the Province.

6. Resolved, That the several Committees, to whom the disposal of the said money was, by the ordinance of the last session, entrusted, do account to the Provincial Congress for their several disbursements, and the uses to which they may have been applied.

Saturday, August 12.

Whereas, it is highly expedient at a time when this Province is likely to be involved in all the horrors of a civil war, and when it has become absolutely necessary to increase the burthen of taxes already laid upon the good people of this Colony for the just defence of their invaluable rights and privileges, that the inhabitants thereof should have frequent opportunities of renewing their choice and approbation of the Representatives in Provincial Congress — It is therefore resolved, that the inhabitants in each County, qualified to vote for Representatives in General Assembly, do meet, together at the places herein after mentioned, on Thursday the twenty-first day of September next, and then and there, by plurality of voices, elect and appoint any number not exceeding five substantial freeholders as Deputies, with full power to represent such County in Provincial Congress to be held at Trenton, in the County of Hunterdon, on Tuesday, the third day of October next: And that the places of meeting for the election in each County shall be, for the County of Bergen at the Court House in New Barbados. County of Essex at the Court House in Newark. County of Middlesex at the Court House in New Brunswick. County of Somerset at the Court House in Hillsborough. County of Morris at the Court House in Morris town. County of Monmouth at the Court House in Freehold. County of Hunterdon at the house of John Ringo in Amwell. County of Sussex at the Court House in Newtown. County of Burlington at the Court House in the city of Burlington. County of Gloucester at the Court House in the town of Gloucester. County of Salem at the Court House in the town of Salem. County of Cumberland at the Court House in Bridgetown, County of Cape May at the Court House in Middle Precinct.

And that the Deputies so elected shall receive a certificate of their election in the words following, to wit:

We do hereby certify, that on the day of the date hereof, A, B, C, &c., were duly elected Deputies for the County of                       in the Province of New Jersey, with full power to represent the said County in Provincial Congress, to be held at Trenton, in the County of Hunterdon, on the third day of October next, as witness our hands and seals this           day of                       A. D. 1775.

Which certificate under the hands and seals of the President or Chairman chosen to preside at such election, together with five or more Freeholders of the said County, shall be sufficient evidence of such election.

Resolved, That during the continuance of the present unhappy disputes between Great Britain and America, there be a new choice of Deputies in every County of this Province yearly, on the third Thursday in September.

Resolved, That on the said third Thursday of September in every year the inhabitants in each County, qualified as aforesaid, do elect, by plurality of voices, a sufficient number of Freeholders to constitute a County Committee of Observation and Correspondence, with full power, as well to superintend and direct the necessary business of the County, as to carry into execution the Resolutions and Orders of the Continental and Provincial Congresses.

Resolved, That the inhabitants of each Township, qualified as aforesaid, do immediately choose (where it is not already done) a sufficient number of Freeholders to constitute a Township Committee: and that on the second Tuesday in March, in every year hereafter, they do proceed anew in like manner to choose such a number of Freeholders as shall be thought necessary to constitute Committees to act as Committees of Observation and Correspondence in each Township, with power to transact the business referred to them by the Continental and Provincial Congresses, and the County Committees.

Wednesday, August 16.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the plan for further regulating the Militia, &c., which, after certain amendments, was approved, and is in the words following, viz.:

The Congress taking into further consideration the state of the Militia in this Province,

Resolved, 1. That the several County, or (where there is no County) the Township Committees, do transmit the names of all the Militia Officers, chosen within their respective Districts, to the Provincial Congress, or to the Committee of Safety, to be by them commissioned, agreeable to the directions of the Continental Congress.

Resolved, 2. That all Officers above the ranlk of a Captain, not already chosen or appointed pursuant to an ordinance of this Congress made at their last session, be appointed by the Congress, or, during their recess, by the Committee of Safety.

Resolved, 3. That where the inhabitants of different Townships have been embodied into one Company, Battalion or Regiment, before the 20th day of June last, it is not the intention of this Congress they should be dissolved, provided they govern themselves according to the rules and directions of the same.

Resolved, 4. That the Militia of Bergen shall compose one Regiment; the Militia of Essex two Regiments, with privilege of forming them into four Battalions; the Militia of Middlesex two Regiments; the Militia of Somerset two Regiments; the Militia of Monmouth three Regiments; the Militia of Morris two Regiments and one Battalion; the Militia of Sussex two Regiments and one Battalion; the Militia of Hunterdon four Regiments; the Militia of Burlington two Regiments, and a Company of Rangers in the Township of Little-Egg-Harbour; the Militia of Gloucester three Battalions; the Militia of Salem one Regiment; the Militia of Cumberland two Battalions; and the Militia of Cape May one Battalion.

Resolved, 5. That this Congress do recommend to all inferior Officers to pay due obedience to their superior Officers, agreeable to the directions of the Continental and Provincial Congresses.

Resolved, 6. That in case of disobedience, or irregular behaviour in any officer whatever, while on duty, complaint be made to the Committee of the County to which he belongs; the majority of whom shall, as soon as convenient, make strict enquiry into the same; and, if they think proper, may suspend the officer so offending, and report their proceedings, together with the charge and evidence, to the Committee of Safety, or to the next Provincial Congress ; who shall take such order therein as to them shall appear to be just and reasonable.

Resolved, 7. That all effective men, between the ages of 16 and 50, who shall refuse to enroll themselves and bear arms, shall pay into the hands of the Township Committees, where they reside, four Shillings Proclamation Money per month, as an equivalent for their personal service.

Resolved, 8. That in case any person shall refuse paying the same, the Committee shall return his name to the Provincial Congress, or to the Committee of Safety, to be dealt with as they shall direct.

Resolved, 9. That every person who hath signed or shall sign the muster-roll, and neglects to attend on the day of mustering, shall pay two Shillings Proclamation for every mustering day he is absent, unless he can give a sufficient reason for his absence, to be judged of by his Captain, who is hereby required to demand the same; and if the delinquent refuse payment, then the Captain shall return his name to the Township Committee, to be by them reported to the next Congress, provided that no more than two fines in a month be imposed on any one person.

Resolved, 10. That the monies received by the Committees and Captains, from persons who do not bear arms, nor attend their duty upon mustering days, shall be by them jointly applied towards defraying the expence attending the instruction and equipment of the Companies in their respective districts — the fines of persons under age to be paid by their parents, and of apprentices by their masters.

Resolved, 11. That each private soldier be furnished with good arms, powder and ball, as near as may be, agreeable to the requisitions of the Continental Congress.

Resolved, 12, That where arms may be wanting by such effective men as shall be unable to procure them, the Captain of the Company to which such person belong shall make application to the Committee of the County or Township, who shall supply them, on receiving security for their proper application, provided any arms shall remain in their hands, after first supplying such of the minute-men, hereafter directed to be enrolled, as may be unable to furnish themselves with the same.

Resolved, 13. That the precendency of rank in the Miltia shall take place in the following order: 1, Essex; 2, Salem; 3, Gloucester; 4, Morris; 5, Sussex; 6, Cape May; 7, Monmouth; 8, Somerset; 9, Bergen; 10, Cumberland; 11, Middlesex; 12, Hunterdon; 13, Burlington; and that, where there may be more than one Regiment or Battalion in a County, the precedency shall be determined by the County Committee, according to their former seniority.

Resolved, 14. That for the purpose of effectually carrying into execution the recommendation of the Continental Congress, respecting the appointment of minute-men, four thousand able-bodied effective men be enlisted and enrolled in the several Counties in this Province, under officers to be appointed and commissioned by this Congress, or Committee of Safety, who shall hold themselves in constant readiness, on the shortest notice, to march to any place where their assistance may be required, for the defence of this or any neighbouring Colony.

Resolved, 15. That the several Counties in this Province shall furnish minute-men in the proportions following, viz.:

County of Bergen, 4 Companies of 64 men each, officers included.
Essex. 6 companies, do.
Middlesex, 6 companies, do.
Monmouth, 6 companies, do.
Somerset, 5 companies, do.
Morris, fi companies, do.
Sussex, 5 companies, do.
Hunterdon, 8 companies, do.
Burlington, 5 companies, do.
Gloucester, 4 companies, do.
Salem, 3 companies, do.
Cumberland, 3 companies, do.
Cape May, 1 company, do.

Resolved, 16. That the said minute-men, upon their enlistment, shall sign a muster-roll in the words following:

We, the subscribers, do voluntarily enlist ourselves as minute-men, in the company of                         in the County of                             And do promise to hold ourselves in constant readiness, on the shortest notice, to march to any place where our assistance may be required, for the defence of this or any neighbouring Colony; as also to pay due obedience to the commands of our Officers, agreeable to the rules and orders of the Continental Congress, or of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, or. during its recess, of the Committee of Safety. As witness our hands, &c.

Resolved, 17. That the several County Committees of this Province, or, where there are no County Committees, the Township Committees jointly, do forthwith nominate officers for the several companies of minute-men in each county, with assurance, that as soon as their companies are completed, they shall receive commissions from the Provincial Congress, or the Committee of Safety.

Resolved, 18. That the minute-men be formed into ten battalions; one in Bergen, one in Essex, one in Middlesex, one in Monmouth, one in Somerset, one in Morris, one in Sussex, one in Hunterdon, one in Burlington, one in Gloucester and Salem; and that the companies in Cumberland and Cape May be independent companies of light infantry and rangers.

Resolved, 19. That wherever the whole or the greater part of a Militia company shall offer their services as minute-men, they may be commanded by the officers already appointed and chosen by them.

Resolved, 20. That whenever any of the said minute-men shall be called into actual service, they shall receive the like pay as the Continental Army; and be furnished with camp equipage and provisions; and also be provided for, if wounded and disabled in the service of their Country.

Resolved, 21. That the several Battalions and Companies of minute-men raised as aforesaid, while remaining in this particular service, shall have precedency of rank of the common Militia of the Province.

Resolved, 22. That the minute-men raised as aforesaid shall continue in service for the space of four months, when such of them as require it, shall be relieved, unless upon actual service.

Resolved, 23. That the precedency of rank, among the several Battalions and Companies of said minute-men, shall be settled from priority in the dates of their respective commissions.

Resolved, 24. That two Brigadier Generals be appointed for this Province, and that                         be the first, and Philemon Dickerson, Esq., be the second Brigadier General of the said Province.

It being suggested, that divers persons in the Province, are attempting to raise Companies of light infantry, which may have a tendency to break other Companies that have been formed by committees, pursuant to the former militia ordinance of this Congress: Resolved, therefore, That no person whatever do presume to raise any light infantry, or independent Company, without the consent of the field officers to whom they belong, and the approbation of the County or Township Committee, where there is no County Committee, be first obtained; and that all Companies formed before the 20th day of June last shall remain as they were formed, unless on such consent and approbation as aforesaid, such only excepted, as have been constituted by permission from this Congress.

Thursday, August 17.

Resolved, That as there are a number of people within this Province, whose peculiar religious principles will not allow them in any case to bear arms — this Congress intend no violence to conscience; and therefore would earnestly recommend it to all such persons to contribute the more liberally, in these times of universal calamity, to the relief of their distressed brethren in the several Colonies; and to do all other services to their oppressed Country, consistent with their religious profession.

Resolved, That before any person shall receive a military commission, agreeable to the Militia ordinance of this Congress, he shall sign the Association formed and recommended by the same; and, if he hold a commission, under the late Militia Act of Assembly, that he first resign such commission to the Governor of this Province.

Resolved, That Jonathan D. Sergeant, Esq., be, and he is hereby appointed Provincial Treasurer to this Congress; and it is ordered, that the balance of monies in his hands, which he received towards paying the expenses of the Delegates of this Colony in the Continental Congress, together with such as may hereafter come into his hands, be applied to such uses as shall be directed by this Congress, or during its recess by the Committee of Safety. And that he do immediately call in the several sums yet due from any of the Counties; and in case of further neglect in them to discharge the same, that the said Treasurer do make report thereof to the next Provincial Congress.

The Congress taking into consideration the remonstrance from the County Committee of Sussex, relative to the raising the prices of shop goods within the said County, occasioned by the advanced price in New York and Philadelphia, do resolve that the said Committee are the proper persons to enquire into the complaint mentioned in the said remonstrance; and if, on examination, they find it to be well founded, do then recommend that the said Committee make application to the Committees of New York and Philadelphia, and represent the conduct of such traders in the said Provinces as shall appear to them to be culpable.

Ordered, That the several Couny Committees do appoint one Surgeon to each Regiment and Battalion belonging to their respective Counties; and certify the name of such Surgeon to the next Congress, or to the Committee of Safety, in order to his being properly commissioned.

Resolved, That this Congress do recommend to the several County Committees in this Colony, that they immediately employ gun-smiths to make such a number of arms as they shall judge to be necessary and wanting in their respective Counties; and that, in the manufactory of the said arms, particular attention be paid to the directions of the Continental Congress.

Ordered, That Hendrick Fisher, Samuel Tucker, Isaac Pearson, John Hart, Jonathan D. Sergeant, Azariah Dunham, Peter Schenck, Enos Kelsey, Joseph Borden, Frederick Frelinghuysen and John Schurman, be a Committee of Safety during the recess of this Congress.

The Congress adjourned to the 20th day of September next, unless sooner convened by the Committee of Safety.

 

Extracts

From the Journal of Proceedings of the Committee of Safety of New Jersey, Held at Princeton in the Months of August and September, 1775.

—————

Committee of Safety
.

Wednesday, August 30.

The Committee of Safety taking into consideration the condition of several Companies in this Province, where vacanies have happened in consequence of the promotion of the Captain or other officers, are of opinion, that, according to the rules and orders of the Continental and Provincial Congresses, such vacancy is to be filled up by the choice of a new officer in the usual manner of election; but that no person can be turned out of office by his Company, without his consent being first obtained.

Thursday, August 31.

Whereas, the public roads of this Province are observed to abound with strollers and vagabonds, and many servants have run away from their masters, and horse stealing and other robberies are become very frequent, therefore it is

Resolved, That it be recommended to the good people of this Province, that they do strictly examine all suspicious persons passing to and fro through the different parts thereof; and if, upon such examination, they do not give a satisfactory account of themselves, they do proceed to deal with them according to the laws of this Province.

Resolved, That the several officers and privates who embody themselves as minute-men in this Province be, and they hereby are directed, for the sake of distinction and convenience, to adopt as their uniform hunting frocks, as near as may be, similar to those of the riflemen now in the Continental service.

Ordered, That this Committee be adjourned to Wednesday, the 13th day of September next, to meet at Princeton, unless sooner convened by the President or Vice President.

Wednesday, September 13.

The Committee met according to adjournment.

Thursday, September 14,

Ordered, That Joseph Borden and Enos Kelsey be a Committee to employ Isaac Collins to print the Minutes of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey; as also such Proceedings of the Committee of Safety as to them may appear necessary.

Journal

Of the Votes and Proceedings of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, Held at Trenton, in the Month of October, 1775.

—————

Provincial Congress.

A LIST OF THE DEPUTIES WHO ATTENDED THIS CONGRESS.

Bergen — John Demarest, Jacobus Post.

Essex — Abraham Clark, Lewis Ogden, Samuel Potter, Caleb Camp, Robert Drummond.

Middlesex — Azariah Dunham, John Dennis.

Morris — William Winds, William De Hart, Jacob Drake, Silas Condit, Ellis Cook.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, Cornelius Van Muliner, Ruloffe Van Dyke.

Sussex — William Maxwell, Ephraim Martin, Thomas Potts, Abia Brown, Mark Thompson.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, John Covenhoven, Joseph Holmes.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Charles Stewart, Augustine Stevenson.

Burlington — Isaac Pearson, John Pope, Samuel How, John Wood, Joseph Newbold.

Gloucester — John Cooper, Joseph Ellis, Thomas Clark, Elijah Clark, Richard Somers.

Salem — John Holme, Edward Keasby, Benjamin Holme, John Carey.

Cumberland — Theophilus Elmer, Jonathan Ayars.

Cape May — Jesse Hand.

Tuesday, October 3, 1775.

Several of the Deputies returned to serve in this Congress for the respective Counties of this Colony, assembled at Trenton, pursuant to the appointment of the late Provincial Congress.

Wednesday, October 4, 1775.

The Congress again assembled, and several other members attending, proceeded to the election of a President and Vice President, when Samuel Tucker, Esquire, was chosen President, and Hendrick Fisher, Esquire, Vice President.

John Mehelm, Esquire, at the request of the Congress, consented to act as Secretary until a Secretary be chosen.

On motion made.

Ordered, That the President do wait upon the ministers of the gospel in this Town, and, in the name of this Congress, request their alternate attendance and service every morning at nine o'clock during the session, in order that the business of the day may be opened with prayer, in the most humble manner to supplicate Almighty God, that, out of his infinite goodness and mercy, he will be pleased to influence and direct the Councils of America and Great Britain, so that peace, unanimity and harmony may be happily re-established between both countries upon a permanent foundation.

The Congress was accordingly opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Spencer.

The Congress then proceeded to examine the certificates of the election of the Deputies for the several Counties in this Colony, and the following gentlemen were returned as duly elected, to wit:

Bergen — John Demarest, Jacobus Post, Abraham Van Boskirk.

Essex — Abraham Clark, Lewis Ogden, Samuel Potter, Caleb Camp, Robert Drummond.

Middlesex — John Dennis, Azariah Dunham.

Morris — William Winds, William De Hart, Jacob Drake, Silas Condit, Ellis Cook.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, Cornelius Van Muliner, Ruloffe Van Dyke.

Sussex — William Maxwell, Ephraim Martin, Thomas Potts, Abia Brown, Mark Thompson.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Charles Stewart, Augustine Stevenson.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, John Covenhoven, Joseph Holmes.

Burlington — Isaac Pearson, John Pope, Samuel How, John Wood, Joseph Newbold.

Gloucester — John Cooper, Joseph Ellis, Thomas Clark, Elijah Clark, Richard Somers.

Salem — Grant Gibbon, Benjamin Holme, John Holme, Edward Keasby, John Carey.

Cumberland — Theophilus Elmer, Jonathan Ayars.

Cape May — Jesse Hand, Elijah Hughes.

A petition from twenty-four inhabitants of the County of Monmouth, suggesting that the Deputies returned for that County were not duly elected, was read and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the Committee of Safety of New York to the Committee of Safety of this Colony, relative to the apprehending of deserters from the Continental Troops; was read and ordered a second reading.

A petition from Daniel Maskell of Cumberland County, praying that commissions may issue for a Company of Minute-Men in that County, was read.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several persons therein named.

A letter from the Committee of the County of Morris, recommending the several persons therein named for commissions in the Battalion of Minute-Men in that County, was read.

Ordered, That commissions do issue accordingly.

Mr. President laid before the Congress a letter from the Earl of Stirling, inclosing copies of some letters lately written by his Lordship on the subject of his having received a commission of Colonel of a Regiment of Militia, together with the return of his Regiment.

Ordered, That the return be filed, and that the letters be laid on the table for the inspection of the members.

Sundry copies of associations from the Township of Freehold in Monmouth County, the Township of Hillsborough in Somerset County, and the Township of Mansfield in Burlington County, were read, and ordered to be filed.

A petition from a number of inhabitants of the Township of Nottingham, praying that the petitioners may be allowed to join Captain Harrison's company of light infantry in Trenton; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress adjourned until nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, October 5, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

On motion made,

Resolved, That William Paterson, Esquire, be appointed Secretary to this Congress.

The petition from Monmouth County, suggesting that the Deputies returned for that County were not duly elected, was read a second time; whereupon, on motion of Mr. Holmes, it is ordered that the parties be allowed a public hearing on the prayer of this petition on Wednesday next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon; and that the Deputies from Monmouth do acquaint the parties therewith.

The letter from the Committee of Safety of New York, to the Committee of Safety of this Colony, respecting the apprehending of deserters from the Continental Troops, was read a second time.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Dunham and Mr. Stewart, be a Committee to prepare the draught of a resolution relative to the same, and make a report thereof to this Congress.

The Congress adjourned until nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, October 6, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A petition from Jonathan Williams and others, objecting to the field officers of the second battalion of Militia for the County of Gloucester, as recommended by the County Committee, and praying that other field officers may be commissioned to command that battalion; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from a number of the inhabitants of the County of Hunterdon, praying that money at interest may be taxed; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A proposal from James Campbell and others, respecting the manufacturing of fire-arms in this Colony; was read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion made.

Ordered, That Mr. Pearson, Mr. Stewart, Mr. Holmes, Mr. De Hart and Mr. Camp, be a Committee to examine the returns of minute-men and officers, and report the same to this Congress.

On motion of Mr. Covenhoven, that Colonel Taylor be heard before this Congress, pursuant to the recommendation of the County Committee of Monmouth, upon the question whether in Colonel Taylor's particular case he might not be permitted to hold the commission of Captain and the commission of Colonel in the same regiment at the same time?

Ordered, That Colonel Taylor be heard immediately.

Colonel Taylor, having been called in, was heard; whereupon, on motion made, it is

Resolved, That the determination of this matter be postponed to a future day.

The Congress adjourned until nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, October 7, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to examine the returns of minute-officers, having reported that they had examined the muster-rolls of Captain Hazlet, Captain Stout, and Captain Brearley, and found them agreeable to the ordinance of the late Congress.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the respective officers of those three companies.

On motion made,

Resolved, That on Thursday morning next this Congress will take into consideration the following matters, to wit:

1st. Whether the present state of the Provincial fund, ordered by the late Congress, be sufficient to answer the present public exigencies?

2. Whether any and what further Provincial fund is necessary? And,

3. The ways and means to erect such fund?

The Congress adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the consideration of Colonel Taylor's case; and, after debating the same.

Resolved unanimously. That no officer in the Militia service in this Colony be permitted to hold two commissions at the same time.

On motion made,

Resolved unanimously, That no one person shall hold commissions under the minute and militia ordinances at the same time.

The Congress adjourned until Monday morning next, 10 o'clock.

Monday, October 9, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Two petitions from the inhabitants of the County of Sussex, signed by a great number of persons, and praying that all who pay taxes may be admitted to vote, with the freeholders at future elections, for Deputies to serve in Congress; were read, and ordered a second reading.

Five petitions from other inhabitants of the County of Sussex, signed by a number of persons, and praying that all suits at law for the recovery of debts already commenced, or to be commenced may be suspended upon certain conditions, until the dispute between Great Britain and the Colonies shall be settled; were read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion made,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the officers of the third company of foot of the township of Acquanuck.

On motion made.

Resolved, That Mr, Hart, Mr. Dennis, Mr. Demarest, Mr. Van Dyke, Mr. Winds, Mr. Martin, Mr. Elijah Clark, Mr. Hand, Mr. Carey, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Newbold, Mr. Taylor and Mr. Potter, be a Committee to prepare an estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a posture of defence at this time, and to make report thereof to this Congress on Thursday morning next.

The Congress adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Dunham having informed this Congress that he had seen Mr. Paterson, who had acquainted him that his business and circumstances would by no means admit of his officiating as Secretary.

The Congress proceeded to the choice of a Secretary, when John Carey, Esq., was unanimously chosen Secretary; and Abraham Clark and Charles Stewart, Esquires, Assistant Secretaries.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the County of Gloucester, praying that some mode may be adopted to compel the payment of the Ten Thousand Pound tax, from those in that County who have refused to pay the same; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition from Jonathan Williams and others, of Gloucester County, relative to the appointment of field-officers, for the Second Battalion of Militia in that County, was read a second time; and the recommendation of the County Committee of Gloucester having likewise been read, and the prayer of the said petition having been duly considered.

Resolved unanimously, That commissions do issue to the gentlemen recommended by the County Committee as proper persons for the officers of the three Battalions in that County.

The Congress adjourned until nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, October 10, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

On motion made,

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Abraham Clark and Mr. Dennis, be a Committee to inspect the minutes of the late Congress and Committee of Safety; and that they make report of such business as stands referred to the consideration of this Congress.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Morris County, praying this Congress to appoint field officers for the lower Regiment of Militia for the said county; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress adjourned to nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, October 11, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The petition from Morris County, praying this Congress to appoint field-officers, &c., was read a second time and Captain Bates attending at the door, and desiring to be heard in support of this petition,

Resolved, That Captain Bates be heard relative to the prayer of the said petition: and Captain Bates having been heard accordingly, and the Congress having debated the same.

Resolved, That this Congress think it is most expedient to wait for further information before they proceed to the appointment of officers; and that the Captains and subalterns of the said Regiment be directed to recommend proper persons for field-officers; such recommendation to be certified by the Chairman of the County Committee.

A petition from Stephen Burrows, relative to the making of cartouch boxes; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from the Committee of Amwell, praying that the Third Regiment of the Militia of Hunterdon County may continue; but that the commissions of the field-officers be vacated, and that the Captains and subalterns may be allowed to choose field-officers; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from a number of the inhabitants of the lower part of Amwell, praying that the Third Regiment in the County of Hunterdon may be united to the First Regiment commanded by Colonel Smith; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from the inhabitants of the upper part of Amwell, praying, that if any alteration be made in the Third Regiment of the Militia of Hunterdon, the petitioners may be united to the Fourth Regiment and not to the First Regiment; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from Captain Imlay and Captain Gray, praying that the field-officers of the Third Regiment of Militia of Hunterdon may be continued; was read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion made.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Abraham Clark, Mr. Dennis, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Ellis, be a Committee to prepare the draught of an ordinance for the further regulating of the Militia of this Colony, and make report thereof to this Congress.

This Congress having received information that, a few days since, a small vessel supposed to be a tender to some man of war, was taken near Barnagat, with three persons on board; and this information appearing to be true, this Congress think it proper that the said vessel be detained for the present, and that the persons taken on board be secured in some safe place in the County of Monmouth, until this Congress can obtain satisfactory information respecting those persons, their business and destination. And this Congress request the Committee of Monmouth to make diligent inquiry into the above matter, and to report to this Congress whatever discovery they may be able to obtain; of which the Secretary is ordered to give the said Committee notice.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the petition from the County of Monmouth, suggesting that the Deputies returned for that County were not duly elected, and praying that the late election may be vacated and a new one granted; and the parties, for and against the petition attending, were called in and heard pursuant to the order of the day, and desiring a further hearing thereon.

The Congress adjourned to four o'clock P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the further consideration of the petition from Monmouth respecting the election of Deputies; and the parties again attending were called in and heard, and then withdrew.

The Deputies from Monmouth having desired leave to withdraw during the debate,

Ordered, That leave be granted; and the Deputies withdrew accordingly.

Whereupon, after debating the question,

On motion made,

Resolved, That the determination of the question be postponed until to-morrow morning.

The Congress adjourned to nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, October 12, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the petition from Monmouth County, relative to the election of deputies; and after debating the same, the question being put, whether the election was regular or not? It passed in the affirmative:

Yeas—

Bergen County,
Middlesex,
Somerset,
Morris,
Sussex,
Hunterdon,
Salem,
Cumberland,
Cape May.

Nays—

Burlington County, Gloucester, Essex.

Ordered, That the Deputies from Monmouth County be called in, and that they take their seats.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of a resolution for apprehending of deserters from the Continental troops, reported a draught of such resolution; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Hart, from the Committee appointed to prepare an estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a state of defence, reported the draught of such an estimate; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition from the Committee of Hackinsack, recommending Militia officers for that precinct, was read and ordered a second reading.

On motion made.

Resolved, That the question relative to the state of the Provincial fund be postponed till the afternoon, to be then taken into consideration.

The petition from the Committee of Hackinsack, recommending Militia officers for that precinct, was read a second time;

Ordered, That commissions do issue pursuant to the prayer of the said petition.

A petition from the Township of Kingwood, and a petition from the Township of Alexandria, in the County of Hunterdon, praying that house holders, and others not freeholders, who pay their proportion of taxes in this Colony, may be admitted to vote for Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress at future elections; were read, and ordered a second reading.

Two other petitions from the Townships of Greenwich and Mansfield-Woodhouse, in the County of Sussex, both of the same purport as above; were also read, and ordered a second reading.

A petitioo from the officers of the united regiment of Freehold and Middletown, praying that the officers therein named may be commissioned, was read;

Ordered, That commissions do issue accordingly.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, and chose Mr. Fisher Chairman, upon the estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a state of defence at this time; and also upon the ways and means necessary to be adopted to provide a sufficient fund to defray that expence; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some progress in the business to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the Congress agreed.

A letter from James Kinsey and William Livingston, Esquires, two of the members of the Continental Congress, recommending to the consideration of this Congress to raise two Battalions in this Colony immediately; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress adjourned until 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, October 13, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The following letter from the President of the Continental Congress, inclosing the minutes of that House as to the raising of two Battalions in this Colony immediately; and also forty-eight blank commissions, for the Captains and subaltern officers, was laid before this Congress; and the letter and minutes were read, and ordered a second reading.

Philadelphia, Oct. 12, 1775.

Gentlemen:— Some late intelligence, laid before Congress, seems to render it absolutely necessary, for the protection of our liberties, and safety of our lives, to raise several new Battalions, and therefore the Congress have come into the inclosed resolutions, which I am ordered to transmit to you. The Congress have the firmest confidence that, from your experienced zeal in this great cause, you will exert your utmost endeavors to carry the said resolutions into execution with all possible expedition.

The Congress have agreed to furnish the men with a hunting shirt, not exceeding the value of one dollar and one-third of a dollar, and a blanket, provided these can be procured, but these are not to be made part of the terms of enlistment.

                                    I am, gentlemen,

Your most obedient humble servant,
John Hancock,        
President.    

By order of Congress, I forward you forty-eight commissions for the Captains and subaltern officers in the New Jersey Battalions.

To the members of the Convention of New Jersey. In Congress, Monday, October 9, 1775.

 

On motion made.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Convention of New Jersey, that they immediately raise, at the expence of the Continent, two Battalions, consisting of eight companies, each company of sixty-eight privates, and officered with one Captain, one Lieutenant, one Ensign, four Sergeants and four Corporals.

That the privates be enlisted for a year, at the rate of five dollars per calendar month, liable to be discharged at any time, on allowing them one month's pay extraordinary.

That each of the privates be allowed, instead of a bounty, a felt hat, a pair of yarn stockings, and a pair of shoes; the men to find their own arms.

That the pay of the officers, for the present, be the same as that of the officers in the present Continental army and in case the pay of the officers in the present Continental army is augmented, the pay of the officers in these Battalions shall be in like manner augmented, from the time of their engaging in the service.

October 12, 1775.

Resolved, That each Captain and other commissioned officer, while in the recruiting service of this Continent, or on their march to join the army, shall be allowed two dollars and two-thirds of a dollar per week, for their subsistence; and that the men who enlist shall each of them, whilst in quarters, be allowed one dollar per week, and one dollar and one-third of a dollar when on their march to join the army for the same purpose.

That the President transmit to the Convention of New Jersey blank commissions, to be filled up by the said Convention, to the Captains and subaltern officers in the said two Battalions, and that the appointment of the field officers be for the present suspended, until the Congress shall take order on that matter.

The form of the inlistment to be in the following words:

"I                     have this day voluntarily enlisted myself, as a soldier in the American Continental army, for one year, unless sooner discharged; and do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations as are or shall be established for the government of the said army."

A true copy from the minutes.
Chas. Thomson,        
Sec.    
By order of the Congress.
John Hancock,        
President.    

A memorial from Jonathan D, Sergeant, Esq., Treasurer to the late Congress, with a report of his proceedings, were read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the Chairman of the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, inclosing two letters, said to have been written by the Rev. Mr. Jonathan Odell of Burlington, to certain persons in Great Britain, and referring the consideration of the said letters to this Congress, was laid before the Congress, and the several letters were read, and ordered a second reading.

A memorial from the Rev. Mr. Odell, praying that this Congress will be pleased to appoint an hour for his being heard this day, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A motion was made by Mr. Mehelm, that this Congress do in general keep their doors open; and, on the question being put, it passed in the negative.

On motion made.

Ordered, That the several associations, with the lists of such persons as have not associated, returned to this Congress, be filed for the inspection of the Deputies.

A petition from the Freeholders of Hackinsack, objecting to the election of the Committee of that precinct, and referring the merits of that election to this Congress, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from a number of the Freeholders of the precinct of Hackinsack, praying that the said election may be confirmed, was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the letter from the Continental Congress, recommending two Battalions to be immediately raised in this Colony; and, after some time spent therein.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Ogden, Mr. Abraham Clark and Mr. Stewart, be a Committee to prepare the draught of an answer, and to report the same this afternoon.

The letter from the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, with the letters of the Rev. Mr. Odell sent therewith; and also the memorial of Mr. Odell, desiring to be heard respecting the above letters, were all read a second time; and Mr. Odell attending:

Ordered, That Mr. Odell hath leave to return to his house at present, upon his parol of honor to attend this Congress on Tuesday next at three o'clock in the afternoon.

The Committee appointed to examine the muster-roll of Minute Officers, reported, that they had inspected those of Captain Tenbrook, Captain Shaw and Captain Anderson, and recommend that their commissions be granted.

Ordered, That commissions do issue accordingly to the officers of those companies.

The Congress adjourned till three o'clock, P. M,

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Several memorials having been presented to this Congress, from gentlemen who offer themselves for commissions in the two Battalions expected to be raised in this Colony; it is ordered that all such memorials as already have, or hereafter may be received on this subject, be filed, until this Congress shall have come to a determination as to the raising of those Battalions; and then to be taken into consideration.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an answer to the letter from the Continental Congress, reported a draught; which was read, and ordered to be engrossed.

The following engrossed answer to the letter from the Continental Congress was read and approved, ordered to be signed by the President, and dispatched immediately.

Trenton, October 13, 1775.

Gentlemen:— The Congress of New Jersey, animated with equal affection, to the common cause of America, and, equally with the other Provinces, desirous to promote its general interest as far as in their power, are sorry to find their good intentions likely to be restrained by one of the resolutions of the honorable Continental Congress of the 12th instant, obligingly communicated to us by their President.

We cannot but observe that if the nomination of the field officers of the Battalions proposed to be raised in this Province, be not first ascertained to be in this Congress, it will much impede the expeditious raising the men; and we are clearly of opinion, that it will tend much to expedite this service, if field officers are first of all appointed; for if they are such as are generally respected in the Province, not only Captains and subalterns of reputation will offer their service, but the privates will enlist more cheerfully — Indeed the other commissions cannot, perhaps, be properly filled up, without inserting in what Battalion the officers are to serve.

We also humbly conceive that, as other Provinces have been indulged with this privilege, we cannot, in justice to our constituents, nor consistent with the honor of our Province, give up this claim.

We have do doubt, therefore, but that the honorable Continental Congress will reconsider this resolution, and determine that this Province ought neither to be precluded a privilege granted to every other Province, nor restrained in their endeavors to promote the general interest of America — In such case, we beg leave to assure them, that this Congress will exert all its influence in promoting the raising the proposed levies; and we have the pleasure to add, that we have reason to hope they will be attended with the desired success.

We are gentlemen.

Your most obedient servants.

By order of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey
.
Samuel Tucker,        
President,    
The members of the Honorable the }
     Continental Congress, Philad'a. }

On motion made.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, upon the estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a state of defence at this time; and also upon the ways and means necessary to be adopted to provide a sufficient fund to defray that expence; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some further progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again on Thursday next; to which the Congress agreed.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, October 14, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The petition from the freeholders of Hackinsack, complaining of an undue election of the Committee of that precinct; and also the petition from others, freeholders of Hackinsack, praying that the said election may be confirmed, were both read a second time; and, after hearing the sundry evidence on both sides, and deliberating thereon,

Resolved unanimously, That the election of the Committee for the precinct of Hackinsack be confirmed.

The certificate from the Committee of the County of Bergen, of field officers chosen for the Regiment of Militia in that County, was read;

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several officers therein named.

Whereas, from the peculiar circumstances of the County of Morris, a debt of about one hundred and eighty Pounds hath accrued in the raising of minutemen in May last, on the alarming account of the battle of Lexington; and it being thought to be right and just that the same should be discharged, it is therefore recommended to the Committee of the County of Morris, to pay the same out of their part or proportion of the Ten Thousand Pound tax, levied on the inhabitants of that County, in virtue of an ordinance of the late Congress ; Provided, That this payment be not considered as paid, or ordered to be paid, at the general expence of the Colony.

On motion made,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several officers of the regiment of Militia in the County of Bergen, whose names are mentioned in the certificate signed by the clerk of the County Committee.

On motion made,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several field officers of ths regiment of Militia of Cape May, whose names are mentioned in the certificate of the County Committee.

On motion made,

Ordered, That Mr. Cooper, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. De Hart and Mr. Carey, be a Committee to prepare the draught of a letter to the Continental Congress, and report the same this afternoon.

The Congress adjourned till four o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of a letter to the Continental Congress, reported such draught, which was read the first and second time, and ordered to be engrossed.

The following engrossed letter to the Continental Congress was read, approved, and ordered to be signed by the President, and dispatched immediately:

In Provincial Congress,           }
Trenton, October 14, 1775. }

Gentlemen:— This Congress finding that, in order to enable them to provide a sufficient quantity of arms and ammunition, and such other articles as are essentially necessary to enforce the operations of the present glorious struggle for liberty, a very considerable fund must at all events be immediately raised; and as this Congress, in all cases of importance, think it necessary that they should have some knowledge of the sentiments of the Continental Congress, I am directed to apply to your House, and to inquire whether it is consistent with the measures the Continental Congress have adopted, to let any of the Provinces have the use of such a sum of the Continental currency as may be sufficient to answer their particular exigencies, upon the faith of such Province; and, if so, what sum the Continental Congress can spare, and upon what terms, for the use of New Jersey at this time.

Anxionsly desirous of rendering every possible assistance to the common cause, this Congress have it before them to make provision sufficient to enable them, at least, to raise four thousand minute-men, to take the field on any emergency; but as it is uncertain what provision the Continental Congress may have thought proper to make for such minute-men, if called into actual service, I am likewise directed to apply to you for information in this respect.

This Congress beg the favour of an answer as soon as possible.

                By order of Congress.

I am, Gentlemen, Your most obedient humble servant,

Samuel Tucker,        
President.    
To the members of the Honorable the Continental Congress now sitting at Philadelphia.

 

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock on Monday morning.

Monday, October 16, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

On motion made.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several officers of the battalion of minute-men, in the County of Morris, whose names are mentioned in the certificate of the County Committee, in the order and of the dates as set forth in the certificate.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, October 17, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of a Resolution, respecting tlie apprehending of deserters from the Continental Troops, reported the following draught, which was read, passed, and ordered to be engrossed.

1. Resolved, That, when information shall be made to any member of any County or Town Committee in this Colony of any deserters from the Continental Army being found lurking in such County or town, any member of such Town or County Committee shall be, and he is hereby authorized to issue his order to the Captain or Commanding Officer of any Company of Minute or Militia men in such town or County, requiring him to send one or more men of his Company to search for and to apprehend such deserter; and, when apprehended, to confine him in some safe place, until he can be conveniently conducted to the army. Provided always, that if any person or persons, so apprehended as aforesaid, shall deny his or their being a deserter or deserters, the Chairman or Deputy Chairman of such Town Committee, do immediately convene such Town Committee to hear and determine the same.

2. Resolved, That all reasonable expences of apprehending and conducting any such deserter or deserters as aforesaid, and allowed by any County Committee, shall be paid out of any public monies in the hands of the Treasurer or Collector of such County; and that such County Committee do transmit the accounts of such disbursements to this Congress or the Committee of Safety, to be laid before the Continental Congress for reimbursement.

3. Resolved, That the inhabitants of this Colony in general be desired to exert themselves in causing such deserter or deserters to be apprehended; and that any thing contained in the above resolutions shall not be construed to preclude any such inhabitant from apprehending such deserters without waiting for an order from any member of such town or County Committee as aforesaid.

The petition from the Township of Nottingham, praying that the petitioners may be permitted to join the light infantry Company at Trenton, was read a second time, and referred to future consideration.

The petition from the County of Gloucester, praying that some mode may be adopted to compel the payment of the ten thousand pounds tax, from such persons as have refused to pay the same, was read a second time;

Ordered, That Mr. Hart, Mr. Ogden, Mr. De Hart, Mr. Pearson and Mr. Dunham, be a Committee to prepare the draught of an Ordinance for that purpose, and report the same to this Congress.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress resumed the letter of the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, the letters said to be written by the Rev. Mr. Odell, and Mr. Odell's memorial; and Mr. Odell attending, was called in and heard, and then ordered to withdraw — whereupon, after deliberating thereon, the previous question being put, that the determination of Mr. Odell's case be postponed till to-morrow morning.

Resolved, That the same be postponed accordingly.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, October 18, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The report from the Committee of the County of Monmouth, relative to the detention of a small sloop, supposed to be a tender to some ship of war, &c., with the several examinations respecting that matter, were read;

Resolved, That it be recommended to that Committee to publish an advertisement in the newspapers, describing the sloop, so that the owner may know where to apply; and that the men and arms found on board the said sloop, be taken proper care of by that Comaiittee, until this Congress or the Committee of Safety, shall give further order therein.

The Congress resumed the consideration of Mr. Odell's case; and, having deliberated thereon, are of opinion, that it appears, from the general purport of Mr. Odell's letter, that, he disapproves of, and is, in principle, opposed to the measures of defence adopted by the Continent, to prevent the oppressive designs of the British Ministry; but. as this Congress would by no means violate the right of private sentiment, and as Mr. Odell's letter does not clearly appear to have been intended to influence public measures, and as some degree of ambiguity is contained in several parts thereof, this Congress do therefore decline passing any public censure against him.

The Congress adjourned till three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

On motion made,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the officers of Captain Sweetwood's company, in Colonel Taylor's regiment of Militia, in Monmouth County.

The petition from Amwell, praying that the Third Regiment of Militia, in Hunterdon County, may be joined to the first — The petition from the upper part of Amwell, praying that, if any alteration be made in the Third Regiment, the petitioners may be joined to the Fourth Regiment in the said County — The petition from the Committee of Amwell; and also the petition of Captain Imlay and and Captain Gray, respecting the Third Regiment of Hunterdon — were all read a second time; and the Congress, having duly considered the prayer of the several petitions,

Resolved unanimously, That the appointment of field officers, for the Third Regiment of Militia, for the County of Hunterdon, be confirmed ; and that the several regiments continue as directed by the late Congress.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, October 19, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the petition from Nottingham, praying that the petitioners may be admitted to join the light infantry company at Trenton ; and, on the question being put,

Resolved, That the prayer of the petition be granted to such persons as reside in the village of King's-Borough.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A petition from sundry inhabitants and freeholders of Trenton and parts adjacent, praying that householders may be admitted to vote at future elections, and that such elections be carried on by ballot; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an Ordinance for the further regulation of the Militia of this Colony, reported a draught of the same; which was read and ordered a second reading.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, upon the estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a state of defence at this time; and also upon the ways and means necessary to be adopted to provide a sufficient fund to defray that expence; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some further progress in the matters referred to them, and desired leave to sit again; to which the Congress agreed.

The several petitions from the County of Sussex, praying a suspension of law suits, upon certain conditions, were read a second time; and, after deliberating thereon.

Ordered, That the further consideration of the prayer of the said petitions be postponed to a future session.

A petition from the farmers of Essex, praying that money at interest, lawyers, &c., may be taxed, was read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion made.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the field officers of the northern battalion of the regiment of Militia of the County of Essex.

On motion made,

The Congress resolved unanimously, That a commission of first Brigadier General of the Militia forces of this Colony do issue to Philemon Dickinson, Esquire.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, October 20, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The certificate of the election of officers of the several companies of Militia in the Township of Freehold, was read;

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several officers therein named.

The certificate of the election of field officers for the battalion of minute-men, for the County of Monmouth, was read;

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the officers therein named.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the Ordinance for the further regulation of the Militia forces of this Colony; and, after some time spent therein,

Ordered, That the said Ordinance be committed to Mr. Stewart, Mr. De Hart, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Pope and Mr. Browne, who are to report their proceedings thereon.

The certificate of the election of field officers for the First Regiment of Sussex County, was read;

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the officers therein named.

The several petitions from Hunterdon and Sussex, praying that householders may be permitted to vote at future elections of Deputies, to serve in Congress, were read a second time; and, after some time spent therein.

On motion made,

Resolved, That the further consideration of the above petitions be postponed until Wednesday next.

The Congress adjourned until to-morrow morning.

Saturday, October 21, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The petition from the farmers of Essex, praying that money at interest, lawyers and mechanics, may be taxed; the recommendation of the Committee of Newark thereon; and the petition from Hunterdon County, praying that money at interest may be taxed; were all read a second time, and referred to further consideration, when this Congress shall find it necessary to raise taxes in this Colony.

On motion made,

Resolved, That this Congress will take up the further consideration of the estimate of expences, and the Provincial fund, on Monday next.

On motion made,

Ordered, That the following letter be engrossed, and dispatched immediately to the Continental Congress, signed by the President.

In Provincial Congress             }
Trenton, October 21, 1775. }

Sir:— Since the resolutions of the Continental Congress, for raising two Battalions in this Colony, were communicated to us, great numbers of gentlemen have applied for commissions or warrants to recruit; but this Congress, expecting hourly to hear from you on the subject of appointing the field officers, have, as yet, forbore either to grant commissions or issue warrants, and therefore are very anxious to have your resolution on the subject of our letter of the 13th instant.

This Congress desire me to assure you that from every appearance the Battalions will speedily be completed, if your honorable House shall think proper to comply with the purport of our letter of the 13th instant.

To expedite this important service, I am to request the favour of you, sir, to transmit to us the resolutions of the Continental Congress, by the bearer, Thomas Potts, Esq., one of our members.

                By order of Congress.

Your most humble servant,
Samuel Tucker,        
President.    
To the Hon. John Hancock, Esq., President }
     of the Continental Congress, Philad'a.     }

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Joseph Salter, Esquire, having returned his commission of Lieutenant Colonel of the Second Regiment of Militia for the County of Monmouth, and desired leave to resign the same;

Resolved unanimously, That his resignation be accepted.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an ordinance for compelling the payment of the ten thousand pound tax, from such persons as have refused to pay their quotas, reported the draught of such ordinance; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress adjourned until Monday morning next.

Monday, October 23, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The draught of an Ordinance for compelling the payment of the ten thousand pound tax, from such persons as have refused to pay their quotas, was read a second time, paragraph by paragraph, and, after deliberating thereon,

Ordered, That the same be engrossed.

Mr. Fisher, from the Committee appointed to examine what matters were referred over to this Congress by the late Provincial Congress or Committee of Safety, reported, that an application to the late Congress to encourage the making of saltpetre in this Colony, and some petitions from the County of Somerset, respecting Colonel M'Donald's appointment to the command of the Battalion of minute-raen in that County, were all the matters referred to this Congress.

The Congress adjourned till three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Pursuant to the order of the day the Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, upon the estimate of the expence necessary to put this Colony into a state of defence at this time; and also upon the ways and means to provide a fund to defray the expences of the same; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some further progress in the matters referred to them, and desired leave to sit again; to which the Congress agreed.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, October 24, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A petition from several persons of Captain Harrison's Company of light infantry, praying that the petitioners may be indulged in continuing in that Company, notwithstanding the late Resolution of this Congress; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The following engrossed Ordinance, for compelling the payment of the ten thousand pound tax, from such persons as have refused to pay their quotas, was read, approved, and, on the question being put,

Resolved, That the same do pass.

Whereas it was resolved and directed, by an Ordinance of the late Congress, that the sum of ten thousand pounds Proclamation money should be apportioned and raised for the use of this Colony; and it appearing that the whole of that sum hath not been collected pursuant thereto: And whereas it is necessary, from the public exigencies of this Colony, that the same should be collected, and that some equitable mode be ascertained for this purpose.

1. It is therefore resolved and directed, That the Collector of every town and precinct, appointed or to be appointed pursuant to the above recited Ordinance, shall and do make demand, on or before the twentieth day of November next, of every person within his District, who hath neglected or refused paying the sum assessed in virtue of said Ordinance, or give notice thereof at his usual place of abode, and inform such person, or give notice as aforesaid, that if the said assessment be not paid into the hands of the said Collector, within fifteen days after the said twentieth day of November next, in such case, the name of the delinquent will be returned to the Committee of the County where such delinquent resides; and such County Committee are hereby ordered to direct their Chairman or Deputy Chairman, to issue an order to some proper person or persons, to be by them appointed for that purpose, to make distress on the goods and chattels of the said delinquent, and make sale thereof at public vendue, giving five days notice thereof by advertisement in such town or County, who shall pay the assessment for which such distress shall be made, into the hands of the said Town Collector, to be by him paid unto the Collector of the County, in the same manner as the other assessments collected by the Ordinance aforementioned are, by an order of the late Congress, directed to be paid; and the person or persons so as aforesaid appointed, or to be appointed, to distrain, after payment made, shall and may retain one shilling and sixpence for each distress and sale: provided always, that, after payment of the sum so distrained for, and the costs of such distress, the overplus, if any, be returned to the owner or owners of the goods so distrained as aforesaid.

2. And it is further resolved and directed, That in case any Town Collector, or person appointed to distrain as aforesaid, shall die, neglect or refuse to do or perform the several duties, in this or the Ordinance above recited, enjoined, new officers for that purpose shall be appointed by the Committee of the County where such default shall happen.

3. And whereas some owners of profitable tracts of land, whereon improvements are made, may not happen to reside in the same Township or Cuunty where such land lies; and, unless some remedy be provided, it may be impracticable to recover the assessment made on such tracts of land; it is therefore resolved and directed, that the goods and chattels of the tenant, or other person residing upon or having the care of such tracts of land, or the goods and chattels of the landlord, if there found, on his refusal or neglect to pay the said assessment, shall be liable to be distrained and sold for payment thereof, and all charges accrued thereon; and in case the tenant, or person having the care of the land as aforesaid, shall pay such assessment, or his goods be distrained and sold for payment thereof, then the said tenant shall and may deduct the assessment so paid out of the rent agreed for.

4. And it is further resolved and directed, That in case any person or persons shall think him, her or themselves aggrieved by any assessment made in pursuance of this or the above recited ordinance, and complaint thereof be made to the Committee of the County where such person or persons shall reside, at the next meeting after the demand of the assessment as aforesaid hath been made, such County Committee shall and may, in such case, determine the same; and if they shall adjudge that the complainant has been unduly assessed in the whole or in part, the Chairman or Deputy Chairman of such County Committee, is hereby directed to draw an order on the Town or County Collector, as the case may require, for repayment to the complainant of so much as shall be adjudged to have been paid more than ought to have been assessed; provided always that no such complaint shall be heard until after payment of the assessment complained of.

5. And it is further resolved and directed, That every County Collector, who shall neglect or refuse accounting with and paying the monies that are or shall be received by him, in virtue of this or the ordinance above recited, to such person or persons as directed in and by the said recited ordinance, shall forfeit, for every such offence, the sum of twenty Pounds; and every Town Collector, who shall neglect or refuse accounting with and paying into the hands of the Collector the monies that are or shall be received by him in virtue of either of the said ordinances above recited, when thereunto required by the Committee of the County, or shall neglect to do or perform the other duties enjoined by either of the said ordinances, shall forfeit five Pounds for every such offence; and every person appointed to distrain as aforesaid, who shall neglect or refuse accounting with and paying into the hands of the Collector of the Town, where such distress shall be made, the monies he shall receive in virtue of this ordinance, when thereunto required by order of the Committee of such Town, or the County Committee, or shall neglect to do or perform the other duties enjoined him by either of the said ordinances, shall pay forty Shillings for every such offence; and every County Committee shall direct their Chairman or deputy Chairman to issue an order to such person or persons as they shall appoint to make distress and sale of the goods and chatties of all such persons who neglect or refuse accounting with or paying into the hand of such person or persons who, in virtue of this or the said recited ordinance, are or shall be appointed to receive the same, as well for recovery of the forfeitures aforesaid, as the public monies detained by them as aforesaid; and in case sufficient goods and chattels for the purposes aforesaid shall not be found, then to take the bodies of such delinquents, who shall be ordered by the Committee of the County, where such default shall happen, to be confined in such safe place as they shall appoint, until the forfeitures and monies detained as aforesaid, and also all charges occurred by reason thereof, be fully paid.

6. And it is further resolved and directed, That all forfeitures, recovered as aforesaid, shall be laid out in such manner as the Committee of the County, where such forfeiture is incurred, shall direct.

A memorial was presented to this Congress from Icabod(sic) B. Barnett, Esquire, of Elizabeth Town, setting forth that, in the month of March last, he was advertised by the Committee of Elizabeth Town, as inimical to the liberties of his Country, for assisting Messrs. Robert and John Murray in landing certain goods out of the ship Beulah; that ever before, and since landing the said goods, he hath been ready and willing to render any service to his Country, on the present occasion, in his power; and that he hath in no wise contravened the public good, except in that particular instance for which he is heartily sorry, and prays an acquittal from his former censure — and it appearing to this Congress, that the behaviour of the said Icabod B. Barnett, since the above transaction, hath by no means been unfriendly to the liberties of this Country; and he having manifested a suitable penitence for his behaviour in the above matter; it is unanimously resolved, That the memoralist ought to be restored to the favourable regard of his Country, and he is accordingly restored to all the civil and commercial privileges which he heretofore enjoyed in this Colony.

On motion made.

Ordered, That Mr. Abraham Clark and Mr. Hart be added to the Committee appointed to prepare and amend the draught of the Militia ordinance.

The Congress adjourned until 3 o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Middlesex County, objecting to the field officers of the Regiment of Militia commanded by Colonel Wetherill, and praying leave to proceed to a new choice of field officers for the said Regiment; was read and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Hunterdon County, praying that householders may be admitted to vote at future elections for Deputies to serve in Congress ; was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House upon the estimate of the expence necessary for the defence of this Colony at this time; and also upon the ways and means to provide a fund to defray the expences of the same; and, after deliberating thereon, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had gone through the several matters to them referred, and had come to the resolutions following.

1. That four thousand stand of arms be purchased for the use of this Colony; and, on the question being put, whether the Congress doth agree to the same? It passed for three thousand stand of arms only to be purchased.

2. That ten tons of gun-powder be purchased for the use of this Colony; to which the Congress agreed.

3. That twenty tons of lead be purchased for the use of this Colony; to which the Congress agreed.

4. That two thousand cartouch-boxes be purchased for the use of this Colony; which, on the question, was reduced to one thousand only.

5. That two medicine chests be purchased for the use of this Colony; to which the Congress agreed.

6. That eight hundred tents, with the necessary furniture, canteens and knapsacks, be purchased for the use of this Colony; and, on the question, it passed for four hundred tents, with the necessary furniture, &c., to be purchased.

7. That one thousand hunting-shirts be purchased for the use of this Colony; which, on the question, passed in the negative.

8. That the sum of one thousand four hundred Pounds be appropriated as subsistence money, at one Shilling per man per day. for the troops of this Colony when called into actual service; and until they arrive at the place of destination; to which the Congress agreed.

9. That the sum of eight thousand five hundred and eighty-five Pounds be appropriated as a fund for the payment of the troops of this Colony for one month, when called into actual service; and, on the question, whether this sum, or the sum of four thousand Pounds only be appropriated? It passed unanimously for four thousand Pounds only.

10. That four thousand blankets be purchased for the use of this Colony; which, on the question, was reduced to two thousand only.

11. That the sum of three hundred Pounds be laid out in axes, spades and entrenching tools, for the use of this Colony; to which the Congress agreed.

12. That the sum of five hundred Pounds be laid out in procuring a train of artillery for the use of this Colony; to which the Congress agreed.

13. That the sum of five hundred Pounds be appropriated to encourage the erection of salt-petre works in this Colony; and, on the question being put, whether this sum or the sum of one thousand Pounds be appropriated to this use? It passed for one thousand Pounds.

On motion made,

Resolved, That the sum of one thousand Pounds, voted by this Congress to encourage the erecting of salt-petre works in this Colony, be appropriated to the payment of a bounty of one Shilling per pound, over and above the market price, for any quantity, not exceeding twenty thousand pounds weight, of good merchantable saltpetre, which shall be made and manufactured in this Colony, on or before the first day of January, 1777; Provided, that the Continental Congress shall not offer the like premium for salt-petre manufactured in any of the United Colonies.

On motion made,

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Congress, that the sum of thirty thousand Pounds Proclamation money, be immediately emitted in bills of credit for the use of this Colony.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Hart, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Elmer and Mr. Dunham, be a Committee to prepare the draught of an Ordinance for emitting the aforesaid sum of thirty thousand Pounds in bills of credit, and to make a provision to sink the same; and also to appoint Commissioners to purchase and procure the several articles enumerated in the foregoing Resolutions, and that they report the same to this Congress.

The Congress adjourned until two o'clock, P. M. tomorrow.

Wednesday, October 25, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A motion was made by the Deputies of the County of Salem, and seconded by the members of Hunterdon, that, as soon as this session is ended, this Congress doth dissolve itself; in order that a new election may take place upon more extensive principles, to wit:

That, at such new election, some householders, or reputable single men, as are possessed bona fide of a personal estate of the value of fifty Pounds Proclamation money, or upwards, and have been resident at least one year in the County, may be admitted to vote with those that are Freeholders:

Ordered, That the consideration of this motion be postponed until this Congress shall determine the petitions from the Counties of Hunterdon and Sussex, praying that householders may be admitted to vote at future elections:

And thereupon, pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress resumed the consideration of the several petitions from the Counties of Hunterdon and Sussex, praying that householders may be admitted to vote at future elections; and, having duly weighed and considered the several arguments for and against the prayer of the said petitions; and also the above motion of the Deputies of the County of Salem, for a dissolution of this Congress ; the previous question was put, whether this Congress will proceed to determine the consideration of the above petitions and motion at this time, or postpone the same to the next session, in order that the sense of the Colony in general may be known?

Resolved, That the same be postponed to the next session of this Congress:

Yeas—

Bergen County,
Monmouth,
Cape May.
Essex,
Burlington,
 
Somerset,
Gloucester,
 

Nays—

Middlesex County,
Hunterdon,
Morris,
Salem,
Sussex,
Cumberland,

The petition from Middlesex, respecting the field officers of Colonel Wetherill's Regiment, was read a second time; and, on the question being put, whether the prayer of the said petition be granted or not? It was passed in the negative unanimously.

The petition from several persons of Captain Harrison's Company of light infantry, praying that the petitioners may be indulged in continuing in that Company, notwithstanding the late Resolution of Congress, was read a second time; and it now appearing, that the Company in Nottingham, to which the petitioners belonged, is united to another Company; it is therefore resolved that the prayer of the said petition be granted; and that a commission do issue to John Matthews, one of the Lieutenants.

The certificate of the election of field officers for the Battalion on the north side of Cohansie creek, in Cumberland County, was read a second time;

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the several persons therein named.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to Captain Thomas Wolverton, and to the officers of his Company of minute- men, in Sussex County,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to Samuel Forman, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel, Elisha Lawrence, Esq., First Major, and James Mott, Esq., Second Major, of the Second Regiment of Militia in the County of Monmouth.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, October 26, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

A petition from the Committee of Sussex County, objecting to the appointment of John Budd Scott, Esq., as First Major of the First Regiment of Militia in that County, and praying that Mr. Scott's commssion may be vacated, was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare the draught of an ordinance for striking the sum of thirty thousand Pounds in bills of credit for the use of this Colony; and to make a provision to sink the same, &c., reported a draught of such ordinance, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The following engrossed draught of the form of an advertisement respectmg the enlistment of men for the two Battalions, recommended to be raised in this Colony, was read and passed.

Ordered, That the same be sent to the press as soon as possible, and that two hundred copies be printed for the use of this Colony.

In Provincial Congress, held at Trenton,       }
the 26th day of October, 1775. }

Whereas the Honorable Continental Congress have recommended to this Congress, That there be immediately raised, in this Colony, at the expence of the Continent, two Battalions, consisting of eight companies each, and each company to consist of sixty-eight privates, and officered with one Captain, one Lieutenant, one Ensign, four Sergeants and four Corporals, on the following conditions.

That the privates be enlisted for a year, at the rate of five dollars per calendar month, liable to be discharged at any time, on allowing one month's pay extraordinary; that each of the privates be allowed, instead of a bounty, a felt hat, a pair of yarn stockings, and a pair of shoes — the men to find their own arms.

That each Captain and other commissioned officer, while in the recruiting service of this Continent, or on their march to join the army, shall be allowed two dollars and two-thirds of a dollar per week, for their subsistence; and that the men who enlist shall, each of them, whilst in quarters, be allowed one dollar per week, and one dollar and one-third of a dollar when on their march to join the army, for the same purpose.

The form of enlistment to be in the following words: "I                     have this day voluntarily enlisted myself as a soldier in the American Continental army for one year, unless sooner discharged; and do bind myself to conform in all instances to such rules and regulations as are or shall be established for the government of the said army."

This Congress, desirous to carry into execution the above resolution of the Continental Congress, do resolve that warrants be issued to proper persons for immediately raising the said two Battalions, consisting of eight companies each, and each company of sixty-eight privates, and officered with one Captain, one Lieutenant, one Ensign, four Sergeants and four Corporals, on the terms aforesaid; which Sergeants, Corporals and privates to be enlisted, shall be able-bodied freemen: And it is further directed, that when any company shall be enlisted, the persons having warrants for raising the same, shall cause a muster to be had thereof, in the presence of either Elias Dayton, Azariah Dunham, Joseph Ellis or John Mehelm, Esquires, who are hereby appointed Muster Masters to review the said companies; and if upon such review such Muster Master, who shall attend for that purpose, shall find the said company complete, agreeable to the above directions, shall thereupon certify the same on the back of the muster-roll of such company to this Congress, or, in their recess, to the Committee of Safety, in order that commissions may be made out to the officers of such company; which commissions the Committee of Safety of this Colony, during the recess of this Congress, upon receiving certificates as above, are required to make out and issue.

And it is hereby recommended to the inhabitants of this Colony, to be aiding and assisting, as far as their influence extends, in raising the aforesaid levies.

And it is further resolved. That each muster-master shall have for his trouble for reviewing each company, such reward as this Congress or Committee of Safety shall judge proper for his service, which the Treasurer of this Colony for the time being, appointed by Congress, shall pay out of the bills of credit to be issued by direction of this Congress, upon an order or orders to him produced from this Congress or Committee of Safety.

By order of the Congress.
Samuel Tucker,      
President.    
Attested,
    John Carey, Sec.

The Congress adjourned till 9 o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Friday, October 27, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The petition from the Committee of Sussex, respecting Mr. Scott's commission, &c., was read a second time:

Resolved unanimously, By all the Counties except Sussex, which was excused from voting on this occasion, that Mr. Scott's commission be confirmed.

On motion made.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to the field officers, and the officers of the eleven companies of the northwest regiment of Militia in the County of Morris, when it shall be made to appear to this Congress that a Colonel hath been elected in the room of Mr. Winds, promoted to the rank of Colonel of the battalion of minute-men in that County.

On motion made,

Ordered, That commissions do issue to Matthias Williamson, Esq., Colonel, Samuell Tuthill, Esq., Lieutenant- Colonel, and Jacobus Post, Esq., Major of the regiment of light horse in the eastern division of this Colony.

The Committee to whom the Militia ordinance was referred, reported a draught of the same, with amendments, which was read, paragraph by paragraph, and debated;

Ordered, That the same be engrossed.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The following letter from the honorable the Continental Congress, was presented and read:

Philadelphia, October 25, 1775.

Gentlemen:— The Congress have taken into consideration your letters of the 13th and 14th instant, and, in answer thereto, I am directed to inform you, that the Congress are of opinion the public service makes it necessary that the Jersey battalions be levied with all possible expedition; but as the Congress are awaiting the return of their Committee from camp, in order to establish permanent regulations for all Continental forces, they, for the present, incline to suspend a determination on the question about the appointment of regimental field officers.

The public exigencies will not admit of loans from the Continental Treasury to any Colonies — the Congress however hope, that this will not disable you from supplying yourselves with arms and ammunition; in doing which, it is not doubted you will fall upon such means as will be most for the ease and safety of the Colony, * * * * * *

From some expressions in your letter of the 14th instant, the Congress apprehend it is the intention of your Convention to take into constant pay 4000 minute men; but as this will be a very heavy expence, and more, we think, than any one Colony can afford, we hope you will weigh and consider such a measure before you adopt it. With respect to provision for minute-men, the Congress have made none; conceiving that the several Colonies will make proper provision for them, where such provision is necessary, or where they are called into actual service, except when they are taken into Continental service, in which case they will be entitled to the same pay as the other Continental Troops.

                I am, gentlemen.

Your most obedient humble servant,
John Hancock,        
President.    
To the members of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey.

A copy of a petition from Mr. Thomas Lowrey, to the Continental Congress, praying that he may be appointed Commissary to the two battalions recommended to be raised in this Colony, was presented and read; and Mr. Lowrey having requested that this Congress would be pleased to recommend him to the Continental Congress, as a fit person for such appointment; and the question being put, whether this Congress will comply with the prayer of Mr. Lowrey's request or not? It passed in the affirmative.

Ordered, That Mr. President do sign an attested copy of this minute, and transmit the same to Mr. Lowrey.

The Ordinance for striking the sum of thirty thousand pounds in bills of credit, for the use of this Colony, and to make provision to sink the same, &c., was read a second time, and debated;

Ordered, That the same be engrossed.

The Congress adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, October 28, 1775.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

The following engrossed Ordinance, for the further regulation of the Militia forces of this Colony, was read, compared and approved:

Whereas the Ordinances of the late Provincial Congress, for regulating the Militia of this Colony, have been found insufficient to answer the good purposes intended; and it appearing to be essentially necessary that some further regulations be adopted at this time of imminent danger.

1. It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That each and every Captain in this Colony, within ten day's after the publication hereof, shall make out a list of all persons residing in his district capable of bearing arms, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, who, by the first Military Ordinance of a former Congress, were advised or requested to enrol themselves by signing a muster-roll therein mentioned, such persons only excepted whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms, who are hereby particularly exempted therefrom; a copy of which list each Captain respectively, within ten days after completing the same, shall deliver to the Colonel of the Regiment to which he shall belong, and such Colonel shall make return thereof to the Brigadier General of the division to which he shall belong; and also transmit a duplicate thereof to the Provincial Congress at their next sitting. And the respective Captains shall also make out exact lists of all such persons residing in their several districts capable of bearing arms, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms; which lists the said Captains shall lay before the Committee of the County to which they belong.

2. And it is further Resolved, That every person above directed to enrol himself by signing a muster-roll, shall bear arms, attend musters, and in all things be conformable to the rules and orders hereinafter mentioned; and shall, with all convenient speed, furnish himself with a good musket or firelock, and bayonet, sword or tomahawk, a steel ramrod, worm, priming wire and brush fitted thereto, a cartouch-box to contain twenty-three rounds of cartridges, twelve flints and a knapsack, agreeable to the direction of the Continental Congress, under the forfeiture of two shillings for the want of a musket or firelock, and of one shilling for the want of the other above enumerated articles.

3. And it is further Resolved, That every person directed to be enrolled as above, shall, at his place of abode, be also provided with one pound of powder, and three pounds of bullets of proper size to his musket or firelock.

4. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That each whole company of Militia do assemble at least once every month, properly accoutered as aforesaid, at such place as the Captain, or commanding officer of such company shall direct, and shall spend the whole day in perfecting themselves in the military exercises; and that a general muster or review be had of each regiment three times in every year, at such times and places as the field officers of each regiment shall think proper to appoint.

5. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That in case any person shall refuse or neglect to serve as a sergeant or corporal in any company, being thereunto requested by the Captain or commanding officer, or shall refuse or neglect to warn the men to appear under arms when required by the Captain or commanding officer, such sergeant or corporal, shall for every such neglect or refusal, forfeit the sum of twelve Shillings.

6. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all officers commissioned, by this or the former Congress, do subscribe the following declaration, to wit:

We, the subscribers, the officers of one of the regiments in the County of                     and Colony of New Jersey, do hereby promise and engage, under all the ties of religion, honor and regard to our Country, that we will, respectively, duly observe, and carry into execution, to the utmost of our power, all and every the orders, resolves and recommendations made, or to be made, by the Provincial Congress of this Colony, for defending our Constitution, and preserving the same inviolate; and that we will also render due obedience to such officers, who either by rank or superiority, are regularly placed above us. Which declaration shall be laid before the next sitting of the Provincial Congress.

7. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the following penalties be inflicted on those who do not attend and obey orders on the days appointed for general musters and reviews, to wit, a Colonel six Pounds, a Lieutenant Colonel five Pounds, a Major four Pounds, a Captain three Pounds, Lieutenants, Ensigns and Adjutants two Pounds each. Sergeants, Corporals, drummers, fifers and privates, directed to be enrolled as aforesaid, ten Shillings each, for each and every default. And that there shall be inflicted on those who do not attend properly accoutered as abovesaid, and obey orders, on the times to be appointed tor the meeting of the companies, at least once every month, to wit, a Captain thirty Shillings, Lieutenants and Ensigns twenty Shillings each. Sergeants, Corporals, drummers, fifers and privates four Shillings each, for each and every default. Provided always, that reasonable excuses shall be admitted for delinquents non-attendance, by those persons who are to issue the warrants of distress.

8. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all fines, under the degree of a Captain, shall be levied on the goods and chattels of the offenders, by warrant from the Captain directed to a Sergeant of his company; and those of field officers and Captains, under the degree of Colonel, to be levied on the goods and chattels of the offender, by a warrant from the Colonel of the regiment directed to the Adjutant; and those of a Colonel, by a warrant from a Brigadier General, directed to a Major of the regiment to which such delinquent or delinquents belong.

9. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the several officers and persons to whom warrants of distress shall be directed, shall, upon receipt thereof, immediately levy the several fines and forfeitures therein mentioned, under the forfeiture of forty Shillings for every neglect in levying the same, to be recovered by a warrant under the hand of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where such neglect shall happen, directed to such person or persons as such Committee shall appoint for that; and every Sergeant shall levy upon each delinquent, in the warrant to him directed, the sum of one Shilling over and,above the penalty laid in such warrant, which he is to keep and detain as a reward for his trouble; and each Major or Adjutant shall receive for each distress by them made, the sum of five Shillings, which he is to levy as abovesaid. And the fines and forfeitures aforesaid levied by a Sergeant, when recovered, shall be paid to the Captain issuing such warrant, to be by him laid out in supplying such of his company with arms as are not able to furnish themselves therewith; and shall render to the Committee of the County, in which he resides, a true account of all such fines and forfeitures by him received, and his disbursements out of the same, agreeable to the above directions, when he shall be thereunto required by said Committee; and in case any of such fines and forfeitures shall remain in such Captain's hands for the space of two months not laid out as aforesaid, he shall then pay the same to such Committee, to be by them laid out as above directed; and all fines recovered from any officer or officers, above the degree of Lieutenant, shall be immediately paid into the hands of the County Committee, to be by them laid out in such manner as they shall judge most serviceable for the common defence of the Colony.

10. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That if this Colony shall be alarmed or invaded by an armed force, then, and in such case, every subaltern and soldier so enrolled, or directed to be enrolled as aforesaid; and also each minute man raised, or which may then be raised, is hereby requested immediately to repair, properly armed and accoutered, to his Captain's residence, unless otherwise ordered; and the Captain, or commanding officer of the company nearest to the place where such alarm or invasion shall happen, shall immediately march his company to oppose the enemy; and at the same time send an express to the commanding officer of the Regiment to which he belongs, who is to march with the whole, or part of the forces under his command, as he, before receiving orders from one of the general officers, shall judge necessary, in order to prevent the enemy from landing or penetrating into any part of the country; and at the same time shall send an express to some one of the general officers nearest to him, informing him of the intelligence he hath received of such an alarm or invasion; and, during the times of such invasion or alarm, the officers and soldiers abovesaid, shall be subject to a courtmartial, under the same rules and orders as directed and ordered by the Continental Congress of the associated Colonies, held at Philadelphia on the tenth day of May last, for the better government of the Continental troops.

11. Provided always, and it is further Resolved and Directed, That no pains and penalties, imposed by a courtmartial, shall extend to the taking life or member of any delinquent offender who shall be called out as aforesaid.

12. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That every person between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, capable of bearing arms as aforesaid, who shall come from any of the neighboring Provinces into this Colony, shall, within two weeks after his arrival, enrol himself in the company of the place where such person may chance to reside, and attend musters, as before directed for the Militia; and, in case of neglect or refusal, shall be subject to the same fines and forfeitures.

13. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the officers and minute-men, now formed into companies or Battalions, or such as shall be so formed hereafter, shall observe the same rules, orders and directions, as to attending musters, and learning the military discipline; and be subject to the same fines and penalties for non-attendance, as before directed for the Militia, and to be recovered in like manner.

14. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the minute-men, when called out to the assistance of a neighbouring Colony, shall be subject to the articles of war established by the Continental Congress, and be under the direction of their own officers, unless a Continental officer of superior rank be present, to whom, in such case, they are to yield due subordination.

15. And whereas, several companies of light-horse have been raised in this Colony; and as it is probable that more may be raised hereafter. It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That each company of light-horse do not exceed forty privates, and that one company only be allowed to be raised in each County; and that each Regiment be commanded by a Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, and Major, who are to be subject to the command of the Brigadier Generals of this Colony, the Provincial Congress or Committee of Safety; and that such Regiments of horse shall be under the same regulations, as to the times of muster and learning of the military discipline, as before directed for the foot Militia by this Ordinance, and subject to the same fines and penalties for non-attendance; which fines and penalties are to be recovered in manner aforesaid; and that the officers of each Regiment of horse take equal rank with the Militia officers of foot, holding similar commissions of the same date.

16, And it is further Resolved and Directed, That each and every of the inhabitants of this Colony, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms as above directed, shall as an equivalent thereto, and also in lieu of all future voluntary contributions for public and benevolent uses, as recommended by Congress, pay into the hands of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where they reside, the sum of four shillings per month for such exemption; and in case they, or either of them, shall neglect or refuse to pay the same, that then, upon such neglect or refusal, such Committee once every three months, shall, and are hereby required and enjoined to issue a warrant of distress, under the hand of their Chairman or Deputy Chairman directed to such person or persons as they shall appoint for that purpose, requiring distress to be made on the goods and chattels of every such delinquent; and that the same be sold at public vendue, giving five days notice thereof by advertisement; and, out of the money arising by such sale, to pay to the Chairman of such Committee the money then due from every such delinquent, returning the overplus, if any to the owner thereof, after detaining one shilling and sixpence for every such distress and sale; and in case any person or persons aforesaid, under age, shall make default in paying their equivalent as aforesaid, the same, by order of such Committee, shall be demanded of the parent, master or person whose care such delinquents are under; and, upon their refusal or neglect to pay, the same shall be recovered by distress and sale as aforesaid of such delinquent's parent, master or other person whose care he or they are under; and the County Committees respectively are also hereby enjoined and required, once every six months, to pay unto either of the Treasurers of this Colony, for the time being, appointed by this Congress, all such sum and sums of money as they may receive as abovesaid, to be applied as a Provincial Fund to such uses and purposes as this or a future Congress shall judge the exigencies of the times may require.

17. Provided alivays, and it is further Resolved and Directed, That every person above directed and required to pay an equivalent for the above exemptions, shall be excused from paying such equivalent every time he shall make it appear to the Committee of the County where he resides, that he was sick or unable to attend musters at the time when the Company, in the district he lives in, shall attend their monthly exercises; or shall make it appear he was at that time out of the Province, or necessarily engaged in the public business of the Colony.

18. And it is further Resolved, That in case any person or persons shall think him or themselves aggrieved by a distress made for their fines and forfeitures as aforesaid, such person or persons may, within two months thereafter, appeal to the Committee of the Township or Committee of the County in which he or they shall reside, which Committee shall take the same into consideration; and, in case they find any such appellant aggrieved, shall order suitable redress, by directing the money recovered of him or them, or such part thereof as they think proper, to be returned by the Captain or other officer who issued the warrant of distress, who is hereby required to return the same accordingly; or in case the goods distrained are not sold, the Committee then may give such order therein as to them may seem just and right, conforming themselves in such, decisions, as near as may be, to the true intent and meaning of this Ordinance.

Whereupon the question being put, whether the aforesaid Ordinance do pass this Congress or not? It was carried in the affirmative.

On motion made, it is ordered. That the rules laid down by the Continental Congress, for the regulation of the army of the United Colonies, be printed with the above Militia Ordinance.

On motion made,

Resolved, That the following gentlemen be recommended by this Congress to the Honourable the Continental Congress, as proper persons for field officers of the two Battalions to be raised in this Colony; to wit:

Lord Stirling, Colonel.
William Winds, Lieut. Col.
William De Hart, Major.
}
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For the Eastern Battalion.
 

William Maxwell, Col.
Israel Shreive, Lieut. Col.
David Ray, Major.
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For the Western Battalion.
 

Ordered, That the President do sign an attested copy of this Resolution, and transmit the same to the Continental Congress.

On motion made,

Resolved, That commissions be certified, signed by the President, and delivered to the members of this Congress for the distant Counties, to be by them filled up and delivered to the respective officers, upon proper certificates, from the County Committee, that such respective officers have been duly elected, according to the Ordinance of this Congress; which certificate is to be returned to this Congress at their next sitting, or to the Committee of Safety.

On motion made,

Resolved unanimously, That a commission of Second Brigadier General of the Militia forces of tHis Colony do immediately issue to William Livingston, Esquire.

Ordered, That the Secretary, Colonel Ellis, and Colonel Maxwell, be a Committee to wait on Mr. Livingston, at Mrs. Stell's and present him with the above commission.

Whereupon the Committee withdrew, and having returned to their seats, reported, that they had presented the said commission to Mr. Livingston, who had received the same in a polite manner, and desired that his thanks might be returned to this Congress.

The Congress adjourned to three o'clock, P. M.

The Congress met pursuant to adjournment.

Major Ephraim Anderson having thought proper to resign his commission of First Major of the First Regiment of the Hunterdon Militia;

Resolved unanimously, That his resignation be accepted.

The following engrossed Ordinance for striking the sum of thirty thousand Pounds in bills of credit, for the use of this Colony, and to make a provision to sink the same, &c., was read, compared and approved:

Whereas, it appears essentially necessary, at this time of increasing danger, that the inhabitants of this Colony should be furnished with ammunition and other military stores, and that this Colony should be put into some proper posture of defence.

It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That Messrs. Samuel Tucker, Abraham Hunt, Joseph Ellis and Alexander Chambers be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners for the Western Division; and that Hendrick Fisher, Azariah Dunham, Abraham Clark, and Samuel Potter be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners for the Eastern Division of this Colony; which said Commissioners, or the major part of them, are hereby authorized and directed to receive of the Treasurers of this Colony, for the time being, appointed by this Congress, or either of them, all such sum or sums of money as they shall, from time to time, find necessary to expend for the use of this Colony, pursuant to the resolutions hereinafter mentioned.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Commissioners be, and they are hereby authorized and directed to contract with artificers for, or otherwise purchase three thousand stand of arms, at any price not exceeding three Pounds seven Shillings each stand; and also to purchase ten tons of gun-powder, twenty tons of lead, one thousand cartouch-boxes, at any price not exceeding nine shillings each; a quantity of flints, brushes, priming wire and cartridge paper, not exceeding one hundred Pounds in value; two chests of medicine, not exceeding three hundred Pounds in value, four hundred tents, with camp equipage, &c., not exceeding one thousand eight hundred and seventy Pounds in value; two thousand blankets, not exceeding one thousand five hundred Pounds in value; a number of axes, spades and other entrenching tools, not exceeding three hundred Pounds in value; and a train of artillery, not exceeding five hundred Pounds in value.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, THat the said Commissioners do supply the troops of this Colony, when called to action in this or any of the neighbouring Colonies, with one month's subsistence, at one shilling per day per man, or provisions to that amount, if necessary: Provided, that the expence of such subsistence doth not exceed the sum of one thousand four hundred Pounds in value; and one month's pay for the troops of this Colony, when called into actual service: Provided that the Continental Congress do not make provision for the same; and provided also, that the pay of such troops doth not exceed the sum of four thousand Pounds in value.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Treasurers of this Colony be, and they are hereby required and enjoined to pay to the said Commissioners, or the major part of them, or to their order, all such sum or sums of money as they may find necessary to expend for the purposes aforesaid; and the receipt or receipts from the said Commissioners, or a major part of them, shall be sufficient vouchers and discharges to the said Treasurers, or either of them, their executors and administrators, for all monies by them paid pursuant to this ordinace.

And whereas it is absolutely necessary to provide a fund for defraying the above expence, it is therefore Resolved and Directed, That bills of credit, to the amount of thirty thousand Pounds Proclamation money, be immedately prepared, printed, and made as follows, to wit: Five thousand seven hundred bills, each of the value of three Pounds; six thousand bills, each of the value of one Pound ten Shillings; four thousand bills, each of the value of fifteen Shillings; and three thousand bills, each of the value of six Shillings; which bills shall be in the form following, to wit:

This bill, by an Ordinance of the Provincial Congress, shall pass current in all payments within the Colony of New Jersey, for                         Proclamation money.
Dated the                 day of                    1775.

And shall be impressed with such devices as the inspectors of the press hereinafter appointed shall direct; and, when printed, shall be delivered to Hendrick Fisher and Azariah Dunham, Esquires, of the Eastern Division, and to John Hart and John Carey, Esquires, of the Western Division, four of the signers thereof, in equal moities; one moiety to be signed by the Treasurer and signers of the Eastern Division; and the other moiety by the Treasurer and signers of the Western Division. And the said signers are hereby authorized and required, upon delivery of the said bills by the printer thereof, to administer to him, and he is hereby directed and required to take an oath or affirmation, in the following words:

I, A B, do declare, that, from the time the letters were set and fit to be put into the press for the printing the bills of credit now by me delivered, until the same bills were printed and the letters unset and put into the boxes again, I went at no time out of the room in which the said letters were without locking them up so as they could not be come at without violence, a false key, or other art then unknown to me; and therefore, to the best of my knowledge, no copies were printed off but in my presence; and that all the blotters and other papers whatsoever printed by the said letters, while set for printing the said bills, to the best of my knowledge, are here delivered, together with the stamps for the indents and devices; and that I have not at any time been privy or consenting to any other or more bills being struck than I now deliver; and that in all things relating to this affair, I have demeaned myself according to the true intent and meaning of the Ordinance, by virtue whereof this money is printed, to the best of my knowledge and understanding. Which printer, at the time he is ordered to print the said bills, shall have a copy of this oath or affirmation, that he may govern himself accordingly. Provided always, That, if any accident has happened, he may have the liberty of making an exception thereof in his oath or affirmation, he declaring fully how it was.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the bills made current by this Ordinance shall be nearly the size and likeness of the bills now current in this Colony, and shall be signed and numbered by the respective persons hereinbefore appointed signers thereof; and in case of their, or either of their deaths, or other disability then Joseph Hugg of the Western Division, and John Covenhoven of the Eastern Division, are hereby appointed signers of the said bills; and one half of them shall be delivered to the Treasurer of the Eastern Division of this Colony appointed by this Ordinance, to be by him signed; and the other half shall be delivered to the Treasurer of the Western Division, to be by him signed; and, in case of refusal or disability of either of the said Treasurers, then any three of the persons nominated in this Ordinance as signers are to sign the same.

And, in order that the said bills may be numbered and signed with the less charge and risk, and with the most ease and expedition, the said signers are to observe the directions following, to wit:

First, Before the said signers do receive any of the said bills they shall each of them take an oath, or affirmation if Quakers, before a Justice of the Peace, for the true signing of the said bills of credit; and that they will sign no more, or other bills, than by this Ordinance is directed; and that, to the best of their skill, they will perform what, by this Ordinance, they are enjoined as their duty. A certificate of which oath or affirmation is to be signed by the Justice, and the deponents or affirmants to be delivered to the Treasurers with the bills when signed by them.

Secondly. On receiving the bills from the printer, the said signers shall burn and destroy the blotters, and they shall divide the fair bills so received into two equal parts, and, to avoid confusion, shall agree betwixt themselves how the parts of each shall be numbered; and the signers for the Eastern Division shall take the stamps for the escutcheons, and the signers for the Western Division shall take the stamps for the arms.

Thirdly, Each of the signers may then carry his part to his own house, there to be numbered and signed by him with all possible expedition; which, or such part as is then necessary, being done, they shall meet at a day and place by them to be appointed, and agreed on, and each deliver the part numbered and signed by him to the other, in order for him to sign the same; and they shall then together burn and destroy the bills, if any be, over and above the number hereby appointed to be issued, and in like manner shall do, from time to time, until all are signed and exchanged.

Fourthly, Each of the said signers may then carry the part of the bills aforesaid, so delivered to them by the other, to their respective houses, to be signed with all possible expidition; and when signed, in any sums, from time to time, to be delivered to the Treasurer of the Division where the signers live, and the stamps for the escutcheons and arms, taking receipts of the respective Treasurers for the sums so delivered; which, when produced, shall be sufficient to discharge the said signers respectively, their heirs, executors or administrators, from such parts of the said bills as the receipts do express.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Treasurers shall, respectively, sign the said bills to them delivered; and, under the obligation of their oaths or affirmations for the due execution of their offices, pay them out accordingly as they shall be directed, by this and any future order of the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety, of this Colony, and no otherwise.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the bills of credit to be made and issued, by virtue of this Ordinance, shall pass current until the twenty-first day of December, which will be in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty six.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That Samuel Tucker, Hendrick Fisher and Richard Smith, Esquires, or any two of them, are hereby authorized and directed to agree with the printer for the price to be paid him for printing the bills, according to the directions of this Ordinance, and shall be and are hereby appointed inspectors of the press, to take care that the printer of the bills of credit doth duly perform the duty herby enjoined him.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That there shall be paid to the printer of the said bills of credit, such sum or sums of money for printing them, as the said inspectors, or any two of them, shall certify under their hands they had agreed to pay him for that service; and there shall be paid to the Treasurers, inspectors and signers, such reward for their trouble as the Congress or Committee of Safety, for this Colony, shall deem reasonable. All which sums of money shall be paid by the Treasurers, or either of them, out of the money made current by virtue of this Ordinance, and shall take proper receipts for the same; which receipts, when laid before the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety, shall discharge the said Treasurers, their heirs, executors and administrators, for all such sums by them paid, pursuant to this Ordinance.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the residue of the said thirty thousand Pounds made current by this Ordinance, and not herein appropriated, shall remain in the said treasury as a fund, subject to be disposed of in future by the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety, of this Colony.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That for the better credit and effectual sinking of the said bills of credit, there shall be assessed, levied and raised, on the several inhabitants of this Colony, their goods and chattels, lands and tenements, the sum of ten thousand Pounds, annually, in every of the years one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six, to be paid in the proportions and manner following:

By the County of Bergen
By the County of Essex
By the County of Middlesex
By the County of Somerset
By the County of Monmouth
By the County of Morris
By the County of Sussex
By the County of Hunterdon
By the County of Burlington
By the County of Gloucester
By the County of Salem
By the County of Cumberland
By the County of Cape May
£664
742
872
904
1069
723
593
1363
1071
783
679
385
166
8
18
6
2
2
8
5
16
13
2
12
6
18
0
0
8
0
8
0
4
8
4
8
0
8
0

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the several quotas, so apportioned as aforesaid, shall be assessed, raised, levied, collected and paid into the treasuries, in the same method, manner, proportion and form, as is directed by an act passed in the tenth year of his present Majesty's reign, entitled An act to settle the quotas of the several Counties in this Colony; provided that some other more equitable expedient for sinking the same, in a more easy method to the inhabitants of this Colony, shall not be agreed upon in the meantime.

Whereupon the question being put, whether this Ordinance do pass or not? It was carried in the affirmative.

The memorial of Jonathan D. Serjeant, Esq., Treasurer to the late Congress of this Colony, was read a second time, and unanimously approved;

Ordered, That the thanks of this Congress be returned to Mr. Serjeant, for his constant and steady attention to the public cause at these times of general calamity.

On motion made,

Resolved unanimously, That commissions do issue to Messrs. John Cooper and John Dennis, the Treasurers for this Colony, appointed by this Congress, upon their giving such security as this Congress, or the Committee of Safety shall direct.

On motion made,

Resolved, That upon proper certificates, from any County Committee of this Colony, being produced to the President, or Vice President, in the recess of this Congress, certifying the election of militia or minute officers, for any of the Battalions in this Colony, the President or Vice President do issue commissions accordingly.

Ordered, That a commission do issue to John Taylor, Esq., as Second Major of the Fourth Regiment of Militia, in Hunterdon County.

On motion made,

Resolved, That in the case of the death, or removal out of the Colony, of any of the Deputies of this Congress, before the next annual election, the freeholders of the County, for which such person was a Deputy, have leave to proceed to a new election to supply his place.

On motion made,

Resolved, That it be recommended to the several County Committees of this Colony, to allow their respective Deputies such recompence for their time and public service, in attending the Provincial Congresses and Committees of Safety, as they shall think reasonable.

Resolved, That a commission do issue to James Holmes, Esq., as Surgeon to the Sussex Battalion of minute-men.

Resolved, That a commission do issue to Peter Campbell, Esquire, as Aid-de-Camp to Brigadier General Dickinson.

On motion made,

Resolved, That the following gentlemen be, and they are hereby appointed a Committee of Safety, to act for the public welfare of this Colony, in the recess of this Congress, to wit:

Mr. President Tucker,
Mr. Vice President Fisher.
John Hart,
Abraham Clark,
Lewis Ogden,
Joseph Holmes,
John Mehelm,
Isaac Pearson,
John Pope,
Azariah Dunham,
John Dennis,
Augustine Stevenson,
Ruloff Van Dyke,
 
 
}
}
}
}
}
} — Esquires.
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}
}
}

Which said Committee of Safety, or the major part of the members thereof, are hereby directed to meet at such time and place as the President and Vice President shall direct.

On motion made.

Resolved, That Mr. President be desired to return the thanks of this Congress to the Reverend Mr. Spencer, and the Reverend Mr. Panton, for their polite attention and' services, during the present sitting; and also to the several communities, who have been pleased to accommodate this Congress with the use of their respective places of worship.

On motion made.

Resolved, That the Secretary be requested to revise, correct and make out a fair copy of the minutes of this Congress for publication; and that he be allowed such recompence for his time and trouble as this Congress, or Committee of Safety shall deem reasonable.

Resolved, That as soon as the Secretary hath prepared a fair copy of the minutes of this Congress for the press, Mr. President do issue an order to Isaac Collins, to immediately print off one thousand copies thereof, for the use of the Colony in general; and five hundred copies of the new Militia Ordinance, with the Articles of War, for regulating the Continental army, annexed, for the use of the Militia forces.

Resolved, That, out of the monies in the Treasury of this Congress, there be paid to Mr. President so much money as he hath expended for firewood, candles, pens, ink and paper, for the use of this Congress, during the present sitting; and also ten Shillings to Mr. Fisher, and ten Shillings to Mr. Mehelm, for two volumes of the Acts of Assembly of this Colony; and to Daniel Bellingeau, the doorkeeper of this Congress, for his constant attendance and services during this sitting, six Pounds; and also, to the said Daniel Bellingeau, the sum of three Pounds fifteen Shillings, for his services in attending the late Congress.

The Congress adjourned to meet at New Brunswick on the first Tuesday in April next, unless sooner convened by the President, Vice President, or the Committee of Safety.

 

An Ordinance

For regulating the Militia of New Jersey, passed at a Sitting of the Provincial Congress, Held at Trenton in the Month of October, 1775, To which is annexed the Continental Articles of War.

—————

An Ordinance, &c.

Whereas the ordinances of the late Provincial Congress, for regulating the Militia of this Colony, have been found insufficient to answer the good purposes intended; and it appearing to be essentially necessary that some further regulations be adopted at this time of imminent danger;

1. It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That each and every Captain in this Colony, within ten days after the publication hereof, shall make out a list of all persons residing in his district capable of bearing arms, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, who, by the first military ordinance of a former Congress, were advised or requested to enrol themselves by signing a muster-roll therein mentioned, such persons only excepted whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms, who are hereby particularly exempted therefrom; a copy of which list each Captain, respectively, within ten days after completing the same, shall deliver to the Colonel of the regiment to which he shall belong, and such Colonel shall make return thereof to the Brigadier General of the division to which he shall belong; and also transmit a duplicate thereof to the Provicial Congress at their next sitting. And the respective Captains shall also make out exact lists of all such persons residing in their several districts capable of bearing arms, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms; which lists the said Captains shall lay before the Committee of the County to which they belong.

2. And it is further Resolved, That every person above directed to enrol himself by signing a muster-roll, shall bear arms, attend musters, and in all things be conformable to the rules and orders herein after mentioned; and shall, with all convenient speed, furnish himself with a good musket or firelock, and bayonet, sword or tomahawk, a steel ramrod, priming wire and brush fitted thereto, a cartouch-box to contain twenty-three rounds of cartridges, twelve flints, and a knapsack, agreeable to the direction of the Continental Congress, under the forfeitures of two Shillings for the want of a musket or firelock, and of one Shilling for the want of the other above enumerated articles.

3. And it is further Resolved, That every person directed to be enrolled as above, shall, at his place of abode, be also provided with one pound of powder, and three pounds of bullets of proper size to his musket or firelock.

4: And it is further Resolved and Directed, That each whole company of Militia do assemble at least once every month, properly accoutered as aforesaid, at such place as the Captain, or commanding officer of such company, shall direct, and shall spend the whole day in perfecting themselves in the military exercise; and that a general muster or review be had of each regiment three times in every year, at such times and places as the field officers of each regiment shall think proper to appoint.

5. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That in case any person shall refuse or neglect to serve as a sergeant or corporal in any company, being thereunto requested by the Captain or commanding officer, or shall refuse or neglect to warn the men to appear under arms when required by the Captain or commanding officer, such sergeant or corporal, shall, for every such neglect or refusal, forfeit the sum of twelve Shillings.

6. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all officers commissioned, by this or the former Congress, do subscribe the following declaration, to wit:

We, the subscribers, the officers of one of the regiments in the County of                         and Colony of New Jersey, do hereby promise and engage, under all the ties of religion, honor and regard to our Country, that we will, respectively, duly observe, and carry into execution, to the utmost of our power, all and every the orders, resolves and recommendations made, or to be made, by the Provincial Congress of this Colony, for defending our Constitution, and preserving the same inviolate; and that we will also render due obedience to such officers, who either by rank or superiority, are regularly placed above us. Which declaration shall be laid before the next sitting of the Provincial Congress,

7. And it is farther Resolved and Directed, That the following penalties be inflicted on those who do not attend and obey orders on the days appointed for general musters or reviews, to wit:

A Colonel six Pounds, a Lieutenant-Colonel five Pounds, Major four Pounds, Captain three Pounds, Lieutenants, Ensigns and Adjutants two Pounds each. Sergeants, Corporals, drummers, fifes and privates, directed to be enrolled as aforesaid, ten Shillings each, for each and every default. And that there shall be inflicted on those who do not attend properly accoutered as abovesaid, and obey orders, on the times to be appointed for the meeting of the Companies, at least once every month, to wit, a Captain thirty Shillings, Lieutenants and Ensigns twenty Shillings each. Sergeants, Corporals, drummers, fifes and privates four Shillings each, for each and every default. Provided always, that reasonable excuses shall be admitted for delinquents non-attendance, by those persons who are to issue the warrants of distress.

8. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all fines, under the degree of a Captain, shall be levied on the goods and chattels of the offender, by warrant from the Captain directed to a Sergeant of his Company; and those of field-officers and Captains, under the degree of Colonel, to be levied on the goods and chattels of the offender, by a warrant from the Colonel of the Regiment directed to the Adjutant; and those of a Colonel, by a warrant from a Brigadier-General, directed to a Major of the Regiment to which such delinquent or delinquents belong.

9. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the several officers and persons to whom warrants of distress shall be directed, shall, upon receipt thereof, immediately levy the several fines and forfeitures therein mentioned, under the forfeiture of forty Shillings for every neglect in levying the same, to be recovered by a warrant under the hand of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where such neglect shall happen, directed to such person or persons as such Committee shall appoint for that purpose: and every Sergeant shall levy upon each delinquent, in the warrant to him directed, the sum of one Shilling over and above the penalty laid in such warrant, which he is to keep and detain as a reward for his trouble; and each Major or Adjutant shall receive, for each distress by them made, the sum of five Shillings, which he is to levy as abovesaid. And the fines and forfeitures aforesaid levied by a Sergeant, when recovered, shall be paid to the Captain issuing such warrant, to be by him laid out in supplying such of his Company with arms as are not able to furnish themselves therewith; and shall render to the Committee of the County, in which he resides, a true account of all such fines and forfeitures by him received, and his disbursements out of the same, agreeable to the above directions, when he shall be thereunto required by said Committee: and in case any of such fines and forfeitures shall remain in such Captain's hands for the space of two months not laid out as aforesaid, he shall then pay the same to such Committee, to be by them laid out as above directed: and all fines recovered from any officer or officers, above the degree of Lieutenant, shall be immediately paid into the hands of the County Committee, to be by them laid out in such manner as they shall judge most serviceable for the common defence of the Colony.

10. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That if this Colony shall be alarmed or invaded by an armed force, then, and in such case, every subaltern and soldier so enrolled, or directed to be enrolled as aforesaid; and also each minute-man raised, or which may then be raised, is hereby requested immediately to repair, properly armed and accoutered, to his Captain's residence, unless otherwise ordered; and the Captain, or Commanding Officer of the Company nearest to the place where such alarm or invasion shall happen, shall immediately march his Company to oppose the enemy; and at the same time send an express to the Commanding Officer of the Regiment to which he belongs, who is to march with the whole, or part of the forces under his command, as he, before receiving orders from one of the general officers shall judge necessary, in order to prevent the enemy from landing or penetrating into any part of the country; and at the same time shall send an express to some one of the general officers nearest to him, informing him of the intelligence he hath received of such an alarm or invasion; and, during the times of such invasion or alarm, the officers and soldiers abovesaid, shall be subject to a courtmartial, under the same rules and orders as directed and ordered by the Continental Congress of the associated Colonies, held at Philadelphia on the tenth day of May last, for the better government of the Continental troops.

11. Provided always, and it is farther Resolved and Directed, That no pains and penalties, imposed by a court-martial, shall extend to the taking life or member of any delinquent or offender who shall be called out as aforesaid.

12. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That every person between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, capable of bearing arms as aforesaid, who shall come from any of the neighbouring Provinces in this Colony, shall, within two weeks after his arrival, enrol himself in the company of the place where such person may chance to reside, and attend musters as before directed for the Militia; and, in case of neglect or refusal, shall be subject to the same fines and forfeitures.

13. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the officers and minute men now formed into companies or Battalions, or such as shall be so formed hereafter, shall observe the same rules, orders and directions, as to attending musters, and learning the military discipline, and be subject to the same fines and penalties for non-attendance, as before directed for the Militia, and to be recovered iu like manner.

14. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the minute-men. when called out to the assistance of a neighbouring Colony, shall be subject to the articles of war, established by the Continental Congress, and be under the direction of their own officers, unless a Continental officer of superior rank be present, to whom, in such case, they are to yield due subordination.

15. And whereas, several companies of light horse have been raised in this Colony; and as it is probable that more may be raised hereafter. It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That each company of light horse do not exceed forty privates, and that one company only be allowed to be raised in each County; and that each regiment be commanded by a Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, and Major, who are to be subject to the command of the Brigadier Generals of this Colony, the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety; and that such Regiments of horse shall be under the same regulations, as to the times of muster, and learning the military discipline, as before directed for the foot Militia by this Ordinance, and subject to the same fines and penalties for non-attendance; which fines and penallies are to be recovered in manner aforesaid; and that the officers of each Regiment of horse take equal rank with the militia officers of foot holding similar commissions of the same date.

16. And it is further Resolved and Directed, That each and every of the inhabitants of this Colony, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms as above directed, shall, as an equivalent thereto, and also in lieu of all future voluntary contributions for public and benevolent uses, as recommended by Congress, pay into the hands of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where they reside, the sum of four Shillings per month for such their exemption; and in case they, or either of them, shall neglect or refuse to pay the same, that then, upon such neglect or refusal, such Committee, once every three months, shall, and are hereby required and enjoined to issue a warrant of distress, under the hand of their Chairman or Deputy Chairman, directed to such person or persons as they shall appoint for that purpose, requiring distress to be made on the goods and chattels of every such delinquent; and that the same be sold at public vendue, giving five days notice thereof by advertisement; and, out of the money arising by such sale, to pay the Chairman of such Committee the money then due from every such delinquent, returning the overplus, if any, to the owner thereof, after detaining one Shilling and Sixpence for every such distress and sale; and in case any person or persons aforesaid, under age, shall make default in paying their equivalent as aforesaid, the same, by order of such Committee, shall be demanded of the parent, master or person whose care such delinquents are under; and, upon their refusal or neglect to pay, the same shall be recovered by distress and sale as aforesaid of such delinquent's parent, master or other person whose care he or they are under; and the County Committees respectively are also hereby enjoined and required, once every six months, to pay unto either of the Treasurers of this Colony, for the time being, appointed by this Congress, all such sum and sums of money as they may receive as abovesaid, to be applied as a Provincial fund to such uses and purposes as this or a future Congress shall judge the exigencies of the times may require.

17. Provided always, and it is further Resolved and Directed, That every person above directed and required to pay an equivalent for the above exemptions, shall be excused from paying such equivalent every time he shall make it appear to the Committee of the County where he resides, that he was sick or unable to attend musters at the time when the company, in the District he lives in, shall attend their monthly exercises; or shall make it appear he was at that time out of the Province, or necessarily engaged in the public business of the Colony.

18. And it is further Resolved, That in case any person or persons shall think him or themselves aggrieved by a distress made for their fines and forfeitures as aforesaid, such person or persons may, within two months thereafter, appeal to the Committee of the Township or Committee of the County in which he or they shall reside, which Committee shall take the same into consideration ; and, in case they find any such appellant aggrieved, shall order suitable redress, by directing the money recovered of him or them, or such part thereof as they think proper, to be returned by the Captain or other officer who issued the warrant of distress, who is hereby required to return the same accordingly, or in case the goods distrained are not sold, the Committee then may give such order therein as to them may seem just and right, conforming themselves in such decisions, as near as may be, to the true intent and meaning of this Ordinance.

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Rules and Articles for the Better Government of the Troops raised, or to be raised, and kept in pay by and at the joint expence of the twelve United English Colonies of North America.

In General Congress of the United Colonies, held at Philadelphia on the 10th day of May, 1775.

Whereas his Majesty's most faithful subjects in these Colonies are reduced to a dangerous and critical situation, by the attempts of the British Ministry, to carry into execution, by force of arms, several unconstitutional and oppressive acts of the British Parliament for laying taxes in America, to enforce the collection of those taxes, and for altering and changing the Constitution and internal police(sic) of some of these Colonies, in violation of the natural and civil rights of the Colonies.

And whereas hostilities have been actually commenced in the Massachusetts bay, by the British troops, under the command of General Gage, and the lives of a number of the inhabitants of that Colony destroyed; the town of Boston not only having been long occupied as a garrisoned town in an enemy's country, but the inhabitants thereof, treated with a severity and cruelty not to be justified even towards declared enemies.

And whereas large reinforcements have been ordered, and are soon expected, for the declared purpose of compelling; these Colonies to submit to the operation of the said acts, which hath rendered it necessary, and an indispensable duty, for the express purpose of securing and defending these Colonies, and preserving them in safety against all attempts to carry the said acts into execution, that an armed force be raised sufficient to defeat such hostile designs, and preserve and defend the lives, liberties and immunities of the Colonists; for the due regulating and well ordering of which,

Resolved, That the following rules and orders be attended to and observed by sach forces as are or may hereafter be raised for the purpose aforesaid:

Article 1. That every officer who shall be retained, and every soldier who shall serve in the Continental army, shall, at the time of his acceptance of his commission or inlistment, subscribe these rules and regulations; and that the officers and soldiers, already of that army, shall also, as soon as may be, subscribe the same; from the time of which subscription every officer and soldier shall be bound by those regulations; but if any of the officers or soldiers, now of the said army, do not subscribe these rules and regulations, then they may be retained in the said army, subject to the rules and regulations under which they entered into the service, or be discharged from the service at the option of the Commander- in-chief.

Art. 2. It is earnestly recommended to all officers and soldiers, diligently to attend divine service; and all officers and soldiers, who shall behave indecently or irreverently at any place of divine worship, shall, if commissioned officers, be brought before a court-martial, there to be publicly and severely reprimanded by the president; if non-commissioned officers or soldiers, every person so offending shall, for his first offence, forfeit one-sixth of a dollar, to be deducted out of his next pay; for the second offence, he shall not only forfeit a like sum, but be confined for twenty-four hours; and for every like offence, shall suffer and pay in like manner; which money so forfeited, shall be applied to the use of the sick soldiers of the troop or company to which the offender belongs.

Art. 3, Whatsoever non-commissioned officer or soldier shall use any profane oath or execration, shall incur the penalties expressed in the foregoing article; and if a commissioned officer be thus guilty of profane cursing or swearing, he shall forfeit and pay, for each and every such offence, the sum of four Shillings, lawful money.

Art. 4. Any officer or soldier, who shall behave himself with contempt or disrespect towards the General or Generals, or Commanders-in-Chief of the Continental forces, or shall speak false words, tending to his or their hurt or dishonour, shall be punished according to the nature of his offence, by the judgment of a general courtmartial.

Art. 5. Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause or join in any mutiny or sedition, in the regiment, troop or company to which he belongs, or in any other regiment, troop or company of the Continental forces, either by land or sea, or in any part, post, detachment or guard, on any pretence whatsoever, shall suffer such punishment as by a general court-martial shall be ordered.

Art. 6. Any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier who, being present at any mutiny or sedition, does not use his utmost endeavors to suppress the same; or coming to the knowledge of any mutiny or intended mutiny, does not, without delay, give information thereof to the commanding officer, shall be punished by order of a general court-martial, according to the nature of his offence.

Art. 7. Any officer or soldier, who shall strike his superior officer, or draw or offer to draw, or shall lift up any weapon, or offer any violence against him, being in the execution of his office, on any pretence whatsoever, or shall disobey any lawful commands of his superior officer, shall suffer such punishment as shall, according to the nature of his offence, be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 8. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier, who shall desert, or without leave of his Commanding Officer, absent himself from the Troop or company to which he belongs, or from any detachnaent of the same, shall, upon being convicted thereof, be punished according to the nature of his offence, at the discretion of a general courtmartial.

Art. 9. Whatsoever officer or soldier shall be convicted of having advised or persuaded any other officer or soldier to desert, shall suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 10. All officers of what condition soever, shall have power to part and quell all quarrels, frays and disorders, though the persons concerned should belong to another regiment, troop or company; and either order officers to be arrested, or non-commissioned officers or soldiers to be confined and imprisoned, till their proper superior officers shall be acquainted therewith; and whosoever shall refuse to obey such officer (though of an inferior rank) or shall draw his sword upon him, shall be punished at the discretion of a general court-martial.

Art. 11. No officer or soldier shall use any reproachful or provoking speeches or gestures to another; nor shall presume to send a challenge to any person to fight a duel: And whoever shall, knowingly and willingly, suffer any person whatsoever to go forth to fight a duel; or shall second, promote or carry any challenge, shall be deemed as a principal: And whatsoever officer or soldier shall upraid another for refusing a challenge, shall also be considered as a challenger: And all such offenders in any of these or such like cases, shall be punished at the discretion of a general court-martial.

Art. 12. Every officer commanding in quarters, or on a march, shall keep good order, and, to the utmost of his power, redress all such abuses or disorders which may be committed by any officer or soldier under his command: If upon any complaint being made to him, of officers or soldiers beating or otherwise ill-treating any person, or of committing any kind of riot, to the disquieting of the inhabitants of this continent, he, the said Commander, who shall refuse or omit to see justice done on the offender or offenders, and reparation made to the party or parties injured, as far as the offenders wages shall enable him or them, shall, upon due proof thereof, be punished as ordered by a general court-martial, in such manner as if he himself had committed the crimes or disorders complained of.

Art. 13. If any officer should think himself to be wronged by his Colonel or the commanding officer of the Regiment, and shall, upon due application made to him, be refused to be redressed, he may complain to the General or Commander-in-Chief of the Continental forces, in order to obtain justice, who is hereby required to examine into said complaint, and see that justice be done.

Art. 14. If any inferior officer or soldier shall think himself wronged by his Captain or other officer commanding the troop or company to which he belongs, he is to complain thereof to the commanding officer of the Regiment, who is hereby required to summon a regimental court-martial for the doing justice to the complainant; from which regimental court-martial, either party may, if he still thinks himself aggrieved, appeal to a general courtmartial; but if, upon a second hearing, the appeal shall appear to be vexatious and groundless, the person so appealing shall be punished at the discretion of the general court-martial.

Art. 15. Whatsoever non-commissioned officer or soldier shall be convicted, at a regimental court-martial, of having sold, or designedly, or through neglect, wasted the ammunition, arms or provisions, or other military stores, delivered out to him, to be employed in the service of this Continent, shall, if an officer, be reduced to a private sentinel; and if a private soldier, shall suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by a regimental court-martial.

Art. 16. All non-commissioned officers and soldiers, who shall be found one mile from the camp, without leave in writing from their commanding officer, shall suffer such punishment as shall be inflicted on him or them by the sentence of a regimental court-martial.

Art. 17. No officer or soldier shall lie out of his quarters or camp, without leave from the commanding officer of the regiment, upon penalty of being punished according to the nature of his offence, by order of a regimental courtmartial.

Art. 18. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier shall retire to his quarters or tent at the beating of the retreat; in default of which, he shall be punished according to the nature of his offence, by order of the commanding officer.

Art. 19. No officer, non-commissioned officer or soldier, shall fail of repairing, at the time fixed, to the place of parade or exercise, or other rendezvous appointed by the commanding officer, if not prevented by sickness or some other evident necessity; or shall go from the said place of rendezvous, or from his guard, without leave from his commanding officer, before he shall be regularly dismissed or relieved, on penalty of being punished according to the nature of his offence, by the sentence of a regimental court-martial.

Art. 20. Whatsoever commissioned officer shall be found drunk on his guard, party or duty, under arms, shall be cashiered for it; any non-commissioned officer or soldier, so offending, shall suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a regimental courtmartial.

Art. 21. Whatsoever sentinel shall be found sleeping upon his post, or shall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, shall suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 22. Any person belonging to the Continenal army, who, by discharging of fire arms, beating of drums, or by any other means whatsoever, shall occasion false alarms, in camp or quarters, shall suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 23. Any officer or soldier who shall, without urgent necessity, or without leave of his superior officer, quit his platoon or division, shall be punished according to the nature of his offence, by the sentence of a regimental court-martial.

Art. 24. No officer or soldier shall do violence, or offer any insult, or abuse, to any person who shall bring provisions, or other necessaries, to the camp, or quarters of the Continental army; any officer or soldier so offending, shall, upon complaint being made to the commanding officer, suffer such punishment as shall be ordered by a regimental court-martial.

Art. 25. Whatsover officer or soldier shall shamefully abandon any post committed to his charge, or shall speak words inducing others to do the like, in time of an engagement, shall suffer death immediately.

Art. 26. Any person belonging to the Continental army, who shall make known the watchword to any person who is not entitled to receive it, according to the rules and discipline of war, or shall presume to give a parole, or watchword different from what he received, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 27. Whosoever, belonging to the Continental army, shall relieve the enemy with money, victuals, or ammunition; or shall knowingly harbour or protect an enemy, shall suffer such punishment as by a general court-martial shall be ordered.

Art. 28. Whosoever, belonging to the Continental army, shall be convicted of holding correspondence with, or of giving intelligence to the enemy, either directly or indirectly, shall suffer such punishment as by a general court-martial shall be ordered.

Art. 29. All public stores taken in the enemy's camp or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing or provisions, shall be secured for the use of the United Colonies.

Art. 30. If any officer or soldier shall leave his post or colours, in time of an engagement, to go in search of plunder, he shall, upon being convicted thereof before a general court-martial, suffer such punishment as by said court-martial shall be ordered.

Art. 31. If any commander of any post, intrenchment, or fortress, shall be compelled, by the officers or soldiers under his command, to give it up to the enemy, or to abandon it, the commissioned officer, non-commissioned officers or soldiers who shall be convicted of having so offended, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as may be inflicted upon them by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 32. All suttlers and retailers to a camp, and all persons whatsoever, serving with the Continental army in the field, though not enlisted soldiers, are to be subject to the articles rules and regulations of the Continental army.

Art. 33. No general court-martial shall consist of a less number than thirteen, none of which shall be under the degree of a commissioned officer; and the president shall be a field officer; and the president of each and every court-martial, whether general or regimental, shall have power to administer an oath to every witness, in order to the trial of offenders. And the members of all courts-martial shall be duly sworn by the president; and the next in rank on the court-martial, shall administer the oath to the president.

Art. 34. The members, both of general and regimental courts-martial, shall, when belonging to different corps, take the same rank which they hold in the army; but when courts-martial shall be composed of officers of one corps, they shall take their ranks according to their commissions by which they are mustered in the said corps.

Art. 35. All the members of a court-martial, are to behave with calmness, decency and impartiality; and in giving of their votes are to begin with the youngest or lowest in commission.

Art. 36. No field officer shall be tried by any person under the degree of a Captain; nor shall any proceedings or trials be carried on, excepting between the hours of eight in the morning, and three in the afternoon, except in cases which require an immediate example.

Art. 37. The commissoned officers of every regiment may, by the appointment of their Colonel or commanding officer, hold regimental courts-martial for the inquiring into such disputes or criminal matters as may come before them, and for the inflicting corporal punishments, for small offences, and shall give judgment by the majority of voices ; but no sentence shall be executed till the commanding officer, (not being a member of the court-martial) shall have confirmed the same.

Art. 38. No regimental court-martial shall consist of less than five officers, excepting in cases where that number cannot be conveniently assembled, when three may be sufficient; who are likewise to determine upon the sentence by the majority of voices; which sentence is to be confirmed by the commanding officer, not being a member of the court-martial.

Art. 39. Every officer, commanding any fort, castle or barrack, or elsewhere, where the corps under his command consists of detachments from different regiments, or of independent companies, may assemble courts-martial for the trial of offenders in the same manner as if they were regimental, whose sentence is not to be executed till it shall be confirmed by the said commanding officer.

Art. 40. No person whatsoever shall use menacing words, signs or gestures in the presence of a court-martial then sitting, or shall cause any disorder or riot, so as to disturb their proceeding, on the penalty of being punished at the discretion of the said court-martial.

Art. 41. To the end that offenders may be brought to justice; whenever any officer or soldier shall commit a crime deserving punishment, he shall by his commanding officer, if an officer, be put in arrest; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, be imprisoned till he shall be either tried by a court-martial, or shall be lawfully discharged by proper authority.

Art. 42. No officer or soldier who shall be put in arrest, or imprisonment, shall continue in his confinement more than eight days, or till such time as a court-martial can be conveniently assembled.

Art. 43. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall refuse to receive or keep any prisoner committed to his charge, by an officer belonging to the Continental forces; which officer shall at the same time deliver an account in writing, signed by himself, of the crime with which the said prisoner is charged.

Art. 44. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall presume to release any prisoner committed to his charge, without proper authority for so doing; nor shall he suffer any prisoner to escape, on the penalty of being punished for it, by the sentence of a general court-martial.

Art. 45. Every officer or provost marshal, to whose charge prisoners shall be committed, is hereby required, within twenty-four hours after such commitment, or as soon as he shall be relieved from his guard, to give in. writing to the Colonel of the regiment to whom the prisoner belongs (where the prisoner is confined upon the guard belonging to the said regiment, and that his offence only relates to the neglect of duty in his own corps) or to the Commander-in-Chief, their names, their crimes, and the names of the officers who committed them, on the penalty of being punished for his disobedience or neglect, at the discretion of a general courtmartial.

Art. 46. And if any officer under arrest, shall leave his confinement before he is set at liberty by the officer who confined him, or by a superior power, he shall be cashiered for it.

Art. 47. Whatsoever commissioned officer shall be convicted before a general court-martial, of behaving in a scandalous, infamous manner, such as is unbecoming the character of an officer and a gentleman, shall be discharged from the service.

Art. 48. All officers, conductors, gunners, matrosses, drivers, or any other persons whatsoever, receiving pay or hire in the service of the Continental artillery, shall be governed by the aforesaid rules and articles, and shall be subject to be tried by courts-martial, in like manner with the officers and soldiers of the Continental troops.

Art. 49. For differences arising amongst themselves, or in matters relating solely to their own corps, the courts-martial may be composed of their own officers; but where a number sufficient of such officers cannot be assembled, or in matters wherein other corps are interested, the officers of artillery shall sit in courts-martial with the officers of the other corps.

Art. 50. All crimes not capital, and all disorders and neglects, which officers and soldiers may be guilty of, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, though not mentioned in the articles of war, are to be taken cognizance of by a general or regimental court-martial, according to the nature and degree of the offence, and be punished at their discretion.

Art. 51 That no persons shall be sentenced by a court-martial to suffer death, except in the cases expressly mentioned in the foregoing articles; nor shall any punishment be inflicted at the discretion of a court-martial, other than degrading, cashiering, drumming out of the army, whipping not exceeding thirty-nine lashes, fine not exceeding two months pay of the offender, imprisonment not exceeding one month.

Art. 52. The field officers of each and every regiment are to appoint some suitable person belonging to such regiment, to receive all such fines as may arise within the same for any breach of any of the foregoing articles, and shall direct the same to be carefully and properly applied to the relief of such sick, wounded or necessitous soldiers, as belong to such regiment; and such person shall account with such officer for all fines received, and the application thereof

Art. 53. All members sitting in courts-martial shall be sworn by the President of said courts, which President shall himself be sworn by the officer in said court next in rank: The oath to be administered previous to their proceeding to the trial of any offender, in form following, viz.:

You, A. B., swear that you will well and truly try, and impartially determine, the case of the prisoner now to be tried, according to the rules for regulating the Continental army. So help you God.

Art. 54. All persons called to give evidence, in any case, before a court-martial, who shall refuse to give evidence, shall be punished for such refusal, at the discretion of such court-martial: The oath to be administered in the form following, viz:

You swear the evidence you shall give in the case now in hearing, shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. So help you God,

Art. 55. Every officer commanding a regiment, troop or company, shall, upon notice given to him by the Commissary of the Musters, or from one of his Deputies, assemble the regiment, troop or company under his command, in the next convenient place for their being mustered.

Art. 56. Every Colonel or other field officer, or officer commanding any corps, to which there is no field officer, and actually residing with it, may give furloughs to non-commissioned officers and soldiers, in such numbers, and for so long a time, as he shall judge to be most consistent with the good of the service; but no non-commissioned officer or soldier shall, by leave of his Captain, or inferior officer, commanding the troop or company (his field officer not being present) be absent above twenty days in six months, nor shall more than two private men be absent at the same time from their troop or company, excepting some extraordinary occasion shall require it, of which occasion the field officer present with, and commanding the regiment or independent corps, is to be judge.

Art. 57. At every muster the commanding officer of each regiment, troop or company, then present, shall give to the Commissary of Musters certificates signed by himself, signifying how long such officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers, who shall not appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their absence; which reasons, and the time of absence, shall be inserted in the muster rolls opposite to the respective names of such absentees: the said certificates shall, together with the muster rolls, be by the said Commissary transmitted to the General, and to this or any future Congress of the United Colonies, or Committee appointed thereby, within twenty days next after such master being taken; on failure whereof the Commissary so offending, shall be discharged from the service.

Art. 58. Every officer who shall be convicted before a general court martial of having signed a false certificate, relating to the absence of either officer, non-commissioned officer or private soldier, shall be cashiered.

Art. 59. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false muster of man or horse, and every officer or Commissary, who shall willingly sign, direct or allow the signing of the muster rolls, wherein such false muster is contained, shall, upon proof made thereof, by two witnesses, before a general court-martial, be cashiered, and moreover forfeit all such pay as may be due to him at the time of conviction for such offence.

Art. 60. Any Commissary who shall be convicted of having taken any gift or gratuity on the mustering any regiment, troop or company, or on the signing the muster rolls, shall be displaced from his office, and forfeit his pay, as in the preceding article.

Art. 61. Any officer who shall presume to muster any person as a soldier, who is at other times accustomed to wear a livery, or who does not actually do his duty as a soldier, shall be deemed guilty of having made a false muster, and shall suffer accordingly.

Art. 62. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false return to the Commander-in-Chief of the American forces, or to any his superior officer, authorized to call for such returns, of the state of the regiment, troop, independent company or garrison, under his command, or of arms, ammunition, clothing or other stores thereunto belonging, shall, by a court-martial, be cashiered.

Art. 63. The commanding officer of every regiment, troop, independent company or garrison, in the service aforesaid, shall, in the beginning of every month remit to the Commander-in-Chief of said forces an exact return of the state of the regiment, troop, independent company, or garrison under his command, specifying the names of the officers not then residing at their posts, and the reason for, and time of their absence: Whoever shall be convicted of having, through neglect or design, omitted the sending such returns, shall be punished according to the nature of his crime, by the judgment of a general court-martial.

Art. 64. No suttler shall be permitted to sell any kind of liquors or victuals, or to keep their houses or shops open, for the entertainment of soldiers, after nine at night, or before the beating of the reveilles, or upon Sundays, during divine service or sermon, on the penalty of being dismissed from all future suttling.

Art. 65. All officers commanding in the camp, or in any forts, barracks, or garrisons, are hereby required to see that the persons permitted to suttle, shall supply the soldiers with good and wholesome provisions at a reasonable price, as they shall be answerable for their neglect.

Art. 66. No officers commanding in any camp, garrisons, forts, or barracks, shall either themselves exact exorbitant prices for houses or stalls, let out to suttlers, or shall connive at the like exactions in others, nor lay any duty or impositions upon, or be interested in the sale of such victuals, liquors, or other neccessaries of life, which are brought into the camp, garrison, fort or barracks, for the use of the soldiers, on the penalty of being discharged from the service.

Art. 67. That the General, or Commander-in-chief, for the time being, shall have full power of pardoning, or mitigating any of the punishments ordered to be inflcted, for any of the offences mentioned in the foregoing articles; and every offender convicted as aforesaid, by any regimental court-martial, may be pardoned, or have his punishment mitigated by the Colonel or officer commanding tlie regiment.

Art. 68. When any commissioned officers shall happen to die or be killed in the service of the United Colonies, the Major of the regiment, or the officer doing the Major's duty in his absence, shall immediately secure all his effects or equipage then in camp or quarters; and shall, before the next regimental court-martial, make an inventory thereof, and forthwith transmit to the office of the Secretary of the Congress, or Assembly of the Province in which the corps is stationed, or shall happen to be at the time of the death of such officer; to the end, that his executors may, after payment of his debts in quarters, and interment, receive the overplus, if any be, to his or their use.

Art. 69. When any non-commissioned officer, or private soldier, shall happen to die or be killed in the service of the United Colonies, the then commanding officer of the troop or company shall, in the presence of two other commissioned officers, take an account of whatever effects he dies possessed of, and transmit the same, as in the case above provided for, in order that the same may be secured for, and paid to their respective representatives.

In Congress, November 7, 1775.

Resolved, That the following additions and alterations or amendments, be made in the Rules and Regulations of the Continental army, viz.:

1. All persons convicted of holding a treacherous correspondence with, or giving intelligence to the enemy, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as a general court-martial shall think proper.

2 All commissioned officers found guilty by a general court-martial of any fraud or embezzlement, shall forfeit all his pay, be ipso facto cashiered, and deemed unfit for further service as an officer.

3. All non-commissioned officers and soldiers convicted before a regimental court-martial of stealing, embezzling or destroying ammunition, provisions, tools, or anything belonging to the public stores, if a non-commissioned officer, to be reduced to the ranks, and punished with whipping, not less than fifteen, nor more than thirty-nine lashes, at the discretion of the court-martial; if a private soldier, with the same corporal punishment.

4. In all cases where a commissioned officer is cashiered for cowardice or fraud, it be added in the punishment that the crime, name, place of abode, and punishment of the delinquent be published in the newspapers, in and about the camp, and of that Colony from which the offender came or usually resides; after which it shall be deemed scandalous in any officer to associate with him.

5. Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause, or join in any mutiny or sedition in the regiment, troop or company to which he belongs, or in any other regiment troop or company of the Continental forces, either by land or sea, or in any party, post, detachment or guard, on any pretence whatsoever, shall suffer death or such other punishment as a general court-martial shall direct.

6. Any officer or soldier who shall desert to the enemy, and afterwards be taken, shall suffer death or such other punishment as a general court-martial shall direct.

7. Whatsoever commissioned officer shall be found drunk on his guard, party or other duty, under arms, shall be cashiered and drummed out of the army with infamy; any non-commissioned officer or soldier, so offending, shall be sentenced to be whipt, not less than twenty nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence.

8. Whatsoever officer or soldier, placed as sentinel, shall be found sleeping upon his post, or shall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, if a commissioned officer, shall be cashiered and drummed out of the army with infamy; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, shall be sentenced to be whipped, not less than twenty nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence.

9. No officer or soldier shall lie out his quarters or camp, without leave from the commanding officer of the regiment, upon penalty, if an officer, of being mulcted one month's pay for the first offence, and cashiered for the second; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, of being confined seven days on bread and water for the first offence, and the same punishment and a forfeiture of a week's pay for the second.

10. Whatsoever officer or soldier shall misbehave himself before the enemy, or shamefully abandon any post committed to his charge, or shall speak words, inducing others to do the like, shall suffer death.

11 All public stores taken in the enemy's camp or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing or provisions, shall be secured for the use of the United Colonies. And all commissioned officers found guilty, by a general court-martial, of embezzling the same, or any of them, shall forfeit all his pay, be ipso facto cashiered, and be deemed unfit for farther service as an officer. And all non-commissioned officers and soldiers, convicted before a regimental court-martial of stealing or embezzling the same, if a non-commissioned officer, shall be reduced to the ranks and punished with whipping not less than fifteen nor more than thirty-nine lashes, at the discretion of the court-martial; if a private soldier, with the same punishment.

12. If any officer or soldier shall leave his post or colours, in time of an engagement, to go in search of plunder, he shall if a commissioned officer, be cashiered and drummed out of the army with infamy, and forfeit all share of plunder; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, be whipped, not less than twenty nor more than thirty-nine lashes, according to the nature of the offence, and forfeit all share of plunder taken from the enemy.

13. Every officer commanding a regiment, troop or company, shall, upon notice given to him by the commissary of the musters, or from one of his Deputies, assemble the regiment, troop or company under his command, in the next convenient place for their being mustered, on penalty of his being cashiered, and mulcted of his pay.

14. At every muster, the commanding officer of each regiment, troop or company, there present, shall give to the commissary of musters certificates, signed by himself, signifying how long such officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers, who shall not appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their absence; which reasons, and the time of absence, shall be inserted in the muster rolls, opposite to the names of such absentees; and the surgeons or their mates shall, at the same time, give to the commissary of musters a certificate signed by them, signifying the state of health or sickness of those under their care, and the said certificates shall, together with the muster rolls, be, by the said commissary, transmitted to the General, and to this or any future Congress of the United Colonies or Committee appointed thereby, within twenty days next after such muster being taken, on failure whereof the commissary, so offending, shall be discharged from the service.

15. Every officer who shall be convicted, before a general court-martial, of having signed a false certificate relating to the absence of either officer, non-commissioned officer or private soldier; and every surgeon or mate convicted of signing a false certificate, relating to the health or sickness of those under his care, shall be cashiered.

16. All officers and soldiers who shall wilfully or through negligence, disobey any general or special orders, shall be punished at the discretion of a regimental court-martial, where the offence is against a regimental order, and at the discretion of a general court-martial, where the offence is against an order given from the Commander-in-chief, or the commanding officer of any detachment or post, and such general court-martial can be had.

By order of the Congress,
John Hancock,        
President.    
A true copy from the Minutes,
                          Charles Thompson,
                                                Secretary,

 

New Jersey Assembly.

—————

At a sitting began at Burlington, Wednesday, November 15, 1775, and continued until the 6th day of December following, being the second sitting of the Fourth Session of the Twenty-second Assembly of New Jersey.

NAMES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES.

City of Perth Amboy — Cortland Skinner, Speaker, John Combs.

Middlesex — John Wetherill, Azariah Dunham.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, Richard Lawrence.

Essex — Stephen Crane, Henry Garritse.

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, John Roy.

Bergen — Theunis Dey, John Demarest.

Morris — Jacob Ford, William Winds.

City of Burlington — James Kinsey, Thomas P. Hewlings.

County of Burlington — Henry Paxson, Anthony Sykes.

Gloucester — John Hinchman, Robert F. Price.

Salem — Grant Gibbon, Benjamin F. Holme.

Cape May — Jonathan Hand, Eli Eldridge.

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm.

Cumberland — John Shepperd, Theophilus Elmer.

Sussex — Nathaniel Pettit, Joseph Barton.

Burlington, Wednesday, November 15, 1775.

Pursuant to his Excellency's several prorogations of the General Assembly from time to time till this day, several Members met, and, for want of a sufficient number to make a House for business, adjourned till to-morrow morning, ten o'clock.

Thursday, November 16, 1775.

The House met, and, for want of a sufficient number of Members to make a House, adjourned to three, P. M.

The House met.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher and Mr. Paxson do wait on his Excellency, and acquaint him that a sufficient number of Members to proceed to business are met, and ready to receive anything he may please to lay before them.

Mr. Deputy Secretary laid before the House the several prorogations of the House since last session, which were read.

Mr. Fisher reported that Mr. Paxson and himself waited upon the Governour, according to order, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him presently.

A Message from the Governour, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and requires the immediate attendance of the House.

Whereupon, Mr. Speaker quitted the chair, and, with the House, went to wait upon the Governour; and being returned, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and reported that the House had waited on the Governour, who was pleased to make a Speech to the Council and this House, of which Mr. Speaker said he had, to prevent mistakes, obtained a copy. And the same, by order of the House, was read, and is as follows, viz.:

Gentlemen of the Council, and Gentlemen of the Assembly:

I have called this meeting that you might have an opportunity of transacting such business as the publick exigencies of the Province require.

Having lately said so much to you concerning the present unhappy situation of publick affairs, and the destructive measures which have been adopted in the Colonies, under the pretence of necessity; and as I do not yet see that the urging any more arguments on that head has a chance of producing any good effect, I shall not endanger the harmony of the present session by a further discussion of the subject.

It is necessary, however, that you should be informed, "that his Majesty laments to find his subjects in America so lost to their true interests as neither to accept the Resolution of the House of Commons of the 20th of February, nor make it the basis of a negotiation, when, in all probability, it would have led to some plan of accommodation; and that, as they have preferred engaging in a rebellion which menaces to overthrow the Constitution, it becomes His Majesty's duty, and is his firm resolution, that the most vigorous efforts should be made, both by sea and land, to reduce his rebellious subjects to obedience. But it is hoped that, unfavourable as the prospects are at present, the time will come when men of sense and friends to peace and good order will see the fatal consequences of the delusions which have led to the measures the people of America are now pursuing, and that we may yet see the publick tranquility re-established, on the ground of the terms held out by His Majesty and the Parliament."

It is likewise proper that you should know "that the Commanders of His Majesty's Squadrons in America have orders to proceed, as in the case of a Town in actual rebellion, against such of the seaport Towns and places, being accessible to the King's Ships, as shall offer any violence to the King's Officers, or in which any Troops shall be raised or military works erected, other than by His Majesty's authority, or any attempts made to seize or plunder any publick magazine of Arms or Ammunition."

Although the King's Officers in this Province have not as yet, except in one or two instances, met with any insults or improper treatment from any of the inhabitants, yet such has been the general infatuation and disorder of the times, that had I followed the judgment and advice of some of my best friends, I should ere this have sought (as other of the King's Governours have done) an asylum on board of one of His Majesty's Ships; but as I am conscious that I have the true interest and welfare of the people at heart, (though I am so unhappy as to differ widely in opinion with their Representatives, respecting the best means of serving them in the present crisis,) I shall continue my confidence in that affection and regard which I have on so many occasions experienced from all ranks, during my residence in this Colony. I have indeed the stronger inducement to run this risk, and to use my influence with the other Crown Officers to do the same, because our retreat would necessarily be attributed to either the effect or well grounded apprehension of violence, and of course subject the Colony to be more immediately considered as in actual rebellion, and be productive of mischiefs which it is my earnest inclination and determination to prevent, as far as may be in my power. Let me therefore, gentlemen, entreat you to exert your influence likewise with the people, that they may not. by any action of theirs, give cause for the bringing such calamities on the Province. No advantage can possibly result from the seizing, confinement, or ill treatment of Officers, adequate to the certain damage such acts of violence must occasion the Province to suffer.

However, gentlemen, if you should be of a different opinion, and will not or cannot answer for our safety, all I ask is, that you will tell me so in such plain, open language as cannot be misunderstood; for as sentiments of independency are, by some men of present consequence, openly avowed, and essays are already appearing in the publick papers to ridicule the people's fears of that horrid measure, and remove their aversion to Republican Government, it is high time that every man should know what he has to expect. If, as I hope, you have an abhorrence of such design, you will do your Country an essential service by declaring it in so full and explicit terms as may discourage the attempt. You may always rely on finding me ready to co-operate with you in every proper expedient for promoting peace, order, and good Government; and I shall deem it a particular happiness to have an opportunity of being instrumental in saving this Province from the present impending danger.

William Franklin.      
Council Chamber, November 16, 1775.

Ordered, That his Excellency's Speech be read a second time.

The House adjourned till ten o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, November 17, 1775.

The House met.

Mr. Crane had leave of absence on special occasion.

Mr. Speaker laid before the House a Letter to him from Richard Penn and Arthur Lee, Esqs.; which was read, and the same is as follows, viz.:

London, September 2, 1775.

"Honourable Sir:— On the 21st of last month we sent to the Secretary of State for America a copy of the petition from the General Congress, and yesterday, the first moment that was permitted us, we presented to him the original, which his Lordship promised to deliver to His Majesty. We thought it our duty to press his Lordship to obtain an answer, but we were told that, as His Majesty did not receive it on the throne, no answer would be given.

"We have the honour of being, honourable Sir, your most faithful and obedient servants,

"Richard Penn,       
"Arthur Lee.             
" To the Honourable the Speaker of the Assembly of New Jersey."

Mr. Kinsey and Mr. De Hart, two of the Delegates appointed by this House to attend the Continental Congress, applied to the House for leave to resign their said appointments, alleging that they are so particularly circumstanced as to render their attendance exceedingly inconvenient to their private affairs.

Resolved, That the House will take this matter into consideration.

The House adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

Several Members of this House being absent, whereby the publick business has been greatly retarded,

Ordered, That the Sergeant-at-Arms do give notice forthwith to Benjamin Holme, Robert F. Price, John Combs, John Wetherill, Azariah Dunham, and William Winds, Esqs., to attend their service here immediately.

Mr. Mehelm had leave to be absent on Monday next, upon special business.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, November 18, 1775.

The House met, and adjourned till Monday morning, ten o'clock.

Monday, November 20, 1775.

The House met, and adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Combs and Mr. Winds appeared, and assigned to the House satisfactory reasons for their non-appearance.

A Petition was presented to the House, from fifty-two Inhabitants of the Township of Chesterfield, in the County of Burlington, setting forth their abhorrence of personal Slavery, and praying the Legislature to take the matter into their most serious consideration, and pass an Act to set free all the Slaves now in the Colony; which Petition was read, and ordered a second reading.

His Excellency's Speech was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, November 21, 1775.

The House met.

A Petition was presented to the House, from divers Inhabitants of the County of Burlington, praying for reasons therein set forth, that young men living with their parents may be taxed; the same was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on his Excellency's Speech; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the Committee had gone through the Speech, and had come to sundry Resolutions, which he was ready to report whenever the House will please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately; whereupon Mr. Fisher reported the Resolutions of the Committee, as follow, viz.:

1. Resolved, That an humble Address be presented to his Excellency, in answer to his Speech.

To which the House agreed.

2. Resolved, That the Government of this Colony be honourably supported from the 1st day of October, 1775, to the 1st day of October, 1776.

To which the House agreed.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Kinsey, and Mr. Gibbon, be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of an Address to his Excellency in answer to his Speech.

Ordered, That Mr. Hinchman, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Shepperd, Mr. Deraarest, and Mr. Sykes, be a Committee to prepare and bring in a Bill for support of Government.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Ordered, That Mr. Elmer, Mr. Mehelm, and Mr. Ford, be a Committee to bring in a Bill to authorize the Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties to pay all persons lieretofore appointed to number the Inhabitants of the Colony.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, November 22, 1775.

The House met.

The House took into consideration the request of James Kinsey, and John DeHart, Esqs., two of the Delegates appointed by this House to attend the Continental Congress, for leave to resign their said appointments.

Resolved, That the reasons given by those gentlemen for their resignation appear to the House to be satisfactory, and that their resignation be therefore accepted; thereupon,

Resolved, That the three remaining Delegates, or any two of them, represent the Colony during the present Continental Congress.

On the question whether the House agrees to this last Resolve or not, it passed in the affirmative, as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Dey,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Sykes,
Gibbon
Holme,
Hand,
Tucker,
Mehelm,
Shepperd,
Elmer,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Paxson, Hinchman.                        

Resolved, That it is the opinion of, and this House do advise, that the present Committee of Correspondence may draw any part of the sum of one thousand Pounds, made subject to their order by an Act passed in 1773, not exceeding two hundred Pounds, to pay the further expenses of the Delegates appointed by this House to attend the Continental Congress, and that this House will allow thereof.

On motion made,

Ordered, That Mr. Taylor, Mr. Lawrence, and Mr. Combs, be a Committee to prepare and bring in a Bill to enable the Justices and Freeholders of Monmouth to elect Loan Officers.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit.

A MESSAGE TO THE ASSEMBLY.

Gentlemen:— As I understand that there is now a sufficient number of members met to proceed on business of every kind proper for your consideration, I am to lay before you a requisition from His Majesty. It is contained in a letter which I lately had the honour of receiving from the Right Honourable the Earl of Dartmouth, one of His Majesty's principal Secretaries of State. His Lordship writes thus:

"I enclose an order of His Majesty in Council, approving an act for striking one hundred thousand Pounds in bills of credit, and directing the modes for sinking the same."

"The very great attention which has been shown to the wishes of the Province, in the allowance of the loan act, is an evidence of His Majesty's gracious inclination to grant them every indulgence that can consist with the true principles of commerce and the Constitution; and I beg leave to assure you that no part of my duty is more agreeable to me than carrying into execution these gracious intentions of my royal master."

"At the same time, I am commanded by the King to say to you that it would have been more agreeable to His Majesty, if the Assembly, instead of a general appropriation of the interest of the loan to the support of Government, in such manner as shall be directed by future acts, had thought fit to make a settlement, during the existence of that loan, upon the civil officers of Government, of salaries more suitable to their respective offices than what they now receive; and to appropriate a specifick portion of the said interest to building houses for the residence of the Governour and the meeting of the Legislature, of which you say there is a shameful want. Such an appropriation is no more than what they owe to the dignity of their own Government and His Majesty's just expectations; and therefore it is His Majesty's pleasure, that you do require the Assembly, in His Majesty's name, to make such provision accordingly, trusting that they will not make such an ill return to His Majesty's grace and favour in the confirmation of this law, as not to comply with so just and reasonable a requisition."

I shall not, gentlemen, so far hazard, the giving you offence as to suppose that any arguments can be requisite to persuade you to a compliance with His Majesty's desire and expectations in this respect; more especially as the mode for raising the money does not require any tax to be laid on the inhabitants of the Province, and will, if adopted, most probably be the means of establishing a precedent that may render all taxes for the future support of Government unnecessary. You must likewise be fully sensible, that as the King has manifested such confidence in the legal representatives of the people, it cannot but be their interest as well as duty, particularly at this time, to convince him that that confidence is not misplaced. Besides, such repeated declarations have been made to His Majesty, that he might always have the firmest reliance on the compliance of his subjects in this Colony with every reasonable requisition in their power; and this being so evidently of that nature, I cannot entertain a doubt of your being happy in having so good an opportunity of demonstrating that you mean your actions should ever correspond with your professions.

Wm. Franklin.      

 

Burlington, November 21, 1775.

Which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, November 23, 1775.

The House met.

A Petition was presented to the House, from thirty-two Freeholders of the County of Burlington, praying the House to enter into such Resolves as may discourage an Independency on Great Britain, and that they will also support the civil Government, as heretofore, viz:

PETITION TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

"The Petition of divers Freeholders of the County of Burlington respectfully sheweth:

"That your Petitioners are deeply impressed with a sense of the calamitous state of publick affairs, in the unhappy contest which at present subsists between Great Britain and her Colonies. That they sincerely lament that either Country should dwell so much on their own dignity or importance as to delay, for one moment, to make such reasonable propositions as should lead to a happy reconciliation of the present differences. That your Petitioners are greatly alarmed at the sentiments of independency which are openly avowed by too many people at this time; your Petitioners conceiving that, should such an event take place, the consequence would be the destruction of the interests of the whole British Empire, and a perpetual bar to every door of peace and reconciliation between the Parent State and the Colonies. That your Petitioners conceive that the expenses of the opposition, against the oppressive measures of the British Ministry and Parliament, will fall most heavy on the landed interest, being the only permanent estate; and that your Petitioners, as a part of that interest, have an undoubted right to be heard, and their reasonable requests considered, with that attention which their situation particularly merits.

"That, in the opinion of your Petitioners, an effectual opposition may be made against the measures now pursuing by the Ministry and Parliament of Great Britain, without changing the constitutional form of Government, in the British Empire established; and that your Petitioners have not the least desire that the union of the Colonies, in that opposition, should be broken, which they think the establishment of an independency would effect. That as the King has objected to the receiving of the Petition of the Congress, (as we suppose) because it did not come ihrough the accustomed and constitutional channel, with due submission to the honourable House, it is the sense of your Petitioners that that mode ought to be tried, and the reasons why we cannot accede to the proposition of the House of Commons, on the 20th day of February last, should modestly be set forth; at the same time declaring our desire of a perpetual union, and our willingness to contribute our just proportion to the support of the whole Empire, according to the utmost of our ability, whenever constitutionally required so to do. Your Petitioners therefore pray that your honourable House will take into consideration the subject matter of this Petition, and make such resolves as may discourage an independency, should such a measure be attempted, and also make such provision for the support of the civil Government of this Colony as heretofore; your Petitioners hereby making their solemn protest against the change of the form of Government, as by law established, and declaring that it is not, nor never was their intention to vest any Congress or body of men whatsoever with that power.

John Monrow,
Ch. Ph. Hughes,
Thomas Shinn,
Aaron Smith,
William Budd,
Mahlon Gaskill,
Aquila Shinn,
Thomas Paxson,
Joseph Mullen,
Joseph Weaver,
William Norton,
Joseph Butterworth,
Josiah White,
Francis Vinecomb,
George West,
Aaron Wills,
Aaron Barton,
Samuel Clark,
Jacob Parker,
John Powell,
Thomas Lee,
Aaron Atkinson,
Jabez Woolston,
Joseph Burr, Jun.,
John Comfort,
William West,
Thomas Hunloke,
Hosea Eyre,
Henry Burr,
Samuel Swain,
Daniel Shields,
Thomas Budd, Jun.

Which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Ford, from the Committee on that service, brought in a Bill entitled "An Act to authorize the Board of Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties in the Colony of New Jersey to defray the expense of taking lists of the Inhabitants," which was read the second time.

Ordered, That Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Crane, Mr. Fisher, and Mr. Paxson, be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of Answer to the said Message.

On a motion made, that the several Barracks in this Colony are in such decay that unless repaired they will be in ruins, and that a Resolve may pass, that this House will make provision, during this session, for repairing the same, the question was taken, whether the House will enter into such resolution or not. It passed in the negative, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Fisher,
Roy,
Ford,
Winds,
Kinsey,
Hinchman,
Holme,
Tucker,
Mehelm,
Elmer,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Taylor,
Lawrence,
Garritse,
Dey,
Demarest,
Hewlings,
Paxson,
Sykes,
 
Gibbon,
Hand,
Eldridge,
Shepperd,
 

The House took into consideration the several Petitions referred from last session, for and against a Bill for the more easy manumission of Slaves; the Bill being read, after some time spent in debate thereon, the question was put, whether the Bill shall be committed or not. It passed in the negative, as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Lawrence,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Paxson,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
Gibbon,
Tucker,
Mehelm,
Shepperd,
Elmer.
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Taylor,
Crane,
Garritse,
Fisher,
Roy,
Dey,
Demarest,
Ford,
Winds,
Holme,
Hand,
Edlridge,
Barton,
 

Thereupon, upon the question,

Resolved, That the said Bill be referred to the next session of Assembly.

Yeas—

Mr. Lawrence,
Fisher,
Roy,
Ford,
Kinsey,
Hewlings,
Paxson,
Sykes,
Hinchman,
Shepperd,
Gibbon,
Holme,
Tucker,
Mehelm.
Elmer.

Nats—

Mr. Combs,
Taylor,
Crane,
Garritse,
Dey,
Demarest,
Winds,
 
Hand,
Eldridge,
Barton,
 

The House adjourned till three P.M.

The House met.

Mr. Fisher, from the Committee appointed to bring in the draught of an Address to his Excellency, produced a draught accordingly; which was read, and ordered to be read a second time.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, November 24, 1775.

The House met.

Mr. Crane had leave of absence till Monday afternoon next.

Resolved, That Mr. Dennis DeBerdt, Esq., be, and he is hereby appointed Agent of this Colony at the Court of Great Britain, in the room of Benjamin Franklin, Esq.

The Address to his Excellency was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

The House accordingly resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Address; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some progress in the matter to them referred, and desired leave to sit again.

Ordered, That the said Committee do sit again.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Taylor, from the Committee appointed for the purpose, brought in a Bill entitled "A supplementary Act to the Act entitled 'An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same;'" which was read, and ordered a second reading.

A Petition was presented to the House from thirty-four Freeholders of the County of Burlington, praying the House to enter into such resolves as may discourage an Independency on Great Britain and to support the civil Government as heretofore; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, November 25, 1775
.

The House met.

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Address to his Excellency; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had gone through the Address, and had made sundry amendments to the same, which, by order of the House, be reported, and the same being read, and further amended in the House, the further consideration thereof was referred till the afternoon.

The House adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Hinchman had leave of absence till Monday noon next.

A Petition was presented to the House, from nineteen Freeholders of the City of Burlington and parts adjacent, praying the House to enter into such Resolves as may discourage an Independency on Great Britain, and that they will also support the civil Government, as usual; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House resumed the consideration of the Address, with the amendments; and, after some time spent therein, the said Address, as amended, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Demarest,
Holme,
Taylor,
Ford,
Eldridge,
Lawrence,
Winds,
Tucker,
Garritse,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Fisher,
Sykes,
Sheppard,
Roy,
Gibbon,
Elmer,
Dey,
Hand,
Barton.

Nay—

Mr. Kinsey    

The House adjurned till Monday morning, nine o'clock.

Monday, November 27, 1775

The House met.

The Bill entitled "A suppleentary Act to the Act entitled 'An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same,'" was read the second time, amended in the House, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed..

The Bill entitled "An Act to authorize the Board of Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties in the Colony of New Jersey to defray the expense of taking Lists of the Inhabitants," was read the second time, amended in the House, and upon the question, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

A Petition was presented to the House, from forty-eight Freeholders of the County of Burlington, praying the House to enter into such resolves as may discourage an Independency on Great Britain, and that they will support the civil Government as heretofore; which was read and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That the Sergeant-at-Arms do summon the signers of a Petition from the City of Burlington, presented to the House on Saturday last, to attend the House at four o'clock this afternoon.

Mr. Tucker, from the Committee appointed to that service, brought in a Bill entitled "An Act for the support of Government of His Majesty's Colony of New Jersey, to commence the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, and to end the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six; and to discharge the publick debts, and contingent charges thereof," which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The House adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

The engrossed Bill entitled "An Act to authorize the Board of Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties in the Colony of New Jersey to defray the expense of taking Lists of the Inhabitants," was read and compared.

On the question, Resolved, That the same do pass:

Yeas—

Mr. Lawrence,
Winds,
Holme,
Fisher,
Hewlings,
Elmer,
Roy,
Paxson,
Tucker,
Demarest,
Hinchman,
Mehelm,
Ford,
Gibbon,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Dey,
Hand,
Taylor,
Sykes,
Eldridge,
Garritse,
Kinsey,
Shepperd.

Ordered, That Mr. Hewlings do carry the said Bill to the Council for concurrence.

Mr. Hewlings reported, that Mr. Gibbon and himself delivered the Bill, with them intrusted, to Mr. Hopkinson, one of the gentlemen of the Council, the Council not then sitting.

According to order, the Petitioners from the City of Burlington attended, and being called in, and heard.

Ordered, That the consideration thereof be deferred till to-morrow morning.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, November 28, 1775.

The House met.

The engrossed Bill entitled "A supplementary Act to the Act entitled 'An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds, in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same,'" was read and compared; on the question.

Resolved, That the same do pass,

Ordered, That Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Combs do carry the said Bill to the Council for concurrence.

The House was moved, that a Committee be appointed to prepare the draught of a Petition to His Majesty, humbly beseeching him to use his interposition to prevent the effusion of blood; and to express the great desire this House hath to a restoration of peace and harmony with the Parent State, on constitutional principles.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Kinsey, Mr. Paxson, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Lawrence, and Mr. Gibbon, be a Committee to prepare and bring in the draught of a Petition accordingly.

Mr. Winds had leave of absence for the remainder of the session, upon extraordinary occasions.

The House took into consideration the inquiry had yesterday, touching the Petitions presented to this House; and it appearing from the Petitioners of the City of Burlington, who were called in and heard, that they signed the same from reports that some men affected independency, and being alarmed at such sentiments, they were induced to present the Petition, hoping that the House would discourage such sentiments by their Resolutions; whereupon, the several Petitions being read the second time,

1. Resolved, That reports of Independency, in the apprehension of this House, are groundless.

2. Resolved, That it be recommended to the Delegates of the Colony to use their utmost endeavours for the obtaining a redress of American grievances, and for restoring the union between the Colonies and Great Britain, upon constitutional principles.

3. Resolved, That the said Delegates be directed not to give their assent to, but utterly to reject any propositions, if such should be made, that may separate this Colony from the Mother Country, or change tlie form of Government thereof.

The House also taking into consideration the conduct of Mr. Richard Smith, late of Philadelphia, merchant, upon the hearing had yesterday.

Ordered, That the Sergeant-at-Arms do bring the said Richard Smith before this House, at four o'clock this afternoon, to answer for the insult offered by him to the House during the said hearing.

Ordered, That Mr. Tucker, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Shepperd, Mr. Hewlings and Mr. Gibbon, or any three of them, be a Committee to settle all publick Accounts that may come before the House this session.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Richard Smith attending, pursuant to the order of the forenoon, and being examined as to the words spoken by him of the member, informed the House that he neither intended any offence or insult to the House or any member of it, and that he is sorry any member of this House should take it as an insult upon him; with which this House being satisfied, and being of opinion that it appears Mr. Smith really misapprehended the words of the member, and that the same member is not justly chargeable with such opinions, do discharge Mr. Smith from any further attendance on the House.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, November 29, 1775.

The House met.

The engrossed Address to his Excellency was read and compared ; on the question,

Ordered, That Mr. Speaker do sign the same.

Ordered, That Mr. Tucker and Mr. Elmer do wait upon the Governour, and desire to know when his Excellency will be attended by the House with their Address.

The Bill for the support of Government was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House,

The House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Bill for support of Government; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again; to which the House agreed.

The House adjourned till three, P. M.

The House met.

A Message from the Council, by Mr. Stockton, acquainting the House that the Council had passed the Bill entitled "An Act to authorize the Board of Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties in the Colony of New Jersey to defray the expense of taking Lists of the Inhabitants."

The House again, according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Bill for support of Government; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that the Committee had gone through the matters to them referred, and had come to several Resolutions, which he was ready to report whenever the House will please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the Report be made immediately.

Whereupon, Mr. Fisher reported the Resolutions of the Committee, as follows, viz.:

1. Resolved, That in and by the said Bill, when passed into a law, there be paid to his Excellency William Franklin, Esq., Governour of this Colony, at the rate of twelve hundred Pounds per annum, Proclamation Money, to commence the first day of October last.

And on the question, whether the House agrees to the said sum or not, it passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Ford,
Eldridge,
Garritse,
Kinsey,
Tucker,
Fisher,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Roy,
Hinchman,
Shepperd,
Dey,
Gibbon,
Elmer,
Demarest,
Holme,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Lawrence,
Hand,
Taylor,
Sykes,
 
who voted for one thousand Pounds.

2. To David Ogden, Esq., second Justice of the Supreme Court of this Colony, at the rate of one hundred and fifty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

And on the question, whether the House agrees thereto or not, it passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Kinsey,
Holme,
Fisher,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Roy,
Sykes,
Shepperd,
Demarest,
Hinchman,
Elmer,
Ford,
Gibbon,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Garritse,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Dey,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Hand,
 
who voted for one hundred Pounds.

3. To Richard Stockton, Esq., third Justice of the Supreme Court of this Colony, at the rate of one hundred and fifty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

And on the question, whether the House agrees thereto or not, it passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Kinsey,
Holme,
Fisher,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Roy,
Sykes,
Shepperd,
Demarest,
Hinchman,
Elmer,
Ford,
Gibbon,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Garritse,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Dey,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Hand,
 

4. To Cortland Skinner, Esq., Attorney General of this Colony, at the rate of forty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

And on the question, whether the House agrees thereto or not, it passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Kinsey,
Holme,
Garritse,
Hewlings,
Mehelm,
Fisher,
Sykes,
Shepperd,
Roy,
Hinchman,
 
Elmer,
Demarest,
Gibbon,
Barton,
Ford.
 

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Dey,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Hand,
 
Tucker,
Lawrence,
 
who voted for thirty Pounds.

5. To Joseph Smith and John Symth, Esqs., Treasurers of this Colony, each at the rate of forty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

6. To the Clerk of the Council for the time being, at the rate of thirty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

7. To the Agent of this Colony for the time being, at the rate of one hundred Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

8. To the Clerk of the Circuits for the time being, residing in this Colony, the sum of twenty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

9. To the Doorkeeper of the Council of this Colony, at the rate of ten Pounds per annum, money aforesaid.

To which the House agreed.

10. To his Excellency William Franklin, Esq., at the rate of sixty Pounds per annum, money aforesaid, for house rent, provided he makes Perth Amboy or Burlington the place of his residence.

To which the House agreed.

11. To the Justice or Justices of the Supreme Court of this Colony, for attending the Circuit Courts, and Courts of Oyer and Terminer, in the manner prescribed by the said Act, the sum of ten Pounds for each time.

To which the House agreed.

12. To each of the Council for the time being, for the time they may attend at any sitting of General Assembly within the time, eight Shillings per day.

On the question, whether the sum be eight Shillings or six Shillings, it was carried for eight Shillings, as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Demarest,
Gibbon,
Garritse,
Ford,
Mehelm,
Fisher,
Kinsey,
Shepperd,
Roy,
Hewlings,
Elmer,
Dey,
Hinchman,
Barton.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Sykes,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Holme,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Hand,
 
who voted for six Shillings.

13. To Richard Smith, one of the Clerks of the House of Representatives, or any other Clerk, for his attendance, the sum of ten Shillings per day, for the time he hath or shall attend at any sitting of General Assembly, during the continuance of this Act; also, the sum of four Pence per sheet, reckoning ninety words to the sheet, for entering the Minutes of any sitting, during the continuance of this Act, fair in the Journals and copying the Laws and Minutes for the Printer; and to the said Richard Smith the sum of ten Pounds, for pen, ink and paper, and hiring Clerks to forward the business of this session; and for a Journal for the use of the General Assembly, thirty-three Shillings;

To which the House agreed.

14. To Charles Pettit, Esq., Deputy Secretary, or to the Deputy Secretary for the time being, for copying publick Laws to send home to England, during the continuance of this Act, four Pence per sheet, reckoning ninety words to the sheet; and to the said Charles Pettit, for extraordinary services, the sum of twenty Pounds;

To which the House agreed.

15, To each of the Treasurers of this Colony, six Pence per Pound, for exchanging ragged and torn Bills of Credit of this Colony;

To which the House agreed.

16. To Isaac Collins, or any other Printer hereafter to be appointed, for printing the Minutes of the House of Representatives of any sitting during the continuance of this Act, and for printing the Laws passed at any sitting as aforesaid, or any other printing, such sums as Hendrick Fisher, Stephen Crane, James Kinsey, and Thomas Polgreen Hewlings, Esqs., or any two of them, shall agree to be paid for the said services;

To which the House agreed.

17. To the Sergeant-at-Arms for the time being, who shall attend the Council, the sum of three Shillings per diem; and to the Sergeant-at-Arms who shall attend the House of Representatives, the sum of three Shillings per diem;

To which the House agreed.

18. To the Doorkeeper of the House of Representatives for the time being, who shall attend the House in manner aforesaid, the sum of three Shillings and six Pence per diem;

To which the House agreed.

19. To the Speaker and every of the Members of the House of Representatives, for the time each of them shall attend at any sitting of General Assembly, during the continuance of this Act, eight Shillings per diem.

On the question, whether the sum be eight Shillings or six Shillings per diem, it was carried for eight Shillings, as follows, viz..

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Ford,
Hinchman,
Fisher,
Kinsey,
Gibbon,
Roy,
Barton,
Mehelm,
Dey,
Garritse,
Shepperd,
Demarest,
Hewlings,
Elmer.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Sykes,
Eldridge,
Taylor,
Holme,
Tucker,
Lawrence,
Hand,
 
who voted for six Shillings.

Ordered, That the Bill for support of Government, as reported and agreed to, be engrossed.

Mr. Tucker reported, that Mr. Elmer and himself delivered the Message of the House to his Excellency, according to order, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Thursday, November 30, 1775.

The House met.

The House taking into consideration the inconvenience arising from requiring the attendance of two of the Delegates to represent the Colony in the Continental Congress:

Resolved, That any one of the three Delegates appointed to attend the Congress be, and such Delegate is hereby fully authorized to represent this Colony during the present Congress.

A Message from the Council, by Mr. Hopkinson informing the House that the Council have passed the Bill entitled "A supplementary Act to the Act entitled 'An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds, in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same;'" without any amendment.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

The Petition from sundry Freeholders of Burlington County, praying that Young Men who live with their parents may be taxed, was read the second time.

It was moved that the prayer of the Petition may be granted. Whereupon the previous question was demanded, whether that question shall now be put or not. It passed in the negative, as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Crane,
Paxson,
Mehelm,
Kinsey,
Gibbon,
Shepperd,
Hewlings,
Tucker.
 

Navs—

Mr. Combs,
Dey,
Holme,
Lawrence,
Demarest,
Hand,
Taylor,
Ford,
Eldridge,
Garritse,
Sykes,
 
Elmer,
Fisher,
Hinchman,
Barton,
Roy.
 

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the next session of Assembly.

The Petition from the Township of Chesterfield, in the County of Burlington, praying a law to set free all the Slaves now in the Colony, was read a second time.

Ordered, That the same do lie on the table.

The Committee appointed to consider the Governour's Message at the last session informed the House that they were ready to make a report, and at the same time mentioned to the House, that the report was necessarily drawn up in such a manner as they apprehended might possibly occasion a longer session than the House at this time might incline to, and might be productive of some controversy. Whereupon, the House taking the same into their consideration, and also being of opinion that anything which might interrupt the harmony, in this present critical situation of the Province, ought not to be entered into at the present session, unless something should occur during their sitting which may, in their opinion, render it necessary, do order that the report be postponed.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, ready to receive the Address of the House.

Whereupon, Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and, with the House, went to wait upon the Governour; and being returned Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and reported that the House had waited on the Governour, and delivered their Address, in these words:

To His Excellency William Franklin, Esq., Captain General, Governour, and Commander-in-Chief, in and over His Majesty^s Colony of Nova-Cæsarea, or New Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the same, &c.:

The humble Address of the Representatives of the said Colony, in General Assembly convened.

May it Please Your Excellency:— We, His Majesty's loyal and dutiful subjects, the Representatives of the Colony of New Jersey, in General Assembly convened, have considered your Excellency's speech at the opening of the present session.

We sincerely lament the unhappy situation of publick affairs; and we regret that, though we have presented a dutiful petition to His Majesty, yet we have little prospect of his favourable interposition for the removal of those grievances under which we suffer, in common with his other American subjects.

There is nothing we desire with greater anxiety than a reconciliation with our Parent State, on constitutional principles. But if the resolution of the House of Commons, of the 20th of February, could, without departing from the duty we owe to our constituents, have been accepted, or made the basis of a negotiation which would probably have led to any plan of accommodation, we have been and still are greatly mistaken.

We are surprised to hear that any persons could have advised your Excellency to have sought an asylum on hoard of one of His Majesty's ships. We cannot imagine that your Excellency could have had any just reason to fear any insult or improper treatment from the people of the Colony; and if your retreat would necessarily be attributed to either the effect or well-grounded apprehensions of violence, and be productive of mischiefs to the inhabitants, however such advisers may deserve to be esteemed your "best friends," we cannot suppose them to be really so to the Colony.

Your Excellency's safety, or that of any of the officers of Government, we apprehend to be in no danger. We place our own safety in that protection which the laws of our Country and the executive powers of the Government afford to all the King's subjects. It is the only asylum which we have to fly to; and we make no doubt but that it will be, as it hitherto hath been, found fully equal to the purpose both of securing your Excellency and others. And we hope to find that the officers of Government will conduct themselves so prudently as not to invite any ill-usage, and that they will not make any supposed "infatuation, or disorder" of the times, a pretence to leave the Province, and thereby endeavour to subject the inhabitants to any calamities.

We know of no sentiments of independency that are by men of any consequence, openly avowed; nor do we approve of any essays tending to encourage such a measure. We have already expressed our detestation of such opinions, and we have so frequently and fully declared our sentiments on this subject, and in particular in our petition to the King at the last session of Assembly, that we should have thought ourselves, as at present we really deserve to be, exempt from all suspicion of this nature.

We have already resolved to support His Majesty's Government, and look upon it to be our duty to use our influence to promote peace, order, and good government.

By order of the House,
Cortland Skinner,        
Speaker.    

House of Assembly, November 29, 1775.

To which his Excellency was pleased to make the following answer:

Gentlemen:— I return you my thanks for your resolution to support His Majesty's Government, and cannot but approve your determination to promote peace and good order.

I shall avoid, for the reasons I gave you in my speech, any remarks on your sentiments respecting the present unhappy situation of publick affairs, and shall transmit to His Majesty your opinion of the resolution of the House of Commons. Thus much, however, I would only observe, that if you really thought, or still think, that the making that resolution the basis of a negotiation would not have led to some plan of accommodation, on terms that Americans have heretofore solemnly and repeatedly declared would give them full content, then you have been and still are greatly mistaken.

Your surprise that any persons could advise me to seek an asylum, when so many Governours and Crown officers had been before compelled to do the like, is as extraordinary as your supposition that those persons must therefore be no friends to the Colony.

It gives me pleasure, however, to find that you make no doubt but that the laws of the Country, and the executive powers of the Government, will afford safety, and prove an asylum to all the King's subjects. On the strength of this assurance. His Majesty's officers, who have now the misfortune of being confined in Trenton, by some supposed unlawful authority, cannot hesitate to apply for that legal remedy, an habeas corpus; nor can any of His Majesty's Justices of the Supreme Court have the least scruple to grant it, nor ought any one to doubt "but that it will (as you say) be found fully equal to the purpose."

Your hope that the Officers of Government will conduct themselves prudently, will, I trust, be greatly gratified, at least by some of them, if a manly, conscientious discharge of their duty to their King and Country, as far as may be in their power, is consistent with your ideas of prudence. As they have not even made the real disorders of the times a pretence for leaving the Province, it seems rather unkind to intimate any suspicion that they would do it on a supposed disorder of the times; "equally unjustifiable is it to insinuate that any of them would be so absurd as to 'invite' ill usage," or so wicked as to "endeavour to subject the inhabitants to any calamities." But such suspicions and such language must, I suppose, be attributed to the fashion of the times.

In speaking of the sentiments of independency, openly avowed by some men of present consequence, I had not the most distant thought that you would consider the remark as at all meant for or applicable to your House. If any faith is to be put (as you say) in your frequent and full declarations of your sentiments on this subject, you certainly deserve to be exempt from all suspicions of that nature. I even initimated, in my speech, that you must entertain "an abhorrence of such design." Your present disapprobation of the essays tending to encourage that measure gives me great satisfaction, and I sincerely wish that both you and I may, ere long, have the happiness to see those, who either openly or privately avow sentiments of independency, men of no consequene.

On motion made, that this House do send a message to his Excellency, requesting him to dissolve the present Assembly at the end of the present session, and give the people another choice of Representatives:

The Previous Question was demanded, "Whether the said question shall now be put or not"
It passed as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Lawrence,
Gibbon,
Tucker,
Kinsey,
Holme,
Mehelm,
Paxson,
Hand,
Shepperd,
Hinchman,
Eldridge,
Elmer.

Nays—

Mr. Combs,
Fisher,
Ford,
Taylor,
Roy,
Hewlings,
Crane,
Dey,
Sykes,
Garritse,
Demarest,
Barton.

The voices being equal, Mr. Speaker gave his vote in the negative.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Friday, December 1, 1775.

The House met.

Mr. Kinsey, from the Committee appointed to bring in an Answer to his Excellency's Message of the 22d of November last, brought in a draught accordingly, which was read and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Fisher, from the Committee appointed to prepare and bring in the draught of a Petition to the King, brought in the same accordingly; which was read and ordered a second reading.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

A petition was presented to the House, from the Hon. Daniel Coxe, Esq., President of the Board of the Western Proprietors of this Province, requesting leave, in behalf of himself and the Board of Western Proprietors, to bring in a Bill, at the next session of Assembly, for appointing Commissioners to settle the disputes of the said Western Proprietors with the Eastern Proprietors, and finally to settle the line of division between the said Proprietors, and suggesting that the Eastern Proprietors do acquiesce in this mode of accommodating the differences, and agree to join in the nomination of Commissioners; which Petition being read,

Ordered, That the Petitioner have leave to bring in a Bill at the next session, according to the prayer of the Petition.

The House adjourned till five o'clock.

The House met.

The engrossed Bill entitled "An Act for the support of Government of His Majesty's Colony of New Jersey, to commence the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, and to end the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, and to discharge the publick debts and contingent charges thereof," was read and compared; on the question,

Resolved, That the same do pass:

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Crane. Mr. Ford, Mr. Paxson, Mr. Combs, Mr. Sykes, Mr. Elmer, and Mr. Tucker, do carry the said Bill to the Council for concurrence.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, December 2, 1775.

The House met.

Mr. Fisher reported, that the other gentlemen and himself delivered the Support Bill, with them intrusted, to the Speaker in Council.

On motion made, that proper persons may be appointed to take care of, rent out, and from the rents, to keep in good repair, the several Barracks and their Furniture, in this Colony: The question was put thereon, and it passed in the affirmative.

Ordered, That Mr. Hinchman, Mr. Tucker and Mr. Gibbon be a Committee to prepare and bring in a Bill pursuant to the above Resolution.

Mr. Hinchman, from the Committee appointed for that purpose, brought in a Bill entitled "An Act to empower the persons therein named to take care of, rent out, and from the rents to keep in good repair, the several Barracks and their Furniture, in this Colony," which was read and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Speaker laid before the House a Letter from Isaac Debow, Esq., late Sheriff of the County of Hunterdon, enclosing a copy of the said Sheriff's advertisements, conditions and amount of sales of Lord Stirling's Lands in the County of Hunterdon, with a copy of Mr. Speaker's Letter to the said late Sheriff; which were read.

Odered, That the consideration thereof be referred to the afternoon.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

The Bill entitled "An Act to empower the persons therein named to take care of, rent out, and, from the rents, to keep in good repair, the several Barracks and their Furniture, in this Colony," was read a second time, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Mr. Roy had leave of absence till Monday morning next.

Mr. Barton had leave of absence for the remainder of the session, upon extraordinary occasions.

The House took into consideration the papers laid before the House this morning, by Mr. Speaker, relative to the sale of Lord Stirling's Estate in Hunterdon, and, after some time spent in debate thereon, the further consideration thereof was adjourned till Monday next.

The House adjourned till ten o'clock, on Monday morning next.

Monday, December 4, 1775.

The House met.

The engrossed Bill entitled "An Act to empower the persons therein named to take care of, rent out, and, from the rents, to keep in good repair, the several Barracks and their Furniture, in this Colony," was read and compared, on the question, Resolved, That the same do pass.

Yeas—

Mr. Combs,
Dey,
Hinchman,
Garritse,
Ford,
Mehelm,
Fisher,
 
Kinsey,
Elmer,
Roy.
 

Nays—

Mr. Lawrence,
Paxson,
Hand,
Demarest,
Gibbon,
Eldridge,
Hewlings,
Holme,
Shepperd.

Ordered, That Mr, Kinsey and Mr. Elmer do carry the said Bill to the Council, for concurrence.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

The House resumed the consideration of the papers laid before this House, relative to a sale of Lands, belonging to Lord Stirling, by the late Sheriff of Hunterdon,

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Mehelm, Mr, Roy, and Mr. Dunham be, and they, or any three of them, are hereby appointed a Committee to examine into the said sale, collect evidence relating thereto, and report to this House at the next session; and in the meantime, to give directions for the further prosecution of the suit against said Lord Stirling, if necessary.

The draught of a Message to his Excellency, in answer to his Message of the 22d of November last, was read the second time, and committed to Mr, Fisher, Mr. Shepperd, Mr. Gibbon, and Mr. Lawrence.

The Petition to the King was read the second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, December 5, 1775.

The House met.

A Message from the Council, by Mr. Parker, informing the House that the Council have passed the Bill entitled "An Act for the support of Government," &c.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

Mr. Fisher, from the Committee to whom the draught of a Message to his Excellency was committed, reported the same; which being read and amended in the House,

Ordered, That the said Message, as amended, be engrossed.

The House according to order, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the Petition to the King; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair, and Mr Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, by leave of the House, reported that the Committee had spent some time in debate upon the subject matter of the Petition referred to them, and came to the following Resolution:

That as a Petition is already before his Majesty, to which the House has received no answer, and hoping that it will effect the good purpose intended, in the opinion of this Committee the present Petition ought to be referred; and that the Committee of Correspondence do instruct the Agent to solicit an answer to the said former Petition.

To which the House unanimously agreed.

The House adjourned till nine o'clock, to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, December 6, 1775.

The House met.

The engrossed Message to his Excellency was read and compared.

Ordered, That the same be sent accordingly.

And the Message is as follows, viz.:

House of Assembly, December 6. 1775.

Ordered, That Mr. Hinchman and Mr. Mehelm do wait on his Excellency, and, in answer to his Message of the 21st of November, inform him that this House have taken the same into their serious consideration, and although they entertain the most grateful sense of the attention that has been shown to the wishes of the Colony in the allowance of the Loan Act, and of His Majesty's gracious inclinations to give "every indulgence that can consist with the true principles of commerce and the Constitution," and are sincerely disposed to grant His Majesty's requisitions, as far as the circumstances of the Colony will allow; yet at this time the House cannot think it prudent to go into any increase of the salaries of the officers of Government, nor do they apprehend that it will be beneficial for his government over us to settle them longer than for the usual time, or expedient to erect buildings at present, better to accommodate the branches of the Legislature.

That the House hopes, when it is considered that on his Excellency's arrival to this Government, the salary was raised from one thousand Pounds to one thousand two hundred Pounds per annum, which has been continued ever since; that sixty Pounds a year has constantly been granted to provide a house for his Excellency's residence; that the salaries of the Justices of the Supreme Court have been lately raised from fifty to one hundred and fifty Pounds per annum; that the other Crown officers either have salaries given to them or fees equal to the importance of their service; that there are places provided for the Legislature to meet and do the publick business at Perth Amboy, and that although such provision is not made at Burlington, yet no considerable inconvenience has attended it — When his Excellency considers these matters, he will, we hope, be of opinion with us, that the House has shown a disposition to make such suitable provision for the support of Government as, from time to time, was in their power, which nothing has retarded more than the inconvenience of two seats of Government, a circumstance they sincerely wish was removed. But the House assures his Excellency that, at a future day, when this inconvenience shall be remedied, and the unnatural controversy now subsisting is happily settled, they will show their readiness to comply with every just requisition, and demonstrate that they ever mean their actions shall correspond with their professions.

By order of the House,

Richard .Smith,        
Clerk.    

Ordered, Mr. Kinsey and Mr. Eldridge do wait on the Council, and inquire whether the Council have anything further before them; if not, that this House proposes to apply to his Excellency for a dismission.

Mr. Hinchman reported that Mr. Mehelm and himself delivered the Messages of the House with them intrusted to his Excellency, who was pleased to say he would take the same into consideration.

Mr. Kinsey reported that Mr. Eldridge and himself delivered the Message of the House with them intrusted to the Speaker in Council.

A Message from the Council, by Mr. Hopkinson.

Mr. Hopkinson informed the House that the Council had nothing further before them.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher and Mr. Paxson do wait upon the Governour, and inform him that this House have gone through the business before them, and are desirous of a dismission.

Mr. Fisher reported, that Mr. Paxson and himself delivered the Message of the House to his Excellency, according to order, who was pleased to say the House should hear from him in the afternoon.

The House adjourned till three P. M.

The House met.

A Message from his Excellency, by Mr. Deputy Secretary Pettit:

Mr. Speaker:— His Excellency is in the Council Chamber, and requires the immediate attendance of the House.

Whereupon, Mr. Speaker left the Chair, and, with the House, went to wait upon the Governour, who was pleased to give his assent to the following Bills, enacting the same, viz.:

1. An Act for the support of Government of His Majesty's Colony of New Jersey, to commence the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, and to end the first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six; and to discharge the publick debts, and contingent charges thereof.

2. A supplementary Act to the Act entitled "An Act for striking One Hundred Thousand Pounds, in Bills of Credit, and directing the mode for sinking the same."

3. An Act for the speedy recovery of Debts, from six Pounds to ten Pounds.

4. An Act to provide a more effectual remedy against excessive costs, in the recovery of Debts above ten Pounds, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

5. An Act to authorize the Board of Justices and Freeholders of the several Counties in the Colony of New Jersey to defray the expense of taking Lists of the Inhabitants.

6. An Act to prevent Rams from running at Large at certain seasons of the year.

7. An Act to empower Isaac Haines to erect a Dam, Mills, and other Water Works, on the southernmost branch of the Ancocas Creek, in the Township of Evesham, in the County of Burlington.

8. An Act to enable the owners and possessors of Meadows and Tide Marsh, lying on both sides of the south branch of Pensawken Creek, in the Counties of Burlington and Gloucester, to erect and maintain a Bank, Dam, and other Water Works, across the said Creek, in order to prevent the tide from overflowing the same.

And then his Excellency was pleased to prorogue the General Assembly till Wednesday, third day of January next, then to meet at Perth Amboy.

 

Council of New Jersey.

A Journal of the Proceedings of His Majesty's Council for the Province of New Jersey, at a session of the General Assembly began and holden at the City of Burlington, on the fifteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, and in the sixteenth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord, King George the Third.

Wednesday, November 15, 1775,

Tlie House met.

Present — The Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Thursday, November 16, 1775.

The House met.

Present — The Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

His Excellency came into the Council Chamber, and having, by the Deputy Secretary, commanded the attendance of the House of Assembly, the Speaker, with the House, attended, when his Excellency was pleased to make a Speech to both Houses, in the words following, viz:

See page 283, Assembly proceedings.

After which, the Speaker, with the House of Assembly, withdrew.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Friday, November 17, 1775.

The House met.

Present — John Stevens, Esq., the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Saturday, November 18, 1775.

The House met.

Present as before.

The House continued till Monday next.

Monday, November 20, 1775.

The House met.

Present as before.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Tuesday, November 21, 1775,

The House met.

Present as before.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Wednesday, November 22, 1775.

The House met.

Present — John Stevens, Esq., the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

The House having taken into consideration the importance of several matters that will be likely to require their attention at this session, and being desirous to have the assistance of every member who is not withheld from attendance by sickness or other unavoidable cause:

Ordered, That the Clerk of the House do forthwith dispatch a Letter to the Hon. James Parker, Esq., requiring his attendance.

The House having taken into consideration his Excellency's Speech at the opening of the session,

Resolved, That an humble Address be presented to his Excellency, in answer to the said Speech.

Ordered, That the Chief Justice and Mr. Hopkinson be a Committee to draw the said Address.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Thursday, November 23, 1775.

The House met.

Present — John Stevens, Esq., the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

The House continued till to-morrow.

Friday, November 24, 1775.

The House met.

Present — John Stevens, Esq.. the Chief Justice, Richard Stockton, Esq., Stephen Skinner, Esq., Daniel Coxe, Esq., John Lawrence, Esq., Francis Hopkinson, Esq.

Mr. Dey and Mr. Garritse, from the House of Assembly, presented for the concurrence of this House a Bill entitled "A supplementary Act to an Act entitled 'An Act appointing Commissioners for finally settling and determining the several Rights, Titles, and Claims to the common Lands in the Township of Bergen, and for making partition thereof, in just and equitable proportions, among those who shall be adjudged by the said Commissioners to be entitled to the same,'" which was read the first time and ordered a second reading.

The House continued till four o'clock P. M.

——————————

Journal

Of the Votes and Proceedings as well of the Committee of Safety, at a Sitting in January, 1776, As the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, At a Sitting at New Brunswick, Began January 31, and continued to the Second Day of March following.

—————

A LIST OF THE DEPUTIES RETURNED TO SERVE IN CONGRESS.

Bergen — John Demarest, Jacobus Post, Abraham Van Boskirk.

Essex — Abraham Clark, Lewis Ogden, Samuel Potter, Caleb Camp, Robert Drummond,

Middlesex — John Wetherill, John Dennis, Azariah Dunham.

Morris — *William Winds, *William De Hart, Jacob Drake, Silas Condit, Ellis Cook,

Somerset — Hendrick Fisher, *Cornelius Van Muliner, Ruloffe Van Dyke,

Sussex — * William Maxwell, Ephraim Martin, *Thomas Potts, Abijah Brown, Mark Thompson,

Hunterdon — Samuel Tucker, John Mehelm, John Hart, Charles Stewart, *Augustine Stevenson,

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, John Covenhoven, Joseph Holmes.

Burlington — Isaac Pierson, John Pope, Samuel How, *John Wood, Joseph Newbold.

Gloucester — *John Cooper, Joseph Ellis, *Thomas Clark, *Elijah Clark, *Richard Somers.

Salem — *Grant Gibbon, Benjamin Holme, John Holme, Edward Keasbey, John Carey.

Cumberland — Theophilus Elmer, Jonathan Eyers.

Cape May — *Jesse Hand, Elijah Hughes.

Note, — Those marked with a * did not attend the sitting of Congress at Brunswick.

——————————

Proceedings of the Committee of Safety.

—————

Princeton, January 9th, 1776.

The Committee of Safety of the Province of New Jersey, pursuant to notice given for that purpose, met this day, and there not being a sufficient number of Members to proceed on business, adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Wednesday, January 10th, 1776.

The Committee met.

Present — Samuel Tucker, President; Hendrick Fisher, Vice President; Abraham Clark, D. Secretary; Azariah Dunham, RulofFe Van Dike, John Dennis, Augustine Stevenson, John Pope.

The President laid before the Committee a letter from the Provincial Congress of New York, inclosing resolutions of the Continental Congress, and the Congress of New York, relative to establishing posts at proper distances, to carry intelligence to the different parts of the Colony or elsewhere, as occasion may require; and for erecting beacons at proper distances, which the Congress of New York recommended to the Congress of New Jersey: Which letter and resolves were read in this Committee, who, after duly considering the same, approve of the expediency of establishing posts for the purposes aforesaid, have therefore.

Resolved, That a man and horse be kept in constant readiness by each of the several Committees of Newark, Elizabeth Town, Woodbridge, New Brunswick, Princeton and Trenton, whose business shall be to forward all expresses to and from the Continental Congress: And that the aforesaid Town Committees shall, on every intelligence of any invasion or alarm, send expresses to the neighbouring Town Committees, who are directed to provide expresses to forward the same from town to town, to the Town Committees, and to such officers of the militia as they may think proper to notify thereof throughout the Colony, with as much expedition as may be in their power. And that all the expences incurred by such expresses, the Treasurers of this Colony appointed by the Provincial Congress, or either of them, are hereby required to pay on order or orders signed by the Chairman of either of the Committees of the Townships in this Colony. Which orders, with indorsements thereon by the person or persons to whom the same are made payable shall be sufficient vouchers the said Treasurers, or either of them, for such sums of money as they or either of them may pay thereon as aforesaid.

Ordered, That the above resolve be published in the New York and Pennsylvania gazettes.

A memorial from Yelles Mead of the County of Bergen, and several other memorials from the Counties of Bergen and Essex, of the same tenor, sitting forth that the said Yelles Mead had, in expectation of a Lieutenant's commission in Captain Meeker's Company, in one of the battalions in this Colony, raised his compliment of men for said company, praying a commission accordingly. Also a memorial from George Ross, the 3d, of the County of Essex, setting forth, that in expectation of an Ensign's commission in said Captain Meeker's Company, he had raised his compliment of men, praying a commission in consequence thereof, were laid before the Committee and read, and several recommendations in favour of the memorialists were also read: And also a letter from Lord Stirling, recommending Mathias Halstead, of Elizabethtown, First Lieutenant, and the abovesaid Yelles Mead, Ensign of Captain Meeker's Company, was also read.

Ordered, That the said memorials, recommendations and letter have a second reading.

Two recommendations from the Committee of Woodbridge were laid before the Committee, recommending James Bonny, Captain, James Manning, First Lieutenant, David Crow, Second Lieutenant, and John Clarkson, Ensign of a Company of Militia in Woodbridge. The other recommending Ellis Barron, Captain, Ralph Marsh, First Lieutenant, Matthew Freeman, Second Lieutenant, and Jonathan Bloomfield, Ensign of another Company of Militia in said Woodbridge, which were read, and commissions ordered to be issued accordingly.

A certificate was produced from the Chairman of the Committee of the North Ward of New Brunswick, certifying that John Taylor was elected Captain, Jacob Mersural, First Lieutenant, James Schuurman, Second Lieutenant, and John Voorhees, Jr., Ensign, of a Company of minutemen in Colonel Neilson's Battalion.

Ordered, That the above gentlemen be commissioned accordingly to their appointment.

The Committee adjourned till 2 o'clock, P. M.

The Committee met according to adjournment.

John Hart, Esq., one of the Committee, attending, took his seat accordingly.

Mr. President laid before the Committee a letter from Richard Smith, Esq., one of the Delegates of this Province, at the Continental Congress, in the words following:

"Dear Sir:— I am desired by the Congress to transmit to you the enclosed extracts from their proceedings, the whole of which, relative to that subject, I have sent to Lord Stirling, by this post, together with six dozen copies of the articles of war. The 1000 dollars mentioned in the extract, I have received from the Continental Treasury, and they wait your commands.

"The Congress wish to know in what manner the prisoners of war at Trenton live, who supplies them, and upon what terms. The reason of the enquiry is, that very extravagant claims are made on this head from other quarters, and we aim to render the public burthens as light as possible. You will, as soon as it is convenient, afford me the necessary information.

"I am, your affectionate faithful servant,
"Richard Smith.        
"Philadelphia, January 4th, 1776.
"          Samuel Tucker, Esq,"

The enclosed resolve, referred to in the above letter, was read, and is in the words following.

In Congress, Jan. 2, 1776.

"Resolved, That the Barracks in the Colony of New Jersey, be prepared for the reception of such of the Battalions, as may not be in readiness to proceed to New York, and that the ministerial troops or prisoners at present occupying them, be accommodated in the said Colony in such a manner as the Committee of Safety for the said Colony, shall think most prudent and convenient.

"That the hundred stand of arms supplied by the Colony of New York, for the New Jersey Battalion, be paid for by the Convention of New Jersey, and that in order to enable the said Convention to make such payment, as well as to furnish such of the men belonging to the said Battalions, as are yet unprovided with arms. The further sum of one thousand dollars be advanced to the said Convention, and that the price of the arms be deducted out of the wages of the privates belonging to said Battalions."

Extracts from the minutes,
Charles Thompson,          
Secretary.    

The above letter and resolve were read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning 9 o'clock.

Thursday, January 10, 1776.

Joseph Holmes, Esq., one of this Committee, attending, took his seat accordingly.

Jacob Scoggin, Esq., laid before this Committee a recommendation of the Committee of the County of Salem, in favour of certain gentlemen to be commissioned field officers of the Militia in said County. And it appearing to this Committee that a controversy now subsists in the County of Salem, respecting the appoinment of field officers, and as this Committee have not at present an opportunity of hearing the grounds of the controversy from both parties, and being desirous of acting in such a manner as may conciliate all parties in a just and equitable determination between them in the appointment of said officers; do in order thereto direct as well as the Committee of the County of Salem, as such other persons as are opposed to the gentlemen recommended by the said Committee, or may have any claim to commissions, by the election of the Captains and the subalterns of the Militia before the 16th day of August last, to appear, by persons properly deputed for that purpose, before the Congress of this Province, the 6th day after their next meeting, that the truth of facts may be then fully known, that they may take such resolution thereon as to them may seem just.

Ordered, That a copy of the above order be delivered to Mr. Scoggin, to be laid before the County Committee, to be by them communicated to the contending parties.

Adjourned till 2 P. M.

The Committee met.

This Committee received information from the Committee of the County of Monmouth, by Dr. Scudder and Dr. Henderson, and also by letter from the Chairman of the said Committee, that a small sloop, called the Polly and Anne, one Hains, captain, was on the 24th of December last stranded on Squan Beach, on board of which was a quantity of beef, pork and other provisions; which vessel and cargo is now in the care and custody of Colonel Forman, except such articles as are perishable, which the Committee directed to be sold by Dr. Scudder and Dr. Henderson; an inventory of which cargo, as well such as were sold, as such as remain, were laid before this Committee. And one James Webb, a passenger on board said vessel when stranded, appeared before this Committee, by whose deposition it appears that said vessel was bound from New York to Boston, and from all circumstances, the provisions on board were designed for the Ministerial army.

The Committee taking the above matters into consideration, think it proper that the whole of said cargo be immediately sold, and the vessel secured. Which vessel, with the amount of the sales, after deducting the necessary expences, be referred to the disposal of the Congress of this Colony at their next sitting. And that Colonel David Forman, Dr. Nathaniel Scudder, and Dr. Thomas Henderson be, and are hereby authorised and impowered to secure the abovesaid vessel, and to complete the sales of the cargo, in some convenient time, and account for the sales, and report their proceedings to the Congress of this Province at their next sitting; and may deliver to the seamen and passengers belonging to said vessel, all such clothing and other effects as belong to them (exclusive of the cargo) provided they call for the same in a reasonable time. And that the thanks of this Committee be returned to Colonel Forman, for his extraordinary care and vigilance in securing the said vessel and cargo.

And whereas it appears that the Captain, master and passengers of the sloop Polly and Anne, stranded on Squan Beach, are inhabitants of the Colony of New York ; it is therefore,

Ordered, That the said Captain, master and passengers, or such of them as are in this Province, be conveyed under guard, as Colonel Forman may think proper, to New York, and delivered to the Provincial Congress or Committee of Safety, to be dealt with. as they may think proper.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Friday, January 12, 1776.

The Committee met.

Whereas, a certain Richard Symonds, a midshipman, belonging to one of the King's ships of War, was in September last, taken on board a small tender at Barnagat, since which he hath remained a prisoner in the County of Monmouth.

Ordered, That Richard Symonds be removed to Trenton, and there be admitted to remain a prisoner of war on his parole of honour, on the same terms granted to those officers who are already prisoners at that place.

Robert Ellison, Esq., of the County of Sussex, was brought before this Committee by order of the Committee of the County of Sussex, on a charge of many misdemeanors committed against the liberties of America, and among others of entering into an association, resolving not to pay the tax ordered to be levied by the Congress of this Province, and not to purchase any goods which might be distrained from persons for their taxes, or for non-attendance at musters. Mr. Ellison being informed of said charge confessed the same to be true, and that he was influenced thereto by Justice Nathaniel Pettit; but that after signing the said association, he had erased his name therefrom; that he had nothing to offer in his justification but his ignorance of the consequence of his proceedings, and his precipitately engaging therein without consideration, and manifested a deep contrition for his offences. He acknowledged he had signed the association recommended by the Provincial Congress, before signing the association mentioned above. That after signing the general association, and before his signing that now charged against him, he had been apprehended in Pennsylvania for practices unfriendly to the liberties of America, where he then made a full recantation and asked pardon of the public, promising reformation.

Nathaniel Pettit, Esq., of the County of Sussex, also appeared before this Committee, by order of the Committee of said County, being charged with signing and promoting said association mentioned in Robert Ellison's charge; which the said Mr. Pettit confessed, only alledging in his justification, that he had no intention thereby of using any violent measures in opposing the proceedings of the Congress; and, being fully heard in his own justification, by order withdrew.

The above charges against Mr. Ellison and Mr. Pettit were reserved to the consideration of the Committee in the afternoon.

Adjourned till two o'clock, P. M.

The Committee met.

The Committee resumed the consideration of the matters alledged against Robert Ellison and Nathaniel Pettit, Esq.; and the facts charged against them, appearing by their own confessions, to be true, and the offences of both being nearly equal,

Resolved, That the said Robert Ellison and Nathaniel Pettit be returned to the County of Sussex under the custody of Colonel Ephraim Martin, and that they be both disarmed, and pay to the Committee of the aforesaid County or their Chairman, the sum of eight Pounds each towards defraying the expences of apprehending and bringing them before the Committee. And also, that they severally give security to the said Committee or their Chairman in the sum of fifty Pounds each, for their future good behaviour, and thereupon be discharged from further detention; and, as during the present process, the said Ellison and Pettit have not only appeared unfriendly to the liberties of this Country, but from their conduct have appeared unworthy of the offices of magistracy which they now sustain. This Committee therefore think it adviseable for the said delinquents to desist from the further execution of their respective offices, until by their future good behaviour, they may appear more worthy to execute the same, and shall be called thereto by the Congress or Committee of Safety of this Province. And that the Committee of the County of Sussex be assured of this Committee's hearty approbation of their timely and spirited exertions in apprehending the above persons.

A memorial from the Committee of the County of Cumberland, was presented to this Committee and read, setting forth, that they had apprehended and secured in custody Daniel Stretch, Richard Cayford and Nathaniel Dowdney, inhabitants of that County, convicted of being enemies to this Country, by using their influence with the ignorant and unwary, to raise a party to oppose the measures adopted for redress of grievances. Cursing and ill-treating all Congresses and Committees, and refusing to give any reasonable satisfaction for their extraordinary conduct. The said Committee requesting the direction of this Committee respecting said offenders.

This Committee, duly considering the conduct of the above persons, and finding it necessary to use spirited exertions for the discouragement of such base behaviour. Do order and resolve, that the Committee of the County of Cumberland, detain the said Daniel Stretch, Richard Cayford and Nathaniel Dowdney in close confinement, until they shall manifest a suitable contrition for their offences, satisfactory to the said Committee, pay the charges that have or may accrue in apprehending and detaining them in custody, and give security to said Committee in the sum of fifty Pounds each for their future good behaviour.

Also, Resolved, That the said Daniel Stretch, Richard Cayford and Nathaniel Dowdney be disarmed by the said Committee.

This Committee received several resolutions and determinations of the Continental Congress respecting raising one new battalion in this Province. Erecting and establishing a Court of Admiralty. Advising the forming some useful regulations respecting the Continental forces raised in this Colony; which requisitions, together with many other important concerns render the speedy meeting of the Congress of this Province, absolutely necessary. This Committee have, therefore, appointed the meeting of said Congress to be at New Brunswick, on Wednesday, the thirty-first day of this instant, January.

The letter from Lord Stirling, recommending Matthias Halstead to be commissioned First Lieutenant, and Yelles Mead Ensign in Captain Joseph Meeker's company in one of the battalions raised in this Colony, and the memorial of Yelles Mead, claiming the First Lieutenant's commission in said company, and of George Ross, the third, claiming the Ensign's commission in said company, with several recommendations accompanying the same, were all read the second time: And being duly considered,

Ordered, That Yelles Mead be commissioned First Lieutenant, and George Ross, the third, Ensign of said company.

A memorial was presented from John Goldtrap, of the County of Somerset, recommending the encouraging of linnen(sic) and woolen manufactories in this Colony, was read and referred to the next meeting of Congress.

Several memorials were presented to this Committee for appointments in a battalion to be raised in this Colony, which were read and filed, to be taken into consideration at the meeting of Congress.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

Saturday, January 13th, 1776.

The Committee met.

The Committee having before them several resolutions of the Continental Congress, of the second day of this instant, January, among which are the following paragraphs:

"And, with respect to such unworthy Americans, as regardless of their duty to their Creator, their country and their posterity, have taken part with our oppressors, and influenced by the hope, or possession of ignominious rewards, strive to recommend themselves to the bounty of administration, by misrepresenting and traducing the conduct and principles of the friends of American Liberty, and opposing every measure formed for its preservation, and security;

Resolved, That it be recommended to the different Assemblies, Conventions, and Committees, or Councils of Safety, in the united Colonies, by the most speedy and effectual measures to frustrate the mischievous machinations, and restrain the wicked practices of these men.

And it is the opinion of this Congress, that they ought to be disarmed, and the more dangerous among them, either kept in safe custody, or bound with sufficient sureties to their good behaviour.

And in order that the said Assemblies, Conventions, Committees, or Councils of Safety may be enabled with greater ease and safety, to carry this resolution into execution.

Resolved, That they be authorized to call to their aid, whatever Continental troops, stationed in, or near their respective Colonies, may be conveniently spared from their more immediate duty; and the commanding officers of such troops, are hereby directed, to afford the said Assemblies, Conventions, Committees, or Councils of Safety, all such assistance, in executing this resolution, as they may require, and which, consistent with the good of the service, may be supplied.

This Committee, do therefore most earnestly recommend to the several Counties and Town Committees, of this Province, to be vigilant and active, in carrying the above resolution into execution; at the same time, recommending the exercise of due moderation, and prudence in the affair; requesting all officers of the militia, in this Province, to aid and assist the said Committees, and to execute such orders as they, or either of them shall receive from the Committee of the County, or Township, where they reside.

The letter from Richard Smith, Esq., with the enclosed resolve of the Continental Congress, were read the second time.

Ordered, That Richard Smith, Esq., deliver to the President, or Vice President, the one thousand dollars, by him received from the Continental Congress, mentioned in said resolve. And that the said President, or Vice President, lay out the same for fire arms, for the use of the Continental troops, in this Colony.

Ordered, That John Posee, Esq., deliver the arms, by him purchased, to Col, William Maxwell, or his order, for the use of the Continental troops in this Colony,

Application was made from the Committee of the County of Morris, to this Committee, recommending Jacob Ford, Jr., to be commissioned Colonel; Ellis Cook, Lieutenant Colonel; Cornelius Ludlow, First Major; Eleazor Lindsley, Second Major, and John Doughty, Adjutant of the eastern regiment of militia, in the County of Morris.

Ordered, That commissions be issued, agreeable to the above recommendation.

Ordered, That the prisoners of war, now in the barracks at Trenton, be removed from thence, by the Committee of Observation, of that town, to such convenient quarters as they may be able to procure; in order that the Continental forces may occupy the said barracks; and that the expences in providing quarters for such prisoners, be paid out of the provincial money in the treasury.

Ordered, That the President, write to the Continental Congress, acquainting them, that the Congress of this Province are to meet this month, at which time they will, undoubtedly give all due attention to raising the battalion, ordered in this Colony: This Committee having, for weighty reasons, deferred issuing warrants, till meeting of Congress; being formerly persuaded, that the appointment of officers, by the Congress, will give much greater satisfaction in the Colony, than if appointed by this Committee; at the same time, recommend Azariah Dunham, Esq., to be appointed Commissary, for supplying such battalion when raised.

The Committee adjourned their present sitting.

Proceedings of Provincial Congress of New Jersey.

—————

New Brunswick, Wednesday, Jan. 31, 1776.

The Congress of New Jersey, being summoned to meet this day, at New Brunswick, a number of the members met accordingly: But not being a sufficient number to proceed upon business, they adjourned till to-morrow morning 9 o'clock.

Thursday, February 1, 1776.

The Congress met, and the members of several Counties being absent.

Adjourned till 2 o'clock, P. M.

Met according to adjournment.

The minutes of the last setting of Congress, and a number of the printed military ordinances being come to hand,

Ordered, That the said minutes, and military ordinances be distributed in the several counties, as follows:

 

To Bergen County,
Essex County,
Middlesex County,
Somerset County,
Monmouth County,
Morris County,
Sussex County,
Hunterdon County,
Burlington County,
Gloucester County,
Salem County,
Cumberland County,
Cape May County

Minutes

66
74
87
90
106
72
59
136
107
76
67
38
16

Military Ordinances

33
37
43
45
53
36
30
68
53
38
33
19
8

An address and petition from the Committee of the County of Somerset, were presented to this Congress, desiring that householders, and others, not freeholders, who pay part of the taxes in this Colony, may be admitted to vote for Delegates, in the Provincial Congress, at future elections: and that said elections may be proceeded in by ballot; which were read and ordered a second reading.

Several petitions from the freeholders, and inhabitants, of the County of Essex, were presented to the Congress, desiring, that all persons, subject to taxation, in this Colony, may be admitted to vote at future elections, for Delegates in the Provincial Congress. And also praying, that money at interest, and other effects, may bear all equal proportion of the taxes: Which were read, and ordered second readings.

Two petitions were presented to the House from a number of the inhabitants of the County of Morris, praying, that in the appointment of officers to fill up the Battalion now to be raised, due attention be had to the abilities and qualifications of the officers; and that none be commissioned under the age of twenty-one years; which were read, and ordered second readings.

Mr. President laid before the Congress a letter he had received from Jacob Ford, Esq., a collector of the County of Morris, setting forth that a complaint had been made to the Committee of that county, against the subscriber, that he had written a letter to one of the precinct collectors, requesting him not to receive any Continental or Connecticut money, as the Treasurer had refused taking the same; certifying in said letter, that the reason of his making such a request to the precinct collector, was occasioned by John Smith, Esq., the Eastern Treasurer's refusing such money from the subscriber in payment of the taxes; which letter was read, and orderd a second reading.

Lieut. Col. Winds informed this Congress, that he was stationed at Perth Amboy, with a part of the Eastern battalion of the Continental forces raised in this Colony, and that he was destitute of ammunition, and thought it not improbable he might soon have occassion for a supply. And this Congress being informed, that the County of Somerset had a quantity of powder in store, and the County of Middlesex a quantity of lead, in consideration whereof

Ordered, That Mr. President request the Chairman of the Committee of Somerset to furnish Colonel Winds with four quarter casks of powder. And that he also request the Chairman of the Committee of the County of Middlesex, to furnish Colonel Winds with 150 pounds of lead, and that the said powder and lead shall be replaced in some convenient time.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning 9 o'clock.

Friday, February 2, 1776.

Congress met according to adjournment.

John Cary, Esq., Secretary to this Congress, not having attended this sitting, and it being uncertain when he will attend; and also whether he will incline to continue his service if present, as he accepted his appointment last sitting with great reluctance; and as Messrs. Clark and Stewart declined officiating in Mr. Cary's room, as they found such service interfered with the duty of their stations as Delegates of the Congress, and as these reasons operated equally against Mr. Cary's being taken from the more immediate service of the Congress, while his time and attention were taken up in the execution of his office. Therefore,

Resolved unanimously, That William Patterson, Esq., be appointed Secretary to this Congress.

William Maxwell, Esq., Colonel of the Western battalion of this Colony, laid before this Congress certain resolutions of the Continental Congress, recommending the immediate arming Colonel Maxwell's battalion, under orders to march to Canada, which were read and filed.

Whereas the Continental Congress have ordered Colonel Maxwell's battalion to march to Canada, as soon as the men can be furnished with arms and other articles absolutely essential; and whereas arms are extremely scarce and indeed impossible to be procured in time for the equipment of said battalion, without making application to the several Counties in this Province.

Resolved, That the Committees or other public bodies, in whose hands any of the New Jersey Provincial arms and accoutrements are deposited, to deliver the same to the commanding officer, of said battalion, or his order; of whom they are required to take vouchers, with the valuation of said arms, &c,, there under written; and that this Congress will either immediately pay for said arms, agreeable to appointment, or replace them as soon as possible, whichever the said Committees, or public bodies shall think most proper.

This Congress do in the most strong and explicit manner, recommend to every private person who has arms, fit for immediate use, to dispose of the same for the purpose above mentioned.

Ordered, That copies of the above resolve be immediately made and certified by the Secretary.

Ordered, That copies of the following letter, signed by the President, be sent to the commanding officers, and Chairman of the several County Committees in the Province:

Gentlemen:— The late repulse at Quebec requires every exertion of the friends of American freedom, in consequence whereof Colonel Maxwell's battalion is ordered to march forthwith, and the Continental Congress have applied to our body, urging the greatest dispatch in procuring arms and necessaries for this expedition. Therefore in pursuance of the aforesaid application we request you, gentlemen, to use the utmost diligence and activity in collecting all the public arms belonging to your County, being your proportion of the Provincial arms unsold. Dispatch in this case is quite necessary, as, no doubt the arms are distributed in the hands of the associators, it will be necessary that every officer do his part. The value of the arms will be paid in money, or the number be replaced; and the expences of collecting and forwarding them punctually discharged. We put you to this trouble with regret; but the necessity of the measure must apologise. You will have the arms collected in your County, valued by good men and sent to Burlington or Trenton, under the care of such officer of Colonel Maxwell's battalion as may be the bearer hereof.

Adjourned till to-morrow 3 o'clock.

Met according to adjournment.

The question being put whether any officer in the battalions already raised in this Province shall be advanced, or appointed to any command in the battalion now to be raised, it was carried in the negative.

Resolved, That this Congress shall on Monday next, go into the appointment of officers for the third battalion of this Province.

The proceedings of the Committee of Hillsborough in the County of Somerset, against Peter Vroom of Piscataway in the County of Middlesex, being transmitted to this Congress, and read, ordered, that the charge against said Vroom be now considered.

Peter Vroom being ordered to be brought before this Congress attended accordingly, and the proceedings of the Commiitee of Hillsborough were read in presence of said Vroom, who confessed the charge therein exhibited, and having offered matter in mitigation was ordered to withdraw.

Resolved, That the determination of the charge exhibited against Peter Vroom be deferred to some future day in the present session, and that in the meantime he be committed to the common gaol of the County of Somerset, the keeper of which is hereby required to receive and keep him in close confinement, until this Congress take further order therein.

The memorial of the commissioned officers in the western battalion of this Province, stationed at Burlington, respecting the equipment of the men under their command, was read and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Dennis, Mr. Clark and Mr. Pope be a Committee to prepare a draught of an ordinance for appointing barrack masters in this Colony, and making provision for defraying the expence of repairing said barracks.

Ordered, That Mr. Hart, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Ogden and Mr. Brown be a Committee to prepare a draught of an ordinance for erecting a Court of Admiralty in this Province.

Ordered, That the blankets belonging to the barracks in New Brunswick be appropriated to the use of the Continental forces; and that Mr. John Schuurman and Mr. William Applegate of the town aforesaid, be requested to ascertain the value of the said blankets, and to transmit an account thereof to John Dennis, Esq., the Eastern Treasurer.

Ordered, That the blankets belonging to the barracks in Elizabethtown, be appropriated to the use of the Continental forces; and that Mr. Edward Thomas and Mr. Isaac Woodruff of the place aforesaid, be requested to ascertain the value of the said blankets, and to transmit an account thereof unto John Dennis, Esq., the Eastern Treasurer.

Ordered, That the blankets belonging to the barracks in Trenton, be appropriated to the use of the Continental forces; and that Mr. Abraham Hunt, and Mr. Alexander Chambers of the town aforesaid, be requested to ascertain the value of said blankets, and to transmit an account thereof to John Dennis, Esq., the Eastern Treasurer.

Ordered, That John Dennis, Esq. do receive of the commissary the money arising from the sale of the blankets belonging to the barracks in this province, and do account with this Congress for the same.

On application of Capt. Peter Ten Eick, in favor of Peter Vroom, and from the family circumstances of said Vroom, it is resolved, that the former order of commitment be remanded; and that the aforesaid Peter Vroom be committed to the custody of Captain Peter Ten Eick, who has pledged his parole of honor to bring said Vroom before the Congress whenever required.

Adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, February 3, 1776.

Congress met according to adjournment.

Ordered. That the blankets belonging to the barracks in Perth Amboy be appropriated to the use of the Continental forces, and that Mr. Samuel Sergeant and Mr. Jonathan Deare, of the city aforesaid, be requested to ascertain the value of said blankets, and to transmit an account thereof to John Dennis, Esq., the Eastern Treasurer.

Samuel Tuthill, Esq. holding the commission of Lieutenant Colonel of a regiment of light horse in this Province, resigned the same.

Ordered, That the said resignation be accepted.

Jacobus Post, Esq. holding the commission of Major of a regiment of light horse in this Province, resigned the same.

Ordered, That the said resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That Abraham Ogden, Esq. be Lieutenant Colonel and William Barnet, Esq. be Major of the regiment of light horse in the eastern division of this Province; and that commissions be made out accordingly.

The petition and remonstrance of the Committee of the County of Bergen, respecting the seizure of arms belonging to said County, by a detachment of Continental troops in the first regiment raised in this Province, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Somerset, praying that freeholders only may elect delegates in this Province, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Lord Stirling, the Colonel of the first regiment of militia in the County of Somerset, being appointed to a command in the Continental army; therefore, ordered, that Stephen Hunt, Esq. be Colonel, Abraham Ten Eick, Esq. Lieutenant Colonel. James Linn, Esq. First Major, and Derrick Meddagh, Esq. Second Major of the said regiment, and that commissions be made out accordingly.

Adjourned till 2 o'clock.

Met according to adjournment.

The Monmouth County Committee having nominated Mr, Thomas Barber, as Surgeon of the first regiment of foot militia, in the County of Monmouth, ordered, that a commission be made out accordingly.

Resolved uiianimously, That it is the opinion of this Congress, that the money in the Eastern Treasury of this Province, and the bonds, securities and other writing belonging to said Treasury are at present, from their local situation, very insecure, and exposed to danger; and that therefore the same be immediately removed to New Brunswick until this Congress take further order therein ; and that Mr. Hart, Mr. Martin, Mr. Drummond, Mr. Potter and Mr. Pope, be a committee to wait on the Treasurer with a copy of the above resolve, and to carry the same into effect.

Resolved unanimously, That the records in the Secretary's office, at Perth Amboy, be immediately removed to New Brunswick, until this Congress take further order therein; and that Mr. Hart, Mr. Martin, Mr. Drummond, Mr. Potter, and Mr. Pope be a committee to wait upon Mr. Pettit with a copy of this resolve, and to carry the same into effect.

Resolved unanimously, That the Committees, if they should find it necessary, take to their assistance, Col. Winds, or other Officers at Amboy, with the troops under their command, for the purpose of removing the said records and treasury, to the place appointed.

Adjourned till 10 o'clock Monday morning.

Monday, February 5, 1776.

Congress met according to adjournment.

A letter from Lord Stirling, inclosing several letters respecting the loading of vessels in several parts of this Province with lumber for the West India Islands, was read; and on motion made, resolved unanimously, That all County and Town Committees within this Province, exert themselves to prevent any vessel within their several districts, taking in any lading, or departing therewith, from any port in this Province, contrary to the General Association of the Continental Congress, unless the master of such vessel produce a special license therefor, duly authenticated from said Congress, agreeable to a subsequent resolve thereof, or from the Congress or Committee of Safety of this Province, signed by the President or Vice President; and also that they particularly attend to all imports into this Colony, that the resolutions of the Continental Congress be duly observed; and that the Militia of this Province do give all necessary assistance to said Committee in their exertions above mentioned, when called upon for that purpose. And it is hereby recommended to the officers of the Continental troops which are or may be in this Province, also to assist in the above measures, when thereunto particularly requested by the Committees aforesaid.

And it is further Resolved, That no County or Town Committee within this Province, presume to grant any license or permit for the exportation of any produce, lumber or merchandize whatsoever, contrary to the said General Association; and that a copy of the foregoing resolves be immediately transmitted to the printers at New York and Philadelphia, to be inserted in the public papers.

Ordered, That a copy of the above resolves be sent to the Right Honourable William, Earl of Stirling.

The petition of William Steel, praying that he may be discharged, &c., was read the first time.

The Committee appointed to wait on Mr. Pettit, and to remove the records in the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, made report, that they had waited on Mr. Pettit, and, as ordered, had removed the books and records mentioned in the schedule produced.

The Committee appointed to remove the money in the Treasury, &c., made report, that they had waited on Mr. Smith, with a copy of the resolve, who in the presence of Jonathan Deare, Esq., (said to be a Notary Public) forbid, and protested against the removal of the said money, but that they had notwithstanding removed the same as ordered.

A letter from Lord Stirling, inclosing an attested copy of a letter written by Cortland Skinner, Esq., and directed to Colonel William Skinner, in England, was read, and said Skinner's letter referred for further consideration.

The proceedings of the Committee of Bethlehem, in the County of Hunterdon, against Christopher Harrison, being transmitted to this Congress and read;

Ordered, That the charge against said Harrison be postponed.

Adjourned to 2 o'clock, P. M.

Met according to adjournment.

A member of this House informing that Mr. Pettit and Mr. Smith were desirous of being heard, respecting the removal of the treasury and records from Amboy:

Ordered, That they be now heard.

Whereupon they were heard accordingly.

Resolved unanimously, That the eastern treasury, with the bonds, securities and other writings thereunto belonging, be removed to the house of Peter Schenck, Esq., in the County of Somerset.

Resolved unanimously, That the eastern records and books, removed by a late resolve of this Congress, from the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, to New Brunswick, be further removed to Burlington, and lodged in the Secretary's office at that place.

Ordered, That a copy of the following letter be signed by the President, and sent to Mr. Pettit.

In Congress, New Jersey,   }
New Brunswick, Feb. 5, 1776.       }

Sir:— The papers, books and records mentioned and contained in the schedule annexed, have been ordered by this Congress to be removed from the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, and deposited in the Secretary's office at Burlington, there to remain under your care. You are hereby required to attend there on Thursday next, and receive the same, and when received to give your acknowledgment thereof accordingly.

Resolved unanimously, That the papers, books and records in the Surveyor General's office at Perth Amboy, be immediately removed to the house of Peter Schenck, Esq., in the County of Somerset; and that Mr. Van Boskirk and Mr. Cook be a committee to wait upon Mr. Smith with a copy of this resolve, and carry the same into effect.

Resolved unanimously. That the committee, if they should find it necessary, do take to their assistance Major Deare, or other officer, and the militia under his command, for the purpose of removing the papers, books and records in the Surveyor General's office at Perth Amboy, to the place appointed.

Agreeable to the order of the day, for the appointment of officers for the third battalion of this province, the same was taken into consideration.

Ordered, That the said appointment be deferred till tomorrow.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the Bethelehem Committee against Christopher Harrison, who, being ordered to attend, was brought in accordingly, and the charges exhibited against said Harrison were read; in support of which. Captain Kehart was called upon as a witness, and being duly sworn, did establish the same:

The said Harrison being heard, and having offered matter in mitigation of his offence, was ordered to withdraw.

The Congress took the above charge against Christopher Harrison into consideration, and after some debates theron, referred the determination thereof until to-morrow morning.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Tuesday, February 6, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the charge against Christopher Harrison, and,

Resolved, That said Christopher Harrison pay the expenses accruing on apprehending him and bringing him before this Congress, as the same shall be taxed by the Committee of the Township of Bethlehem, in the County of Hunterdon; that he give sufficient security to the said Committee in the sum of 50 l. for his future peaceable and good behaviour, and that he be disarmed, and remain a prisoner in the common gaol of the County of Somerset, until he comply with the above determinations: To which place the guard which brought him before this Congress, are required to convey him, and the keeper of the gaol in said county of Somerset is requested to receive said prisoner, and keep him in safe custody, as abovesaid.

The petition of William Steele had a second reading, and after some debate thereon, was referred for further consideration.

The Committee appointed to draught a letter to the Honorable Continental Congress, respecting the sale and consumption of tea, made report, which was read, approved, and ordered to be entered, and a copy to be engrossed and signed by the President: The letter is in following words:

In Provincial Congress, New Jersey,     }
New Brunswick, February 6, 1776. }

Gentlemen:— "Induced by a report current in this Province, that the honorable Continental Congress, had agreed to allow the use of East India teas, many persons have publicly sold that article, and the use of it is therefore in danger of becoming more general.

"We did not hesitate to determine that common report, often deceitful, and always uncertain, ought not to be sufficient to contravene a known and established regulation; but on a resolve being proposed for the purpose of putting a stop to this growing evil, one of the members informed us, that he heard several of the Continental delegates publicly declare, it was agreed in Congress, that no notice should be taken of the sale or use of East India teas in the Eastern Colonies. Here indeed we hesitated; and it being of great moment that every regulation of the honorable Representative Body of the Continent should be preserved inviolate, we must request, that you will speedily inform us, whether any, or what agreement has been made by you respecting the sale and use of East India teas."

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Clark be a committee to draw up a draught of a publication relative to raising the battalion in this Colony, recommended by the Continental Congress.

Adjourned till 3 o'clock P. M.

Met according to acljoiirnment.

Mr. Fisher, from the committee appointed to draw up a draught of a publication, respecting raising a battalion in this Colony, reported the same, which was read, and after several amendments were made, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed, and is in the words following:

Province of New Jersey, in Congress,     }
February 5, 1776. }

"Whereas, by a resolution of the honorable Continental Congress, a third battalion is recommended immediately to be raised in this Colony, for the service and at the expense of the United Colonies, consisting of eight companies, and each company of seventy-eight privates, and officered with one Captain, two Lieutenants, one Ensign, four Sergeants, and four Corporals; which recommendation, this Congress, being desirous fully to comply with, do therefore resolve. That officers of the said battalion be immediately recommended for commissions; and that the Captains and Subalterns be appointed; and warrants issued for the enlisting the aforesaid complement of men.

Resolved, That agreeable to the recommendation of the said Honorable Continental Congress, the recruiting officer enlist none but healthy, sound and able-bodied freemen, not under sixteen years of age; the form of the enlistment to be in the following words:

"I                     have this day enlisted myself as a soldier in the American Continental Army for one year, unless sooner discharged; and do bind myself to conform in all instances to such rules and regulations as are or shall be established for the government of the said army."

Resolved, That no apprentice whatsoever be enlisted within this Colony, without the consent of his master or mistress first obtained in writing: And that every person under the age of twenty-one .years, enlisting himself as aforesaid, may within twenty-four hours after their parents or guardians shall have notice of such enlistment, obtain his discharge, by refunding the money received from the recruiting officer, and returning such necessaries as may have been supplied him by the officer, or the value thereof in money.

That as to the pay and subsistence of said officers and soldiers, the same is fixed and ascertained by the said Continental Congress.

That it be recommended to the officers of said battalion to pay the strictest attention to the behaviour of the troops, in quarters or on their march, that they give no reasonable cause of complaint.

And it is further directed, that where any company shall be enlisted, the captains having warrants for raising the same, shall cause a muster to be had thereof in the presence of Azariah Dunham, John Mehelm, Joseph Ellis, or Edmond Thomas, Esquires, who are hereby appointed Muster-masters to review the said Companies, and administer an oath to such Captains, in the words following; which the said Captains respectively are required to take, viz.:

"I, A. B. do solemnly swear, that all the men whose names are entered in the muster roll by me produced, are truly and bona fide enlisted, and so far, as I know or believe, intend going in the service of the United Colonies in the 3d battalion raised or raising in this Colony.

So help me God."

And if upon such review, the Muster-master, who shall attend for that purpose, shall obtain the abovesaid, oath, or (if of the people called Quakers) an affirmation to the same effect; and also find the said complete, agreeable to the above directions, shall thereupon certify the same on the back of the muster roll of such company to this Congress, or in their recess to the Committee of Safety, in order that commissions may be made out to the officers of such company; which commissions the Committee of Safety of this Colony during the recess of this Congress, upon receiving certificates as above, are required to make out and deliver. And it is hereby recommended to the inhabitants of this Colony to be aiding and assisting, as far as their influence extends, in raising the aforesaid levies.

By order of the Congress.
Samuel Tucker,        
President.    
Attested,
    William Patterson,
                        Secretary.

On motion made,

Resolved unanirmously, That the following gentlemen be recommended by this Congress to the Honorable the Continental Congress as proper persons for field officers of the third battalion to be raised in this Colony, (to wit) Elias Dayton, Colonel; Anthony Walton White, Lieutenant Colonel; and Francis Barber, Major.

Ordered, That the President do sign an attested copy of this resolution, and transmit the same to the Continental Congress.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the County of Middlesex, praying, that money at interest may be taxed, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That William Steele, confined in the gaol of New Brunswick, be brought before this Congress, and now heard.

Whereupon he was brought in accordingly.

The offence of which he was accused being read to said Steele, he acknowledged the same; which being duly considered.

Resolved, unanimously, That the said Steele be discharged from his present confinement, upon his paying the cost of the present prosecution, as the same shall be taxed by the Committee of the South Ward of New Brunswick, and give his obligation to the said Committee in the sum of fifty Pounds for his future peaceable and good behaviour, and yield up to the Chairman of said Committee all his arms of defence, to remain in custody of said Committee until they shall judge it proper to redeliver them.

Ordered, That Mr. Demarest do attend the papers, books and records removed from the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, and deliver the same to Charles Pettit, Esq., on Thursday next at Burlington; on delivery whereof, he is hereby required to take Mr. Pettit's receipt, agreeable to an order of this Congress.

John Dennis, Esq., laid before this Congress, an appraisement of the blankets in the barracks at New Brunswick, by John Schurman and William Applegate, which is in the words following:

New Brunswick, February 6, 1776.

In pursuance to order of the Provincial Congress, directed to us the subscribers, for appraising all the blankets in the barracks at New Brunswick, we find as follows:

62
23
5

 

Blankets, which we value at
      do           "       "       "     "
      do           "       "       "     "

Proclamation,

15s.
12s.
7, 6d.

 

£46
13
1

£62

10
16
17

3

0
0
6

6

John Schurman,            
William Applegate.      
To John Dennis, Esq.

Congress adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Wednesday, February 7, 1776.

Congress met.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Morris County, praying, that money at interest may be taxed, and that all persons taxed may have voices in elections, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania to this Congress, was read, and ordered a second reading to-morrow morning.

Nathaniel Scudder and David Furman's report of the cargo, &c., of the sloop Polly and Ann, was laid before the Congress, and read, and ordered to be filed.
Adjourned till 3 o'clock in the afternoon.
Met according to adjournment.
The Congress proceeded to the election of officers in the third battalion, when the following persons were chosen by ballot:
Samuel Potter, Captain, Rinear Blanchard, Lieut., Josiah Quimby, 2d Lieut., Cornelius Hennion, Ensign.

Thomas Patterson, Captain, John Mott, 1st Lieut., Wm. M'Daniel, Jun,, 2d Lieutenant, Edward Patterson, Ensign.

John Ross, Captain, Edward M'Michael, 1st Lieutenant, Richard Cox, Jun., 2d Lieutenant, Thomas Coachey, Ensign.

Wm. Eugene Imlay, Captain, Richard Lloyd, 1st Lieutenant, Daniel Pierson, 2d Lieutenant, Edgar Gaulidet, Ensign.

Peter Dickinson, Captain, Stephen Dunham, 1st Lieutenant, David Tuttle, 2d Lieutenant, William Tenbrook, Ensign.

Thomas Reading, Captain, John Anderson, 1st Lieutenant, Ralph Guild, 2d Lieutenant, John Hagan, Ensign.

Joseph Bloomfield, Captain, Josiah Seely, 1st Lieutenant, William Gifford, 2d Lientenant, Ebenezer Elmer, Ensign.

Anthony Sharp, Captain, Samuel Flanagan, 1st Lieutenant, Samuel Hazlett, 2d Lieutenant, Nathaniel Leonard, Jun., Ensign.

Ordered, That warrants be signed by the President, and attested by the Secretary, do issue to the above named persons, to enlist men for the third battalion.

Samuel Shepherd was unanimously appointed Adjutant for said battalion.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, February 8, 1776.

Congress met.

The representation of the County Committee of Salem, touching the origin, progress, and present state of the disturbances in said County, was laid before the Congress and read: Whereupon Doctor Samuel Dick was notified, in pursuance of an order of the Committee of Safety of the 11th day of January last, attending, came before Congress, and after some time spent in hearing his defence against said representation, the Congress postponed the furiher hearing thereof, till to-morrow.

The Resolution of the Justices and Freeholders, County Committee and field officers, of Middlesex, purporting, that they would furnish Colonel Maxwell's battalion with fifty stand of arms, &c., was read; whereupon it is ordered, that Mr. Martin, Mr. Camp and Mr. Pope be a Committee to inspect said arms, and to report thereon.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock, afternoon.

The Congress met, and adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, February 9, 1776.

Congress met.

Ordered, That commissions do issue to Mathias Ward, Lieutenant Colonel, David Conduit, Major, and Samuel Hays, Adjutant in the first battalion of the second regiment of militia in the County of Essex, whereof Philip Cortlandt, Esq , is Colonel. A return of the Captains and subalterns in said battalion was read and filed, and commissions ordered to made be out according to said return.

Ordered, That a commission do issue to Richard Stites, Esq , Captain of a company in the first regiment of foot militia, in the County of Somerset. The same was made out accordingly.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Middlesex County, praying, that money at interest may be taxed, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from Mr. Smith, respecting his officiating as treasurer, was received and read, and ordered a second reading.

The Congress proceeded to the further hearing of the defence against the representation of the County Committee of Salem, and also what might be offered in support thereof, but not having time fully to hear both parties, the said hearing was further postponed to the afternoon.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress again proceeded to hear the proofs and arguments for and against the allegations contained in the representation of the County Committee of Salem, and referred the consideration thereof till to-morrow morning.

A petition and remonstrance of the inhabitants of Salem, respecting representation in Congress, were presented and read, and ordered second readings.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, February 10, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas by an ordinance of this Congress, passed at Trenton, the 28th day of October last, the Commissioners therein named and appointed to purchase fire arms and military store, were particularly restricted in the price to be paid for said fire arms, whereby the manufactory thereof hath been greatly impeded; for remedy whereof, it is resolyed unanimously, that the said Commissioners have full power immediately to proceed in contracting for fire arms upon the best terms in their power, without any limitation or restriction, and that this Congress will in convenient time pass an ordinance for that purpose.

The memorial of William Patterson and Frederick Frelinghuysen, officers in the Somerset battalion of minute men, praying that some further regulation be made for the equipment and government of said men, was read, and ordered a second reading.

The memorial of Thomas Reading nominated Captain in the third battalion ordered to be raised in this Province, for the service of the United Colonies, praying, that he may be senior Captain in said battalion, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The memorial of Thomas Reading, praying that he may be senior Captain in the third battalion, was read a second time; and after some debate thereon, the previous question was demanded and put. Whether this Congress will now go into the appointment or not? It was carried in the negative.

The Congress proceeded to the election of a Quarter-master for the third battalion, when William Norcross was chosen to that office.

Cyrus Dehart having resigned his office of Ensign in Capt. Howel's company in the first battalion, Jacob Kemper was appointed ensign in said company in his stead.

As William Tenbrook, appointed an Ensign in Captain Dickinson's company, refused to accept said appointment, Francis Du Clos was elected Ensign in said company.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the representation from the County Committee of Salem; and it appearing that there is a sufficient number of associators in the County of Salem to form two battalions:

Therefore resolved unanimously, That it be recommended to the Committee of said County, to divide the said County into two districts, and that in each district a battalion be formed, and a list of the officers nominated to command each battalion, be presented by the said County Committee to this Congress, or Committee of Safety, in order ihat commissions may be granted.

On motion.

Ordered, That the following letter be sent to the Continental Congress:

In Provincial Congress, New Jersey, }      
New Brunswick, Feb. 10, 1776,     )      

Gentlemen:— Sensible of the importance that the battalions raised in this Province should be as speedily as possible furnished with arms, we collected for the supply of the First and Second battalions, all the arms fit for service that could be obtained in this Province: We have therefore no resource of providing arms for the Third battalion, but from our own manufactories or importation. How soon they can be manufactured, is uncertain; and we have no present prospect of receiving them from abroad. But being informed that two thousand stand have been lately imported, and that they are within your disposal, we should be glad that part of them may be ordered for the use of the Third battalion, unless some more immediate public service calls for them.

We beg leave to propose, whether it would not be advisable to clothe the battalions now raising in uniform, deducting the expence attending it out of the men's wages.

We are informed, that considerable quantities of powder are lately arrived; and it being probable, that the assistance of the militia of this Province may be speedily wanted for the defence of this or a neighbouring Colony ; we request the favour of your assistauce in supplying us with ten tons of gun powder, and twenty tons of lead, or as much as may be spared.

On a requisition from Lord Stirling, the Committee of Elizabethtown have furnished him with six thousand cartridges, — Somerset County, four quarter casks of powder, — Woodbridge, a considerable quantity, — and Brunswick one hundred and fifty weight of lead. Our militia are very illy supplied with ammunition, those who have granted the above supplies, are therefore very desirous that they may be immediately replaced.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock Monday morning.

Monday, February 12, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The memorial of John Neilson, Colonel of the Middlesex battalion of minute-men, praying, that they may be placed on some more respectable footing, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

The letter from the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, setting forth the expediency of raising artillery companies, was read the second time and after some debates thereon, was referred for further consideration.

A letter from the Committee of Safety of New York, requesting that this Congress would order a detachment of militia immediately to guard the live stock on Staten Island, and otherwise secure that place from depredations, was read and considered; and

On motion,

Resolved unanimously, That upon the requisition of the Committee of Safety of New York now made to this Congress, a detachment of volunteers, consisting of 300 of the militia of the County of Middlesex, 300 of the militia of the County of Essex, and 100 of the militia of the county of Somerset, be ordered immediately to march to Staten Island, under the command of Colonel Nathaniel Heard, Lieut. Colonel Edward Thomas, and Major John Dunn, to prevent the enemy from landing on said island, and carrying off live stock and provisions; and that each man furnish himself with at least four days provision; which said detachment is to remain on said island until further orders from this Congress, not exceeding one month; and that the said forces shall be provided for with provisions during their stay, and be paid the same wages while on duty as are paid to the Continental forces.

Resolved unanimously, That Azariah Dunham be Commissary to supply the above detachment with provisions and other necessaries.

Ordered, That Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Stewart, Mr. Ogden, Mr. Cary, and Mr. Ellis, be a Committee to draught the instructions for Colonel Heard, and a letter to the Committee of Safety of New York.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition of Captain Joseph Badcock, in the County of Somerset, enclosing a list of the names of certain persons in his company who refused to sign a muster-roll, praying the advice of this Congress therein, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A representation from the Committee of Elizabethtown, setting forth. That many persons are continually removing into this Province, who may perhaps be unfriendly to the cause of American freedom; and praying, that some regulations be made therein, was read; and after some debates, was referred to Mr. Dennis, Mr. Clark, and Mr. Martin, to bring in an ordinance for the purposes prayed for.

The Committee appointed to draw the draught of a letter to the Committee of Safety of New York, and also instructions to Colonel Heard, brought in said letter and instructions; which being read and amended, were both agreed to, engrossed, and signed by the President.

The Committee appointed to inspect the arms furnished Colonel Maxwell's battalion, by the Justices and Freeholders, County Committee and field officers of Middlesex, made report, which was read, and ordered to be filed.

A Memorial of Dr. Treat, praying that his bill for attending the sick soldiers in Colonel Maxwell's battalion, may be paid, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Richard Bowlsby, Esq., against whom a complaint was exhibited before the Committee of the Township of Mansfield-Woodhouse, in the County of Sussex, for opposing the present measures; being referred by said Committee to this Congress and brought under a guard, was ordered to attend. The charge was read, and witnesses called in support of it. After which witnesses were also called and interrogated on the part of the said Bowlsby, who made his defence, and being fully heard, was ordered to withdraw.

The said Committee of the Township of Mansfield-Woodhouse, before whom a complaint was also exhibited against Dr. Andrew M'Cleney, referred said complaint to this Congress: The delinquent being brought under a guard, was ordered to attend; the complaint against him was read, his defence heard, and then by order he withdrew.

The above charges were referred for further consideration.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, February 13, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee of Cape May made return of militia officers, which was read and ordered to be filed.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the charge against Richard Bowlsby, Esq., and after some time spent therein,

Resolved, That said Bowlsby pay the costs of the present prosecution, to be taxed by the County Committee of Sussex, and give obligation to the Chairman of said Committee in the sum of five hundred Pounds for his good behaviour in future; and that he yield up to said Chairman all his arms and weapons of defence, to remain in custody of said Chairman until said Committee shall judge it proper to re-deliver them. And, on non compliance herewith, the said Bowlsby be committed to the keeper of the common gaol of said County, who is hereby ordered to keep him in close confinement. This Congress do deem it advisable that the said Richard Bowlsby forthwith desist from the execution of his office, as magistrate, until by his future good behaviour, to be judged of by said Committee, he denotes his penitence, and renders himself worthy of the confidence of the public.

Ordered, That the said Richard Bowlsby be reconducted to the Chairman of the County Committee of Sussex, by Capt. Abraham M'Kinney, to be dealt with as is above directed.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the charges exhibited against Dr. Andrew M'Cleney, and after some time spent therein.

Resolved, That said M'Cleney pay the costs of the present prosecution, to be taxed by the County Committee of Sussex, and give obligation to the Chairman of said Committee, in the sum of fifty Pounds for his good behaviour in future, and that he yield up to said Chairman all his arms and weapons of defence, to remain in custody of said Chairman until said Committee shall judge it proper to re-deliver them; and on non-compliance herewith, that said M'Cleney be committed to the keeper of the common gaol of said city, who is hereby ordered to keep him in close confinement.

Ordered, That the said Andrew M'Cleney be re-conducted to the Chairman of the County Committee of Sussex, by Capt. Abraham M'Kinney, to be dealt with as is above directed.

Ordered, That the County Committee of Sussex, do report their proceedings on the resolutions of this Congress against Richard Bowlsby, Esq. and Andrew M'Cleney, to the present or some future Congress, or, during their recess, to the Committee of Safety of this Colony.

Petitions of sundry inhabitants of Essex, praying, that money at interest may be taxed, and that all persons taxed may have voices in future elections, were read, and ordered second readings.

This Congress being of opinion that if two Commissaries be appointed for supplying the New Jersey forces in the Continental service, it would be of considerable advantage to that service, do

Resolve, That Colonel Dunham, who lives in the Eastern Division of New Jersey, be recommended to the Honorable Continental Congress as a person well qualified to be appointed joint Commissary with Colonel Lowrey, who lives in West Jersey, for the Third Battalion, now raising, and such as shall be raised in this Colony in future.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A remonstrance of the County Committee of Monmouth, praying that the qualification of electors may not be concluded upon during the present session; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Resolved, That on Friday next this Congress will go into the consideration of the qualification of electors.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the letter from the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, recommending the forming one or more artillery companies in this Colony; and after some deliberation thereon, the same, and all other means of defence necessary for this Colony, with the ways and means for defraying the expence thereof, was referred to a Committee of the whole Congress.

The Congress accordingly resolved itself into a Committee of the whole, on the necessary means of defence for this Colony. After some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that said Committee had come to the several Resolutions following:

Resolved, That a train of artillery, consisting of 12 field pieces, be immediately purchased for the use of this Colony.

Resolved, That two complete artillery companies be raised in this Colony.

And whereas by a former ordinance of this Congress, the sum of 30,000 Pounds was directed to be emitted in paper bills of credit, which bills are not yet printed; and whereas from the present alarming state of public affairs, it is probable that a larger sum may be wanted:

Therefore, Resolved, That in lieu of the said 30,0U0 Pounds there he now struck in paper bills of credit the sum of 50,000 Pounds.

Resolved, That for the above purpose, a new ordinance be immediately prepared for striking the said 50,000 Pounds and directing the manner of sinking the same; as also to provide the several articles of defence mentioned in the former ordinance, and such other articles as may be deemed proper and necessary.

To which several resolves the Congress agreed.

Resolved, That this Congress will to-morrow morning go into the election of Deputies, to represent this Province in Continental Congress.

Ordered, That Mr. Clark, Mr. Dennis, Mr. Stewart, Mr. Carey, and Mr. Ogden, be a Committee to prepare an ordinance for striking 50,000 Pounds and also draught a letter in answer to the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Wednesday, February 14, 1776.

Congress met according to adjourment.

A letter from the Honorable John Hancock, Esq., requesting that detachments of minute men, equal to a battalion, be immediately armed and accoutered, and sent to New York, to act under Major General Lee, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Demarest appointed to deliver the papers, books, and records, removed from the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, to Mr. Pettit at the Secretary's office at Burlington, and to take receipt therefor; made report of such delivery, which was read, and ordered to be filed.

Agreeable to the order of the day, the Congress proceeded to elect Delegates to represent this Province in Continental Congress; which election being made, it is thereupon.

Resolved, unanimously, That William Livingston, John DeHart, Richard Smith, John Cooper, and Jonathan Dickinson Serjeant, Esquires, be Delegates to represent this Province in the Continental Congress for the space of one year, or, until others shall be legally appointed in their stead; and that they, or any three or more of them, have full and ample power to consent and agree to all measures, which such Congress shall deem necessary. And this Province bind themselves to execute to the utmost of their power, all Resolutions which the said Congress may adopt. And further, if the said Congress shall think necessary to adjourn, we do authorize our said Delegates, to represent and act for this Province in any one Congress to be held by virtue of such adjournment during their delegation.

On motion,

Resolved unanimously, That the thanks of this Congress be returned to the several gentlemen, who have represented this Colony in the Honourable Continental Congress, for their faithful discharge of the important trust reposed in them; and that the President do transmit the same accordingly.

On motion,

Resolved unanimously, That Mr. Lewis Dunham be recommended by this Congress to the Honourable Continental Congress, as Surgeon, and Mr. Thomas Read, as Surgeon's Mate, for the Third battalion now raising in this Colony.

Resolved unanimously, That this Congress will make provision for defraying the expences of the gentlemen appointed to represent this Colony in Continental Congress.

Adjourned till 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Fisher, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Drake and Mr. Brown, be a Committee to prepare an Ordinance for exempting persons, who enlist in the service of the United Colonies from being arrested.

Ordered, That Mr. Covenhoven, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Hughs and Mr. Elmer, be a Committee to prepare an Ordinance for numbering the inhabitants of this Colony, pursuant to the direction of the Continental Congress.

The Committee appointed to prepare a draught of an Ordinance for appointing Barrack-masters in this Province, and making provision for defraying the expence of repairing said barracks, brought in the same; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion,

Ordered, That Moses Scot be Surgeon to the Second regiment of foot militia, in the County of Middlesex, under the command of Colonel Whetherill.

On motion.

Ordered, That Oliver Barnet, Esq., be Surgeon to the Fourth regiment of foot militia in the County of Huhterdon, under the command of Colonel Mehelm.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, February 15, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The letter from the Hon. Continental Congress of the 12th instant, was read the second time, and is in the words following:

Gentlemen:— The arrival of troops at New York, the importance of that place to the welfare of America, and the necessity of throwing up a number of works to prevent our enemies from landing and taking post there, render it necessary, that a number of troops should immediately join Major General Lee; I am therefore desired to apply to you, and request you would with all possible expedition send detachments of your minute men, equal to a battalion, under proper officers, and well armed and accoutered, to New York, there to be under the command of General Lee.

Your approved zeal in the cause of your country, gives me the strongest assurance, that you will with alacrity embrace this opportunity of giving aid to your neighbours, and that your people will cheerfully engage in a service, by which they will not only render a very essential service to their country, but also have an opportunity of acquiring military skill and knowledge in the construction of field works, and the method of fortifying and entrenching camps, by which they will be the better able, when occasion calls, to defend their rights and liberties.

I am, Gentlemen

Your obedient humble servant,                    
John Hancock,            
President.      
Honourable Convention
      of New Jersey.

The Congress taking the above letter into consideration, and desirous of doing every thing in their power to promote the common cause, do

Resolve, unanimously, That the above requisition be complied with, and that detachments of minute-men properly accoutred, equal to a battalion in the Continental service, be immediately made, and marched to New York, under the command of Charles Stewart, Esq., Colonel; Mark Thompson, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel; Frederick Frelinghuysen and Thomas Henderson, Esqrs,, Majors:

And that said battalion, when joined with the Continental forces, be under the command of Major General Lee. Which battalion, by a resolution of the Continental Congress, of the 25th of October last, shall be entitled to the same pay while on service, as allowed to the Continental troops, and furnished with provisions in the same manner.

And this Congress do recommend to the Committees in particular, and to the inhabitants in general of this Colony, to afford all the assistance in their power in raising and equipping said battalion.

The Committee of the Township of Maidenhead in the County of Hunterdon, made return of persons who signed the Association, as well as those who refused, which was read, and ordered to be filed.

The Committee appointed to draught an ordinance for erecting a Court of Admiralty in this Province, reported. That they had consulted William Livingston, Esq., one of our Delegates in Continental Congress on the subject, and proposed to him, whether it would not be of manifest advantage to the Colonies, if that Congress should, by one general ordinance, institute the powers and mode of erecting a Court of Admiralty to be adopted by all the Colonies: That Mr. Livingston agreed thereto, and said he would take the first opportunity of proposing this matter in Congress; and added, that as they had already given directions for the disposition of the transport lately carried into Elizabethtown, no injury could ensue to the public from the New Jersey Congress deferring the erecting a Court of Admiralty in this Province, until they are informed whether the Continental Congress will direct a general ordinance for the purpose: And the Committee submit it to consideration of the Congress, whether it will not, for the above reasons, be expedient, that the said Committee should for the present defer further proceedings in the business to which they were appointed.

The Congress taking the said report into consideration,

Ordered, That further proceedings of the said Committee be deferred accordingly.

Charles Roberts, by an order of the County Committee ot Somerset, directed to Major Frederick Frelinghuysen, was brought before this Congress. The charge exhibited against said Roberts, was read, who having made his defence, and being fully heard, was ordered to withdraw.

The Congress having duly considered said charge, do

Resolve, That said Charles Roberts pay the costs of the present prosecution, to be taxed by the County Committee of Somerset, and give obligation, with surety, to the Chairman of said Committee, in the sum of 150 l. for his good behaviour in future; that he yield up to said Chairman all his arms and weapons of defence, to remain in custody of said Chairman until the said Committee shall deem it proper to re-deliver them; and, on noncompliance herewith, that the said Roberts be committed to the keeper of the common gaol of said county, who is hereby ordered to keep him in close confinement during such non-compliance.

Ordered, That the said Charles Roberts be reconducted to the Chairman of the County Committee of Somerset, by Major Frederick Frelinghuysen, to be dealt with as is above directed.

A letter from the County Committee of Somerset, setting forth, That they think it expedient, some measure should be taken to fortify Perth Amboy, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of Somerset, praying that none but freeholders may be qualified to elect deputies to represent them in Congress, was read and ordered a second reading.

A memorial from the County Committee of Monmouth, praying. That some mode may be prescribed for keeping Minute Companies on foot, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, February 16, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from the inhabitants of the city of New Brunswick, praying, That they may be admitted as well as freeholders, to vote for deputies in Congress, was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition of the committee for the town of Newark, in the county of Essex, setting forth, that a dispute had arisen between said committee and the County Committee of Essex, respecting the appropriation of said townships part of the £10,000 tax; praying, that this Congress would take some order therein, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Carey, Mr. Mehelm and Mr. Martin be a committee to prepare the draft of an ordinance directing the manner of signing the general association by persons of tender consciences; and for further regulating the militia of this Colony.

Adjourned to 2 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The several petitions from the different Counties in this Province, praying, That householders, &c., may be qualified to vote for Representatives in Congress; the petition of the County Committee of Monmouth, praying that the Congress would not at present decide upon the qualifications of electors; and also the two petitions from several of the inhabitants of the County of Somerset, praying. That freeholders only may elect deputies for Congress, were all read the second time; and the Congress, agreeable to the order of the day, taking into consideration the subject matter of the said several petitions, and after duly deliberating thereon, the question was put. Whether every person of full age, who hath immediately preceding the election, resided one whole year in any County of this Colony, and is worth at least fifty Pounds in real or personal estate, shall be admitted to vote in the County wherein he resides, for Representatives in Provincial Congress, or not? It passed in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Essex County,
Middlesex County,
Morris County,
Hunterdon County,
Sussex County,
Burlington County,
Gloucester County,
Salem County,
Cumberland County,
 

Nays—

Bergen County,
Somerset County,
Monmouth County,
Cape May County.

Ordered, That Mr. Clark, Mr. Garden, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Carey be a committee to prepare an ordinance for the above purpose; and also to ascertain the qualifications of Representatives to serve in Congress.

The petition of the Committee for the Township of Newark, in the County of Essex, was read the second time; and the gentlemen attending in behalf of the Committee of the County of Essex, requesting that the hearing the matter alledged in said petition may be deferred till Thursday next.

The said hearing was deferred accordingly.

Ordered, That both parties do attend this Congress on Thursday next, at two o'clock in the afternoon, to be heard for and against said petition.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, February 17, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to prepare an Ordinance for striking 50,000 l. &c., brought in the same, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ralph Guild, having returned his warrant for enlisting men, as 2d Lieutenant in Captain Reading's company, Jeremiah Ballard was nominated as 2d Lieutenant in that company.

A petition of officers and privates of the company whereof George Taylor, Esq., was Captain at the time of being elected Colonel; praying, that he may occupy both offices, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Joshua Corshon, Esq., having, on account of his infirmity, resigned his commission of Captain in the 3d regiment of foot militia in the County of Hunterdon, whereof Nathaniel Hunt, Esq., is Colonel; Ordered, that said resignation be accepted, and that the company immediately proceed to the election of a Captain.

The Committee appointed to prepare an Ordinance, to fix the Qualification of electors of Deputies, &c., brought in the same, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare an Ordinance for exempting persons who enlist in the service of the United Colonies, from being arrested, brought in the same; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare a draught of an Ordinance, directing the manner of signing the general association, &c., and for further regulating the militia of this Colony, brought in the same; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Dr. William Burnet be Surgeon for the Second regiment of foot militia in the County of Essex; and that Dr. Uzal Johnston be Surgeon for the First battalion; and Dr. Nicholas Roach be Surgeon for the Second battalion of said regiment; and that commissions be issued accordingly.

Ordered, That Dr. Abraham Van Boskirk be Surgeon for the regiment of foot militia in the County of Bergen; and that a commission be made out accordingly.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock Monday morning.

Monday, February 19, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Dr. Timothy Jones be Surgeon for the Eastern regiment of foot militia in the County of Morris ; and that a commission be made out accordingly.

The Committee to whom the representation from the Committee of Elizabethtown was referred, brought in an Ordinance for preventing persons deserting places in danger of being attacked, and for restraining such as are dangerous to the common cause, from taking refuge in this Colony; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The draught of an Ordinance for appointing Barrack masters in this Province, and making provision for defraying the expense of repairing said barracks, was read the second time, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

The draught of an Ordinance directing the manner of signing the general association by persons of tender consciences, and enforcing the same; and also for amending the Militia Ordinance passed at the last session of this Congress; was read the second time, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Several resolutions of the Continental Congress recommending certain matters to this Congress, were read and filed.

The draught of an ordinance for exempting persons who enlist in the service of the United Colonies from arrests, was read the second time, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The draught of an ordinance for preventing persons deserting places in danger of being attacked, &c., was read the second time, and committed to Mr. Hart, Mr. Dennis, and Mr. Ogden.

A petition of the Committee for the Township of Piscataway, praying that this Congress would take some measures for fortifying Amboy, was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare an ordinance for numbering the inhabitants of this Colony, pursuant to the directions of the Continental Congress, brought in the same; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The draught of an ordinance for striking fifty thousand Pounds, and providing for sinking the same, was read the second time, and referred to a Committee of the Whole House to-morrow morning.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Tuesday, February 20, 1776.

Congress met according to adjournment.

The letter from Jacob Ford, Esq., respecting the Eastern Treasurer's refusing Continental bills in payment of taxes, was read the second time.

Resolved, unanimodsly, That it is the duty of the Treasurers of this Colony to receive the bills of credit issued by the Continental Congress, in payment of all taxes and other debts payable to the Treasury.

Mr. Smyth's letter respecting his officiating as Treasurer, was read the second time.

Ordered, That Mr. President do send the following letter to Mr. Smyth.

"Sir:— I am to inform you, that the Congress have been long waiting for your answer, whether you would consider yourself as Treasurer under your former obligation. This would be very agreeable to Congress; and though your indisposition may for some time prevent your going to the treasury chest at Mr. Schenck's; yet you can, as occasion may require, have recourse thereto by such persons as you can confide in.

"A resolve of the Congress, respecting Continental currency you have enclosed."

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, on the ordinance for striking fifty thousand Pounds, and providing for sinking the same. After some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, That they had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again. To which the Congress agreed.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, on the Ordinance for striking 50,000 l. and providing for sinking the same.

After some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the Ciiair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that they had made some further progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again. To which the Congress agreed.

A letter from Colonel Maxwell, praying that a company of riflemen may be raised and joined to his battalion, was read and filed.

A petition of sundry militia officers in the County of Burlington, setting forth, that they had been at considerable expence in providing fugal(sic) [fugelhorn] men, fifers, drummers, &c., praying that this Congress would reimburse them therefor, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, February 21, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The petition of the Committee for the Township of Piscataway, praying that some more equal mode of taxation may be prescribed, and, in particular, that money at interest may be taxed, was read, and referred to the Committee on the Ordinance for striking 50,000 Pounds and providing for sinking the same.

The petition of Captain Joseph Badcock, in the County of Somerset inclosing a list of the names of certain persons in his company, who refused to sign a muster roll, praying the advice of this Congress therein, was read the second time, and referred for further consideration.

This Congress, having received of the Continental Congress, half a ton of gun powder, in order to replace the gun powder, formerly lent said Continental Congress, by Somerset, Brunswick, Woodbridge and Elizabeth; and there being a surplus, after replacing what had been so borrowed, of which the Township of Shrewsbury hath made application for part.

Whereupon it is ordered, That said Township be furnished with a cask of the powder aforesaid, containing 108lbs. 6oz., for which said Township is to account with this Congress.

A motion being made and debated, the question was put, whether this Congress shall be dissolved, and the electors have an opportunity of making a new choice of Deputies, before the time appointed by an Ordinance of the last Congress? It was carried in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Bergen County,
Essex County,
Burlington County,
Gloucester County.
Salem County,
Cumberland County,
Cape May County.
 

Nays—

Middlesex County,
Morris County,
Sussex County.
Hunterdon County,
Somerset County
 

On motion.

Resolved, That there be a new election of Deputies to represent this Colony in Provincial Congress, on the fourth Monday in May next.

Ordered, That commissions be made out for the following persons, officers of a company in the regiment, whereof William Maxwell, Esq., was late Colonel, agreeable to a certificate of their appointment, viz.:

George Rible, Captain; Henry Shute, First Lieutenant; Richard Auter, Second Lieutenant; Philip Wintersteen. Ensign.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from Mr, Smyth, respecting his officiating as Treasurer, was read. To which the following answer was returned.

"Sir:— We are sorry to observe, that the conditions you mention in your letter of this day, on which you are willing to execute the office of Treasurer, are not satisfactory. We must therefore desire your answer explicitly, whether you are willing to take charge of the treasury chest, when delivered safely at Mr. Schenck's, continue to act as Treasurer, and acknowledge yourself accountable to the Province as fully to all intents and purposes, as you was, by your obligation before the removal of the chest.

"If you agree thereto, as the execution of the office under those circumstances, will necessarily be attended with extraordinary expences, this Congress are willing to make you a reasonable compensation therefor."

A letter from the Right Honourable William Earl of Stirling was received and read, and is in the words following:

New York, 20th February, 1776.

"Sir:— As the Asia man-of-war, with her attendants, have now taken their station in the bay below this city, and the Phoenix between the Narrows and Sandyhook, and do take every provision vessel coming from New Jersey; it is become highly proper to prevent any provisions or produce of any kind being shipped from New Jersey to this or any other place whatsoever, while those ships continue in a situation which will enable them to make seizures of them. I have, therefore, General Lee's directions to request, that the Congress of New Jersey will give immediate directions to prevent any provisions or other produce being shipped or sent off from any part of East New Jersey, that can possibly fall into the hands of the enemy.

"I am, sir, your most humble servant,

Stirling."      
The President of the Congress of the
    Province of New Jersey, at New
    Brunswick.

The Congress, sensible of the expediency of the above request, do Resolve, That provisions and all other kinds of produce of this Colony, be immediately prevented from being sent to New York, or other parts, whereby they must pass New York bay, or the bay between Sandyhook and Perth Amboy, or Staten Island: And all owners and masters of vessels of every kind, are prohibited from sending any provisions or produce from any part of this Province as aforesaid, until permitted by this Congress.

All County and Township Committees in the Eastern Division of this Province, are hereby directed to be vigilant and active in carrying this resolve into effect.

Ordered, That the following persons be officers of a company of minute-men in the Township of Newark, agreeable to a certificate of their election, viz.: Joseph Ailing, Captain, Joseph Wheeler, 1st Lieutenant, Caleb Bruen, 2d Lieutenant, Isaac Plume, Ensign.

The draught of an ordinance to fix the qualifications of electors, and of Deputies, &c., was read the second time, and committed to Mr. Fisher, Mr. Martin, Mr. Hughes, Mr. Covenhoven, and Mr. John Holmes.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Thursday, February 22, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from James Hughes, a prisoner at Elizabethtown, informing that he is much indisposed in body, praying leave of this Congress that he may go to Now York, and put himself under the care of Dr. Jones, was read, and referred to the Committee of Elizabethtown.

The Congress again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the ordinance for striking 50,000 l. and providing for sinking the same. After some time spent therin, Mr. President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that they had gone through the said ordinance, and were ready to report the same.

Ordered, That the report be made in the afternoon.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Mr. Fisher from the Committee of the Whole House, to whom the ordinance for emitting fifty thousand Pounds in bills of credit, for the purposes therein mentioned, &c., reported the same, agreeable to the order of this morning, which was read; and several amendments being thereunto made, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

The parties for and against the petition from the Committee of the Township of Newark, against the Committee of the County of Essex, attending, and the petitioners requiring a longer day, in order to procure proper witnesses; it is therefore

Ordered, That the further hearing of said controversy be deferred till Tuesday next, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon; at which time, both parties are required to attend properly prepared, as this Congress are resolved at that time to hear and determine said dispute.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, February 23, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to wait upon Mr, Smyth, and remove the papers, books, and records in the Surveyor General's office at Perth Amboy, made report, That they had waited on Mr. Smyth, and had as ordered, removed the papers, books and records, mentioned in a certain schedule produced and filed.

Elias Dayton, Esq., Colonel of the first regiment of foot Militia in the County of Essex, being promoted to the command of a battalion in the Continental service; it is therefore

Ordered, That Edward Thomas be Colonel, Jeremiah Smith, Lieutenant Colonel, and Oliver Spencer, first Major of said first regiment of Militia in the County of Essex.

The petition and remonstrance of the County Committee of Bergen, respecting the seizure of arms belonging to said County, by a detachment of Continental troops, under the command of Captain Joseph Meeker, in the right honorable William Earl of Stirling's regiment, was read the second time, and

Resolved unanimously, That this Congress will either pay for, or replace the arms taken by Captain Meeker, which ever the County Committee of Bergen shall choose; and will as soon as possible enquire fully into, and decide upon the cause of complaint exhibited in said petition and remonstrance.

Resolved, That a letter be immediately written and signed by the President, to the right honorable William Earl of Stirling respecting the seizure of the arms aforesaid, and desiring that his Lordship would transmit to this Congress a copy of the orders given Captain Meeker; as also of those which his Lordship received of the honorable Continental Congress, respecting said arms.

This Congress resumed the consideration of a Court of Admiralty, and Resolved, That said court be instituted in this Province as soon as possible; and that Mr. Carey and Mr. Clark be added to the Committee appointed to draught an ordinance for that purpose.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee to whom the draught of an ordinance for fixing the qualifications of electors and deputies, &c., was committed, reported the same with amendments; which being read, was committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the ordinance for fixing the qualifications of electors and deputies, &c., after some time spent therein, Mr. President resumed the chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee reported, that they had made some progress in the matters to them referred, and desired leave to sit again. To which the Congress agreed.

The engrossed ordinance directing the manner of signing the General Association, &c., was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

Ordered, That Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Hart, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Mehelm, and Mr. Dunham, be a Committee to prepare an ordinance for defraying incidental charges.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, February 24, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The engrossed ordinance for appointing barrack masters in this Province, &c,, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The engrossed ordinance for exempting persons who enlist in the service of the United Colonies, from arrests, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The several petitions and memorials respecting the minute men in this Province, &c., were read the second time; and after some deliberation thereon,

Ordered, That Mr. Clark, Mr. Hart, Mr. Elmer, and Mr, Martin, be a Committee to prepare an ordinance for regulating the former minute department of Militia, and incorporating the same with the standing Militia.

Mr. Josiah Seely, appointed 1st Lieutenant in Captain Bloomfield's company, informed this Congress, that since his nomination, some particular circumstances happened, which laid him under the necessity of declining said appointment; whereupon the Congress proceeded to the choice of a first Lieutenant in said company, when Constant Peck was elected.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The petition of officers and the privates, in the company whereof George Taylor, Esq., was Captain, at the time of being elected Colonel, was read the second time, and ordered to lie on the table.

The petition of sundry Militia officers in the County of Burlington, praying, that this Congress will reimburse them their expence in providing fugal men, &c., was read the second time and ordered to lie on the table.

The letter from the County Committee of Somerset, and the petition from the Township Committee of Piscataway, setting forth, that Perth Amboy is much exposed to hostile invasions, and praying that some measures might be taken to fortify said place, and guard it against invasions were read the second lime.

As the matter contained in said letter and petition, is of great importance to this Colony in particular, and to the United Colonies in general; and as the carrying the same into effect will be attended with considerable expense, it was moved and agreed, that the following letter be sent to the Continental Congress:

Gentlemen:— This Congress having taken into their serious consideration, the necessity of defending .such parts of this Colony as are more immediately exposed to an invasion of the enemy, are of opinion, that the city of Perth Amboy, in East Jersey, from its open channel, and safe harbour, and from its local situation, is a place deserving the utmost attention at this time. As the city of New York has at present a large body of troops, and fortifications are now erecting for its defence, it is more than probable, that the enemy, sensible of these preparations, will attempt a lodgment at Perth Amboy, from whence incursions might easily be made into the heart of the country, before a sufficient force can be collected to oppose them.

That part of West Jersey, which is situate on the river Delaware, below Philadelphia, appears also to merit great attention at this time. Opposite to Reedy Island, at a place called Elsenborough, in the County of Salem, a landing might easily be effected. This is within forty miles of Philadelphia, in a County abounding with provisions; and from whence an army might easily make its way to Cooper's Ferry in a very short time.

This Congress would be happy, if they had it in their power to take into immediate pay, a sufficient body of troops for the defence of both these important posts: but as this will be an expence too great for this Colony to support upon its own bottom, and as the being guarded at all points, is a matter of the utmost importance to the common cause, more especially to the cities of Philadelphia and New York; this Congress beg leave to submit to the consideration of your Honourable House, the urgent necessity of making some immediate preparations to prevent any attempt of the enemy to land an army in those parts of this Province, which appear to be so situated, as greatly to facilitate the success of such an attempt. One or two battalions, with two artillery companies, may be sufficient for this important service. And we humbly submit to your consideration the necessity and propriety of such a step being immediately adopted. We wish not to put the continent to this expense for the sole defense of the inhabitants of this Colony: but the interests of this Colony in particular being so connected with that of the United Colonies in general, as to render an invasion in New Jersey, a matter of the utmost importance to all; we humbly conceive, that the necessity of the occasion will induce the wisdom of your Honourable House to take into Continental pay two battalions and two companies of artillery; or such a body of forces as may be thought sufficient to answer this desirable purpose.

The express by which this is forwarded, will wait your commands; and I am to request the favour of an answer as soon as possible.

I am likewise to request, that commissions may be sent for the officers of the Third battalion, as some of the companies are already full, and others in a fair way.

I am, Gentlemen,
Your most obedient humble servant,              
Sam. Tucker,          
President.    
By order of the Congress.
To the Hon. Continental Congress.

Adjourned till Monday morning 9 o'clock.

Monday, February 26, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

A Resolution of the Continental Congress was received and read, and is in the words following:

In Congress, February 22, 1776.

A Delegate from New Jersey, having informed Congress that the regiment of militia ordered by the Convention of that Colony, to march to the defence of New York, in consequence of the resolve of Congress of the 12th of this month, were not sufficiently armed, and that they could not be furnished with arms, unless the Congress supplied them; and as this Congress have not arms to spare, those they have, being necessary for arming the battalions in the Continental service:

Therefore resolved, That the march of said battalion of militia be countermanded.

Extract from the minutes.

Charles Thompson,          
Secretary.    

Ordered, That the officers be immediately notified of the above countermand.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Petitions of the Committee of Correspondence and Observation for the Precinct of New Barbados, and Hackinsack, of the Township Committee of Franklin, and of the Precinct Committee of Saddle River, in the County of Bergen, setting forth, that the Deputies who represent the said County in Provincial Congress, and the persons who compose the County Committee of Bergen, were not duly elected, &c., praying that the said Deputies may be dismissed from their seats in Congress; that the said Committee may be dissolved, and that a new election may be directed, were read, and ordered a second reading.

The Township Committee of Trenton, made return of the persons, who, in their bounds signed the general Association of this Colony, and of those who refused so to do; which was ordered to be filed.

The Committee to whom the draught of an ordinance respecting persons who remove from the adjacent Colonies, &c. was committed, reported the same with amendments, which being read, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

The Congress again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House, on the ordinance for fixing the qualifications of electors and Deputies, &c. After some time spent therein, the President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Fisher, Chairman of the Committee, reported, that they had gone thro' the said ordinance, which being read, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Tuesday, February 27, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from John Smyth, Esq., Treasurer of the Eastern Division of this Colony, was read, and is in the following words:

"Sir:— Mr. Stevens, according to my request, has been so good as to come down to this place, to whom I communicated the letter sent to me by the Congress, relative to the removal of the Treasury, as I did to my other securities some time before.

"I find that they are willing to continue security for me, considering the difficulty of the times, provided the chest is removed to a place where the office may be executed in the usual manner. I would therefore propose, that, as I am not now able, and have little prospect of being so, in less than six weeks, to attend the chest, it be removed to Mr. Stevens', who will receive the taxes that are still to be paid in; and the County Collectors may be desired to attend at his house for that purpose. In which case no one will or can have recourse to the chest, but those who have already entered into engagements, and are by law accountable to the public, for the due performance of my office, which cannot in justice or reason be expected of me or them, without the chest is suffered to remain in my or their possession.

"As this proposal fully comprehends the declared intention of the Congress in removing the chest, I cannot doubt its proving fully agreeable and satisfactory to them.

"Whenever I am able to attend the duty of the office abroad, the chest may then be removed to any other place, that shall be agreed on by all concerned, there to remain until we see happier times.

"Mr. Stevens goes home by way of Brunswick, to whom I beg you will please to give your answer, who will forward it to me.

" I am, your most humble servant,
John Smyth."        
Perth Amboy, Feb. 26, 1776.
      Samuel Tucker, Esq.

On the question being put, whether the treasury chest of the Eastern Division of this Colony, lately removed by a resolve of this Congress, from Perth Amboy, in order to be lodged in the hands of Peter Schenck, Esq., at Milstone, for the sake of greater safety, be, agreeable to the request of Mr. Smyth, the Eastern Treasurer, carried to the dwelling house of the Honorable John Stevens, one of Mr. Smyth's securities, there to remain during Mr. Smyth's indisposition, or until this Congress shall take further order therein, on the terms expressed in the above letter, to wit, that Mr. Smyth and his securities continue bound by their former obligations; and provided they be at the charge of such removal? It was carried in the affirmative as follows:

Yeas—

Bergen,
Essex,
Monmouth,
Burlington,
Salem,
 
Cape May,
Hunterdon.
 

Nays—

Middlesex,
Somerset,
Morris,
Sussex,
Cumberland.
 

The petitions of the Committee of Correspondence and Observation, for the precinct of New Barbadoes and Hackinsack, of the Township Committee of Franklin, and of the precinct Committee of Saddle River, in the County of Bergen, setting forth, that the Deputies who represent the said County in Provincial Congress, and the persons who compose the County Committee of Bergen, were not duly elected, &c., and praying, that the said Deputies may be dismissed from their seats in Congress, that the said County Committee may be dissolved, and that a new election may be directed, were read the second time.

Whereas this Congress expect soon to rise, and, having already resolved upon a dissolution, have directed, that, on the fourth Monday in May next, the several Counties in this Province proceed to the election of Deputies for Provincial Congress, and of County Committees, think it unnecessary, at this time, to enter into the merits of, and decide upon, the complaint exhibited in the above petitions. This Congress, however, direct, that all the money raised in the County of Bergen, by a former resolve of Congress, be immediately collected and paid into the hands of the County Collector; to be drawn out and appropriated, as the County Committee of Bergen shall direct, agreeable to former resolutions of Congress; and that said Committee do keep proper accounts of all such appropriations and expenditures, to be laid before Congress when required.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The memorial of James Richmond, setting forth, that the ships of war in New York bay, do not make captures of vessels freighted with wheat, and praying permission of this Congress to carry produce from this Colony to New York, was read, and ordered a second reading.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress went into the consideration of the petition from the Committee for the Township of Newark, against the County Committee of Essex. The deputies from said Committees, attending, were heard for and against the said petition. After which they withdrew.

The above petition was referred for further consideration.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, February 28, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas the late resolution of this Congress, prohibiting the export of provisions and produce from this Colony to New York, was founded on information, that the ships of war in New York bay, made captures of vessels so laden; and whereas this Congress are fully satisfied, that the reason of making said prohibition no longer subsists: It is therefore

Resolved, unanimously, That the Resolution of this Congress, made the twenty-first day of this instant February, prohibiting the export of provisions and produce from this Colony to the city of New York, be, and is hereby repealed.

This Congress having resumed the consideration of the petition of the Township of Newark, lament, that any disputes should arise among persons distinguished for their zeal and activity in promoting the common cause of America; and regret the necessity of their interference to compose the dissentions, that have for some time subsisted between the County Committee of Essex, and the Township Committee of Newark. In order, however, to decide upon said dispute, and in hopes of reconciling the parties at variance, it is

Resolved, That, as by the late Ordinances of Congress, the County Committee have undoubted right to appoint a County Collector, and dispose of the money raised by an Ordinance of the late Congress, the Committee of the Township of Newark be, and they are hereby enjoined to cease claiming the disposition of such money; but whereas there was no County Committee in the County of Essex, before the twenty-first day of September last, until which time, the Township Committees had the disposal of the money raised as aforesaid in their respective Townships: It is therefore further

Resolved, That all monies actually expended by said Township Committees, before that time, be allowed by said County Committees to be a legal expenditure; and the arms or ammunition purchased by each Township Committee, as well as such as shall be purchased by the County Committee, be considered as a County stock, and divided to each Township according to its quota of such tax: And if any Township Committee in Essex have made contracts for ammunition, not already fulfilled, it is recommended to the County Committee to fulfill such contracts, and to distribute the ammunition procured thereby in the Townships as aforesaid.

The engrossed Ordinance for striking the sum of 50,000 l. five shillings, in bills of credit, for the purposes therein mentioned, and directing the manner of sinking the same, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The engrossed Ordinance, to prevent persons deserting places in danger of being attacked, and for restraining such as are dangerous to the common cause, from taking refuge in this Colony, was read and compared; and on the question. Whether the same do pass or not? it was carried in the affirmative, as follows:

Yeas—

Bergen,
Morris,
Hunterdon,
Essex,
Somerset,
Cumberland.
Middlesex,
Sussex,
 

Nays—

Monmouth,
Cape May.
Salem,
 
Burlington,
 

Resolved, That the same do pass.

On motion,

Ordered, That Doctor Baldwin be Surgeon for the Second regiment of foot militia in the County of Sussex, whereof Ephraim Martin, Esq., is Colonel.

On motion,

Ordered, That Doctor Jonathan Horton, be Surgeon for the Western regiment of foot militia, in the County of Morris, whereof Jacob Drake, Esq., is Colonel.

Agreeable to certificate,

Ordered, That the following persons be officers of three of the militia companies in the precinct of New Barbadoes, and County of Bergen, and in the regiment whereof Theunis Dey, Esq., is Colonel, viz., Jacob Terhune, Captain, George Brinckerhoff, First Lieutenant, Hendrick Budon, Second Lieutenant, and Jacobus Poulesse, Ensign of the New Barbadoes company. Nicausa Terhune, Captain, Jacob Van Winkle, First Lieutenant, John Uriancy, Second Lieutenant, and Walling Van Winkle, Ensign of the Pollifly company. Jacobus Jaralman, Captain, Peter Sandford, First Lieutenant, Elijah Sanford, Second Lieutenant, and John Jaralman, Ensign of the New Barbadoes Neck company.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A representation from the Township Committee of Woodbridge, praying, that money at interest may be taxed; that the people called Quakers may, for non-attendance on military duty, pay an equivalent to the expense and services of Associators; and that Perth Amboy, which is much exposed to an attack from the enemy, may be fortified and guarded; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition of the Township Committee of Piscataway, and of the military officers in said Township, setting forth, that the ordinance of last Congress for the further regulation of the militia, was defective in several particulars, &c., praying, that this Congress would device some remedy therefor, was read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee appointed to prepare an ordinance for regulating the former minute department of militia, and incorporating the same with the standing militia, reported the same, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The engrossed ordinance for directing the mode and fixing the time for the election of Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress for this Colony; and also to ascertain the qualification of electors, &c., was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

Agreeable to certificate.

Ordered, That the following persons be officers of a company in the Second Regiment of foot militia in the County of Somerset, under the command of Abraham Quick, Esq., Colonel, viz., William Churchill Houston, Captain, Aaron Longstreet, First Lieutenant, Zebulon Barton, Second Lieutenant, and James Stockton, Ensign.

The Township Committee of Amwell, in the County of Hunterdon, having made return of the persons who signed, and of those who refused to sign the General Association of this Colony.

Ordered, That the same be filed.

The draught of an ordinance for numbering the inhabitants of this Colony, pursuant to the direction of the Continental Congress, was read the second time, and after certain amendments, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Resolved, That Samuel Tucker and John Dennis, Esquires, Treasurers of this Colony, shall each of them, give bond with security, for the faithful performance of their office, in the sum of 10,000 l., to John Wetherill, Hendrick Fisher, Abraham Clark, John Hart, Isaac Pearson, and Augustine Stevenson, Esquires, and the survivors of them, in trust for the said Colony.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

Thursday, February 29, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Continental Congress having desired this Congress to give directions for conveying the baggage belonging to the prisoners taken at St. John's, from Wallpack in this Colony, to Lancaster, in the Province of Pennsylvania,

Ordered, That Colonel Martin and Major Brown, be, and they hereby are directed to carry the above requisition into effect.

The Congress having resumed the consideration of the necessity of instituting a Court of Admiralty in this Colony,

Resolved, That the erection of such Court be deferred until some future day; but as it is highly expedient immediately to determine upon the seizure of the ship Blue Mountain Valley, that this Congress will proceed to the decision thereof to-morrow, at two o'clock in the afternoon.

On motion.

Agreed, That the President write to the Chairman of the Committee of Elizabeth town, desiring that he would cause such witnesses as may be necessary, respecting the above capture, to appear before Congress at the time aforementioned.

The Committee appointed to prepare an Ordinance for defraying incidental charges, reported the same; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Mr. Coachy, appointed an Ensign in Captain Ross's company, having declined accepting said appointment, the Congress proceeded to the election of an Ensign, when George Cottnam was elected.

The draught of an Ordinance for regulating the former minute department of militia, and incorporating the same with the standing militia, was read the second time, and, after sundry amendments, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Friday, March 1, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress having resumed the consideration of the charge exhibited against Peter Vroom,

Resolved, That said Peter Vroom pay the costs of the present prosecution, to be taxed by the Township Committee of Piscataway, and give obligation with surety, to the Chairman of said Committee in the sum of 150 Pounds for his good behaviour in future; that he yield up to said Chairman all his arms and weapons of defence, to remain in custody of said Chairman, until the said Committee shall deem it proper to re-deliver them; and on non-compliance herewith, that said Vroom be committed to the keeper of the common gaol of the County of Middlesex, who is hereby ordered to keep him in close confinement, during such non-compliance.

The Congress proceeded to the election of officers for the two companies of artillery, when the following persons were chosen:

Frederick Freelinghuysen, Captain; Daniel Neil, Captain- Lieutenant; Thomas Clark, First Lieutenant, and John Heard, Second Lieutenant of the Eastern Company, Samuel Hugg, Captain; Thomas Newark, Captain- Lieutenant, John Westcott, First Lieutenant, and Joseph Dayton, Second Lieutenant of the Western Company.

Ordered, That Mr. Carey and Mr. Clark be a Committee to prepare an Ordinance for raising two companies of artillery in this Colony, and providing for their pay and subsistence.

Ordered, That Mr. Carey and Mr. Clark be a Committee to draw the form of a bond to be executed by the Treasurers.

Mr. Dennis presented to this Congress, the Hon. John Stevens's receipt for the treasury chest; which was read, and ordered to be filed, and is in the words following:

Received of John Dennis, Esq., the treasury chest of the Eastern Division of New Jersey, lately removed from Perth Amboy, and deposited with Mr. Dennis, by order of Congress; which chest is now locked, and the key remaining in the hands of the Treasurer, John Smyth, Esq. The treasury chest aforesaid, with its contents, I received into my charge for the purposes mentioned in Mr. Smyth's letter of the 26th of February, directed to, and in the possession of the Congress of New Jersey. Dated the twenty-eighth day of February, Anno Domini, 1776.

John Stevens      
.

On motion,

An ordinance for paying a bounty on salt petre, and common salt, manufactured in New Jersey, and for purchasing salt petre, was brought in and read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The ordinance for paying a bounty on salt petre, and common salt, manufactured in new Jersey, &c., was read the second time, and several amendments being thereunto made, the same was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

The Committee appointed to draw the draught of an ordinance for raising two artillery companies in New Jersey, and providing for their pay and subsistence, brought in the same, which was read, and ordered a second reading,

Agreed, That John Dennis, Esq., send the records of the Surveyor General's Office, to the house of Peter Schenck, Esquire.

Ordered, That Mr. Dennis and Mr. Dunham, be a Committee to adjust and settle the accounts of powder furnished the Earl of Stirling, by Somerset, Brunswick, Woodbridge and Elizabethtown, and to repay the same out of the half ton sent this Congress by the honorable Continental Congress. That said Committee are to keep the surplus in their hands on account; and to report to the next Congress or Committee of Safety.

Agreeable to order, the Congress took under consideration the capture of the ship Blue Mountain Valley, and having heard and examined the proofs respecting the same, postponed the decision until to-morrow morning.

Adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, March 2, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

The draught of an ordinance for raising two companies of artillery, and providing for their pay and subsistence, was read the second time; and being amended, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

The Congress proceeded to the determination of the prize ship Blue Mountain Valley, now lying at Elizabethtown Point, lately seized by Lord Stirling, with detachments of the Continental forces, and militia: And it appearing by the testimony of creditable witnesses, upon their oaths, that the said ship, John H. Dempster, master, sailed from London some time last fall, laden with stores shipped by order of the right honorable the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury, bound to the port of Boston, or any one other port in America: The said cargo by the bill of loading, dated the 30th day of September, 1775, to be delivered unto the Commander-in-Chief of his Majesty's forces in America, or to his order. And the honorable Continental Congress, having previous to the taking the aforesaid ship,

"Resolved, That all transport vessels in the same service having on board any troops, arms, ammunition, clothing, provisions, or military or naval stores of what kind so ever, and all vessels to whomsoever belonging, that shall be employed in carrying provisions or other necessaries, to the British army or armies, or navy, that now are, or hereafter shall be within any of the United Colonies, or any goods, wares, or merchandize, for the use of such fleet or army, shall be liable to seizure, and, with their cargoes, shall be confiscated,"

It is therefore Resolved, That the said ship Blue Mountain Valley, with such of her cargo, as was shipped by order of the said Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury directed, as by said bills of loading, to be delivered at the port of Boston, or elsewhere, unto the Commander-in-Chief of his Majesty's forces in America, or to his order: shall be and is hereby confiscated to the use of the captors, pursuant to the general directions for distribution, resolved on by the said honorable Continental Congress.

Resolved, That the said ship and cargo be disposed of by any two agents or persons to be chosen, the one by Lord Stirling, and the other by the Committee of Elizabeth town.

Resolved, That all the necessary charge and expense, which have arisen, by guarding and securing said prize, and supporting the seamen, be first deducted out of the neat proceeds of such sales.

Resolved, That the amount of the sales of the ship and cargo (the expense and charge of guarding and securing the same, and supporting the seamen being first deducted and paid thereout) be divided among all the captors, as well those of the militia sent out by the Committee of Elizabethtown, as such of the Continental forces as were employed in that service under Lord Stirling: that the said distribution be made among the officers, privates, and to the vessels employed in said captor, in such manner as is usually distributed in the neighbouring Colonies, agreeable to the resolutions of the Continental Congress.

Resolved, That all such goods, wares, and merchandize on board said ship, belonging to the captain, mates, and seamen, as their, or either of their own private properties, be reserved for the proprietors thereof, and delivered to them free of all costs and deductions.

Resolved, That the captain and seamen belonging to said ship when seized, be suffered to go to any place they may think proper (his Majesty's fleet or army only excepted.)

And this Congress recommend to the captors of said ship, to make some gratuity to each of the seamen on board, to enable them to travel to some other parts in pursuit of business.

The draught of a letter to the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania, in answer to their letter respecting raising artillery companies in this Province, was read, and agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed; which was done accordingly, and is in the words following:

Gentlemen:— The Congress have taken into their serious consideration the important matters recommended to them by your letter of the fifth ultimo.

It is with pleasure that this Congress find that you have taken so very necessary a step, as to cause a survey to be made of the Jersey shore upon the river Delaware; and this Congress concur with you in opinion, that the necessity of making an early provision to guard both shores against common danger, is a measure of the highest importance, and requires immediate consideration.

This Congress very gratefully acknowledges the patriotic tender you have been pleased to make of your service, in giving or receiving mutual assistance, as the circumstances and situation of things may require; and this Congress will most cheerfully co-operate with you, in promoting all such measures as may be best calculated to advance the common cause.

In pursuit of this plan, this Congress have agreed to raise forthwith two companies of artillery, and to purchase twelve field pieces for the defence of this Colony to be stationed one half in East Jersey, and the other half in West Jersey. But as it is probable, that the officers appointed to the command of these companies may have occasion for some instruction, to improve them in the art of gunnery, this Congress in such case will rely upon your friendly declarations of affording such assistance as may be required.

With regard to the purchase of cannon, the Committee appointed by this Congress have orders to procure them on the best terms; and this Committee we recommend to your attention, if it should be found necessary to give you any farther trouble in the management of this affair. This Congress have made provision for paying a bounty of one shilling per pound for such merchantable saltpetre as shall be made in this Colony before the first day of January next. But should it be found necessary for any persons to acquire more practical knowledge of the art of making this necessary article, this Congress will in such case most gladly accept your obliging offer, and give a recommendation to such persons accordingly.

By order, &c.        

The engrossed ordinance for numbering the inhabitants of this Colony, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The engrossed Ordinance for disbanding minute men, &c., was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

This Congress have before them a certified copy of a letter lately wrote by Cortland Skinner, Esq., Attorney General of this Colony, to his brother Colonel Skinner, in Great Britain, containing many sentiments and expressions prejudicial to the peace and welfare of the United Colonies.

And whereas by a law of this Colony, passed the last session of General Assembly, a salary was provided for, and granted to the said Attorney General, under confidence of his friendly disposition towards the interests of this Province; which confidence from the tenor of said letter, no longer subsists; and Mr. Skinner having left the Colony, ceases to perform the duty of his office. This Congress therefore, as a duty they owe their constituents, request the Treasurers of this Colony, and each of them, to stop all payments of salary to the said Cortland Skinner, until this Congress shall give further order thereon.

Adjourned to 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The engrossed Ordinance for raising two companies of artillery, and providing for their pay and subsistence, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The Hon. Continental Congress, having recommended to this Congress to provide carriages for transporting baggage and military stores through this Colony. In compliance wherewith, it is

Resolved, That the Treasurers of this Colony, appointed by Congress, or either of them, do deposit(sic) the sum of twenty-five Pounds Proclamation money in the hands of each of the Chairmen of the Committees of the Counties of Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Hunterdon, and Sussex, taking proper receipts for the same, to be at the disposal of the respective Committees of the Counties aforesaid, to be by them laid out and applied in paying the expense of baggage wagons employed in this Colony; for which money the Chairmen of said respective Committees shall be accountable to the Congress of this Colony or Committee of Safety, and shall render true accounts of their disbursements, when, and as often thereunto as required.

The engrossed Ordinance for paying a bounty on salt petre, and common salt, manufactured in New Jersey, and for purchasing salt petre, was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

The Ordinance to provide for the payment of incidental charges, was read the second time, agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed. The aforesaid Ordinance being engrossed was read and compared.

Resolved, That the same do pass.

Azariah Dunham brought from the Continental Congress, their determination upon the application of this Congress for forces to be stationed in this Colony; which being read, is in the words following:

"Application being made to Congress, by the Convention of New Jersey, for two more battalions, and two companies of artillery to be raised in that Colony, and the same being referred to a Committee; on the report of the said Committee, the Congress did not agree to the raising any more battalions, or companies in that Colony."

Charles Thompson.      
March 1, 1776.

On motion.

Resolved, That a letter of instruction to the Delegates of this Province in Continental Congress, be immediately prepared and sent to them: A draught of which being produced, was read and agreed to, and is as follows:

Gentlemen:— You must be sensible, that this Congress are extremely destitute of the means of information, compared with your body, and of course, unable to point out any certain line of conduct for you to pursue: Your deliberations must no doubt be formed upon the measures of the British Ministry, which are uncertain, extraordinary, and new almost every week. We therefore only request, that you would join in the general voice of the United Colonies, and pursue such measures as you may judge most beneficial for the public good of all the Colonies.

By order, &c.      

This Congress, sensible of the extreme scarcity of blankets now wanted for Continental forces, do recommend it to all the inhabitants of this Colony, who may have any good blankets that they can possibly spare, to dispose of the same to the commissary on reasonable terms, for the use of said forces.

Resolved, That John Anderson of New York, be employed to print the minutes and ordinances of this sitting, and that the President sign an order for the same; and that the Treasurers of this Colony or either of them, pay to the said John Anderson, so much as Abraham Clark and Lewis Ogden, Esquires, shall certify that they have agreed shall be paid for printing the same.

The Congress adjourned to the fourth Monday in May next, then to meet at Burlington, unless sooner called by the President or Vice President.

 

Ordinances

Of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, Passed at the Sitting of Congress, at New Brunswick, in February and March, 1776.

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AN ORDINANCE

Directing the manner of signing the General Association, by persons of tender consciences, and enforcing the same; and also for amending the Militia Ordinance, passed at the last session of this Congress.

Although it is not the design of this Congress, to offer violence to conscience, yet it is highly necessary that all the inhabitants of this Colony should associate as far as their religious principles will permit; it is therefore resolved and directed, That all persons, whose religious principles would not suffer them to bear arms, and to sign the General Association of this Colony, recommended by Congress in its original form, may be allowed to sign the same, with the following proviso:

"I agree to the above Association, as far as the same is consistent with my religious principles."

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all persons, who when requested to sign the Association, with the proviso aforesaid, shall refuse so to do, shall be disarmed, and give sufficient security for their peaceable and good behaviour, paying the expense attending the same. And the Committees of the several Counties and Townships, are hereby required forthwith to tender the said Association to all who have hitherto refused or neglected to sign it, and to carry the above resolution into effect.

Provided always, That if any person shall think himself aggrieved by any sentence of a Township Committee, he may on giving security to prosecute the same to effect, and paying such costs and charges, as the said Committee shall adjudge thereon, appeal to the Committee of the County wherein such Township is situated; which County Committee is hereby required, and fully impowered to hear the complaint of the appellant, and decide upon the same. And if any person shall think himself aggrieved by any sentence of a County Committee, he may, on giving security and paying costs as aforesaid, appeal therefrom to this Congress.

Provided always, That the said Committees may confine any person, notwithstanding his offer of security, who in their opinion, may when permitted to go at large, prove dangerous to the common cause.

And whereas the late Militia ordinance of this Congress, hath not made any provision for subjecting such of the inhabitants of this Colony, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms, to any penalty for not attending, and obeying orders on the days to be appointed for general musters or reviews; and it being highly equitable and just, that at this time of public danger, all such inhabitants of this Colony should bear an equal proportion of the public expenses, as an equivalent for an exemption from bearing arms.

It is therefore further Resolved and Directed, That there shall be inflicted on all such of the inhabitants of this Colony, between the ages of sixteen and fifty years, whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms, and who shall not hereafter attend properly accoutered, and obey orders, on the terms to be appointed for the general muster or review of the regiments of Militia in this Colony, the sum of ten Shillings proclamation money, for each and every default, anything in the before recited ordinance contained to the contrary notwithstanding; to be recovered (and applied) by warrant of distress, in manner and form as directed by the said recited ordinance.

Provided always, that the times so as aforesaid to be appointed for days of general muster or review, do not exceed three days in a year, and that reasonable excuses shall be admitted for such delinquents non-attendance, by such persons who shall be appointed to issue warrants of distress for the recovery of such penalties.

And whereas vacancies have and may happen in companies of militia in this Colony, by the promotion, resignation, death, removal, or other disability of the captain or other officers of such companies; for supplying which vacancies.

It is further Resolved and Directed, That each and every company, where such vacancy have or may happen, shall within ten days after such vacancy happens or such company shall have notice of this resolve, assemble and elect proper persons, for supplying such vacancy, and make return thereof to the Committee of the Township to which they belong, who are to report the same to this Congress or Committee of Safety, in order that commissions may issue: And in case such company shall neglect to elect officers within the time above limited, or in case any person or persons so elected, shall neglect to make the aforesaid return, at the next meeting of the Committee thereafter: that then and in such case, the said Committee shall name and appoint proper persons to be commissioned as aforesaid, or otherwise such Committee, upon the neglect of the said company or companies to elect persons to be commissioned as aforesaid, may, if they think it advisable, to dissolve such company, and incorporating the persons composing the same, into other companies contiguous thereto; in which companies they shall be enrolled and bear arms under the fines and penalties, in the ordinance, directed for non-attendance.

And whereas by the said former ordinance, no distinction is made between those who sign the muster rolls, and those who do not sign the same: It is hereby declared, that no distinction is intended; but, that all those who refuse to sign such muster roll, within the ages mentioned (except such persons whose religious principles will not suffer them to bear arms,) shall be enrolled, and be subject to the same command, and liable to the same fines and forfeitures for neglect of duty, as those are who sign such muster roll.

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AN ORDINANCE

For appointing Barrack Masters in this Province, and making provision for defraying the expence of repairing said barracks.

Whereas, the barracks heretofore erected in this Colony, have for some time past been neglected, and by that means much out of repair, which the circumstances of the present times require to be immediately put in order for the reception of such of the Continental forces as have been, or may be raised in this Colony, or quartered in the same; for which purpose, and that said barracks, may in future be taken proper care of, and suitably provided with necessary furniture:

It is Resolved, That the following persons be, and are hereby appointed Barrack Masters, viz.: Isaac Woodruff and Edward Thomas, Esqrs., for the barracks in Elizabeth town; Samuel Serjeant and Johnathan Deare, Esqrs., for the barracks in Perth Amboy; Hendrick Fisher and John Schurman, Esqrs., for the barracks in New Brunswick; Alexander Chambers and William Tucker, Esqrs., for the barracks in Trenton; and Thomas Rodman and Samuel Howe, Esqrs., for the barracks in Burlington. Which said Barrack Masters in each respective towns before named, are hereby authorized and empowered, to take the care and charge of the barracks over which they are above particularly appointed, and cause the same to be put in proper repair, and provided with suitable furniture for the reception of such Continental, or Provincial troops, as may occasionally be quartered therein; provided such barrack furniture can be procured on reasonable terms. And also, that they respectively settle and discharge the expense of all such repairs as have been lately made, or are now making on the barracks, to the care of which they are particularly appointed. And the Treasurers of this Colony appointed by Congress, or either of them, are required to pay to the said respective Barrack Masters, or either of them, out of the money to be made current by an ordinance of this Congress, all such sum, and sums of money, as they or either of them may find necessary for the purposes aforesaid, not exceeding the sum of two hundred Pounds proclamation money for each of said barracks in one year. And the said Treasurers shall take proper receipts for the money so by them or either of them paid out as aforesaid; which receipts when laid before a Congress of this Province, or persons properly authorized thereto, shall discharge the said Treasurers, their heirs, executors and administrators, for all such sums by them, or either of them, paid out as aforesaid. And the said Barrack Masters and each of them, are hereby required to render a true account, to this or a future Congress, of all monies by them received and expended, pursuant to the direction of this ordinance, who shall be allowed a reasonable compensation for their time and trouble in executing the aforesaid trust.

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AN ORDINANCE

For exempting persons who enlist in the service of the United Colonies from arrest.

Whereas, the speedy and effectual recruiting of the forces for the defence of the United Colonies is, in the present situation of affairs, of great importance to the security and defence of the said Colonies.

And whereas the subjecting soldiers to arrest for small debts, tends greatly to retard and obstruct the service: it is therefore ordered and directed by this Congress, that any person, who shall enlist and enter himself as a soldier in any of the companies of the Continental forces, and doth not owe more than thirty-five dollars to any one creditor, or upwards of one hundred and fifty dollars in the whole to all his creditors; then the person of the enlisted shall be free from all arrests in civil actions, during the time of his service as aforesaid. And those who are in custody, either on mesne process or execution, and do not owe as aforesaid, shall be discharged under the hands and seals of any of the Judges of the County where any such person or persons shall be so imprisoned : and the goods and effects of all such debtors shall be free from attachments, executions, and other legal process, during the aforesaid service. Provided always that such goods and effects shall not be removed out of the city, town or precinct, where the persons enlisted resided when they did enlist, during the time limited as aforesaid. And upon full proof of any attempt to remove the said goods and effects out of the city, town or precinct as aforesaid, then the said goods and effects shall be liable to the same process, as the laws have already provided for; and in case the said person or persons so enlisted, shall or do after the publication of this ordinance, or after the time of such enlisting, by any deed or deeds, power or powers of attorney, make sale of, or empower others in his or their absence, or during the time so limited as aforesaid, make sale of his or their goods and chattels, lands and tenements, to any person or persons whatsoever, whereby the creditor or creditors of such person or persons so enlisting as aforesaid, shall or may be defrauded or deprived of their just debts, all and every such deed or deeds, and sales made by any such person or persons, or by virtue of his or their power or powers of attorney, as aforesaid, shall be void and of none effect; and such goods and chattels, lands and tenements, shall nevertheless be liable to be proceeded against by attachment, or any other legal process, at the suit of any creditor or creditors of such person or persons, any thing in this ordinance to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding.

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AN ORDINANCE

For striking the sum of fifty thousand Pounds, five Shillings, in bills of credit, for the purposes therein mentioned, and directing the manner of sinking the same.

Whereas it is prudent, not only to make provision for putting the Province into such state of defence, as the present situation thereof seems to require; but also, to have such sum of money in the Treasury as may probably be sufficient to answer future exigencies and contingent charges. And whereas the sum of thirty thousand Pounds, directed to be issued by an ordinance passed at the last sitting of this Congress, hath not as yet been printed; and as the same may not be sufficient to answer the purposes aforesaid: It is therefore Resolved, That the said ordinance be null, void, and vacated to all intents and purposes whatsoever; and in lieu thereof, it is resolved, ordained and directed, that the sum of fifty thousand Pounds, five Shillings, in bills of credit of this Province, be, as soon as possible, prepared, printed and made as follows, viz.: Nine thousand five hundred bills, each of the value of three Pounds: Ten thousand bills each of the value of one Pound ten Shillings: six thousand six hundred and sixty-seven bills, each of the value of fifteen Shillings; and five thousand bills, each of the value of six Shillings; which bills shall be in the form following, to wit:

This Bill, by an Ordinance of the Provincial Congress, shall pass current in all payments within the Colony of New Jersey, for                     Proclamation money. Dated the twentieth day of February, 1776.

And shall be impressed with such devices as the inspectors of the press, herein after appointed shall direct; and, when printed, shall be delivered to Hendrick Fisher, and Azariah Dunham, Esquires, of the Eastern Division, and to John Hart and Samuel Howe, Esquires, of the Western division, four of the signers thereof, in equal moities; one moiety to be signed by the Treasurer and signers of the Eastern Division; and the other moiety, by the Treasurer and signers of the Western Division. And the said signers are hereby authorized and required, upon delivery of the said bills by the printer thereof, to administer to him, and he is hereby directed and required to take an oath or affirmation, in the following words:

I, A. B., do declare, that from the time the letters were set, and fit to be put into the press, for the printing the bills of credit now by me delivered, until the same bills were printed, and the letters unset and put into the boxes again, I went at no time out of the room in which the said letters were, without locking them up, so that they could not be come at without violence, a false key, or other art then unknown to me; and therefore, to the best of my knowledge, no copies were printed off but in my presence; and that all the blotters and other papers whatsoever printed by the said letter, while set for printing the said bills, to the best of my knowledge, are here delivered, together with the stamps for the indents and devices; and that I have not at any time been privy or consenting to any other or more bills being struck than I now deliver; and that in all things relating to this affair, I have demeaned myself according to the true intent and meaning of the ordinance, by virtue whereof this money is printed, to the best of my knowledge and understanding.

Which printer, at the time he is ordered to print the said bill, shall have a copy of this oath or affirmation, that he may govern himself accordingly. Provided always, that if any accident has happened, he may have the liberty of making an exception thereof in his oath or affirmation, he declaring fully how it was.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the bills made current by this ordinance, shall be nearly the size and likeness of the bills now current in this Colony, and shall be signed and numbered by the respective persons herein before appointed signers thereof; and in case of their, or either of their deaths or other disability, then Joseph Hugg, of the the Western Division, and John Covenhoven of the Eastern Division, are hereby appointed signers of said bills.

And, in order that the said bills may be numbered and signed with the less charge and risk, and with the most ease and expedition, the said signers are to observe the directions following, to wit, First, before the said signers do receive any of the said bills, they shall each of them take an oath or, affirmation if Quakers, before a justice of the peace, for the true signing of the said bills of credit; and that they will sign no more, or no other bills, than by this ordinance is directed; and that, to the best of their skill, they will perform what by this ordinance, they are enjoined as their duty. A certificate of which oath or affirmation, is to be signed by the Justice, and by the deponents and affirmants, to be delivered to the Treasurers with the bills when signed by them.

Secondly, on receiving the bills from the printer, the said signers shall burn and destroy the blotters, and they shall divide the fair bills so received into two equal parts, and to avoid confusion, shall agree betwixt themselves how the parts of each shall be numbered; and the signers for the Eastern Division, shall take the stamps for the escutcheons, and the signers for the Western Division, shall take the stamps for the ornaments.

Thirdly, each of the signers may then carry his part to his own house, there to be numbered and signed by him with all possible expedition; which, or such part as is then necessary, being done, they shall meet at a day and place by them to be appointed, and agreed on, and each deliver the part numbered and signed by him to the other, in order for him to sign the same; and they shall then together burn and destroy the bills, if any be, over and above the number hereby appointed to be issued, and in like manner shall do from time to time, until all are signed and exchanged.

Fourthly, each of the said signers may then carry the part of the bills aforesaid, so delivered to them by the other to their respective houses, to be signed with all possible expedition; and when signed, in any sums, from time to time to be delivered to the Treasurer of the Division where the signers live, and the stamps for the escutcheons and ornaments, taking receipts of the respective Treasurers, for the sums so delivered; which, when produced, shall be sufficient to discharge the said signers respectively, their heirs, executors and administrators, from such parts of the said bills as the receipts do express.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Treasurers shall, respectively, sign the said bills to them delivered; and under the obligation of their oaths or affirmations, for the due execution of their offices, pay them out accordingly, as they shall be directed, by this or any future order of the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety of this Colony, and no otherwise.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the bills of credit to be made and issued by virtue of this ordinance, shall pass current, until the twenty-first day of December, which will be in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one, and shall be received in the said treasuries, until the expiration of six months after the time last mentioned.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That Samuel Tucker, Hendrick Fisher, Richard Smith, John Pope, and James Starling, Esquires, or any two of them, are hereby authorized and directed to agree with the printer for the price to be paid him for printing the bills according to the directions of this ordinance, and shall be, and are hereby appointed inspectors of the press, to take care that the printer of the bills of credit doth duly perform the duty hereby enjoined him.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That there shall be paid to the printer of the said bills of credit, such sum or sums of money for printing them, as the said inspectors, or any two of them, shall certify under their hands, they had agreed to pay him for that service; and there shall be paid to the treasurers, inspectors and signers, such reward for their trouble, as the Congress or Committee of Safety for this Colony, shall deem reasonable. All which sums of money, shall be paid by the Treasurers, or either of them, out of the money made current by virtue of this ordinance, and shall take proper receipts for the same; which receipts, when laid before, and approved by the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety, shall discharge the said Treasurers, their heirs, executors and administrators, for all such sums by them paid pursuant to this ordinance.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said sum of fifty thousand Pounds, five Shillings, when printed and signed as aforesaid, shall be delivered, one half thereof to the Treasurer appointed by the Congress of New Jersey, for the Eastern Division, and the other half to the Treasurer appointed as aforesaid, for the Western Division of this Colony; and each of the said Treasurers is hereby directed immediately after receiving said bills to sign as many of them as shall amount unto the sum of one thousand Pounds; and the said Treasurers shall respectively from time to time proceed to sign such further part of the said sum of fifty thousand Pounds, five Shillings, as shall be sufficient to answer the public uses of this Colony, ready to be issued as aforesaid. Provided, that not more than one thousand Pounds shall, after the issuing the above sums, be, at any one time, remaining in the hands of either of said Treasurers, signed by them as aforesaid.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That Messrs. William Tucker, Abraham Hunt, Joseph Ellis, and Alexander Chambers, be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners for the Western Division; and that Hendrick Fisher, Azariah Dunham, Abraham Clark, and Caleb Camp, be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners for the Eastern Division of this Colony; which said Commissioners or the major part of them, are hereby authorized and directed to receive of the Treasurers of this Colony for the time being, appointed by this Congress, or either of them, all such sum or sums of money as they shall, from time to time, find necessary to expend for the use of this Colony, pursuant to the resolutions hereinafter mentioned.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Commissioners be, and they are hereby authorized and directed, to contract with artificers for, or otherwise purchase, three thousand stand of arms, on the most reasonable terms they possibly can; and also to purchase ten tons of gunpowder, twenty tons of lead, one thousand cartouch boxes, at any price, not exceeding nine Shillings each; a quantity of flints, brushes, priming wire, and cartridge paper, not exceeding one hundred Pounds in value; two chests of medicine, with chirurgical instruments, not exceeding three hundred Pounds in value; four hundred tents, with camp equipage not exceeding one thousand eight hundred and seventy Pounds in value; two thousand blankets, not exceeding one thousand five hundred Pounds in value; a number of axes, spades, and other entrenching tools, not exceeding three hundred Pounds in value; and a train of artillery, consisting of twelve field pieces, of such sizes as the said Commissioners shall judge most advantageous for the defence of the Province, together with the necessary carriages, ball, shot, and equipments.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Commissioners do supply the troops of this Colony, when called to action in this or any of the neighboring Colonies, with one month's subsistence, at one Shilling per day per man, or provisions to that amount, if necessary: Provided, that the expense of such subsistence doth not exceed the sum of one thousand four hundred Pounds in value, and one month's pay for the troops of this Colony, when called into actual service: Provided, that the Continental Congress do not make provision for the same; and provided also, that the pay of such troops, doth not exceed the sum of four thousand Pounds in value.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Treasurers of this Colony be, and they are hereby enjoined to pay to the said Commissioners, or to any three of them, of the Eastern, or any three of the Western Division, or their orders respectively all such sum or sums of money as they may find necessary to expend for the purposes aforesaid: Provided always, that no three Commissioners of either division, shall draw out of the Treasury, any greater sum than shall be sufficient for the purchasing and providing one half of the articles, the said Commissioners are above authorized to purchase and provide, unless a major part of the said Commissioners give them joint orders therefor: And the receipt or receipts from the said Commissioners respectively for monies received by them in manner above directed, shall be sufficient vouchers, and discharges to the said Treasurers, or either of them, their executors and administrators, for all monies by them paid pursuant to this ordinance.

And in order that the said sum of fifty thousand Pounds five Shillings, may be duly sunk, and the credit of the same thereby effectually secured; it is resolved, that the sum of ten thousand Pounds one Shilling, be levied and paid into the Treasury of this Colony, on the twenty-first day of December, in each and every of the years one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven; one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight; one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine; one thousand seven hundred and ninety; and one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one: in order that the same may be inspected, cancelled, burnt and destroyed by the Congress of this Colony, or, in their recess, the Committee of Safety.

And that said sum of ten thousand Pounds, one Shilling, may be raised on the several inhabitants of this Colony in the most equitable manner, in each of the aforesaid years; it is resolved, that the same be raised in manner following:

All householders, the tax of whose rateable estate, exclusive of certainties, does not amount to six Shillings, shall be rated at the discretion of the assessors, not under two Shillings, nor above thirty Shillings.

All merchants and shopkeepers, shall be rated at the discretion of the assessors, not under five Shillings, nor above twenty Shillings for the same.

Every ferry shall be rated at the discretion of the assessors, not under five Shillings, nor above five Pounds.

Every coasting sloop, schooner, shallop, flat, passage boat, pilot boat, wood boat, and pettiauger, shall be rated at the discretion of the assessors, in proportion to their burden and business, not under three Shillings, nor above thirty Shillings.

Every single man, who works for hire, and keeps a horse, mare or gelding, shall be rated, not under four Shillings, nor above ten Shillings.

Every single man who works for hire, and does not keep a horse, mare, or gelding, shall be rated, not under two Shillings, nor above six Shillings.

Provided always, That if any single man, who works for hire, shall have any estate herein after made rateable, the tax of which would amount to more than he is above directed to be rated at, he shall be rated for such estate only.

Every bought servant and slave, being male, of sixteen years old and upwards (except such slaves as are not able to work) shall be rated the sum of two Shillings.

Every riding chair or kittereen, shall be rated the sum of one Shilling.

Every two horse chaise or curricle, shall be rated the sum of two Shillings.

Every four wheel chaise or phaeton, shall be rated the sum of five Shillings.

Every coach or chariot, shall be rated the sum of nine Shillings.

Every waggon, the body of which hangeth on springs, shall be rated the sum of two Shillings.

All cattle, horses, mares, and geldings, of two years old and upwards, shall be estimated at eight Shillings each head.

And the assessors in each respective Township or district, shall, as nearly as may be, ascertain the real value of all profitable tracts of land, held by deed, patent or survey, including all the tenements, buildings, and other improvements thereon; and, in making the assessments thereof, the same shall be estimated at one-twentieth part of the value ascertained as aforesaid.

All unimproved tracts of land, held by deed, patent, or survey, shall be valued and estimated as aforesaid, at the one-fortieth part of the real value thereof.

All mortgages, bonds, bills and notes at interest, which shall be deemed recoverable and of value, and due to the inhabitants of this Colony, shall be valued at one-twentieth part of the principal thereof. Provided always, that if any inhabitant of this Colony, shall pay interest for a part or the whole of the sum he receives interest for, then, and in such case, he shall not be rated or assessed for any larger sum than the sum he receives interest for exceeds the sum he pays interest for.

Every hawker or peddler, travelling on foot, and exposing goods to sale (except such goods as are manufactured in the United Colonies) before he or she exposes any such goods to sale, shall, over and above all other taxes, pay to the County Collector, who shall give a certificate therefor, the sum of six Shillings in each County, wherein the same are exposed to sale.

Every hawker or pedlar, travelling with a horse or carriage, and exposing goods to sale as aforesaid, shall in like manner, pay the sum of twelve Shillings.

And it is further Resolved, That the said ten thousand Pounds, one Shilling, directed to be assessed in each and every of the five years before mentioned, shall be collected and paid into the treasury on or before the said twenty-first day of December, in each of the said years, in the proportions following, viz.:

By the County of Bergen, the sum of six hundred and sixty-four Pounds, eight Shillings and two Pence.

By the County of Essex, the sum of seven hundred and forty-two Pounds, eighteen Shillings and two Pence.

By the County of Middlesex, the sum of eight hundred and seventy-two Pounds, six Shillings and eight Pence.

By the County of Somerset, the sum of nine hundred and four Pounds, two Shillings and two Pence.

By the County of Monmouth, the sum of one thousand and sixty-nine Pounds, two Shillings and eight Pence.

By the County of Morris, the sum of seven hundred and twenty-three Pounds, eight Shillings and two Pence.

By the County of Sussex, the sum of five hundred and ninety-three Pounds, five Shillings and four Pence.

By the County of Hunterdon, the sum of one thousand three hundred and sixty-three Pounds, sixteen Shillings and eight Pence.

By the County of Burlington, the sum of one thousand and seventy-one Pounds, thirteen Shillings and four Pence.

By the County of Gloucester, the sum of seven hundred and sixty-three Pounds, two Shillings and eight Pence.

By the County of Salem, the sum of six hundred and seventy-nine Pounds, twelve Shillings and two Pence.

By the County of Cumberland, the sum of three hundred and eighty-five Pounds, six Shillings and eight Pence.

By the County of Cape May, the sum of one hundred and sixty-six Pounds, eighteen Shillings and two Pence.

And it is further Resolved, That the inhabitants of this Colony, at their town meetings to be held in each Township in this Colony, on the second Tuesday in March annually, in each of the years the said monies are directed to be levied, shall elect proper persons to assess and collect the aforesaid taxes; and in case the said inhabitants shall neglect to choose assessors and collectors, as aforesaid, or, in case any such so chosen, shall decease or remove out of the Township in which he or they were chosen, or be otherwise disabled from performing the duties enjoined by this ordinance, that then the Committee of the Township where such neglect, removal, or disability may happen, shall elect others to supply such vacancy; and if any person chosen assessor or collector as aforesaid, shall neglect or refuse to execute the same, agreeable to the directions of this ordinance, every person so neglecting or refusing, shall forfeit and pay to the Committee of the Township where he resides for the use of such Township, the sum of five Pounds, for every such neglect or refusal.

And it is further Resolved, That the Committee of each respective County in this Colony, shall annually choose a county collector, for receiving the aforesaid quotas, and paying the same into the Treasury. And upon such county collectors refusing or neglecting so to do, shall forfeit and pay to such County Committee for every such neglect or refusal, the sum of ten Pounds, for the use of such County.

And it is further Resolved, That each of the assessors chosen as aforesaid, shall, before they do anything in pursuance of this ordinance, take the following oath or affirmation:

"That you will truly value and assess the rateable estates of the inhabitants of the Township or Precinct of                         pursuant to the directions of this ordinance; and also assist the other assessors in settling the quotas, according to the best of your skill and understanding."

And in order that the several and respective sums aforesaid, may be equitably assessed and levied; it is further resolved, that all and every of the inhabitants or householders of each County in this Colony, on application to them made by the assessors of the respective towns or districts, chosen as aforesaid, shall forthwith give a true account of their names, and estates, real and personal, made rateable by this ordinance, and where the same doth lie, which the assessors shall take down in writing, with the value thereof, in order to be enabled thereby to make just and true assessments, and to render duplicates thereof to the town or district collectors chosen as aforesaid, by the times hereinafter prescribed for that purpose. And in case any of the inhabitants or householders, shall at any time refuse to render a true account of their rateable estate, as aforesaid, every such person so refusing, shall forfeit the sum of three Pounds, and be rated double the sum the said assessors in their discretion, may suppose such person so refusing, might otherwise in proportion to his estate, have been rated at.

And it is further Resolved, That in each of the years the said ten thousand Pounds, one Shilling, is before directed to be assessed, levied and collected, the assessors of each town, or district, shall on or before the tenth day of August, take an exact account of each person's rateable estates, made rateable aforesaid, within their respective districts; and on the first Monday in September in each of the said years, the said assessors of every town and district in each County in this Colony, shall meet together at such places in each County as are appointed by the laws of this Colony for the like purposes, and there settle and adjust the quota each of the Townships or districts in such County are to pay that year, to make up the quota hereinbefore ascertained for such County: Which quota of each Township being so fixed and ascertained the said assessors of each Township or district, shall then proceed to make said assessment: They shall first compute the amount of the certainties in such Township or district, and deduct the same from the quota of such Township or district, together with all such forfeitures as may be received by virtue of this ordinance; and, after such deduction, the said assessors shall add their own, and the township and county collectors fees to the remainder; and assess such remainder and addition of fees equally on the pound value of all the estates in their respective Townships or districts, of which they may have taken the value as hereinbefore directed, so as to make up and pay the respective quotas as aforesaid, with the additional charges of assessing, collecting and paying the same into the Treasury as aforesaid; of which assessments, the said respective assessors shall deliver exact duplicates to the collectors of such districts within ten days after settling the quotas as aforesaid. For assessing and collecting which said assessments, the assessors shall have six Pence, the town collector four Pence, and the county collector two Pence on the pound for all monies assessed and collected by virtue of this ordinance.

And whereas some owners of improved lands and tenements, may not reside in the said County or Township where the same shall be situated: It is therefore Resolved, That the tenant or person occupying such land and tenement, or either of them, shall be assessed for the same, and may deduct such assessment out of the rent with which he is chargeable for such land or tenement; and where no tenant or person in the County occupies such land, the tax for the same, shall be recovered of the owner thereof in like manner as hereinafter is directed. And every person seated on and holding land, not having the property thereof, or paying rent for the same, shall, notwithstanding be assessed for so much lands, and tenants, as he or they shall actually occupy.

And it is further Resolved, That the Collectors of each Township or District, shall in some convenient time after receiving the aforesaid assessments from the assessors, notify each particular person assessed thereof, informing him of the time the same must be paid. And in case any such assessments shall remain unpaid the first day of November, after such assessment, the said Collector shall make out a list of all such delinquents, with the sums in which they are severally assessed, and lay the same before the Committee of the County to which they belong; which Committee are hereby directed and required to make out a warrant of distress, directed to such person or persons as they shall appoint for that purpose, requiring distress to be made on all such delinquents goods and chattels, to at least the amount of their respective assessments, with the addition of eighteen pence for each distress; directing, that such goods and chattels be sold in five days after such distress, for paying their said assessments, and costs of distraint. And in case any person or persons shall think him or themselves aggrieved by such assessment, every such person may appeal to the Committee of the County in which he or they reside, within one month after notice of such assessment; which Committee shall proceed to hear such appeal, and give suitable redress.

And in order to prevent dissentions in the several Townships in this Colony, respecting settling their quotas, from a suspicion that the assessors of some one town, have valued the estates therein less than the assessors of another town in the same County.

It is therefore Resolved, That in settling the quotas of each township, the assessors shall produce an exact account of the quantity of land in that township, with the number of cattle and horses of two years old and upwards, money at interest, and the before mentioned certainties; which certainties shall be first deducted from the quota of the County, as heretofore hath been practised in like cases, and then divide the remainder to each township upon the land, and money at interest; in which division the land shall be valued between the sums limited for each County, by the last act of assembly of this Colony, for settling the quotas in the several Counties: And the cattle and horses shall be valued at eight shillings each head, and the money at interest at the one twentieth part of the real amount thereof, and divide the same upon the Pound value of such estates; which said valuation, is only to regulate the division of the quotas of each township. But, in making the assessments, the said land, tenements, and real estate of each individual is to be valued at the one twentieth part of the real intrinsic value thereof, except tracts of land whereon no improvement is made, which is to be valued at the one fortieth part of the value thereof, as is before directed.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That if any person or persons, shall in this Colony refuse to accept in payment any of the bills of credit emitted in virtue of this ordinance, not exceeding ten Pounds, he or they so refusing, shall forfeit the the sum of ten Pounds, and if the sum tendered and refused as aforesaid, exceed the sum often Pounds, then the person so refusing shall forfeit a sum equal in value to the sum so refused; and in order that the mode of recovery of the said sums so forfeited as aforesaid, may be ascertained and established; it is further directed, that on complaint against any person refusing said bills as aforesaid, being made to the Committee of the township where the same shall happen, the said Committee shall give notice to said delinquent, that he be and appear before them at a day and place to be ascertained in such notice, to answer to the charge also to be specified therein; and if it shall appear to the said Committee by the oath or affirmation of two good and lawful witnesses, that the said delinquent hath made such refusal, and that he had, previous thereto, been informed of the penalty to be incurred thereby, in virtue of this ordinance, then, and in such case, the Chairman or deputy Chairman of said Committee shall, by an order in writing, under his hand, directed to some proper person to be appointed by said Committee, authorize said persons to make distress and sale of the goods, chattels and effects of the delinquent, to the amount of the forfeitures incurred as aforesaid, together with costs and expences, that shall accrue by reason of said refusal, to be taxed by said Committee; and the said person appointed to distrain as aforesaid, shall proceed thereon in like manner and form, as the distrainer is herein before directed for collecting the assessments made in virtue of this ordinance; and shall and may retain in his hands, one Shilling and sixpence, if the sum levied as aforesaid, be under ten Pounds; and if the same exceed ten Pounds, then the addition of three pence the Pound for each distress and sale; and the residue of the monies that shall arise from said sale, he shall deliver to the owner of the goods and chattels, distrained as aforesaid. And in case any such delinquent shall think himself aggrieved by the determination of the said Committee, he shall and may, within five days after such determination, appeal to the Committee of the County, he previously giving sufficient security to the Chairman of said Township Committee, to prosecute said appeal the next meeting of said County Committee; and also for payment of all such sums, costs, and charges as shall be adjudged against him by the said County Committee; and in case he shall think himself aggrieved by the determination of the said County Committee, he may, within five days thereafter, appeal therefrom to the Congress or Committee of Safety of this Province, giving security to the Chairman or deputy Chairmen of the said County Committee, to prosecute said appeal at their next meeting; and also for payment of all such sums, costs and charges, as shall be adjudged against him, by the Congress or Committee of Safety as aforesaid; which appeals, the several Chairmen or deputy Chairman of the several Committees aforesaid, are hereby required to grant on the above conditions.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That all the forfeitures adjudged, recovered, and collected as aforesaid, shall be paid by the person collecting the same, to the collector of the County where the delinquency happens, to be by him as soon as may be thereafter, paid into the hands of the Treasurers aforesaid, to be appropriated and applied for the public uses of this Colony, as the Provincial Congress shall order and direct.

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AN ORDINANCE

To prevent persons deserting places in danger of being attacked, and for restraining such as are dangerous lo the common cause, from taking refuge in this Colony.

Whereas large numbers of people are daily removing from the neighbouring Colonies into New Jersey, and it being unknown upon what principles such removals are occasioned; whether it is to seek an asylum from ministerial oppression, or the resentment of their injured country, to whom they may have become obnoxious, by adhering to the present system of tyranny now endeavouring to be executed in America; and it being inconsistent with the principles of persons properly attached to the cause of liberty, to desert their Town or Country, at a time their assistance may be absolutely necessary for its defence, unless the support and maintenance of their families may make such removal necessary. This Congress do therefore think it advisable, that, although the inhabitants of this Colony ought most cheerfully to receive into their protection, and afford all the relief in their power to all such as are helpless, and unable to defend themselves, yet they ought to prevent the desertion of places in immediate danger of an attack from the enemy, by all who are proper to remain for the defence thereof; and also to prevent persons inimical to the liberties for which the United Colonies are contending, from taking refuge in this Province: For remedy whereof it is hereby Resolved, That all persons proper to bear arms who have removed or may remove into this Colony from any City or County of another Province, in danger of being suddenly attacked, do immediately return to such City or Province, to make that defence becoming every good citizen, who entertains a proper sense of the worth of liberty, and who has a due regard to his Country's welfare; unless such person or persons shall produce licenses or permits from the Committee of such City or County from whence he or they remove, to reside in this Colony; or unless the residence of such person in this Colony may appear necessary for the support of his family, which may be removed here for safety; or unless such person or persons, from the present stagnation of business may have no visible means of support in the Colony from whence he came, and can procure such support by his industry in this Colony. And the Committee of each and every County and Township in this Colony are directed to carry the above resolve into effect; and to cause all such persons, except as abovesaid, to return to the City or Province from whence they came, after giving them a reasonable time to settle their families, and transact any business that may appear necessary for the public good, or their families support.

And it is further Resolved, That all suspected persons removing into this Colony, shall immediately return to the place they came from; unless their behaviour in this Colony, shall render their detention as delinquents proper: or unless such persons produce certificates from the Committee of the City, Township or County from whence they came, that they have signed the general association recommended by the Continental or their Provincial Congress; and have not by any subsequent act contravened the same; or that they are deemed to be well affected to the cause of American freedom. Which last resolve, the respective Committees abovesaid, are also requested to carry into effect.

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AN ORDINANCE

For directing the mode, and fixing the time for the election of Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress, for this Colony; and also to ascertain the qualification of electors.

Whereas the ordinance for regulating the election of Deputies, to serve in the Provincial Congress of this Colony, doth not sufficiently answer the good purposes intended:

And whereas, at this particular period, it appears to be reasonable and expedient, to extend the qualification of electors, to persons possessing certain degrees of property, as well personal as real. And to the end that elections, upon which the safety of the people so much depends, may not be corruptly managed or obtained.

It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That all freeholders qualified to vote for Representatives in General Assembly in this Colony, who have signed the general association recommended by this Congress; and all other persons of full age, who, immediately preceding the election, shall have resided for the space of one year in any County of this Colony, and who are worth at least fifty Pounds Proclamation money in personal estate, and have signed the general association as aforesaid, shall be admitted to vote in the County wherein he resides, for Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress.

And in order that the good people of this Colony so qualified as aforesaid, may have an opportunity of a new choice of Deputies, and of renewing such choice annually, during the continuance of the present troubles:

It is therefore further Resolved and Directed, That there be a new choice of Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress, for every County of this Colony, on the fourth Monday in May yearly, and every year.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the inhabitants of each County in this Colony, so qualified as aforesaid, do meet together at the places hereinafter mentioned, on the fourth Monday in May next, and on the fourth Monday in May, annually, and then and there by plurality of voices, between the hours of ten in the morning, and three in the afternoon, proceed to elect any number, not more than five, nor less than three substantial Freeholders. Each of whom shall be bona fide, worth five hundred Pounds Proclamation money, at the least, in real and personal estate, to serve as Deputies, with full power to represent such County in Provincial Congress, to be held at the City of Burlington, on the second Monday in June next. And that the places of meeting for the election in each County, shall be, for the County of Bergen, at the Court House in New Barbados. County of Essex, at the Court House in Newark. County of Middlesex, at the Court House in New Brunswick. County of Somerset, at the Court House at Hillsborough. County of Morris, at the Court House in Morristown. County of Monmouth, at the Court House in Freehold. County of Hunterdon, at the Court House in Trenton. County of Sussex, at the Court House in Newton. County of Burlington, at the Court House in the city of Burlington. County of Gloucester, at the Court House in the town of Gloucester. County of Salem, at the Court House in the town of Salem. County of Cumberland, at the Court House in Bridgetown, and County of Cape May, at the Court House in the Middle Precinct.

Provided always, that this resolution shall not be construed to prevent an adjournment of any election from day to day, and from place to place, if the same shall be found necessary.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the inhabitants of this Colony, so qualified as aforesaid, on the first day of each election, between the hours of ten in the morning, and one in the afternoon, do proceed to elect one substantial freeholder in each County to preside as Judge of such election, who shall attend in person, and if a poll be demanded, the election shall be conducted as follows: Each candidate may appoint one Inspector, and one Clerk; and each of the Clerks shall set down in writing the names of the electors, and their numbers in the presence of the Judge and shall make as many distinct columns on fair paper, as there shall be candidates voted for; but previous to which, every Clerk so appointed, shall, by the Judge of the election, or by some magistrate then present, be charged on his solemn oath or affirmation, "Truly and impartially to take the votes and set down the name of each elector; and the place of his residence, and to poll no elector who is not attested, if so required by the Judge or Inspectors of such election.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Judge of each election shall not declare the choice upon the view, nor adjourn either to another day or place, without the consent of the majority of the candidates, nor by any unnecessary adjournment, delay the election: And shall give a copy of the poll to every person that shall desire the same, upon the payment of reasonable fees for writing thereof. And if any freeholder shall be questioned as to his qualification by either of the candidates or Inspectors, such freeholder shall be charged by the Judge of such election, or by some magistrate then present, on his solemn oath or affirmation, "to declare or swear in the presence of God, that he is, and hath been a freeholder and resident in the County for one whole year immediately preceding. That the estate for which he claims to give his vote in such election, is his own proper estate, and that it is not conveyed to him in trust, or on condition that he should give his vote in such election for any particular person whatsoever."

And if any elector, not being a freeholder so qualified as aforesaid, shall be questioned as to his qualification by either of the candidates or Inspectors, such elector shall be charged in manner and form aforesaid, on his solemn oath or affirmation, "To declare or swear, that he is twenty-one years of age, that he hath immediately preceding the election, resided for one whole year in the county; that he is worth a clear estate of the value of at least fifty Pounds proclamation money, and that he hath not before voted at such election."

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Chairman of the several County Committees in this Colony, do give public notice of the time and place of such elections, by putting up advertisements in writing, at least twenty days before the time of each election, at one or more of the most public places in each township or precinct in the several Counties in this Colony.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Deputies so elected as aforesaid, shall receive a certificate of their election in the words following, to wit, "We do hereby certify, that on the day of the date hereof,                         were declared duly elected Deputies for the county of                         in the Colony of New Jersey, with full power to represent the said County in Provincial Congress, to be held at                         in the County of                         on the                         day of                         next. As witness our hands and seals, this                         day of                         Anno dom., 177  . Which certificate, under the hands and seals of the Judge chosen to preside at such election, together with five or more freeholders of the said county, shall be sufficient evidence of such election. And the Deputies so chosen as aforesaid, shall give their attendance in Provincial Congress accordingly.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That in case of the death, or removal out of the Colony of any of the Deputies so chosen as aforesaid, before the next annual election; or in case the seat of any Deputy so chosen as aforesaid, being declared vacant, the freeholders and electors so qualified as aforesaid, of the County for which such person was a Deputy, shall upon the receipt of a warrant under the hand and seal of the President, or Vice President for the time being. Directed to the Chairman of such County Committee for that purpose, have leave to proceed to a new election to supply his place. Provided always, that such election be carried on and regulated in such manner and form as herein is before more particularly mentioned and expressed.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That when and as often as any new election of Deputies for the Colony in general, to serve in any future Congress, shall be directed to be held, the freeholders and electors so qualified as aforesaid, of each County, do proceed to elect a sufficient number of freeholders for each Township, to constitute a County Committee of Observation and Correspondence, with full power as well to superintend and direct the necessary business of the County, as to carry into execution the resolutions and orders of the Continental Congress, the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety of this Colony; subject nevertheless to the same rules and regulations as are herein before resolved and directed for regulating of elections of Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the freeholders and inhabitants of each Township in this Colony, do on the second Tuesday in March yearly, and every year, proceed anew in like manner, to elect such a number of proper persons as shall be thought necessary to constitute Committees, to act as Committees of Observation and Correspondence in each Township, with power to transact the business referred to them by the Continental Congress, the Provincial Congress, or Committee of Safety of this Colony; or by the respective County Committees.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That on the fourth Monday in May next, this Congress shall be, and the same is hereby directed to be dissolved; any thing in the ordinance of the late Provincial Congress of this Colony, of the twelfth of August last, contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That at all future meetings of the Deputies chosen to represent this Colony in Provincial Congress, the votes be taken from the members individually, and not from the Counties collectively.

And it appearing to this Congress to be essential to the welfare of this Colony, that all persons chosen to serve as Deputies in Provincial Congress, should, as far as their particular circumstances admit, be perfectly free from other public engagements.

It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That whenever it shall appear, that any Deputy or Deputies in Provincial Congress, have accepted any military office of profit under the Continental or Provincial Congress, which office may require the personal service of such Deputy or Deputies, the seat of such Deputy or Deputies in Provincial Congress, shall be declared vacant, and a new election be ordered to fill up such vacancy: And such Deputy or Deputies, during his or their continuance in such office of profit, shall not be entitled to a seat, in this or any future Congress.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the Deputies so chosen as aforesaid, when met in Provincial Congress, are and shall be judges of the qualification of their own members, and shall have power to reject such persons as are or shall be unduly elected Deputies to serve in Congress: And also, to expel or disable all such Deputies to sit or serve, who either, by ill practice in elections, or by misbehaviour in Congress, shall, by this, or by any future Congress, or the major part of them, be declared unfit for a seat therein.

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AN ORDINANCE

For numbering the Inhabitants of this Colony.

Whereas it is recommended by the Honourable Continental Congress, that the number of inhabitants of all ages including negroes and mulattoes, in each Colony be taken in order to settle an equitable quota of the taxes which may hereafter be levied on the United Colonies, for sinking the bills of credit, which have been, or may be emitted for the the support and defence of the said United Colonies.

Therefore be it Resolved, That the Committee of each precinct or Township in this Colony, do, as soon as may be, after the publication hereof, appoint one or more person or persons, as they shall think proper, to take an account of the number of inhabitants of all ages, including negroes and mulattoes, within their respective bounds; which said person or persons so appointed, shall, within six days after being notified thereof in writing by the Chairman of said Committee, repair to some justice of the peace in the County where he or they reside, who is hereby directed to administer to him or them the following oath, or affirmation if a Quaker, to wit:

"You shall well and truly take a list of the number of all the inhabitants of the Township of                               in the County of                                   according to the directions of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey; and make a fair and impartial return thereof, to the Chairman of the Committee of the County of                         
So help you God."

And the said person or persons so qualified, shall, on or before the twentieth day of August next, make return of his or their list, containing the number of inhabitants so taken, to the Chairman of the Committee of the County to which they belong. Which County Committee are hereby authorized to allow such reward for the said service, as they shall think reasonable, by an order in writing, signed by the Chairman of said Committee, and directed to the County Collector, to be paid by him out of the public money in his hands. And the said County Committee, within one month after receiving said lists, shall return the same, together with one general list, comprehending the whole of the said inhabitants within their respective jurisdictions, unto the Congress, or, during its recess, to the Committee of Safety of this Colony.

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AN ORDINANCE

For incorporating the minute men lately raised in this Colony into the body of militia; and for further regulating said militia.

Whereas by a resolution of this Congress of the twelfth of August last, a number of minute men were directed to be raised, enlisted and enrolled in the several Counties of this Colony, under officers to be appointed and commissioned by this Congress, to hold themselves in constant readiness to march to any place, where their assistance might be required for the defence of this or any neighbouring Colony.

And whereas, in obedience to said resolve, several companies were enlisted and formed into battalions; since which large numbers of said minute men having entered into the Continental service, the said companies and battalions are greatly reduced, and in no condition to answer the design of their institution.

And whereas our defence, under God, chiefly depends upon a well regulated militia.

It is therefore Resolved, That all the minute men heretofore embodied in the several parts of this Colony, be immediately dissolved, and incorporated with the militia in the several companies in the district in which they respectively reside, as though such minute men had never been raised; anything in the above mentioned resolve to the contrary notwithstanding.

And whereas by an ordinance of Congress, passed this present sitting, all persons refusing to sign the general association, with the proviso therein mentioned, are directed to be disarmed, and give security for their future good behaviour, and some doubts arising whether such non-associators so disarmed, shall be subject to the fines and forfeitures for non-attendance in the militia, as directed by the late Military Ordinance. For removing which doubts, it is further resolved, That each and every person in this Colony, disarmed for refusing to sign the said association, shall be subject to the same fines and forfeitures for not attending and doing duty in the militia, or paying an equivalent therefor, as directed by said ordinance in the same manner, as though he had not been disarmed.

And it is further Resolved, That all and every person or persons, capable of bearing arms, who shall attend at general musters, or at times appointed for learning military discipline, and at such time or times, shall behave himself or themselves rudely and disorderly, and disobey the order of his or their Captain, or other Commanding Officer, shall forfeit and pay for every such unruly and disorderly behaviour, the sum of six Shillings, to be recovered and applied as directed for non-attendance.

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AN ORDINANCE

For raising two Artillery Companies in New Jersey, and providing for their pay and subsistence.

Whereas the present exigencies of the times renders it necessary to raise at least two artillery companies for the defence of this Colony, one to be stationed in the Eastern, and the other in the Western Division thereof. It is therefore Resolved, That two artillery companies, consisting of sixty-four men, officers included, be immediately raised, to be disposed of in this Colony, as the Congress, Committee of Safety, Brigadier General of the Division to which they respectively belong, shall direct; each company to be commanded by a Captain, Captain- Lieutenant, First and Second Lieutenants; and to consist of a Fire-worker, four Sergeants, four Corporals, one Bombadier,(sic) and fifty matrosses, all of whom are to be able-bodied freemen, and to be enlisted for one year, unless sooner discharged; and, when enlisted, shall sign the following enlistment roll:

I                           have this day voluntarily enlisted myself in one of the artillery companies to be raised for the defence of New Jersey, under the command of Captain                             to continue in such company one year, unless sooner discharged; and do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations, as are or shall be established for the government of the Continental forces, or for the said artillery companies, by the Congress or Committee of Safety of New Jersey.

And it is farther Resolved, That there shall be paid to the officers and privates of said companies, from the time they respectively enter into the service, the same pay as is allowed the artillery in the Continental service; which shall be punctually paid by the pay masters hereinafter named and appointed, or one of them; who shall pay each officer ten shillings for every man he shall enlist in said companies, passing muster; and also pay unto each person so enlisted, one dollar a week for his subsistence, from the time he enlists in such company, until he shall be properly stationed, and otherwise provided for.

And it is further Resolved, That said companies shall, at their own expence put themselves in proper uniform, and furnish themselves with good muskets, or fuzees with bayonets.

And it is further Resolved, That when any company shall be raised, the Captain shall cause the said company to be mustered in the presence of the Muster Masters, or either of them, appointed to muster the Third Battalion, now raising, who are hereby appointed Muster Masters for that purpose; and upon such review, may reject such persons as they or either of them may think unfit or improper for such service. And if upon such review, such Muster Master, who shall attend for that purpose, shall find the said company complete, agreeable to the above directions, shall thereupon certify the same on the back of the muster roll of such company, to this Congress, or, in their recess, to the Committee of Safety, in order that commissions may be made out to the officers of such company; which commissions, the Committee of Safety of this Colony, during the recess of this Congress, upon receiving certificates as above, are required to make out and issue.

And it is further Resolved, That Azariah Dunham, Esq., be, and is hereby appointed Commissary and Paymaster to the company of artillery in the Eastern Division of this Province; and that Joseph Ellis, Esq., be, and is hereby appointed Commissary and Paymaster to the said company, directed to be raised in the Western Division. Which said Commissaries shall pay off the said companies monthly; and when assembled, and attending the duty to which they are appointed, the said Commissaries shall provide for such companies the same rations of provisions and drink, as are allowed to the Continental forces. The said Paymasters and Commissaries, before they enter upon the execution of the trust hereby reposed in them, shall severally take an oath, "That they will well and truly do and perform the duties hereby enjoined them, and render true accounts of their receipts and disbursements, when required by a Congress of this Province, or any other representative body of this Colony, who may call for the same;" and deposit such deposition with the Treasurer of the Division to which they belong. And said Paymasters and Commissaries, shall have and receive from the Treasurers of this Colony, appointed by Congress, or either of them, all such sum or sums of money, from time to time, as they or either of them shall find necessary for the purposes aforesaid; and shall be allowed a reasonable compensation for their time and trouble, in receiving and paying the monies herein made payable; and for procuring and supplying provisions for said companies as aforesaid: And the receipts of the said Paymasters and Commissaries, for all monies by them or either of them received of the said Treasurers, or either of them as aforesaid, shall be sufficient vouchers to indemnify the said Treasurers, their executors and administrators, for all monies by them or either of them, paid out pursuant to the directions of this ordinance.

And it is further Resolved, That the muster masters shall be allowed a reasonable compensation for reviewing and mustering such companies.

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AN ORDINANCE

For paying a bounty on salt petre, and common salt, manufactured in New Jersey, and for purchasing salt petre.

Whereas by a resolution of this Congress, of the twenty-fourth of October last, the sum of one thousand Pounds, was voted to be appropriated for the payment of the bounty of one Shilling per pound, over and above the market price, for any quantity, not exceeding twenty thousand weight, of good merchantable salt petre, made and manufactured in this Colony, on or before the first day of January, 1777.

And whereas it is necessary that some mode should be adopted, in order that the appropriation of the above bounty, may be attended with the beneficial effects designed. It is therefore resolved and directed, That every person in this Colony, who shall become a candidate for the aforesaid bounty, or any part thereof, in order to be entitled to the same, shall produce to the Treasurers of this Colony, appointed by this Congress, or either of them, a certificate under the hands and seals of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where such person resides, "That the quantity of salt petre for which such person shall claim the bounty, was manufactured in such County, at some time before the first day of January, 1777; that the same is good merchantable; and that the claimant hath not before received any bounty for the same."

And the several County Committees of this Colony, are hereby authorized and directed, when any claimant for the said bounty, shall apply to them, to examine such claimant upon oath or affirmation, as to the purport of the above certificate; and in order that the quality of the salt petre may be sufficiently ascertained, the County Committees are also directed to call in the aid of persons well skilled in that commodity.

And as this Congress are desirous to give every possible encouragement to this most necessary manufacture; it is therefore resolved, unanimously, that the Committees of each respective County in this Colony, do contract for all such good merchantable salt petre that shall be made in this Colony, at any time before the first day of September next, and for which the aforesaid bounty shall be claimed, at any price not exceeding three Shillings per pound for the same, over and above the said bounty. And the said Committees are hereby directed to purchase the same for the use of this Colony, to be disposed of as the Congress of this Province shall direct.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That the said Treasurers of this Colony, or either of them, out of the fifty thousand Pounds made current in bills of credit, do pay to the several persons, who, upon producing such certificates, as aforesaid, shall or may claim the payment of the above bounty, or any part thereof, such sum or sums of money, as they shall respectively be entitled to as aforesaid. And also to the Chairman of the several County Committees of this Colony, or to their order given in Committee, such sum or sums of money as the respective County Committees shall have engaged to pay for the purchase of such salt petre as aforesaid. Provided, that the amount of the sums claimed to be paid as a bounty, do not exceed the sum of one thousand Pounds, and that not more than the sum of three thousand Pounds, be advanced for the purchase of salt petre. And the receipt of such claimants, or the receipt of the Chairman of such respective County Committee, or person in whose favour an order may be given as aforesaid, endorsed on such certificates, shall be sufficient vouchers to the said Treasurers, or either of them, for the payment of such bounties, or for the purchase of salt petre as aforesaid.

And whereas the making of common salt in this Colony, is a matter of the highest importance at this time; it is therefore resolved, unanimously, that a bounty of six Pence per bushel, for every bushel of good merchantable salt, that shall be made in this Colony, at any time before the first day of November, 1776. Which bounty the said Treasurers of this Colony, or either of them, are hereby required to pay, upon certificates duly attested, and agreed to as aforesaid, under the hand and seal of the Chairman of the Committee of the County where such salt shall be made, certifying, that it hath been proved by the oaths of credible witnesses, that such salt hath actually been made in some County of this Colony, at some time before the said first day of November, 1776; and that the claimant hath not before received any bounty for the same, and the receipt of the Chairman endorsed thereon, shall be sufficient vouchers to the said Treasurers, or either of them, for the payment of the said bounty.

—————

AN ORDINANCE

To provide for the payment of incidental charges.

Whereas it is necessary to provide for the payment of such incidental charges as have accrued during the sittings of this Congress.

It is therefore Resolved and Directed, That there be paid to Samuel Tucker and John Dennis, Esquires, the Treasurers appointed by this Congress, over and above the money allowed by this ordinance for signing the bills of credit, the sum of thirty Pounds proclamation money each, for their services one year, to commence the first day of March instant.

To each of the signers of said bills of credit, the sum of ten Shillings per thousand, for so many thousand Pounds, as they shall respectively sign.

To the President, and each of the members of this Congress, and Committee of Safety, the sum of six Shillings per diem, for every day they have, or shall attend, during the continuance of this Congress, to be certified by Mr. Fisher, Mr. Hart, Mr. Wetherill, Mr. Clark, and Mr. Elmer, or any two of them.

To the Secretary of this Congress, fourteen Shillings per diem, for each day that he hath or shall attend this Congress, to be certified as aforesaid.

To each of the muster masters of this Colony, the sum of twenty-five Shillings for every company he has reviewed, or shall review by order of this Congress.

To the door keeper, the sum of five Shillings per diem, for each day that he hath or shall attend this Congress.

To Myndert Voorhees, the sum of fifteen Pounds for fire wood and candles, and for the use of his large room, during the present sitting of this Congress.

And it is further Resolved and Directed, That there be paid to the commissioners appointed to purchase arms and ammunition, tents and other military stores, such sum or sums of money, as the said commissioners or any three of them shall agree upon, as necessary to be expended; whose receipts shall be sufficient vouchers for the payment of the same.

To John Carey, Esq., as a recompence for his services as Secretary, during the last sitting of this Congress at Trenton, and for revising and copying the minutes for the press, the sum of eleven Pounds four Shillings, proclamation money.

To Doctor Moses Scott, the sum of one Pound, sixteen Shillings and three Pence, in full of his account, for attending certain sick soldiers in New Brunswick.

To Robert Drummond, Esquire, the sum of nine Pounds, three Shillings and four Pence, in full of his account for removing the treasury and records in the Secretary's office at Perth Amboy, to New Brunswick.

To John Dennis, Esq., the sum of seven Pounds, eight Shillings and three Pence, for sundry expenditures, as per account.

To John Pope, Esq., the sum of three Pounds, three Shillings, for sundry expenditures, as per account.

To Ellis Cook, Esq.. the sum of one Pound, six Shillings and eight Pence, in full of his account, for removing the records in the Surveyor General's office at Perth Amboy, to New Brunswick.

To Azariah Dunham, Esquire, the sum of two Pounds, for his expenses, in going to, and returning from Philadelphia, on a message to the Hon. Continental Congress.

To Abraham Clark, Esquire, for copying and correcting the minutes and ordinances of this session for the press, such sum as Azariah Dunham, and John Dennis, Esquires, shall agree to be paid for that service.

Which certificates, with receipts indorsed thereon, shall be sufficient vouchers to the said Treasurers, or either of them; and shall discharge them, their heirs, executors, and administrators, from the several payments, so made and paid out of the treasury by virtue of this ordinance.

 

Journal

Of the Votes and Proceedings of the Convention OF New Jersey, begun at Burlington the Tenth of June, 1776, and thence continued by Adjournment at Trenton and New Brunswick, to the Twenty-first of August following, to which is annexed sundry Ordinances and the Constitution.

—————

Journal, &c.

NAMES OF THE DEPUTIES.

Bergen — John Demarest, Jacobus Post, John Van Boskirk, Jacob Quackenbush, Daniel Isaac Brown.

Essex — Stephen Crane, Abraham Clark, Lewis Ogden, Caleb Camp, Robert Drummond.

Morris — Silas Condict, Jacob Drake Ellis Cook, William Woodhull, Jacob Green,

Sussex — Ephraim Martin, Casper Shaver, Thomas Potts, Isaac Van Campen, John Cleves Symmes.

Somerset — Frederick Frelinghuysen, William Paterson, John Witherspoon, Jacob R. Hardenbergh, James Linn.

Middlesex — Moses Bloomfield, John Wetherill, John Dunn, Jonathan D. Sergeant, John Combs.

Monmouth — Edward Taylor, John Covenhoven, Joseph Holmes, James Mott, Josiah Holmes.

Hunterdon — Philemon Dickinson, John Allen, Samuel Tucker, John Hart, John Mehelm.

Burlington — Peter Tallman,Thomas Reynolds, Thomas Fennimore, Charles Read, Caleb Shreve.

Gloucester — John Sparks, John Cooper, Elijah Clark, Joseph Hugg, Joseph Ellis.

Salem — Andrew Sinnickson, John Holme, Joseph Shinn, Whitten Crips, Samuel Dick.

Cumberland — Theophilus Elmer, Jonathan Ayers, Ephraim Harris, John Buck, Jonathan Bowen.

Cape May — Elijah Hughs, Jesse Hand, Thomas Leaming, Jun., Joseph Savage, Hugh Hathorn.

 

Burlington, Monday, June 10, 1776,

The Provincial Congress of New Jersey, being appointed to meet this day at Burlington, a number of the Members met accordingly; but not being a sufficient number to proceed upon business, adjourned till to-morrow morning ten o'clock.

Tuesday, June 11, ten o'clock, A. M.

A sufficient number of Members not being yet come to town, adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

The Members present met according to adjournment, and a sufficient number attending, the certificates of their elections were produced and read.

Adjourned to six o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment, and proceeded to the election of a President and Secretary, when Samuel Tucker Esquire, was, by a plurality of votes, chosen President, (the votes being taken by ballot) and William Paterson, Esquire, was unanimously chosen Secretary.

The Rev. Doctor Witherspoon opened the Congress with prayer.

Upon motion,

Resolved, unanimously. That the doors of the Congress be kept shut, and the debates and proceedings be kept secret; except in those cases wherein the Congress order otherwise.

The President laid before the Congress a letter from the Honourable John Hancock, Esquire, President of the Continental Congress, together with a number of resolutions, which are as follow:

"In Congress, June 1, 1776.

"Resolved, That six thousand militia be employed to reinforce the army in Canada, and to keep up the communication with that Province; and, to make up that number.

Resolved, That the Colony of Massachusetts-Bay be requested to supply of their militia, 3,000 four battalions.
Connecticut, of their militia, 1,500 two ditto.
New Hampshire, of their militia, 750 one ditto.
New York, of their militia, 750 one ditto.

June 3, 1776.

Resolved, That the General be empowered to employ in Canada a number of Indians, hot exceeding two thousand.

That thirteen thousand eight hundred militia be employed to reinforce the army at New York; to complete which number,

Resolved, That the Colony of Massachusetts-Bay be requested to furnish of their militia,   -   -   2,000
Connecticut, of their militia,   -   -   5,500
New York of their militia,        -   -   3,000
New Jersey, of their militia,   -   -   3,300

Resolved, As the opinion of this Congress, that the eleven battalions raised and ordered to be raised for the protection of the New England Colonies are sufficient.

Resolved, That a flying camp be immediately established in the middle Colonies, and that it consist of ten thousand men; to make up which number,

Resolved, That the Colony of Pennsylvania be requested to furnish of their militia, - - 6,000
Maryland, of their militia, - - 3,400
Delaware Government, of theirs, - - 600

That the militias be engaged to the first day of December next, unless sooner discharged by Congress.

That the pay of the militias commence from the day of their marching from home; and that they be allowed one penny a mile, lawful money, in lieu of rations for travelling expenses, and one day's pay for every twenty miles between home and the general rendezvous going and returning.

That two Provincial Brigadiers-General be employed in the Canada department; one from Massachusetts-Bay, and one from Connecticut.

That four Provincial Brigadiers-General be employed in the New-York department; one from Massachusetts- Bay, one from Connecticut, one from New-York, and one from New Jersey.

That three Provincial Brigadiers-General be employed for the flying camp; two from Pennsylvania, and one from Maryland.

That the said Brigadiers-General be appointed by the respective Colonies above mentioned.

Resolved, That it be earnestly recommended to the Assemblies, Conventions, and Committees of Safety, in the United Colonies, to fall upon the most effectual means for removing the stocks, grain, and meal, from such parts of their respective Colonies as are invaded, or are in imminent danger of being invaded by the enemy.

That the General Assembly of the Colony of Massachusetts- Bay, the Governor and Assembly of Connecticut, the Conventions of New York and New Jersey and the Conventions of such other of the United Colonies, in which there are any lead mines, be requested to transmit to Congress, with all convenient dispatch, the state and condition of the lead mines in their respective Colonies, and use the most speedy means to procure their being wrought to effect.

Extract from the Minutes.
Charles Thomson, Sec."      
"June 4, 1776.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Assemblies and Conventions of the Colonies requested to supply or furnish militias by the resolutions of yesterday, to take particular care that their militias come provided with arms, accoutrements, and camp-kettles.

By order of Congress.
John Hancock,      
President."    

A letter was also laid before the Congress from his Excellency General Washington, earnestly recommending that the above resolutions respecting the Militia of New Jersey be immediately carried into effect; whereupon,

Ordered, That Mr. Dickinson, Mr, Sergeant, Mr. Clark, Mr. Frelinghuysen, Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Cook, and Mr. Covenhoven, be a Committee to devise ways and means for carrying the said resolutions into immediate effect.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Wednesday, June 12.

Met according to adjournment, and opened with prayer, pursuant to the standing order of the House.

Resolved, unanimously, That in all divisions upon any question, if any member move to insert the yeas and nays on the Minutes, and is seconded, the same shall be inserted.

On motion,

That not less than two-thirds of the deputies of this Congress be a quorum or body sufficient to do business; the same was carried in the negative as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Drummond,
Allen,
Hart,
Dickinson,
Taylor,
Covenhoven,
Holmes,
Mott,
Sparks,
Cooper
Demarest,
Post,
Van Boskirk,
Quackenbush.
 

Nays—

Mr. Abrah'm Clark,
Condict,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenbergh,
Mehelm,
Josiah Holmes,
Elijah Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Ayers,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hughes,
Hand,
Leaming,
Savage,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Green,
Frelinghuysen,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Martin,
Shaver,
Potts,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson.
 

Resolved, That a majority of the members elected be always a quorum sufficient to transact any business.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from the Honourable President Hancock, was read, inclosing a resolution of the Continental Congress of the 11th instant, and urging to dispatch in forward the Militia.

Richard Smith, Esquire, one of the Delegates, for this Colony, in the Continental Congress, asking leave to resign his seat there on account of indisposition;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

A memorial from Azariah Dunham, Esquire, requesting the appointment of commissary and paymaster to the troops about to be raised in this Colony for the continental service; was read and ordered a second reading.

A memorial from the commissioners of the Western Division respecting the procuring tents, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the Honourable Edmund Pendleton, Esquire, President of the Convention of Virginia, inclosing the resolutions of the said Convention respecting the independence of these Colonies; read, and ordered to be filed.

A letter from the Provincial Congress of New York, respecting a defection in Bergen County in this Colony, together with some affidavits respecting the same; were read, and ordered to be filed.

A letter from Colonel David Brearley, of the County of Monmouth, complaining of sundry disaffected persons in his regiment; read, and ordered a second reading.

Resolved, That Dr. Roan be requested to attend the western company of artillery; and that this Congress will defray the expense of such attendance.

Two petitions from sundry inhabitants of Burlington County, setting forth, that for certain reasons therein mentioned, no Deputies were elected to represent the said County in the Provincial Congress, and praying that this Congress would appoint a day for the election of Deputies in that County; read and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the County of Monmouth, praying that none of the militia may be taken out of that County, as it lies so exposed to hostile invasion; read, and ordered a second reading.

Two petitions from sundry inhabitants of the south ward of the city of Perth Amboy, in the County of Middlesex, praying that the Government under the King of Great Britain may be suppressed, and that this Congress would point out and establish some more suitable form of Government; read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the County of Hunterdon, setting forth that John Allen, Esquire, was elected a Deputy for that County to serve in Provincial Congress, and praying that his election may, for reasons therein mentioned, be vacated; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till eight o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, June 13.

Met according to adjournment.

John De Hart, Esquire, one of the Delegates in Continental Congress, asking leave to resign his seat on account of the situation of his family and affairs;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

A petition from sundry persons in Captain Maitland's company, in the Township of Alexandria, and County of Hunterdon, praying that the petitioners may, for reasons therein mentioned, be taken from the said company and annexed to a company in Greenwich, in the County of Sussex; read, and ordered a second reading.

The Committee to whom were referred the Resolutions of the Continental Congress for detaching the militia, made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Two petitions from the inhabitants of Somerset County, praying that a bounty may be offered to induce the militia to turn out as volunteers, and that the expense thereon arising may be defrayed by assessments on the ratable estates of the inhabitants in general; were read, and ordered a second reading.

The report of the Committee to whom were referred the Resolutions of the Continental Congress, &c., read a second time; and, after some time spent thereon, recommitted to the same Committee.

The two petitions from sundry inhabitants of Burlington County, praying a day to be appointed for the election of Deputies, &c., read a second time.

Whereas, by a late ordinance of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, it was resolved and directed, "That all Freeholders qualified to vote for Representatives in General Assembly in this Colony, who have signed the general association recommended by this Congress; and all other persons of full age, who immediately preceding the election, shall have resided for the space of one year in any County of this Colony, and who are worth at least fifty pounds, Proclamation money in personal estate, and have signed the general association as aforesaid, shall be admitted to vote in the County wherein they reside for Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress:" And by the said ordinance, the said electors in each County were directed to meet on the fourth Monday in May last, at the particular places therein mentioned, and elect Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress : Notwithstanding which the electors of the County of Burlington neglected to elect such Deputies on the day in said ordinance particularly prescribed; and no power being given to the electors of any County wherein such negligence happened, to proceed to the election of Deputies on any other day, and several of the inhabitants of said County having prayed relief in the premises: It is therefore resolved, That the electors of the County of Burlington, qualified to vote for Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress by virtue of said ordinance, do meet at the Court House in the city of Burlington, on Thursday, the twentieth day of this instant June, between the hours of ten in the forenoon and one in the afternoon, of said day, and proceed to the election of Deputies to serve in Provincial Congress; and also of a County Committee, pursuant to the directions of said ordinance.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Friday, June 14.

The Committee to whom the report of the Committee upon the resolves of the Continental Congress was recommitted, made report of the same; which was read, and being amended, was agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

On motion,

1. Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Congress, the Proclamation of William Franklin, Esquire, late Governor of New Jersey, bearing date on the thirtieth day of May last in the name of the King of Great Britain, appointing a meeting of the General Assembly, to be held on the twentieth day of this instant June, ought not to be obeyed.

On the question,

The above resolution passed as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. A. Clark,
Condict,
Drake,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Green,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Hart,
Mehelm,
Covenhoven,
Mott,
Sparks,
Cooper,
E. Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Ayers,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hand,
Leaming,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Martin,
Shaver,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson,
John Holme.
 

Nays—

Mr. Drummond,
Dickinson,
Allen,
Joseph Holmes,
Hughes,
Savage,
Demarest,
Post,
Van Boskirk,
Brown,
Potts.
 

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, June 16.

Met according to adjournment.

A Petition of sundry inhabitants of the north ward of the city of Perth Amboy, praying that the government of the Province of New Jersey may not be changed: as also a petition from sundry inhabitants of the township of Shrewsbury, in the County of Monmouth to the same effect; read, and ordered a second reading.

On motion,

2. Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Congress, the said William Franklin, Esquire, by such proclamation, has acted in direct contempt and violation of the resolve of the Continental Congress of the fifteenth day of May last;

ON the question,

The said resolution passed as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. A. Clark,
Condict,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Hart,
Mehelm,
Covenhoven,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Elijah Clark,
Sparks,
Drake,
Cook,
Cooper,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hand,
Leaming,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Woodhull,
Green,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Demarest,
Post,
Quackenbush,
Martin
Shaver,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson,
Holme.
 

Nays—

Mr. Drummond,
Dickinson,
Allen,
Taylor,
Joseph Holmes,
Hughes,
Savage,
 
Van Boskirk,
Brown,
Potts.
 

On motion,

3. Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Congress, the said William 1^'ranklin, Esquire, has discovered himself to be an enemy to the liberties of this country; and that measures ought to be immediately taken for securing the person of the said William Franklin, Esquire:

On the question.

The said resolution passed as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. A. Clark,
Camp,
Condict,
Drake,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Green,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Hart,
Mehelm,
Covenhoven,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Sparks,
Cooper,
E. Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hand,
Leaming,
Savage,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Demarest,
Quackenbush,
Martin,
Shaver,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson,
John Holme.

Nays—

Mr, Drummond,
Dickinson,
Allen,
Taylor,
Joseph Holmes,
Hughes,
Post,
 
Van Boskirk,
Brown,
Potts.
 

On motion,

4. Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Congress, all payments of money on account of salary, or otherwise, to the said William Franklin, Esquire, as Governor, ought from henceforth to cease; and that the Treasurers of this Province shall account for the moneys in their hands to this Congress, or to the future Legislature of this Colony.

On the question,

The said resolution passed as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. Abrah'm Clark,
Camp,
Condict,
Drake,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Dickinson,
Hart,
Mehelm,
Taylor,
Covenhoven,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Sparks,
Cooper,
Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hughes,
Hand,
Learning,
Savage,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Demarest,
Post,
Van Boskirk,
Quackenbush,
Martin,
Shaver,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson,
John Holme.
 

Nays—

Mr. Allen, Brown, Potts.

John Zabriskie, of Bergen County, desiring leave to resign his commission as Lieutenant Colonel of the battalion in that County;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Resolved, That the following order do issue to Colonel Nathaniel Heard, of the first battalion of Middlesex County:

The Provincial Congress of New Jersey, reposing great confidence in your zeal and prudence, have thought fit to entrust to your care the execution of the enclosed resolves. It is the desire of Congress that this necessary business be conducted with all the delicacy and tenderness which the nature of the business can possibly admit. For this end you will find among the papers the form of a written parole, in which there is left a blank space for you to fill up, at the choice of Mr. Franklin, with the name of Princeton, Bordentown, or his own farm at Rancocus. When he shall have signed the parole, the Congress will rely upon his honour for the faithful performance of his engagements; but should he refuse to sign the parole, you are desired to put him under strong guard, and keep him in close custody, until the further order of this Congress. Whatever expense may be necessary for this service will be cheerfully defrayed by the Congress. We refer to your discretion what means to use for that purpose; and you have full power and authority to take to your aid whatever force you may require.

John Hart, Esq., was elected Vice President.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A sufficient number not attending to proceed on business, adjourned to Monday morning, ten o'clock.

Monday, June 17.

Met according to adjournment, and a few only of the members attending, adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from the Township Committee of Windsor, in the County of Middlesex, praying that a new mode of government may be established, that men above fifty may bear an equal burden, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

Mr. Ellis, Mr. Clark, and Mr. Camp, having resigned their office as Commissioners;

Ordered, That their resignations be accepted.

Mr. Ellis having resigned his office of Paymaster and Commissary for the company of artillery in West Jersey;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That John Ross, of Woodbridge, and Isaac Woodruff, of Elizabethtown, be Commissioners for the Eastern Division, in the room of Mr. Clark and Mr. Camp, in order to purchase tents, canteens, &c., and that David Pinkerton, of Trenton, be a Commissioner for the Western Division in the room of Mr. Ellis.

A memorial from the Western Commissioners, appointed to procure tents, &c., was read a second time.

Whereas the Commissioners appointed to purchase tents and camp equipage, were restricted in the price, and, from their memorial now before this Congress, it appears that they are at loss to determine what was intended to be comprised under the terms camp-equipage;

It is therefore resolved unanimously, That the said Commissioners immediately purchase on the most reasonable terms they can, four hundred tents, two thousand knapsacks, two thousand haversacks, and two thousand canteens, together with the six hundred and sixty camp kettles, ordered by the resolve of this Congress, bearing date the fourteenth day of this instant June.

Ordered, That Benjamin Holme, of the County of Salem, be Paymaster and Commissary for the Company of Artillery in West Jersey, in the room of Mr. Ellis, who has resigned.

A petition from the inhabitants of Maidenhead, in the County of Hunterdon, praying that a new mode of government may be established; that all future elections be ' annual and by ballot; that the doors of Congress be kept open except in cases where secrecy is necessary, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

A remonstrance from sundry inhabitants of the County of Burlington, complaining of the extravagant price of goods, &c., and praying relief; read, and ordered a second reading.

Pursuant to a certificate of election:

Ordered, That the following persons be commissioned as officers in a company of militia in the County of Hunterdon, in the battalion whereof Isaac Smith, Esquire, is Colonel, to wit: John Hunt, Captain, Henry Mershon, First Lieutenant, Ralph Lanning, Second Lieutenant, Ely Moore, Ensign.

Ordered, That on Friday next, in the forenoon, this Congress will consider the propriety of forming a government; will draught instructions for the Delegates in Continental Congress; and will elect Delegates to represent this Colony in said Congress,

The petition from sundry persons in Captain Maitland's Company, in Hunterdon County, read a second time; whereupon.

Ordered, That the several persons included within the boundaries of the road from Dunlap's Ferry and the Hell Town road over Musconetcunk on the south and east, and the river Delaware and Musconetcunk on the north and west, be added to the company late of Captain Andrew Sprowle, in Sussex County, on account of their particular situation.

On reading a second time the memorial of Colonel David Brearley, respecting certain disaffected persons in Monmouth County; and the letter from the President of the Provincial Congress in New York, stating the circumstances of a defection in Bergen County, &c.

Ordered, That the same be referred to Colonel Dick, Mr. Sergeant, Mr. Symmes, Colonel Covenhoven and Mr. Brown.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, June 18.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from Colonel Heard, of the 17th instant, read, and is in the words following, to wit:

To Samuel Tucker, Esq., President of the Provincial Congress at Burlington, per express.

Sir:— Agreeably to an order and resolve of the Provincial Congress, lately sent me, I this morning, with Major Deare, went to Governor Franklin, and desired him to comply with the order of Congress, and sign the parole sent me, which he absolutely refused to do, and forbid me, at my peril, to carry the order into execution. We then left the Governor's house, and ordered a company of militia, which were in readiness, to attend, and have placed a guard of about sixty men at and around his house. I expect he will persist in refusing to comply and therefore send this per express, and beg the further directions of the Congress respecting this matter, as soon as possible, by return of the bearer, and shall act accordingly.

I am, in great haste.
Sir, your most humble servant,              
Nathaniel Heard.      
Amboy, June 17, 1776.

Ordered unanimously. That a copy of the following letter be signed by the President, and sent to Colonel Heard:

Sir:— It is the desire of Congress, that you immediately bring William Franklin, Esquire, to this place, under such guard as you may think sufficient.

Ordered unanimously, That a copy of the following letter be signed by the President, and sent to the Honourable John Hancock, Esq., President of the Continental Congress:

Sir:— Our Colony has of late been alarmed with sundry attempts of disaffected persons to create disturbances. The proclamation of Mr. Franklin, our late Governor, for calling together the Assembly, is one of these which we have thought deserving the most serious attention. Enclosed we have sent a copy of certain resolves, which we have thought necessary to pass on the occasion; together with a copy of our instructions to Colonel Heard.

We this minute received by express from Colonel Heard, a letter, of which the enclosed is a copy. We have ordered down to this place Mr. Franklin under guard; and now beg leave to submit to the consideration of the Congress, whether it would not be for the general good of the United Colonies, that Mr. Franklin should be removed to some other Colony; Congress will easily conceive the reasons of this application, as Mr. Franklin, we presume, would be capable of doing less mischief in Connecticut or Pennsylvania than in New Jersey. Whatever advice Congress may think proper to give us, we shall be glad to receive; and would further intimate that the countenance and approbation of the Continental Congress would satisfy some persons, who might otherwise be disposed to blame us.

The enclosed printed papers will shew what steps we have taken with respect to the militia.

Ordered, That Cornelius Blanchard be Brigade Major for the eastern division of New Jersey, and be commissioned accordingly.

Ordered, That the Commissioners immediately purchase one or more ammunition waggons, for the use of each of the artillery companies of this Colony.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Memorial from the County Committee of Hunterdon, respecting certain disaffected persons in that County; read, and referred to the Committee for considering the memorial of Col. David Brearley, &c.

Henry Hand, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel of the battalion of Cape May, having resigned his commission,

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Eli Eldridge, Esq., First Major of the same battalion, having resigned his commission,

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Thomas Leaming, Esq., Adjutant of the same battalion, having resigned his commission.

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Pursuant to a certificate of election,

Ordered, That the following persons be commissioned as officers in a company of light infantry, in the Township of Middletown, County of Monmouth, to wit: John Burrowes, Jun., Captain, Jonathan Forman, First Lieutenant, James Whitlock, Second Lieutenant, Samuel Carhart, Third Lieutenant.

The petition from sundry inhabitants of Hunterdon County, praying the election of John Allen, Esq., for certain reasons, to be vacated, &c.; read a second time;

On the question.

Whether the prayer of the said petition be granted? It passed in the negative.

James Mott, Second Major of the second battalion of foot militia, in Monmouth County, having resigned his commission,

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Wednesday, June 19.

Met according to adjournment.

Agreeable to certificate of election,

Ordered, That William Tucker be Captain, John Fitch, First Lieutenant, Isaiah Yard, Second Lieutenant, and Joseph Clunn, Ensign, of a company in Trenton, in the County of Hunterdon, whereof Isaac Smith, Esq., is Colonel.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the Township of Shrewsbury, in Monmouth County, praying that no new mode of government may be established; that the present may continue, as being sufficient for the exigency of our affairs; and that no measures may be adopted that tend to separate this Colony from Great Britain; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from the south ward of New Brunswick, praying that a new government be established; and that a speedy and absolute independence upon Great Britain be proclaimed, &c.; read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from the Committee of Tewkesbury and Readingtown, in Hunterdon County, praying that the bounty offered by a late resolve of this Congress, in order to induce the militia to turn out, may be augmented; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The Committee of the north ward of the City of Perth Amboy, having transmitted to this Congress an appraisement of arms, taken from the non-associators within their bounds;

Ordered, That the same be filed.

The Committee to whom were referred the memorials and representations respecting certain disaffected persons in the Counties of Monmouth, Hunterdon, Bergen, and Sussex, made report, and, after sundry amendments, the same was agreed to, and the Congress came to sundry resolutions thereupon, which are as follow, viz,:

Resolved, That it be referred to the County Committee of Sussex, to take order with the persons who have been charged with behaving in a disorderly manner in that County; and that they be empowered to punish the delinquents according as the case may require, not exceeding fine and imprisonment.

Resolved, That the affidavits transmitted to this Congress, by the President of the Provincial Congress of New York, respecting a supposed defection in the County of Bergen, be transmitted to the Committee of that County; and that they be directed immediately to examine strictly into the truth of the case, and report their proceedings to this Congress as speedily as possible.

Resolved, That the following persons, Richard Robins and Moses Ivins, of the County of Monmouth, and John. Vaught, Frederick Fritz, George Updike, and William Rittenhouse, of the County of Hunterdon, be required to attend this Congress, on Tuesday, the twenty-fifth day of this instant June, at nine o'clock in the forenoon, and that the President employ persons to serve the summonses.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Pursuant to certificate of election.

Ordered unanimously, That David Chambers, Esquire, be Colonel, Thomas Lowrey, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Cornelius Stout, Second Major, of the Third battalion of foot militia in the County of Hunterdon.

A petition from part of Captain John Phillips' company, in the Third battalion of Hunterdon, praying that the said company may be joined to the First battalion ; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The memorial of William Nathaniel French, setting forth, that the estate of his father and family, of whom he is the representative, lies in England and the Island of Barbadoes, and lest the same may be forfeited, praying that he may be exempted from all military calls, associations, &c.; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Whereas, some doubts have arisen whether the late ordinance of the Provincial Congress, directing a bounty of one Shilling a Pound to be paid for all merchantable saltpetre manufactured in this Province, should be allowed on any saltpetre unless in those cases where the same was purchased by the respective Committees; for removing which doubts.

Resolved, That the aforesaid bounty be paid for all saltpetre manufactured in this Colony, upon the proof, and under the limitations in the said ordinance directed, whether the same be sold in this or any other Colony.

Ordered, That Dr. Thomas Ewing be appointed Surgeon to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland and Salem, under the command of Colonel Silas Newcomb.

Ordered, That the Commissioners for the company of artillery in West Jersey, immediately purchase the following articles, for the use of said company, viz.:

Powder,
Cannon ball,
Double headed and grape shot,
Lead,
600
500
1500
600
weight
ditto
ditto
ditto

Knapsacks and haversacks, sixty-four of each; intrenching tools, spades and shovels, twenty; hoes, six; two worms; four rammers and spunges; four handspikes, capped with iron.

A sufficient quantity of coarse oznabrigs [oznaburg], or crocus, for making up cartridges with grape shot; three dozen canisters for the same purpose; six hundred tubes, ready filled; and a sufficient quantity of port-fires, tube-boxes, and boxes for transportation of cartridges.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Thursday, June 20.

Met according to adjournment.

Pursuant to certificate of election from the Committee of Salem, prior to the Militia Ordinance,

Ordered, That Samuel Dick, Esq., be Colonel, Whitton Cripps, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel, William Mecum, Esq., First Major, and Edward Hall, Esq., Second Major, of the western battalion of the said County, and that they be commissioned accordingly.

A letter from President Hancock, of the nineteenth instant, was read; together with a resolve of the Continental Congress, in the words following, viz.:

"In Congress, June 19, 1776.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Convention of New Jersey, to proceed on the examination of Mr. Franklin; and if, upon such examination, they shall be of opinion that he should be confined, to report such opinion to this Congress, and then this Congress will direct the place of his confinement, they concurring in sentiment with the Convention of New Jersey, that it would be improper to confine him in that Colony.

Extract from the Minutes.

Cha. Thomson,          
Sec."      

Adjourned to six o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The certificate of election for Members of Congress for the County of Burlington; read, allowed and filed.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Friday, June 21.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the township of Morris, in the County of Morris, praying that all officers in civil government may be annually elected by the people; that the fees of all officers may be as low as possible, &c., was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That the President write to General Livingston, and inform him, that it is the desire of Congress that he would take the command of the militia destined for New York.

The Honourable the Continental Congress having resolved "That letters be written to the Conventions of New Jersey and New York, and to the Assembly of Connecticut, recommending to them to authorize the Commander-in-Chief in the Colony of New York, to call to the assistance of that Colony, when necessity shall require it, such of the militia of those Colonies as may be necessary; and to afford him such other assistance as the situation of affairs may require : and that it be further recommended to the Convention of New York, to empower the said Commander-in-Chief, to impress carriages and water craft, when necessary, for the publick service; and also to remove ships and other vessels in Hudson's and the East rivers, for the purpose of securing them from the enemy."

This Congress, sensible of the importance of securing New York against the attempts of the enemy to cut off the communication between the Eastern and Southern Colonies; and although they have directed the immediate raising of five battalions to join the Continental army for that purpose; yet, as it is impossible to ascertain the number of the enemy, they are of opinion that, in the present uncertain state of publick affairs, the inhabitants of this Province ought, in cases of extraordinary danger, to give all the occasional assistance in their power, especially as the fate of America may perhaps depend upon the issue of this summer's campaign, do resolve, that in case the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental forces at New York, upon the arrival of British troops, shall stand in need of the aid of the militia of this Colony, that he be authorized to call for the same, by applying to one of the Brigadiers General, or the Colonels of militia. And the said militia, upon such request, are desired immediately to march to the defence of the parts invaded, or threatened with an immediate invasion. And all such of the militia as, upon the requisition of the Commander- in-Chief, shall march to the defence of any place in danger, shall be entitled to the same pay and subsistence as are allowed to the Continental forces, and shall not be detained in such service more than one month from the time of their marching. This Congress, from experience of the zeal and alacrity of the inhabitants of this Colony, to step forward for the defence of. America on all former occasions, are persuaded that this request from their representatives, arising from pure necessity, will be most cheerfully complied with, and the honor and safety of the Colony thereby maintained.

Ordered, That a copy of the above resolution be transmitted to General Washington; and that the same be published in the newspapers.

Ordered, unanimously, That Doctor Melancthon Freeman, be appointed Surgeon, and Mr. Benjamin Stockton, Surgeon's Mate, to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Middlesex and Monmouth.

A petition from John Reynolds and George Riche, papermakers in Germantown, Pennsylvania, setting forth, that they designed to carry on their trade in this Colony, and praying that this Congress would encourage the same; read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the county of Burlington, setting forth, that great expense will necessarily attend recruiting the men directed to be raised by an ordinance of the fourteenth instant; and praying that the men may be subsisted and paid from the time of enlistment; read, and ordered a second reading.

William Franklin, Esq., late Governor of this Province, having been brought before this Congress, pursuant to an order for that purpose, to be examined touching such parts of his conduct as were deemed inimical to the liberties of America, Mr. Franklin refused to answer the questions put to him, denying the authority of this body, which he alleged had usurped the king's government in this Province.

As the said William Franklin, by this and his former conduct, in many instances, appears to be a virulent enemy to this country, and a person that may prove dangerous; therefore, it is

Unanimously resolved, That the said William Franklin be confined in such place and manner as the Honourable Continental Congress shall direct.

Ordered, That the President write to the Continental Congress enclosing the above resolves, and the questions that were put to Mr, Franklin.

Resolved, That Lieutenant Colonel Bowes Read keep under safe guard the person of William Franklin, Esq., until the further order of this Congress; and that the President sign an order for this purpose.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon,

Met according to adjournment.

The petition from sundry inhabitants of Burlington County, setting forth, that great expense will necessarily attend the recruiting the men directed to be raised by an ordinance of the fourteenth instant; and praying that the men may be subsisted and paid from the time of enlistment; was read a second time, referred to Mr, Dick, Mr, Ellis and Mr, Symmes,

Four petitions from the Township of Middletown and Shrewsbury, in the County of Monmouth, praying that the government of the Province of New Jersey may not be changed, &c., read.

Two petitions from the Township of Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, praying that this Congress will immediately establish such mode of government as shall be equal to the present exigencies of this Colony, and fully coincide with the resolve of the Honourable Continental Congress of the 15th of May last; were read.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress went into the consideration of the propriety of forming a government, &c.;

Resolved, That a government be formed for regulating the internal police of this Colony, pursuant to the recommendation of the Continental Congress of the fifteenth of May last;

On the question.

It passed in the affirmative as follows:

Yeas—

Mr. A. Clark,
Ogden,
Camp,
Drummond,
Condict,
Drake,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Green,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenburgh,
Linn,
Hart,
Mehelm,
Covenhoven,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Sparks,
Cooper,
Elijah Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Ayers,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hughes,
Hand,
Leaming,
Savage,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Van Boskirk,
Shaver,
Potts,
Van Campen,
Symmes,
Sinnickson,
Holme,
Shinn,
Cripps,
Dick,
Tallman,
Reynolds,
Fennimore,
Read,
Shreve

Nays—

Mr. Allen, Taylor, Brown.

. Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, June 22.

Upon the question,

Whether one or more Delegates shall be a sufficient number to represent this Colony in Continental Congress? It was passed in the affirmative as follows, viz.:

For one—

Mr. A. Clark,
Ogden,
Camp,
Condict,
Drake,
Cook,
Woodhull,
Green,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Witherspoon,
Hardenberg,
Linn,
Brown,
Shaver,
Potts,
Van Campen,
Mehelm,
Covenhoven,
E. Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Hughes,
Hand,
Leaming,
Savage,
Hathorn,
Bloomfield,
Wetherill,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Combs,
Van Boskirk,
Quackenbush,
Symmes,
John Holme,
Shinn,
Cripps,
Dick,
Reynolds,
Shreve.
 

For more—

Mr. Drummond,
Dickinson,
Hart,
Taylor,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Cooper,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Post,
Sinnickson,
Tallman,
Read.

Resolved, That five persons be elected to represent this Colony in Continental Congress, to serve for one year, unless a new appointment be made before that time, any one of whom shall have power to vote.

Mr. Sergeant having resigned his appointment as Delegate in the Continental Congress:

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress proceeded to the election of Delegates to represent this Colony in Continental Congress, when Richard Stockton, Abraham Clark, John Hart, Francis Hopkinson, Esquires, and Dr. John Witherspoon, were elected by ballot to serve for one year, unless a new appointment be made before that time.

Resolved, That the following instructions be given to the Delegates so elected, viz.:

To Richard Stockton, Abraham Clark, John Hart, Francis Hopkinson, Esquires, and the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon, Delegates appointed to represent the Colony of New Jersey in Continental Congress.

The Congress empower and direct you, in the name of the this Colony, to join with the Delegates of the other Colonies in Continental Congress, in the most vigorous measures for supporting the just rights and liberties of America. And, if you shall judge it necessary and expedient for this purpose, we empower you to join with them in declaring the United Colonies independent of Great Britain, entering into a confederacy for union and common defence, making treaties with foreign nations for commerce and assistance, and to take such other measures as to them and you may appear necessary for these great ends, promising to support them with the whole force of this Province; always observing that, whatever plan of confederacy you enter into, the regulating the internal police of this Province is to be reserved to the Colony Legislature.

Ordered, That Ebenezer Howell, of the County of Salem, be commissioned as Major of the battalion commanded by Colonel Newcomb.

A petition from the County Committee of Monmouth ; read and ordered a second reading.

A petition from Stafford Township, in Monmouth County; read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from Charles Loveland; read, filed, and ordered a second reading.

Two petitions from the Township of Woodbridge; read, filed, and ordered a second reading.

Colonel Borden's account for the paying of Robert Quigley's company; read, filed, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to two o'clock, on Monday next.

Monday, June 24
.

Met according to adjournment.

Two petitions from the Townships of Middletown and Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, praying that this Congress would immediately establish such mode of government as shall be equal to the exigencies of this Colony, and fully coincide with the resolve of the Honourable Continental Congress of the fifteenth of May last; read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the County Committee of Monmouth, enclosing an association signed by certain disaffected persons; read, and ordered a second reading.

A representation of the County Committee of Monmouth, giving a detail of Colonel Forman and the minute-men, seizing several disaffected persons in that county without the express command of the Committee, though approved by them afterwards; accompanied with an account of the expense attending the seizure of said persons; read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Green, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Sergeant, Mr. Ogden, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Hughes, Mr. Covenhoven, Mr. Symmes, Mr. Condict and Mr. Dick, be a Committee to prepare the draught of a constitution.

Ordered, That Thomas Okeson, charged with supplying the British men of war with provisions, be committed to the common jail of Burlington County.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, June 25.

Met according to adjournment.

The Continental Congress having resolved, "That William Franklin, Esquire, be sent under guard to Governor Trumbull, of Connecticut, who is desired to take his parole; and if Mr. Franklin refuse to give his parole, that Governor Trumbull be desired to treat him agreeable to the resolutions of Congress respecting prisoners."

Resolved, That the President do issue orders, and take such measures as may be necessary to carry the above resolve into execution.

Brigadier General Livingston, having by letter informed this Congress that he could not, for reasons therein mentioned, accept the command of the militia destined for New York;

Resolved, That Colonel Nathaniel Heard be, and he is hereby, appointed Brigadier-General of said forces.

The Committee to whom was referred the petition from Burlington, praying that the men raised in order to reinforce the army at New-York, may be subsisted and paid from the time of enlistment, made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Memorial of Colonel Stephen Hunt, setting forth, that several difficulties have arisen in raising the new levies, &c.; read, and ordered a second reading.

Representation of Richard Robins and Moses Ivins, containing reasons for their refusing to obey the summons of this House; read.

The Congress took under consideration the memorial of Colonel Hunt; and also the report of the Committee to whom was referred the petition from Burlington County, &c.; and, after some time spent therein, came to the following determination:

Whereas, by a late ordinance of this Congress for the raising of three thousand three hundred of the militia to reinforce the army at New York, no provision was made for the subsistence of the said militia from the time of enlistment to the time of marching. And whereas, it is highly reasonable that some provision should be made therefor; It is therefore resolved, That every commissioned officer be allowed at the rate of fifteen Shillings a week for his subsistence from the time he begins to recruit, to the time he begins to march to the place of general rendezvous; and that every non-commissioned officer and private be allowed at the rate of seven Shillings and six Pence a week for his subsistence, computing from the time of his enlistment to the time of his marching for the place of destination or general rendezvous.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Wednesday, June 26.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas it appears, from undoubted intelligence, that there are several insurgents in the County of Monmouth, who take every measure in their power to contravene the regulations of Congress, and to oppose the cause of American freedom; and, as it is highly necessary that an immediate check be given to so daring a spirit of disaffection;

It is therefore resolved unanimously, That Colonel Charles Read take to his aid two companies of the militia of the County of Burlington, properly officered and armed, and proceed without delay to the County of Monmouth, in order to apprehend such insurgents and disaffected persons in said County, as this Congress shall give in direction to Colonel Read.

Resolved, unanimously, That Colonel Read take, if necessary, to his assistance, the militia of Monmouth.

Resolved, unanimously, That such officers and militia as engage in this service, shall receive the like pay as the Continental troops.

Resolved, unanimously, That the said militia furnish themselves with provisions, and that this Congress will order payment therefor.

Resolved, That the following directions, signed by the President, be given to Colonel Read:

Colonel Charles Read:

You are hereby ordered to apprehend Richard Robins and Moses Ivins, and to deliver them unto the keeper of the common gaol of the County of Gloucester, who is hereby commanded to keep said persons in close and safe confinement, until this Congress, or Committee of Safety, shall take further order therein: And you are also to apprehend Anthony Woodward, junior, Joseph Grover, Guisebert Guisebertson, and Thomas Lewis Woodward, and bring them before this Congress, or, during their recess, the Committee of Safety.

Whereas it appears, from authentick information, that certain disaffected persons, in the County of Hunterdon, have confederated for the purpose of opposing the measures of the Continental and Provincial Congresses, and have even proceeded to acts of open and daring violence; have plundered and robbed the house of Captain Jones; have beaten, wounded, and otherwise abused the friends of freedom in said County, and now publickly declare, that they will take up arms and engage in behalf of the King of Great Britain, the avowed and implacable enemy of the United Colonies. In order to put an effectual stop to a combination so hostile and dangerous.

It is resolved unanimously, That Lieutenant-Colonel Ten Eick, and Major Berry, take to their aid such a number of the militia, properly officered and armed, of the Counties of Hunterdon and Somerset, as they may think necessary, and proceed, without delay, to the said County of Hunterdon, in order to apprehend such insurgents and disaffected persons as this Congress shall direct.

Resolved, unanimously, That such officers and militia as engage in this service, shall receive the like pay as the Continental troops.

Resolved, unanimously, That the said militia furnish themselves with provisions, and that this Congress will order payment therefor.

Resolved, That the following directions, signed by the President, be sent to Colonel Ten Eick:

Colonel Abraham Ten Eick:

You are hereby ordered to apprehend John Vaught, Joseph Lee, Thomas Swindle, George Cyphers, jun., Peter Cyphers, John Day, William Hunt, jun., Jonathan Hunt, John Hunt, John Seal, jun., Herman Millham, Christopher Vaught, James MacCord, George Casner, Thomas Buskirk, Frederick Frittz, Peter Abgar, Daniel Hunt, George Updike, John Horpence, Philip Forker, Christopher Dilts, Bartholomew Thatcher, Samuel Slater, Edward Taylor, and John Taylor, all of whom you are to keep under strong guard, and to bring before this Congress, or Committee of Safety, or, during their recess, to deliver them to the keeper of the common gaol of Trenton, who is hereby commanded to keep them in close and safe confinement, until this Congress, or Committee of Safety, shall take further orders therein.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to draught a Constitution, &c., reported a draught accordingly; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Woodhull, Dr. Bloomfield and Mr. Joseph Holmes, be a Committee to examine and report all publick accounts.

Ordered, That the President write to the Western Commissioners, and desire them to deliver half a hundred weight of gunpowder to Colonel Johnston.

A petition from the Town Committees of Galloway and Great Egg Harbour, praying that the surplus of the money arising from the sale of goods saved in a transport which was stranded on the coast, may be appropriated towards equipping such persons within their bounds as are unable to equip themselves; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Philip Vickers Fithian be Chaplain to the battalion under the command of Colonel Newcomb; and to the battalion to be raised in the Counties of Middlesex and Monmouth, which are destined for New York.

The petition from sundry inhabitants of the County of Monmouth, praying that none of the militia may be taken out of that County, as it lies so exposed to hostile invasions; was read a second time, and ordered to lie on the table.

Ordered, That the Company under the command of Captain Stillwell, which was directed by the late Committee of Safety to guard the coast of this Colony near Sandy Hook, be continued until the further order of this Convention or Committee of Safety. If it be inconvenient for any of the Company to continue in the said employment. Captain Stillwell is hereby empowered to supply such deficiency by enlistment.

Ordered, That Colonel George Taylor be Commissary for the said Company.

A petition from Thomas Okeson, now confined in Burlington gaol for corresponding with the enemy, praying that he may be released; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Thursday, June 27.

Met according to adjournment.

The memorial from Azariah Dunham, Esquire, requesting the appointment of Commissary and Paymaster for the troops to be raised in this Province for the Continental service, read the second time; whereupon,

Resolved, That this Congress recommend Mr. Dunham as Commissary for the new levies raising in this Colony to reinforce the army at New York.

Resolved, That Mr. Rowland Chambers be recommended by this Congress to the Honourable Continental Congress as a proper person to be Paymaster of the said levies.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, and Mr. Covenhoven being in the Chair, took under consideration the draught of a Constitution, &c.

The President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Covenhoven, from the Committee of the Whole, made report, that they have made some progress in the matters to them referred, and pray leave to sit again.

A letter from the Provincial Congress of New York, enclosing an extract from their Minutes was received and read.

Adjourned till three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, and Mr. Covenhoven being in the Chair, resumed the consideration of the draught of a Constitution.

The President resumed the Chair, and Mr. Covenhoven, from the Committee of the Whole, made report, that they have made some further progress in the matters to them referred, and desire leave to sit again.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Friday, June 28.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from the officers of the militia of Gloucester, appointed to raise men for the Continental service, to reinforce the troops now in New York, setting forth, that fifteen Shillings a week is not sufficient to defray their expenses in enlisting said men, and requesting that this Congress would make such further allowance as may be reasonable and necessary; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Two petitions from sundry inhabitants of the Township of Upper Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, praying that this Congress would immediately establish such mode of government as shall be equal to the exigencies of this Colony, and fully coincide with the resolve of the Honourable Continental Congress of the 15th of May last; read, and ordered a second reading.

The several petitions for and against the establishment of a government, read the second time, and referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole.

The President resumed the chair, when Mr. Covenhoven, from the Committee of the Whole, made report, that they had not yet come to any resolutions, and desired leave to sit again.

Adjourned till three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Andrew Hunter be Chaplain to the three battalions now raising in this Colony, under the command of Colonels Van Cortland, Martin and Hunt, destined to reinforce the army at New York.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole.

The President resumed the chair, and Mr. Covenhoven, from the Committee of the Whole, made report, that they had not yet come to any resolutions, and desired leave to sit again.

Pursuant to a certificate of election,

Ordered, That Ellet Howell be second lieutenant of the light infantry company in the first battalion of foot militia in the County of Hunterdon, whereof Isaac Smith, Esquire is Colonel.

Pursuant to a certificate of election.

Ordered, That Joseph Clunn be Ensign of a company at Trenton, in the same battalion.

Adjourned till seven o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, June 29.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from the County Committee of Monmouth, setting forth, that, in pursuance of a resolution of the late Congress, said Committee furnished Colonel Maxwell's battalion with fifty stand of arms, and that it was in their option to have them replaced or receive their value in money, and praying that this Congress would order the value of said arms to be paid in money, read a second time, and ordered that the treasurer pay the amount of said arms according to the appraisment.

Mr. Josiah Franklin Davenport handed to Congress an account in the words following:

"Extract of a letter from the Provincial Congress, dated Burlington, June 15th, 1776, delivered to Mr. Davenport.

"To Col. Nathaniel Heard:

"Whatever expence may be necessary for this service will be cheerfully defrayed by the Congress.

"Samuel Tucker, President.      

"Colonel Nathaniel Heard to Josiah F. Davenport, June 26, 1776.

Dr.              

"To boarding and lodging Governor Franklin, his servant, &c., one week,

£.3:0:0          

Ordered, That the treasurer pay the above account.

Two memorials, the one from the County Committee of Monmouth, the other from the Committee of Safety of that County, respecting certain disaffected persons in said County; and requesting that this Congress would take some decisive order therein; were read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Dr. John Condict be surgeon to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Bergen, Essex and Burlington, under the command of Colonel Van Cortland, destined to reinforce the army at New York.

A petition from Richard Robins and Moses Ivins, praying a hearing, confessing their faults, offering to make discoveries, and praying a discharge; read and filed.

Ordered, That they attend immediately.

After the hearing.

Ordered, That they be remanded to prison.

A letter from Adjutant General Reed, informing that General Howe is arrived at Sandy Hook with a considerable force, and desiring immediate detachments from the militia of this Colony, to reinforce the army at New York; read and filed.

Ordered, That the President write to Mr. Reed and inform him of the situation of our levies, and the orders this Congress have issued.

John Covenhoven, Esq., elected Vice President.

Agreed that twenty of the members of this Congress be a quorum or body sufficient to transact any business, except such as may respect the formation of the Constitution.

Certain advice being received of the arrival of General Howe at Sandy Hook, Ordered, That all officers who have enlisted men properly armed, under the late ordinance for raising three thousand three hundred men within this Colony, proceed immediately with such numbers as they have collected, or can collect, without delay to New York; assigning a due proportion of officers to the men that they may be ready, and leaving other officers as occasion may require, to collect the remainder. All officers, paymasters, and others, are required to be diligent in their respective stations; and all the friends of liberty throughout the Colony are most earnestly entreated now to exert themselves for the preservation of their country, their lives, liberties and property.

This Congress do likewise earnestly desire all persons to lend arms or other necessaries on the present occasion, and they may rest assured of the publick faith to make amends for any loss or damage they may incur.

Ordered, That Cornelius Van Voorst be Lieutenant- Colonel, Richard Dey, First Major, and John Mauritius Goetschius, Second Major, of the battalion of foot militia in the County of Bergen.

Ordered, That Charles Pettit, Esquire, be commanded immediately to remove the publick records and papers, in his custody, from the city of Perth Amboy to the city of Burlington.

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Congress resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole.

The President resumed the Chair.

Mr. Sparks, from the Committee of the Whole, reported, that the Committee had come to several Resolutions, which he was ready to report.

Resolved, That the Congress will receive the report of the Committee of the Whole on Tuesday next; at which time every member is enjoined to be punctual in his attendance.

Ordered, That Dr. Jonathan Horton be Surgeon, and Dr. David Ewen Surgeon's Mate to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Morris and Sussex, under the command of Col, Martin, destined to reinforce the army at New York.

Congress received a letter from Colonel Taylor of Monmouth, dated ten o'clock in the forenoon of this day, informing that nineteen sail of the enemy's fleet lies at the Hook, and forty-five in sight; read and filed.

Ordered, That the President write to the Continental Congress, enclosing a copy of the above letter, and requesting a supply of powder.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Sunday, June 30.

A sufficient number of members not attending, adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Monday, July 1.

Met according to adjournment.

The Continental Congress having upon request, furnished this Congress with two tons of powder,

Ordered, That the same be distributed in the following manner:

Morris
Bergen
Sussex
Hunterdon
Burlington
 
 
400
400
400
400
300
——
1900
  Somerset
Essex
Monmouth
Middlesex
 
 
 
400
500
700
500
 
——
2100

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas by a regulation of the late Congress, the several Committees in this Colony, were authorized and directed to disarm all the non-associators and persons notoriously disaffected, within their bounds: And whereas it appears that the said regulation hath not been carried into effect in some parts of the Colony; and it being absolutely necessary, in the present dangerous state of publick affairs, when arms are much wanted for the publick defence, that it should be instantly executed: It is therefore directed and resolved, That the several Colonels in this Colony do, without delay, proceed to disarm all such persons within their districts, whose religious principles will not permit them to bear arms; and likewise all such as have hitherto refused and still do refuse to bear arms; that the arms so taken be appraised by some indifferent person or persons; that the said Colonels give vouchers for the same, and that the appraisement and receipt be left in the hands of the persons disarmed.

John Leonard, Richard Robins, Moses Ivins, Thomas Lewis Woodward and Ezekiel Forman, being brought before Congress, to answer certain charges exhibited against them, did severally and voluntarily execute bonds, in the penalty of five hundred pounds, conditioned at all times, and in all things well and faithfully to observe, obey, keep and perform all resolves, orders, ordinances and regulations of the Continental Congress, and of this Provincial Congress, and to be of good behaviour and in no wise knowingly or willingly to act inimically or unfriendly to the cause of the United Colonies.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 2.

Met according to adjournment.

Agreeable to order, the Congress went into the consideration of the report of the Committee of the Whole; and, after some time spent therein, deferred the further consideration thereof till the afternoon.

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Congress the militia of Monmouth County ought, for the present, to remain in their own County, excepting such part thereof as by the late ordinance of this Congress were required to form their proportion of the New-Jersey brigade of three thousand three hundred men.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Henry Waddell Esq. captain of a grenadier company in the militia of Monmouth, having, by petition, prayed that this Congress would accept a resignation of his commission, assigning for reason that he was so frequently afflicted with the gout, that he was rendered incapable of doing the duty of an officer;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That Colonel Isaac Smith be directed to take charge of Christopher Vaught, John Vaught, Joseph Lee, Frederick Frittz, Thomas Buskirk, Jonathan Hunt, Jacob Hunt, Bartholomew Thatcher, John Brady, John Horpence, Philip Cool, Philip Fanker, James Greames, and William Thatcher, disaffected persons, apprehended by order of Congress, and to confine them in the common gaol of Trenton, and there to keep them under guard until the further order of this Congress, or the Committee of Safety.

The Congress resumed the consideration of the report of the Committee of the Whole; which, after sundry amendments, was agreed to.

On the question,

"Whether the draught of the constitution, formed on the report of the Committee of the Whole, be now confirmed, or be deferred for further consideration? It was carried for confirming now, as follows:

For now—

Mr. Camp,
Cook,
Green,
Mehelm,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Sparks,
Cooper,
Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Hand,
Leaming,
Hathorn,
Sergeant,
Shaver,
Symmes,
Shinn,
Tallman,
Reynolds,
Fennimore,
Shreve.
 

For deferring—

Mr. Drummond,
Savage,
Post,
Paterson,
Brown,
Cripps,
Hughes,
Dick,
Read.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Wednesday, July 3.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Joseph Pancoast be commissioned as Captain, Henry Delatush, First Lieutenant, John Kerlin, Ensign, of a company of foot militia in the Township of Mansfield, in Burlington County.

Ordered, That Captain Kinney be cited to appear before this Congress, and answer for his conduct in delaying the removal of William Franklin, Esq. to Connecticut.

Whereas, authentick information has been received by this Congress, that a number of disaffected persons have assembled in the County of Monmouth, preparing, by force of arms, to oppose the cause of American freedom, and to join the British troops, for the destruction of this country; and it being highly necessary that immediate measures be taken to subdue these dangerous insurgents: It is therefore unanimously resolved, That Colonel Charles Read, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Forman, and Major Joseph Haight, do take two hundred of the militia of Burlington County, and two hundred of the militia of Monmouth, and proceed, without delay, in order to quell the aforesaid insurrection, and to disarm and take prisoners whomsoever they shall find assembled with intent to oppose the friends of American freedom; which prisoners, so taken, they shall forthwith bring before this Congress: and the said officers are empowered to take such measures as they shall think necessary for this service.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

On the question.

Whether the draught of the constitution be now printed, or the printing thereof be deferred for a few days, in order to reconsider, in a full house, the propriety of the last clause in the constitution, containing the proviso respecting reconciliation? It was carried as follows:

For printing now—

Mr. Camp,
Hardenberg,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Sparks,
Cooper,
Clark,
Elmer,
Harris,
Bowen,
Leaming,
Shaver,
Shinn,
Tallman,
Fennimore,
Shreve,
Covenhoven.
 

For deferring—

Mr. Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Mehelm,
Josiah Holmes,
Ellis,
Sergeant,
Symmes,
Dick.
 

Ordered, That one thousand copies of the draught of charter rights be immediately printed and dispersed among the inhabitants of this Colony.

On the application of the Provincial Congress of New York,

Ordered, That they be empowered to apprehend and secure such of the inhabitants of that Colony, who have removed into this, as they may think necessary for the publick good; and all persons within this Colony are desired to aid and assist in the execution of such orders for that purpose as they may think proper to make.

Ordered, That Stephen Crane, Lewis Ogden and Caleb Camp, Esquires, be a Secret Committee to correspond and co-operate with the Secret Committee of the Provincial Congress of New York; and that the said Committee be vested with power to issue warrants and apprehend and confine such person or persons as they may think necessary for the publick good.

The petition from the Town Committee of Galloway and Great Egg Harbour, praying that the surplus of the money arising from the sale of goods saved on board a transport belonging to the enemy, which was stranded on the Jersey coast, may be appropriated towards equipping such within their bounds, and the bounds of Little Egg Harbour, as are unable to equip themselves; was read a second time, and ordered to lie on the table.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 4.

Met according to adjournment.

The petition from John Reynolds and George Riche, papermakers in Germantown, Pennsylvania, setting forth that they designed to carry on their trade in this Colony, and praying that this Congress would encourage the same; read a second time, and deferred for further consideration.

Resolved, That, in order to prevent a failure of justice, all judges, justices of the peace, sheriffs, coroners, and other inferior officers of the late government within this Colony, proceed in the execution of their several offices, under the authority of the people, until the intended Legislature and the several officers of the new government be settled and perfected, having respect to the present Constitution of New Jersey, as by the Congress of late ordained, and the orders of the Continental and Provincial Congresses; and that all actions, suits and processes be continued, altering only the style and form thereof, according to the terms by the said Constitution prescribed, in the further prosecution thereof.

Ordered, That the Committee of the County of Gloucester be continued, and they proceed to act in all cases as heretofore directed, until a new election.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas, this Congress has been given to understand that divers persons, in the County of Monmouth, have embodied themselves in opposition to the measures of Congress; and are informed that numbers have expressed their willingness to return to their duty upon assurances of pardon, alledging that they have been seduced and misled by the false and malicious reports of others; It is therefore declared, That all such persons as shall without delay return peaceably to their homes, and conform to the orders of Congress, shall be treated with lenity and indulgence; and upon their good behaviour, shall be restored to the favour of their country; provided that none such as shall appear to have been the leaders and principals in those disorders, who to their other guilt, have added that of seducing the weak and unwary, shall yet be treated according to their demerits.

Adjourned to meet at Trenton, to-morrow morning, ten o'clock.

Trenton, Friday, July 5, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

Isaac De Cow, Esquire, having resigned his commission as Second Major of the first regiment of foot militia in the County of Hunterdon, whereof Isaac Smith, Esq. is Colonel;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That Colonel Joseph Borden do provide waggons, and every other necessary, to accommodate the rifle battalion of Pennsylvania, consisting of five hundred men, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Broadhead, in their march to Monmouth County, the place of their destination.

Resolved, That the artillery company, under the command of Captain Hugg, be ordered to march immediately with their artillery to New Brunswick; and from thence to such place as General Livingston shall direct.

Letter from John Dennis, Esquire, urging the necessity of removing the officers and other prisoners of war from the publick places in which they are at present; as the soldiers have been continually plotting with the negroes, discouraging persons from enlisting in the Continental service, ridiculing the Congress, &c.

Ordered, That the President immediately write to the Honourable Continental Congress, enclosing a copy of the letter from Mr. Dennis, and requesting their advice in what manner to dispose of the said prisoners of war.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That commissions be made out for the following persons, officers in the battalion ordered to be raised in the Counties of Somerset and Hunterdon, destined to reinforce the army at New-York: Richard Stites, Captain, Peter Low, First Lieutenant, Derick Lame, second Lieutenant, John Garrish, Ensign; Jeremiah Dunn, First Lieutenant, William Cummins,Second Lieutenant, David Smaller, Ensign.

Ordered, That the Treasurer for the western division do advance to the wives of William Bertles, Sergeant Willson and Hugh MacLean, the sum of twenty-five shillings, proclamation money, per month each; which sum is to be stopped out of their pay in the hands of Captain Brearley.

Petition from the Township Committee of Piscataway, setting forth, that certain disaffected persons had been taken and carried out of the said township before trial, and praying that this Congress would take some order therein; was read; whereupon.

Ordered, That the President write to General Heard on the above subject.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, July 6.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Cooper and Mr. Dick be a committee to prepare the draught of a bill to regulate the ensuing election.

Resolved, That the several persons appointed muster-masters of the levies, directed to be raised by the late ordinance of this Congress, pay the said levies their subsistence money.

Ordered, That the prisoners now in gaol on account of being disaffected to the cause of the United Colonies, be brought to trial on Wednesday next, at three o'clock afternoon.

Resolved, That a number of the militia in the County of Cape-May, not exceeding five and twenty, commanded by one commissioned officer, be raised and stationed at the point of Cape-May.

Ordered, That Mr. Memucan Hughes be Commissary and Paymaster of the said detachment of militia.

It appearing to be absolutely necessary, in the present dangerous situation of publick affairs, that this Congress continue sitting; and many members having been called away by a regard to their private affairs at this busy season of the year, others by an attention to their families in the neighbourhood of the enemy, and some (we are sorry to say) having wholly neglected their duty to the publick. by departing without leave: therefore.

Ordered, That such members as shall attend be empowered to transact any business which may arise and require immediate consideration whether a sufficient number to constitute a quorum attend or not.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Joseph King be Adjutant, and Mr. Joshua Gordon regimental Quarter-master of the battalion to be raised in the Counties of Sussex and Morris, under the command of Colonel Martin, destined to reinforce the army at New-York.

Congress received a letter from the Honourable President, Hancock, enclosing the following resolve:

"In Congress, July 5, 1776.

"Resolved, That the British officers and soldiers who are prisoners, and now in the Colony of New-Jersey, be sent from thence to the town of York, in the Colony of Pennsylvania; and that the Convention, or Committee of Safety, of New-Jersey, be requested to carry this resolve into immediate execution.

"By order of Congress,
"John Hancock, President"      

Ordered, That the above resolve of the Continental Congress be forthwith carried into immediate execution, and that the necessary steps be immediately taken for that purpose.

Ordered, That the President do take the parole of honour of Mr. John Lawrence of Monmouth County, not to depart the house of Mr. Renssellier Williams; and, if Mr. Lawrence should refuse to give the same, that the President order him to be confined under such guard as he may deem necessary.

Adjourned to nine o'clock on Monday morning.

Monday, July 8.

Met according to adjournment.

On application,.

Ordered, That the President take the parole of Mr. Lawrence, not to depart the Township of Trenton, unless with leave of Congress.

A petition from sundry inhabitants of the Township of Alexandria, in Hunterdon County, praying that no member of Congress may hold any post of profit; that all publick accounts may be fairly stated and put in the journals; that the yeas and nays may also be inserted, &c. read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That the Commissioners send forward, without delay, the camp-kettels by them purchased for the use of General Heard's brigade; that the Commissioners divide them to each battalion, according to the directions of General Heard; and that they take receipts of the several regimental Quarter-Masters, for the number of camp-kettles delivered as aforesaid:

Also ordered, That they send forward the lead, flints and canteens, knapsacks, cartridge-paper, brushes and wires, and intrenching tools, by them purchased, to General Livingston's brigade, to be by him disposed of as necessity may require.

Captain Charles Harrison having resigned his commission.

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

The Committee appointed to prepare a draught for regulating the ensuing election, made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Robert Paterson, Esq., be Surgeon's Mate to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Burlington, Gloucester, Salem, and Cumberland, under the command of Colonel Silas Newcomb.

The memorial of Dr. Thomas Ewing, Surgeon to the battalion under Colonel Newcomb, setting forth, that not knowing what provision has been made of instruments and medicine for the use of the said battalion, he had laid in, for present use, about twenty Pounds worth, relying on the credit of this Congress for the reimbursement of the money; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Dr. Cornelius Baldwin be Surgeon to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Hunterdon and Somerset, under the command of Colonel Stephen Hunt.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 9.

Met according to adjournment.

Colonel Breese having resigned his commission of Colonel of the third battalion of militia in the County of Monmouth, assigning for reason the great backwardness of the people; himself so indifferently attended on field days, and so few ready to turn out, hiding themselves and deserting their houses, when called upon to defend the shore;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That Daniel Hendrickson, Esq., be Colonel of the third battalion of foot militia in the County of Monmouth.

Letter from General Livingston, enclosing copies of letters from General Washington and Major Duychinck; read and filed.

Letter from Lewis Ogden, Esq., read and filed.

Letter from John Dennis, Esq., read and filed.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Mr. Symmes and Mr. Sergeant, appointed a Committee to wait on Stephen Skinner, Esq., Captain Kennedy, Mr. Fairholm, Captain Turnbull, Philip Kearney, Michael Kearney, Doctor John Lawrence, Thomas Skinner, Isaac Bonnell and William Hick, apprehended and removed to this place, pursuant to an order of General Washington, and take their parole, not to depart the town of Trenton, unless with leave of Congress.

The above Committee make report, that they have taken the parole of the above gentlemen, according to order.

Pursuant to order, John Lawrence, Esq., appeared before Congress, and was permitted to return home on his parole, to attend this House whenever called upon.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Wednesday, July 10.

Met according to adjournment.

Letter from Abraham Clark Esq., informing that four tons of powder were ordered to be sent immediately on Continental account for the use of the militia who march out to guard the Province until the flying camp is formed, or for the use of the flying camp, if not expended before they take the field; read, and ordered to be filed.

The petition from Doctor John Hicks, apprehended and removed to this place, pursuant to an order of General Washington, setting forth, that he is a half-pay officer, is desirous of saving his half-pay, as he has a large family to support, that he has not yet signed the association, nor has been ever called upon for that purpose; but seeing the necessity of the Colonies being united, is determined that his half-pay shall not be any restraint upon his future conduct; that he is ready to sign the association, and to act in every respect agreeable to the resolves of the Honourable Continental Congress, praying that he may be permitted to return, as his affairs are suffering on account of his absence; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That the President take the parole of John Richards and Dr. John Hicks, apprehended and sent to this place pursuant to an order of General Washington, not to depart the town of Trenton, unless with leave of this Congress.

The report of the Committee of Trenton, respecting Samuel Henry; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Resolved, That General Livingston be directed to apprehend the person of the late Treasurer, John Smyth, Esq., and remove him, with the publick money in his hands, and such of his books and papers as relate to the Treasury, under guard to Trenton.

Adjourned till three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Samuel Franklin Parker be Major of the battalion raised in the Counties of Middlesex and Monmouth, destined to reinforce the army at New York, in the brigade under General Heard.

Jacob Tice, Ensign in Captain Burrow's company, destined to reinforce the army at New York, having refused to accept his appointment;

Ordered, That Jonathan Holmes be Ensign in the said company.

Ordered, That Mark Thompson, Esq., be Colonel of the first battalion of militia in the County of Sussex.

Pursuant to the order of the day, the Congress went into the examination of witnesses in support of the charges exhibited against certain disaffected persons apprehended in the County of Hunterdon by order of Congress; after hearing several witnesses, the further consideration thereof was deferred till to-morrow morning.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Thursday, July 11.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from Adjutant General Reed, informing Congress that he had it in charge from General Washington to acquaint this body, that it being of the utmost importance to prevent any communication or correspondence with the enemy; and having, from many strong circumstances, just reason to suspect sundry persons about Amboy would avail themselves of their situation to give intelligence and aid to the enemy, he deemed it necessary, for the safety of the publick.that they should be removed to places where they could have no opportunity of carrying such design into execution; submitting it to the consideration of this House, whether some general direction given on this head to the Committees, or general officers or both, is not absolutely necessary; read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Captain William Gamble be directed to apprehend, and bring to this place, Captain Crow; and that this Congress will defray the necessary expense arising thereon.

Congress resumed the examination of witnesses for and against certain disaffected person in the County of Hunterdon; and, after some time spent therein, adjourned the further examination till the afternoon.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Congress resumed the examination of witnesses for and against certain disaffected persons in the County of Hunterdon; and, having gone through the same, deferred the determination thereof until to-morrow.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Friday, July 12.

Met according to adjournment.

On the recommendation of General Livingston, William Bott, Esq., is appointed Adjutant General of the militia of New Jersey.

It appearing that opposition to the draughts was made in Captain Groendyck's company and George Updike and John Horpence having attended before Congress upon a charge of being concerned, when no witnesses appeared to fix the charge upon any individuals; It is ordered, That the Township Committee of Kingswood, take cognizance of the offence of the people of that company.

Ordered, That Lieutenant Howell, with two privates, be directed to proceed immediately to Burlington, and bring, under guard, Thomas Okeson to Trenton.

Upon the application of Dr. Beaumont to this Congress for reimbursement of his expenses in transporting his baggage, &c. and for payment of his subsistence.

Ordered, That Dr. Beaumont be informed, that his application must be made to the Continental Congress.

The proceedings of the Committee of Amwell, in the County of Hunterdon, respecting a certain William Steel, who has his residence in the County of Middlesex, but, being in the County of Hunterdon, was apprehended by order of the said Committee; being transmitted to this Congress, and read;

Ordered, That the said Steel be forthwith brought before this house; whereupon the said William Steel being brought before Congress, the proceedings of the Committee were read in his presence, and, being heard in his defence;

Ordered, That he be committed to the common gaol at Trenton.

It being represented to Congress that the levies in Salem County are obstructed for want of arms, when, at the same time, there are in the County a sufficient number of Jersey arms, which are the publick property of the county; therefore,

Ordered, That the people of that County do supply such of the levies, in the present brigade, as have been or may be raised in that County, with the publick arms in their hands, and that the County Committee be enjoined to see this order properly executed.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met pursuant to adjournment.

A letter from Colonel Stephen Hunt, alledging want of health, and resigning his appointment in the brigade under General Heard; read, and his resignation accepted.

The draught of a bill for regulating the ensuing election, was read the second time; and an amendment being moved, that no person be entitled to a seat in the legislative Council or Assembly, unless he first take the following test, &c.:

I, A B, do swear (or affirm) that I do not hold myself bound to bear allegiance to George the Third, King of Great Britain; that I will not by any means directly or indirectly oppose the measures adopted by this Colony, or the Continental Congress, against the tyranny attempted to be established over these Colonies by the court of Great Britain; and that I do and will bear true allegiance to the government established in this Province under the authority of the people.

On the question.

It was carried in the affirmative as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Camp,
Condict,
Woodhull,
Paterson,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Dickinson,
Josiah Holmes,
Leaming,
Bloomfield,
Dunn,
Sergeant,
Quackenbush,
Shaver,
Van Campen,
Sinnickson,
Cripps.
 

Nays—

Mr. Drummond,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Sparks,
Cooper,
Elmer,
Harris,
Buck,
Combs,
Reynolds,
Tallman,
Shreve.

After some time spent on the said bill, the further consideration thereof was deferred.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, July 13.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Covenhoven, Mr. Mehelm, and Mr. Sergeant, be a Committee to examine into the state of the Eastern Treasury, and that they report thereon.

A petition of Dr. John Hicks, setting forth, that he is willing, if required, to be bound by oath, to act in such manner as to give the fullest satisfaction; that whenever the militia is called out in defence of the country, he will be ready to give his attendance as a surgeon, or in any other station that may afford the most benefit; and praying that he may be permitted to return to his family; read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition of Cornelius Williamson, a prisoner in the gaol of Trenton; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Upon the question.

Whether any of the persons sent under guard from Amboy, be permitted to return in order to remove their effects to such place as Congress shall appoint for a limited time, upon their parole and security, if required? It was carried in the affirmative, as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Drummond,
Dickinson,
Mott,
Josiah Holmes,
Cooper,
Elmer,
Bloomfield,
Combs,
Leaming,
Quackenbush,
Sinnickson,
Shreve.

Nays—

Mr. Condict,
Woodhull,
Covenhoven
Joseph Holmes,
Sparks,
Buck,
Sergeant,
 
Van Campen,
Cripps,
Tallman.
 

The Congress resumed the consideration of the draught of a bill for regulating the ensuing election; and, after some time spent thereon,

Ordered, That the same be recommitted to Dr. Bloomfield, Mr. Cooper, and Mr. Sergeant.

Ordered, That Mr. Michael Kearney have leave to remove to Burlington, on his parole not to depart from thence further than six miles on the east side of Delaware, till the further order of Congress.

Ordered, That Philip Kearney have leave to remove, on his parole, to the dwelling house of Mr. Richard Stevens, in the township of Alexandria, and county of Hunterdon, or to Morristown, and not to depart from thence more than six miles without leave of Congress.

Ordered, That Dr. John Lawrence have leave to remove, on his parole, to Morristown, and not to depart from thence, more than six miles, without leave of Congress.

Ordered, That Mr. Johnston Fairholm have leave on his parole, to reside at Bordentown, or at Mr. Rutherford's, in Hunterdon County, and not to depart from thence, or from within six miles thereof, without leave.

Ordered, That Mr. Bonnel and Mr. Thomas Skinner, have leave, on their parole, to reside at Cranberry Town, and not to depart from thence, or from within six miles thereof, without leave.

Ordered, That Captain Turnbull have leave, on his parole, to remove to Bordentown, and not to depart more than six miles from thence without leave.

Ordered, That Mr. Hick have leave to return home, for the present, giving bond and security for his good behaviour, in the penalty of five hundred Pounds.

Ordered, That Mr. Stephen Skinner and Captain Kennedy have leave, on their parole, to reside at Morristown, and not to remove more than six miles from thence.

Ordered, That Mr. John Richards have leave, on his parole, and security in the penalty of one thousand Pounds, to reside on his own farm, and not to depart more than two miles from thence, without leave.

Doctor John Hicks having come into Congress, and taken an oath to the present government:

Ordered, That he have leave to return home.

Ordered, That the above persons, before they remove to the places of their destination, have leave to remain at home two days in order to settle their business.

Adjourned till Monday morning, eight o'clock.

Monday, July 15.

Met pursuant to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to examine into the state of the Eastern Treasury, made report, that they had waited upon Mr. Smyth, who had delivered into their hands the sum of four thousand nine hundred and forty-four Pounds nineteen Shillings and six Pence, Proclamation money; and also a bag sealed, said to contain a quantity of cancelled paper money.

The Committee further report that they have delivered the above sum of money and bag sealed, to John Stevens, Esq., as ordered by this house, to be by him deposited in the Treasury chest of this Colony, for which they have taken his receipt; that Mr. Smyth, the Treasurer, had not his accounts with him, but has returned home in order to collect his papers, and the monies outstanding, upon his parole and promise to prepare himself for settlement in a short time, and to attend the further order of this House.

Ordered, That Nehemiah Wade, Esq. be Second Major of the first regiment of foot militia in the County of Essex, whereof Edward Thomas, Esq. is Colonel.

Ordered, That Dr. William Winans be Surgeon to the same regiment.

The Committee to whom was recommitted the draught of a bill for regulating the ensuing election, made report, which was read, and, after sundry amendments agreed to, and ordered to be engrossed.

Resolved, On the motion of the members of the County of Salem, That the election in that County be by ballot, and that it be held at the Court House in the Town of Salem, without removing from place to place, any thing in the ordinance for ascertaining the mode and places of election before contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The petition of Cornelius Williamson, a disaffected person, now confined in the common gaol of Hunterdon, in pursuance of the adjudication of the Amwell Committee, praying that he may have an immediate hearing; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 16.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That the Deputy Quartermaster General Colonel Biddle, and his assistants, be empowered, in case of necessity, to impress within this Colony baggage waggons and horses for the service of the United States of North America, paying a reasonable hire for their service while employed.

A letter from Adjutant General Reed, informing that Lord Howe is arrived at the Hook, and the necessity of urging on, with all expedition, the new levies raising in this Colony; read, and ordered to be filed.

A petition from Samuel Wigton, a debtor confined in the gaol of Morris, setting forth, that he was enlisted as a sergeant in Captain Morris's company, in the battalion now under the command Colonel Winds; that before the said company left the County of Morris he was arrested for debt, and committed to the gaol of Morris; and that he has several sums of money due to him from sundry persons in the battalion aforesaid, which, when recovered, are sufficient to discharge his debts; praying that he may have time for the payment of his debts; that he may be released from imprisonment, and that he may be ordered to join his battalion, or any other this Congress may think proper; and also a testimonial thereunder written, signed by sundry persons, in support of the facts contained in the said petition; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Ordered, That Dr. William Burnet be added to the number of Commissioners for East New Jersey, and that he have the like authority as is given to the Commissioners nominated in the ordinance of the late Congress for striking the sum of fifty thousand Pounds.

Resolved, That the several Township Committees throughout this Colony, do immediately exert themselves in procuring lead for the use of the army now engaged in our defence, as the demand for that article is very great and pressing; that to this end they do forthwith collect all the leaden weights from windows and clocks, and all leaden weights of shops, stores and mills, of one pound weight and upwards; also all other lead in and about houses, or other places; and that they forward all the lead which shall by them be so collected to the hands of Alexander Chambers, Abraham Hunt, David Pinkerton, and William Tucker, of Trenton; Hendrick Fisher, of Somerset County, Azariah Dunham, of New Brunswick, John Ross, of Woodbridge, Isaac Woodruff, Elizabethtown, and Dr. William Burnet, of Newark, or any of them. Commissioners appointed for purchasing arms, &c. And the said Commissioners are directed to pay for all such lead, at the rate of six pence Proclamation money the pound weight; together with the reasonable expence that may arise in forwarding the same.

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Captain Kinney appeared before this House, in consequence of the citation issued by this Congress, for a charge of loitering on the road to Connecticut, with the late Governor Franklin, and now, upon examining into the causes of complaint, it appears to this House that whatever delay arose thereon was inevitable, owing to no misconduct in Captain Kinney, but to accidental causes.

The report of the Committee of Trenton respecting Samuel Henry, was read the second time, and Mr. Henry being duly notified, appeared before Congress; the charges against him were read, several witnesses examined, and the further hearing of the same deferred till to-morrow morning.

Whereas, It has been represented to this Congress, that Henry Cuyler, Esq., is so extremely indisposed as to render his removal very dangerous; therefor,

Ordered, That the Chairman of the Committee of Newark take the parole, drawn in the usual manner, of Mr. Cuyler, to remain for the present in his dwelling house at Newark, or within two miles thereof, he giving bond, with security, in the penalty of one thousand Pounds, for the faithful observance of his parole.

Ordered, That Mr. Sergeant, Mr. Hugg and Mr. Elmer, be a Committee to draught an ordinance for punishing traitors and counterfeiters of the Continental and Provincial currencies.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Wednesday, July 17.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from sundry ladies at Perth Amboy, setting forth, that they apprehend fatal and melancholy consequences to themselves and families, and to the inhabitants in general, if they should be deprived of the assistance of Dr. Lawrence's skill in his profession, as his attendance is hourly necessary to several patients now much indisposed, who will be left helpless if he be removed, as no other practitioner resides in that place, praying that he may be permitted to remain in Amboy; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to two o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to draught an ordinance for punishing traitors and counterfeiters, made report, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition of George Woodward, setting forth the distressed situation of the wife and children of Anthony Woodward, who has been hunted by bands of armed men, and driven, contrary to his intention, to the king's troops for shelter and protection, praying that he may return to his rank and station in the community; was read, and ordered a second reading.

A letter from the Committee of Newark, requesting that this Congress would procure, or order to be built, four gondolas or row-gallies, mounted with cannon, to ply between the mouths of Passaick and Hackinsack rivers and Perth Amboy; also informing Congress that four persons were confined in the gaol of Essex, at the desire of the Secret Committee of New York, enclosing their examinations, and some affidavits concerning them, and requesting that this Congress would take some order therein; was read, whereupon,

Ordered, That the said examinations and affidavits be referred to the Secret Committee, appointed by this Congress.

The petition from sundry ladies at Perth Amboy, was read the second time, and ordered that a copy of the following letter, addressed to Mrs. Franklin, one of the subscribers, be signed by the President, and sent:

Madam: I am ordered by Congress to acquaint you, and through you the other ladies of Amboy, that their petition, in favour of Dr. John Lawrence, has been received and considered.

Could any application have procured a greater indulgence to Dr. Lawrence, you may be assured yours could not have failed of success. But, unhappily, madam, we are placed in such a situation, that motives of commisseration to individuals must give place to the safety of the publick.

As Dr. Lawrence therefore has fallen under the suspicion of our generals, we are under the necessity of abiding by the steps which are taken; And are, &c.

Ordered, That Thomas Okeson be committed to the common gaol of Hunterdon, the keeper whereof is hereby commanded to receive the said Okeson into his custody, and to keep him in close confinement until the further order of this Congress, or the future Legislature of this State.

Congress resumed the consideration of the charges exhibited against Samuel Henry, and came to the following determination:

Ordered, That Samuel Henry be committed to the common gaol of Hunterdon, the keeper whereof is hereby commanded to receive the said Samuel Henry into his custody, and to keep him in close confinement until the further order of this Congress, or future Legislature of this State.

Letter from the Honourable John Hancock, Esq. enclosing resolves of the Continental Congress, requiring an addition of two thousand of the militia of this State to the flying camp; read, and referred to Mr. Mehelm, Mr. Ellis, and Mr. Paterson.

Whereas, the Honourable Continental Congress have declared the United Colonies, Free and Independent States; We, the Deputies of New Jersey, in Provincial Congress assembled, do resolve and declare, That we will support the freedom and independence of the said States with our lives and fortunes, and with the whole force of New Jersey.

Adjourned till eight o'clock to-morrow morning.

Thursday, July 18.

Met according to adjournment.

Resolved, That this House from henceforth, instead of the style and title of the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, do adopt and assume the style and title of the Convention of the State of New Jersey.

Ordered, That Colonel Isaac Smith be directed to employ some officer of the militia to apprehend Samuel Henry, and deliver him, together with the order of this Convention for his commitment, to the keeper of the common gaol at Trenton.

The report of the Committee for draughting an ordinance for punishing traitors, &c.; read a second time, and ordered a third reading.

The Committee to whom were referred the resolves of the Continental Congress, &c. made report, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The report of the Committee for draughting an ordinance for punishing traitors, &c.; read a third time.

Ordered, That the same be engrossed and do pass.

The report of the Committee to whom were referred the resolves of the Continental Congress, &c.; read a second time, and ordered a third reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

On the question,

Whether William Ellis, Esq. or Elijah Hand, Esq. be Major of the battalion of militia to be raised in the counties of Burlington, Gloucester and Cumberland? It was carried as follows, viz.:

For W. Ellis, Esq.—

Mr. Drummond,
Paterson,
Hardenbergh,
Mehelm,
Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Sparks,
Clark,
Hugg,
Ellis,
Bloomfield,
Combs,
Van Campen,
Sinnickson,
Cripps,
Tallman,
Shreve.
 

For E. Hand, Esq.—

Mr. Condict,
Josiah Holmes,
Elmer,
Ayers,
Harris,
Buck,
Bowen,
 
Sergeant,
Post,
Taylor,
 

The report of the Committee to whom were referred the resolves of the Continental Congress, read a third time; and, after sundry amendments,

Ordered, unanimously. That the same do pass.

The petition of Ebenezer Cowel, jun., setting forth, that John Barnes, Esq., High Sheriff of the County of Hunterdon, had refused to receive and execute two writs issued under the authority of the people, pursuant to the ordinance of this Convention, read; whereupon,

Ordered, That Mr. Barnes immediately attend this House.

Mr. Barnes appeared before this House, and, in answer to the above charge, informed the Convention that he declines acting as Sheriff under the authority of the people, and is willing to be superseded; wherefore,

Resolved, That a new Sheriff be appointed.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Friday, July 19.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee of Burlington County having called before them Drury Wake, Esq., on a charge of his being inimical to the liberties of this country; and, having made adjudication thereof, the said Drury Wake refused to abide thereby, and appealed to this Convention; the Committee made report of their proceedings, which being read in the presence of the said Wake, and proof being given concerning the same;

Ordered, That the said Drury Wake, Esq., be committed to the common gaol of Salem, the keeper whereof is hereby commanded to receive him into his custody, and keep him in close confinement until the further order of this Convention, or future Legislature of this State.

Ordered, That Colonel Joseph Borden be directed to employ some officer of the militia, with such guard as may be necessary, to deliver Drury Wake, Esq., together with the order of this Convention for his commitment, to the keeper of the common gaol of Salem.

Whereas Drury Wake, Esq., appeared before the County Committee of Burlington, on a charge of his being inimical to the liberties of this country; which Committee, after hearing proofs and allegations, made an adjudication on said charge, and the aforesaid Drury Wake appealed from the adjudication of the said Committee to this Convention:

Resolved therefore, That the said Drury Wake pay all the costs arising on the above prosecution, including the expense of taking him to the gaol of Salem, to be taxed by the County Committee of Burlington.

Mr. William Smith appeared before the Convention upon a charge exhibited against him by the Committee of Woodbridge; and after hearing and considering the several matters alledged and proved relative to the said charge, this House are of opinion that no offence appears to have been made good against him, and do therefore discharge him from all further attendance on this House, or on said Committee, unless some new charge be made appear by which he shall be found guilty of some offence against the State.

Ordered, That Ebenezer Foster, Esq., have leave, on his parole, and security in the sum of one thousand Pounds, to remove to the publick house of Mr. White, in Barnard's-town, in the County of Somerset, and not to go more than six miles from thence unless with leave of this Convention, or the future Legislature of this State.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Conrad Hendricks was brought before this Convention upon a charge transmitted against him by the Committee of the Provincial Congress of New York; and, after hearing and considering the several matters alledged against him, this House are of opinion that no offence has been proved against him, and do therefore discharge him from all further attendance on this House, unless some new charge be made appear by which he shall be found guilty of some offence against the State.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, six o'clock.

Saturday, July 20.

Met according to adjournment.

The petition of Samuel Henry, setting forth, that he is desirous of giving every reasonable satisfaction in his power that may obviate any prejudices remaining on the minds of the Convention; that he is ready to make acknowledgments for any rash expressions that Convention may conceive he has been guilty of, and for every part of his conduct that has been, in their opinion, exceptionable; that it is his fixed resolution so to conduct himself in future, as to afford no further room for just offence; that he is ready to give any security the Convention may think necessary to require; and praying that he may be released from his confinement;

Ordered, That, for the contrition expressed in the above petition, Samuel Henry be discharged from his confinement, and have leave, on his parole, drawn in the usual form, and giving bond, with security, in the sum of two thousand Pounds, for the faithful performance of his parole, to remove to his mills in Trenton, and there, or within a circle of two miles thereof, continue, and not to depart said bounds unless with leave of this Convention, or the future Legislature of this State.

Ordered, That William Tucker, Esq., of Trenton, be Sheriff of the County of Hunterdon until a Sheriff be chosen for said County at the ensuing election, and that a commission be made out accordingly.

Ordered, That the commanding officer of the Pennsylvania troops now at or near Trenton, be desired to apprehend Joseph Stansbury, a suspected person from Philadelphia, and transmit him safely to the Committee of Inspection of that city, who are requested to prevent his rambling through this State, and prying into our unhappy situation.

Ordered, That Peter Tallman, Esq., Chairman of the County Committee of Burlington, be directed to take the parole of the Rev. Jonathan Odell, a person suspected of being inimical to American liberty; that he confine himself on the east side of Delaware river, within a circle of eight miles from the Court House in the city of Burlington.

Adjourned to N. Brunswick, Monday, 3 o'clock P. M.

Monday, July 22.

Met according to adjournment.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 23.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas, the Honourable Continental Congress have resolved, "That it be earnestly recommended to the Convention of New Jersey, to cause all the stock on the sea coast, which they shall apprehend to be in danger of falling into the hands of the enemy, to be immediately removed and driven back into the country to a place of safety." And whereas, this Convention deem it necessary that the above resolution should be carried into immediate effect, particularly in the County of Monmouth, which is at present most exposed to depredations. It is therefore unanimously resolved and directed, That the County Committee of Monmouth proceed, without delay, to remove all the stock on their coast which may be in danger of falling into the hands of the enemy, back into the country, to a place or places of safety.

Convention being informed that Colonel Hendrickson, of Monmouth, was at the door and desired admittance,

Ordered, That he attend.

Colonel Hendrickson informed Convention that the Monmouth coast was exposed extremely to the incursions and depredations of the enemy, and requested that a guard might be stationed along said coast, and maintained at the publick expence.

He further informed Convention that some of his negro slaves had run off, and were on board the enemy's fleet; that he had reason to believe he could recover the said slaves if he were permitted to send a flag, and requesting that, thro' the interference of this House, he might have such permission.

The Convention took the latter requisition under consideration, and agreed unanimously, that the sending of flags comes properly within the Department of Brigadier General Mercer, and that they could no further interfere on the occasion than to write a letter of introduction to the General in favour of Colonel Hendrickson.

The petition of Richard Walker, setting forth, that a legacy of nine hundred Pounds, sterling, was bequeathed to him by his uncle, who resided in England, to be paid on the decease of his grandmother, who was living in the autumn of the year 1775; that if he should take up arms against the kingdom of Great Britain he should lose the above legacy; and praying that he may be exempted from bearing arms against the said kingdom, on engaging that he will not be concerned in any measures that may prove ruinous to the liberty or interest of the United States; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Elmer be added to the Committee appointed to examine into the state of the Eastern Treasury.

Ordered, That the Committee appointed to examine into the state of the Eastern Treasury, proceed forthwith to Amboy; that they be and hereby are vested with full power to bring, if they should deem it necessary, Mr. Smyth, the Treasurer, to this place, with the money in the said Treasury; and all the vouchers, documents and other papers relative thereto; and that the said Committee call to their aid such force as they may think necessary to carry this order into effect.

Agreed that the commission of James Mount, Esq., a field officer in the third battalion of the Monmouth militia, be, and it hereby is revoked.

Ordered, That Oake Wikoff, Esq., be Lieutenant Colonel, Denice Denice, Esq., First Major, and Hendrick Van Brunt, Esq., be Second Major of the third battalion of foot militia in the County of Monmouth.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Wednesday, July 24.

Met according to adjournment.

. A letter from General Washington, informing that the brigade under General Heard was far from being complete, and urging the necessity of raising and forwarding the new levies destined to reinforce the army at New York, was read; whereupon,

Ordered, That a letter be written to General Washington, informing that several companies were on their way to join the brigade, and that this Convention will use its utmost efforts to furnish its quota, and to give His Excellency such other aid as the weal of the United States may require, and the condition of this State will admit.

Also ordered, That a letter be written to Brigadier General Heard, desiring that he would, without delay, make return to Convention of the number of men in the several companies in his brigade, and by what Counties those companies were furnished.

Convention received a letter from the War Office of the 20th of July, referring to this Convention the propriety of Bryan Lefferty, Esquire, his residing in New Jersey, and to take his parole and security.

Ordered, That Mr. Lefferty do sign his parole as settled by Congress, and give security in the sum of one thousand Pounds, to depart hence to the house of the widow Lefferty, in the Township of Bedminister, in Somerset County, and there to remain, or within a circle of four miles thereof, until he have leave to the contrary.

Ordered, That Dr. William Winants be surgeon to the battalion directed to be detached from the militia in the Counties of Bergen, Essex and Morris, under the command of Colonel Thomas, destined to reinforce the flying camp.

Ordered, That Dr. John Hammell be Surgeon's Mate to the battalion directed to be raised in the Counties of Bergen, Essex and Burlington, whereof Philip Van Cortland, Esq., is Colonel, under the command of General Heard, destined to reinforce the army at New York.

Ordered, That Doctor Bodo Otto, Jun., be Surgeon to the battalion directed to be detached from the militia in the Counties of Burlington, Gloucester and Cumberland, to be under the command of Colonel Charles Read, destined to reinforce the flying camp.

Ordered, That Mr. Tallman, Dr. Bloomfield and Mr. Frelinghuysen, be a Committee to draught a bill for amending the militia ordinance.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Agreeable to certificate of election.

Ordered, That Jacob Vanderventer be Captain, and Abraham Terhune, First Lieutenant, of a company in the first battalion of militia in Middlesex County.

Whereas, The independent company in the County of Essex, under the command of Captain Drummond, has been greatly reduced by reason of promotion and otherwise; And whereas, it is inexpedient to take from other companies in order to add to or keep up the proper number of the said independent company; It is therefore agreed unanimously, That the said company be forthwith dissolved, and be incorporated with the other militia in the several companies in the districts in which they respectively reside.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning eight o'clock.

Thursday, July 25.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Dr. Bloomfield, Mr. Drummond, Mr. Quackenbush, Mr. Ogden and Mr. Brown, be a Committee to consider the propriety of building or purchasing of four gondolas or row gallies, mounted with cannon, to ply between the mouths of Passaick and Hackinsack rivers and Perth Amboy.

Richard Stites, Esq., Captain of a company in the County of Somerset, resigned his commission, assigning for reason, that he was appointed to raise a company in the brigade under General Heard; and that he had removed out of the Township in which his company reside;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Micajah Dunn, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel of the first regiment of foot militia in the County of Middlesex, resigned his commission, assigning for reason, that he is so far advanced in life, and of so infirm a state of health, as to render it impossible for him fully to discharge the duty of his station;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That Jonathan Deare. Esq., be Lieutenant Colonel, and John Dunn, Esq., First Major of the first battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex.

Convention received a letter from the Honourable John Hancock, Esq., dated the 22d instant, informing that Congress had come to a resolution to increase the flying camp. For this purpose, that the State of New Jersey is desired to augment its quota with three battalions of militia in addition to those formerly desired by Congress, and send them, with all possible despatch, to join the flying camp. Whereupon,

Ordered, That a letter be written to Congress, informing that Convention had ordered two thousand of its militia to be detached pursuant to the late requisition of Congress, which are to be renewed monthly.

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to prepare a draught for amending the Militia Ordinance, made report, which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Captain Peter Gordon be Brigade Major of the brigade under the command of General Heard, and that he continue Captain of the company under his command in the battalion whereof David Forman, Esq., is Colonel.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning nine o'clock.

Friday, July 26.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee of Inspection for the city of New Brunswick, having referred the case of Mr. John Hortwick to this Convention, the same was taken under consideration, and it appearing by a testimonial of the said Committee, that the aforesaid John Hortwick has always been esteemed as a good citizen, and a hearty friend to this country; that he is a military associator, and as such has turned out on all occasions when required: and this Convention being of opinion, that he was induced to trade with the Captain of the Asia ship of war to fulfil an oath which had been exacted from him by the said Captain, and to regain the liberty of himself and sons, and not with any intention of abetting the enemies of America; and that he has manifested a becoming degree of contrition for his offence. It is agreed unanimously, That the said John Hortwick be forgiven, received into favour, and restored to the good opinion of his countrymen.

Whereas by a resolution of the late Provincial Congress it was, in the election of the County Committee of Bergen, either to receive pay for the arms taken by Captain Meeker, or to have them replaced: And whereas the said Committee have made choice of accepting pay for the arms, of which it appears there were seventy-nine stand; therefore, It is ordered, That either of the Treasurers of this State pay Johannes Demarest. Esq., Doctor Abraham Van Boskirk, and Jacobus Post, Esq., or any of them, persons authorized by the Committee for that purpose, the sum of three hundred and fifty-five Pounds ten Shillings, Proclamation money, being the amount of the aforesaid seventy-nine stand of arms at the rate of four Pounds ten Shillings a piece; and that the receipt of the above named persons, or any of them, shall be a sufficient voucher for that sum.

The Committee of Inspection for the city of New Brunswick, having referred the case of John Brown and Jacob Neifies, persons employed by John Hortwick to purchase some provision for the Asia ship of war, to this Convention, the same was considered accordingly; it appearing that the said John Brown and Jacob Neifies procured the said provision solely with design to assist the said Hortwick, their neighbour, in his distress, and not to aid the enemies of this country; that they have manifested due contrition for their offence, and requested forgiveness therefor: It is therefore ordered, That the said John Brown and Jacob Neifies be forgiven, received into favour, and restored to the good opinion of their countrymen.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That the Committee of the Township of Hillsborough, in the County of Somerset, do leave in the hands of Mr. Isaac Brokaw, clockmaker, thirty pounds weight of lead, he having represented to the Convention that he could not carry on his trade without such quantity.

Adjourned till eight o'clock to-morrow morning.

Saturday, July 27.

Met according to adjournment.

Agreeable to certificate of election,

Ordered, That David De Groot, Esq., be Captain of a company in the first battalion of foot militia in Somerset County, whereof Stephen Hunt, Esq., is Colonel.

The memorial of Jerome Vanderbelt, of the city of New Brunswick, setting forth, that two of his apprentices had enlisted in the brigade under General Heard; that he is a hearty friend to his country; that he cannot well carry on his business without the aid of one of them; and praying the influence of this House that one of his said apprentices may be returned; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Ordered, That Captain John Cook, of Monmouth, be directed to take to his assistance as many of the militia as he shall find necessary, and apprehend any persons whom he has reason to suspect of enlisting, or being enlisted for the British army, and to take them before the County Committee of Monmouth, who are required to commit or discharge such accused persons as they shall find necessary.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Resolved, That General Mercer, in conjunction with the Committee of Perth Amboy, or such of them as can be readily convened, do take immediate steps for removing all such disaffected or suspicious persons in that city as may, from their situation, be thought dangerous to the public cause; especially such as have relations or connexions among the enemy.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon, on Monday next.

Monday, July 29.

Met according to adjournment.

Jacob Wardell, Joseph Wardell, and Peter Wardell, persons apprehended by a detachment of the Monmouth militia, on account of furnishing the enemy with provision, were brought before the House, and witnesses examined in support of the charge;

Ordered, That the determination thereof be deferred till to-morrow.

Ordered, Upon the complaint and representation of the Committee of the western precinct of Somerset County, that Joseph Stockton be committed to the common gaol of Somerset, the keeper whereof is hereby commanded to receive him into his custody, and to keep him in close confinement until the further order of this Convention, or future Legislature of this State.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Tuesday, July 30.

Met according to adjournment.

Convention resumed the consideration of the charge against Jacob Wardell, Joseph Wardell, and Peter Wardell; and, after some time spent therein,

Ordered, That Jacob Wardell be committed to the custody of the Sheriff of Monmouth, to be by him safely kept until discharged by this Convention, or delivered by due course of law.

Ordered, That Joseph Wardell and Peter Wardell be discharged on giving bond, each with security in the sum of five hundred pounds for their future good behaviour, and for their appearance when called upon by the Convention, or future Legislature of this State. The County Committee of Monmouth are directed to take the said bond, and to judge of the security.

Ordered, That Jacob Wardell pay twenty-eight Pounds seven Shillings and eleven Pence, Proclamation money, being the expense of apprehending and bringing him before this Convention, and conducting him to the Sheriff of Monmouth.

The Committee to whom was referred the letter from the Committee of Newark, respecting the building or purchase of four gondolas or row-gallies, to ply between the mouths of Passaick and Hackinsack rivers and Perth Amboy, made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Thomas Hutton be employed, at the rate of one dollar a day, to search for lead and sulphur mines, and flint quarries, and make report in three weeks.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met pursuant to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to examine into the state of the Eastern Treasury, made report, that, including the money by them received at Trenton, as by their former report, they had received in the whole from John Smyth, Esq. the late Treasurer, the sum of six thousand one hundred and one Pounds two Shillings, Proclamation money, besides a bag sealed, said to contain four thousand eight hundred and nineteen Pounds, five Shillings and nine Pence, like money, of bills cancelled; all which they have deposited in the hands of the Honourable John Stevens, Esq. to be by him kept in the Province chest, agreeable to the order of this Convention, as by his receipts appears; and that by the accounts of Mr. Smyth herewith exhibited, there appears to be due from Mr. Smyth to the State, a further balance of nine hundred and thirty Pounds six Shillings and six Pence, like money, exclusive of loan office money not yet signed or disposed of.

Ordered, That the said report be received, and the accounts filed.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Wednesday, July 31.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Chevalier Jouet have leave, on his parole, drawn in the usual manner, and on giving bond with security, in the sum of one thousand Pounds for the faithful performance of his parole, to remove to the dwelling house of Mr. White, innkeeper, in Barnard'stown, in the County of Somerset, and there, or within a circle of four miles thereof, remain, and not depart the said bounds unless with leave of this Convention, or the future Legislature of this State.

Ordered, That a copy of the following letter be signed by the Vice President, and sent to Colonel Wetherill:

Sir: The Convention lately entered into certain resolves, requiring the immediate detaching a brigade of two thousand of the militia of this State to join the flying camp; a copy of which has been transmitted to you.

The present alarming exigencies require the utmost dispatch in this service; we are perfectly at a loss for your reasons in not exerting yourself in making the detachment ordered from your regiment; and we must desire you will explicitly inform us thereof by the bearer.

Letter from the Convention of the State of New York, enclosing the affidavit of Balthazar De Hart, Esq., respecting certain inhabitants of that State, who have either given countenance and aid to our enemies, or have deserted its defence at this dangerous crisis; read and filed.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

This Convention having heard the charges exhibited against Christopher Vaught, John Vaught, Joseph Lee, Thomas Buskirk, Philip Cool, William Thatcher, Christopher Diltz, and Frederick Frittz. disaffected and dangerous persons, apprehended by order of Convention, and considered the several matters alledged and proved relative to the said charges, Do order and resolve, That Christopher Vaught be fined in the sum of one hundred Pounds, John Vaught in the sum of one hundred Pounds, Joseph Lee in the sum of one hundred Pounds, Thomas Buskirk in the sum of twelve Pounds, Philip Cool in the sum of seventy-two Pounds, William Thatcher in the sum of sixty Pounds, Christopher Diltz in the sum of ten Pounds, and Frederick Frittz in the sum of seventy-three Pounds, Proclamation money: and that the above persons be committed until they pay, or give security for the payment of the sums in which they are respectively amerced.

Ordered, That the above fines be appropriated towards defraying the costs and expenses which accrued in apprehending and bringing the said disaffected persons to justice.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Thursday, August 1.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from the Rev. Mr. Odell, praying for certain reasons, that he may be excused from signing the parole heretofore ordered, and offering a new parole, binding himself not to hold any political correspondence with the enemy, or to furnish them with provisions or intelligence; read; whereupon Convention having taken the same into consideration,

Ordered, That Mr. Odell sign the original parole sent to the Committee of Burlington.

The report of the Committee to whom was referred the letter from the Committee of Newark, respecting the building or purchase of gondolas, &c.; read the second time.

Ordered, That the same be referred to the Continental Congress, and that Mr. Ogden and Mr. Sergeant draught a letter for that purpose.

Ordered, That Mr. Camp, Mr. Hand and Mr. Holme, be a Committee to settle the accounts and pay the several detachments of militia of this State, which were lately called out at the requisition of General Washington; that they immediately advertise their appointment; and that they, or any one of them, have power to draw for the money needed, upon the Treasurers, who are required to pay the same.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

On motion,

Resolved, That Thomas Skinner and Isaac Bonnell, Esqrs., be released from their present parole, and be entitled to all the rights and immunities of others the good subjects of this State, on taking an oath, the test which is inserted in the election ordinance.

Ordered, That Mr. Linn be added to the Committee appointed to settle and pay the accounts of the several detachments of militia, &c.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the County Committee of Monmouth, and to the several Township Committees and Colonels of the battalions in the said County, that they assist Captain Wikoff by furnishing him with arms for his levies in General Heard's brigade, as far as they may be able, to expedite the equipment of the said levies. It is further recommended to the said Committees and Colonels, that Captain Wikoff be furnished with such of the arms and accoutrements taken from non-associators, &c., within their bounds, as may be fit for service, he giving sufficient vouchers on receiving the said arms.

Ordered, That Philip Johnston, Esq. be Colonel, Joseph Phillips, Esq., Lieutenant Colonel, and Platt Bayles, Major of the battalion raised in the Counties of Hunterdon and Somerset, in the brigade under the command of General Heard, destined to reinforce the army at New York.

Ordered, That the several battalions in the brigade under General Heard, take rank according to the date of the commissions of the Colonels; that the several Companies in each battalion in said brigade take rank according to the date of the commissions of the Captains; and that the rank of all the officers be regulated according to the date of their several commissions.

John Wetherill, Esq. Colonel of the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex, having informed Mr. Combs, a member of this house, that he was not able to perform the duty of his office, owing to his indisposition and advanced age, and was desirous of resigning his commission, if agreeable to Convention;

Ordered, That the said resignation be accepted.

Azariah Dunham, Lieutenant Colonel of the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex, having informed a member of this house that, as he is engaged in the office of Commissary, he cannot discharge the duty of his military office, and that he was desirous of resigning his commission, if agreeable to the Convention;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Ordered, That John Neilson, Esq. be Colonel, and John Duychinck, Esq. Lieutenant Colonel of the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Friday, August 2.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered. That John Dunn, Esq, be Major of the battalion detached from the militia of the Counties of Middlesex, Monmouth, and Salem, destined to reinforce the flying camp, in the room of Major Duychinck, who was appointed to that command but refused to accept of it.

Ordered, That Robert Hoops, Esq. be Brigade Major of the militia of this State under Brigadier General Dickinson.

Ordered, That Reuben Potter be Second Major of the first battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex.

Ordered, That Captain John Sherrerd be required to apprehend Peter Cyphers, and bring him forthwith before this Convention in custody.

The draught for amending the militia ordinance was read a second time, and referred to further consideration.

The petition of sundry persons in the first regiment of foot militia in the County of Monmouth, praying that further regulations may be made respecting the militia, &c.; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Guisebert Guisebertson, Captain of a company in the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Monmouth, having resigned his commission for reasons mentioned in his letter;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

Resolved, That the several County Committees in this State do cause inventories and appraisements to be made of the estates, real as well as personal, of all such persons within their respective bounds as have or shall have absconded from their homes and joined themselves to the enemies of this State, causing all perishable articles to be sold, and the moneys arising therefrom, and all other the goods and estates of such persons, that they keep in safe and secure custody until the further order of this Convention, or the determination of other proper judicature; Provided, That the said Committees be empowered to leave any part of the said estates in the hands of the relations or friends of such absconding persons, taking such security as they may think proper for the return thereof, or of the value.

The Convention resumed the consideration of the draught prepared by the Committee for amending the militia ordinance, and recommitted it to the same Committee.

The petition of sundry persons in the second battalion of Monmouth; read the second time, and referred to the same Committee.

The memorial of Captain Hankinson, of Monmouth, setting forth, that he had raised a company of minutemen, to continue in service for the space of two months, agreeable to the directions of the late Committee of Safety; that the said company had been called to the Hook on the arrival of General Howe; and praying that the said company may be paid for such service; an account of which accompanied the aforesaid memorial; read, and referred to the Committee of Accounts.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock,

Saturday, August 3.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That the County Committee of Essex, proceed to hear and determine the charges exhibited against the four persons apprehended by order of the Secret Committee of the State of New York, who remained confined in the common gaol of that County on the twenty-fourth day of July last; and that they be vested with full power to acquit, amerce or imprison said persons.

The Committee to whom was referred the draught of an ordinance for amending the militia ordinance, made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

The petition of Ebenezer Foster, now on his parole at Barnard's town, praying that he may be permitted to return to his farm at Woodbridge; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The letter of John Duychinck, Esq., appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Middlesex, enclosing his commission, with a resignation of the same; was read.

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

The report of the Committee to whom was referred the draught of an ordinance for amending the militia ordinance, read the second time; and after sundry amendments,

On the question,

Whether the same do pass, it was carried as follows, viz.:

Yeas—

Mr. Ogden,
Drake,
Woodhull,
Frelinghuysen,
Paterson,
Hardenbergh,
Linn,
Taylor,
Josiah Holmes,
E. Clark,
Hand,
Bloomfield,
Quackenbush,
Brown,
Shaver,
Shinn,
Dick.
 

Nays—

Mr. Joseph Holmes,
Mott,
Sparks,
Elmer,
Buck,
Bowen,
Combs,
John Holmes.
 

Thomas Skinner and Isaac Bonnell, Esqrs., appeared before Convention and took, on oath, the test inserted in the election ordinance; whereupon.

Ordered, That they be released from their parole, and be entitled to all the rights and immunities of others the good subjects of this State.

Adjourned to Monday afternoon five o'clock.

Monday, August 5.

Met according to adjournment.

A sufficient number of members not attending, adjourned to three o'clock to-morrow afternoon.

Tuesday, August 6.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Dr. Jacob Jennings be Surgeon to the battalions directed to be detached from the militia in the Counties of Somerset, Hunterdon, and Sussex, to be under the command of Colonel Mark Thompson, destined to reinforce the flying camp.

The representation of County Committee of Monmouth, respecting the removal of the stock on the sea coast, &c., read, and ordered a second reading.

John Carey, Esq., and Mr. Ephraim Lloyd, from the County of Salem, presented a remonstrance to this Convention (being duly authorized for that purpose) against the resolution which passed this House the 15th day of July last, directing that the election in that County be by ballot, and that it be held at the Court House in the town of Salem, without removing from place to place, &c., and requesting that the said resolution be rescinded; read, and ordered a second reading.

Letter from General Dickinson, read.

Agreeable to certificate of election,

Ordered, That Abraham Johannes Blauvelt be Captain, Cornelius D. Blauvelt, First Lieutenant, Guilliam Bogart, Second Lieutenant; and John Lozier, Ensign of a company of foot militia in the Township of Harrington, and County of Bergen.

Letter from the County Committee of Bergen, informing that some of the powder lately sent to that County by this Convention was damaged and wholly unfit for use, and praying that this Convention would take direction therein, and order the deficiency to be made up; read, and ordered a second reading.

Letter from Col. Thomas, enclosing a letter from Mr. Bott, informing that a certain Caleb Hetfield dissuaded the militia from turning out under Col. Thomas, and even offered a bounty to restrain and keep them back; read, and referred to the County Committee of Essex.

Letter from Daniel Johnes, complaining of sundry riotous and disaffected persons in his company, one of whom struck said Johnes; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till eight o'clock to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, August 7.

Met according to adjournment.

The representation of the Township Committee of Woodbridge, setting forth, that certain persons in the third battalion of Philadelphia militia, had insulted and abused Nathaniel FitzRandolph and Ezekiel Bloomfield, inhabitants of said Township, and praying that this Convention would take the said complaint under consideration; was read, and ordered a second reading.

Letter from Mr. Stockton, enclosing certain resolves of Congress, directing "that this Convention would make such provision for keeping open the communication between the States of New Jersey and New York, by way of the ferries over Passaick and Hackinsack rivers, as to them shall appear most effectual; and that Congress will reimburse the expenses of such service to the State of New Jersey; and recommending to the State of New Jersey, to order their militia immediately to march and join General Mercer;" read and filed.

Letter from General Heard, enclosing return of men in his brigade; read and filed.

Letter from General Mercer; read and filed.

Resolved, That the Deputies in Convention be allowed at the rate of six Shillings a day for every day they have or shall attend during the continuance of this Convention, to be certified by Mr. Elmer, Dr. Bloomfield, Mr. Hand and Mr. Paterson, or any two of them.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

The remonstrance of certain freeholders and others, electors in the County of Salem, against the resolution which passed this House on the 15th day of July last, on motion of the Deputies of that County, &c., read a second time:

Whereas on motion made the 15th day of last month, by the members of the County of Salem, it was resolved, "that the election in that County be by ballot, and that it be held at the Court House in the town of Salem, without removing from place to place, any thing in the ordinance for ascertaining the mode and places of election before contained to the contrary notwithstanding." And whereas a remonstrance, signed by a great number of the freeholders and others electors of said County, has been presented to this Convention, against the above recited resolution, praying that the same may be rescinded, and that the ensuing election in said County may, in every respect, be carried on in the same manner as ordained by Convention for all the other Counties in this State: It is therefore resolved, That the election of members to serve in Legislative Council and Assembly of this State for the County of Salem; and also of one Sheriff and one or more Coroners for said County, to be held on the second Tuesday of this instant August, be conducted in the same manner, and governed by the same regulations, as are prescribed and ordained by this Convention for all the other Counties in this State, anything in the above recited resolution which passed on the motion of the Deputies from Salem, to the contrary notwithstanding.

Adjourned to Friday morning, nine o'clock.

Friday, August 9.

Met according to adjournment.

A petition from sundry officers of the second battalion of Middlesex County, praying a division thereof; read, and ordered a second reading.

Ordered, That Mr. Ogden, Mr. Drummond, Mr. Brown, Mr. Camp and Mr. Combs, be a Committee to devise ways and means, and report a plan for keeping open the communication between this State and New York, by way of the ferries over the rivers Passaick and Hackinsack.

Adjourned to three o'clock afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from General Washington of the 8th instant; read, and filed.

A petition of sundry persons in the south ward of New Brunswick, praying the interposition of this House relative to the choice of officers in a company of militia late commanded by Captain Jacob Pyatt; read, and ordered a second reading.

A petition from sundry persons in Barnard's town, relative to a company of militia; was read.

Ordered, That the same be referred to the County Committee of Somerset.

The petition from sundry officers of the second battalion of Middlesex County, praying a division, &c., read a second time; whereupon.

Ordered, That a third battalion be formed out of the same, to consist of the companies commanded by the Captains Hartipee, Barr, Stout, Schenck, Scudder, Wetherill and Pyatt.

Ordered, That John Duychinck, Esq., be Colonel, Jacob Hyer, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel, William Scudder, Esq., First Major thereof, and that the Second Major be appointed on the return of General Heard's brigade.

Mr. Ogden, from the Committee appointed to devise ways and means for keeping open the communication between New Jersey and New York, by way of the ferries over Passaick and Hackinsack, reported an ordinance for that purpose, which was three times read and passed.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, August 10.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Ogden and Mr. Dick, be a Committee to prepare an ordinance for the immediate detaching of one half of the militia of this State to join the flying camp.

The Board of War and Ordnance having referred the case of Lieutenant Wadman to this Convention, the same was accordingly considered; whereupon,

Ordered, That Lieutenant Wadman sign his parole as settled by Congress, do depart from the city of New Brunswick to Bordentown in the State of New Jersey, and there, or within six miles thereof in said State, to remain, and not to depart said bounds unless with leave of the Honourable Continental Congress, the Convention, or future Legislature of this State.

The Committee of the Western Precinct of Somerset County having referred the case of Joseph Stockton to this Convention; and, before the charge was considered, said Stockton having requested time in order to determine whether he should sign the test inserted in the election ordinance,

Ordered, That he have time for a few days to consider thereof, and that in the mean time he return to Hillsborough.

Ordered, That Thomas Jones be Second Lieutenant in Captain Anderson's Company in the battalion whereof Silas Newcomb, Esq., is Colonel, in General Heard's brigade; and that he continue Adjutant of the same battalion.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

General Mercer's letter received this day, was read and filed.

The Committee appointed to prepare an ordinance for the immediate detaching one-half of the militia, &c., made report; which was read, and ordered a second reading.

Inventories of the estates of Anthony Woodward and William Guisebertson, of Monmouth County, persons who have absconded from their homes and joined the enemy; were read and filed.

Resolved, That, to prevent desertion, no person or persons belonging to or coming from the army in the State of New Jersey, be permitted to go over any of the ferries in or travel through said State without a pass, signed either by General Mercer, Colonel Griffin or Colonel Biddle, and all persons in general, and in particular the members of Committees, militia officers, and owners or keepers of ferries, are strictly enjoined to carry this resolution into effect, by apprehending and securing every person belonging to or coming from said army, who shall not have a pass signed as above directed, until he can be reconducted to the army aforesaid.

The draught of a bill for the immediate detaching of one-half of the militia to join the flying camp, was read the second time, and ordered to be recommitted to Mr. Ogden, Mr. Sergeant and Mr. Paterson.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Sunday, August 11.
.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee to whom was referred the bill for the immediate detaching one-half of the militia, &c,, made report; and, after sundry amendments, was agreed to unanimously.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Resolved, That no troops in the service of the United States, or of any of them, nor their baggage, ammunition, or their other waggons, shall pay for passing any of the ferries within this State, more than one-third part of the ferriage usually paid by such as are not in said service; and, to prevent a misconstruction of this resolve. It is hereby declared, That Commissaries or other persons supplying the army with provisions, stores, &c., are not intended to be included in said resolve, so as to receive any private benefit from the same.

A letter from the War Office of the sixth of August; read, and filed.

Adjourned to Thursday, three o'clock.

Thursday, August 15.

A sufficient number of members not attending, the Convention did not meet.

Friday, August 16.

The Convention met.

Ordered, That the Committees of the several Counties, Towns and Districts in this State, do make out lists of the prisoners of war which now are or have been resident within their districts, and transmit the same to this Convention, or the future Legislature of this State, without delay.

Mr. Hardenbergh added to the Committee of Accounts.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Richard Lott, Esq. be appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the second battalion of Middlesex.

Ordered, That John Taylor be appointed First Major thereof.

The petition of Captain Philip Van Arsdalen, praying leave to raise a Company of light-horse in Somerset County; read, and ordered to lie on the table.

A petition from the officers of the second battalion of Middlesex, praying an addition of Captain Wetherill's Company to that battalion; read, and ordered a second reading.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning, eight o'clock.

Saturday, August 17.

Met according to adjournment.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

A letter from William Ch. Houuston,(sic) Captain of a company in the second battalion of foot militia in the County of Somerset, setting forth, that, from his connexion with the college in the absence of Dr. Witherspoon, and other circumstances, he cannot pay the due attention to his company, and begging leave to resign his commission;

Ordered, That his resignation be accepted.

In pursuance of the recommendation of the Honourable Continental Congress,

Resolved, That all the workmen of this State actually employed in the manufacture of fire-arms be excused from going out with the militia when called upon.

Resolved, unanimously, That the bills of credit emitted by the Honourable Continental Congress be a legal tender within the State of New Jersey, for all sums of money due and owing from one person to another.

Ordered, That Mr. Sergeant revise, correct, and transcribe the Minutes of this Convention for the press, to be inspected, approved, and signed by the President, and that he have the same compensation as has been allowed to the clerks of Assembly in this State.

Whereas the difference of the several currencies within this State very greatly perplexes many of the good people thereof, and more especially such of the people of the neighbouring States as have come hither for our defence against the common enemy, and gives occasion to great impositions and deceits;

Resolved unanimously, That all payments and receipts be made in every part of this State in Proclamation money of New Jersey, at seven Shillings and six Pence the Dollar, reckoning the difference between the usual prices heretofore taken in any other currency, and reducing the same to Proclamation.

Adjourned till Monday morning, eight o'clock.

Monday, August 19.

Met according to adjournment.

Upon the application of Doctor Samuel Bard, for assistance and encouragement of this State in the erecting of salt works;

Resolved unanimously, That this State will, upon good security, lend to the said Doctor Bard a sum of money not exceeding five hundred Pounds, for the term of two years, without interest, for the purpose of erecting salt works within this State.

Resolved unanimously, That this State will receive salt, manufactured by the said Dr. Bard, at one dollar the bushel, in payment of said sum of money; provided the same be tendered for payment before the expiration of two years after the loan of the money.

Resolved unanimously. That if any of the works so to be raised, shall be destroyed by the enemy, this State will sustain the loss of one half of the money which shall have been appropriated for the purpose of erecting such works, out of the money advanced on loan by this State to the said Doctor Bard.

Resolved unanimously, That the workmen actually employed in the said works, not exceeding ten, be exempt from military duty during the time in which they shall be so employed.

Provided, that the said money be lent upon condition that the works shall be completed within three months of the said loan; and that the said Doctor Bard be not entitled to receive the bounty heretofore offered on salt.

A petition signed by fifty-six associators in the company of Captain Smith, in the precinct of Upper Alloway's Creek, in the County of Salem, praying, that they may be formed into a distinct company, and be officered by Abner Penton, as Captain, Eaton Haywood, First Lieutenant, Jacob Houseman, Second Lieutenant, and Thomas Smith, Ensign; was read.

A memorial of the Committee of the said precinct was also read, recommending that the prayer of the said petition may be granted; whereupon.

Ordered, That the prayer of said petition be granted, and that commissions do issue accordingly.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Whereas Isaac Low, Esq. apprehended on suspicion of being unfriendly to the cause of American freedom, did lately give his parole to the Convention, drawn in the usual manner; And whereas, this Convention are now fully satisfied as to the grounds of such suspicion;

Ordered, That Mr. Low be released from his parole, restored to his former liberty, and entitled, during his stay in this State, to all the rights and immunities of others the good subjects thereof.

Mr. Joseph Stockton having appeared before Convention, and took, on oath, the test inserted in the election ordinance;

Ordered, That the bond Mr. Stockton executed to the Committee, be cancelled; that he be released from his present confinement, and be entitled to all the rights and immunities of others the good subjects of this State.

Ordered, That Mr. Hardenbergh, Mr. Elmer, Mr. Condict, and Mr. Hand, be a Committee to settle the accounts of John Dennis, Esq., the eastern Treasurer.

Adjourned till to-morrow morning nine o'clock.

Tuesday, August 20.

Met according to adjournment.

The Committee appointed to settle the accounts of John Dennis, Esq., made report; which was read and accepted.

Adjourned to three o'clock, afternoon.

Met according to adjournment.

Ordered, That Mr. Crow do sign his parole, and give bond in the sum of five hundred Pounds for the performance thereof, to depart from hence to the town of Mount Holly, in the County of Burlington, there, or within the circle of four miles thereof, to remain until discharged, or otherwise permitted by this Convention.

Resolved, That all